PhD Defense by John Terry Johnson

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday July 13, 2022
      11:00 am - 1:00 pm
  • Location: : Applied Physiology Building, Room 1253, 555 14th St NW, Atlanta, Ga. 30318
  • Phone:
  • URL: zoom
  • Email:
  • Fee(s):
    N/A
  • Extras:
Contact
No contact information submitted.
Summaries

Summary Sentence: The Neurobehavioral Effects of Sensorimotor Dissonance During Observation and Execution with Upper-Extremity Prostheses

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Physiology

In the

School of Biological Sciences

 

John Terry Johnson

 

Will defend his dissertation

 

The Neurobehavioral Effects of Sensorimotor Dissonance During Observation and Execution with Upper-Extremity Prostheses

 

July 13th, 2022

11:00AM

 

In person: Applied Physiology Building, Room 1253, 555 14th St NW, Atlanta, Ga. 30318

Virtual: https://gatech.zoom.us/j/93957820789

 

 Thesis Advisor:

Lewis Wheaton, Ph.D.

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Committee Members:

Tim Cope, Ph.D.

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Young-Hui Chang, Ph.D.

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Boris Prilutsky, Ph.D.

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Frank Hammond III, Ph.D.

George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

 

 

 

ABSTRACT: The human ability to perform powerful, complex, and intricate actions using our hands is made possible by the hand's 27 degrees of freedom, its rich sensory feedback, and our ability to observe and understand the actions of others. In the event of an upper-extremity amputation, not only are articulated biological structures lost, but also their available sensory feedback. While great advances have been made in prosthesis engineering, the rate of prosthesis use in upper-extremity amputees remains low. Those who choose to use a prosthesis only do so an average of 50% of the time they could use them. One proposed strategy to improve prosthesis use and acceptance is the provision of task-salient vibrotactile feedback. Studies have been conducted on the efficacy of vibrotactile feedback, but have largely focused on kinematics, leaving a dearth of knowledge regarding the neural effects of vibrotactile feedback. In addition to changes in carrying out reach-to-grasp tasks, amputation and prosthesis use result in a mismatch between the amputee's end-effector (usually a split-hook), and that of non-amputated persons using their hand. This mismatch may lead to increased difficulty determining the intentions of others. Sensorimotor models relating motor actions and their resulting sensory feedback also provide the basis for understanding the intentions of other people as we observe their actions. Brain areas which generate our own movements based on our goals and intentions also relate movements we see performed by others to their probable motor commands. In turn, motor commands lead to probable goals, and goals to the probable intention of the action. Thus, the lack of sensorimotor models for using a prosthesis can lead to not only difficulty using the prosthesis, but also determining the actions of others. The purpose of the proposed studies is to evaluate the neural and behavioral effects of vibrotactile feedback during prosthesis use, and to evaluate cognitive changes between observing a hand or a prosthesis performing reach-to-grasp actions. In Aim 1, electroencephalography and 3D motion capture were used to examine neural activity while performing reach-to-grasp actions using a prosthesis with and without vibrotactile feedback. In Aim2, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure differences in brain activity when naïve participants unfamiliar with prostheses observed a hand and a prosthesis reaching to grasp everyday objects. In Aim 3, clusters of cortical activity found in Aim 2 were used to assess effective connectivity between clusters, as well as to determine graph-theoretic network properties of those clusters, and their changes when observing either a hand or prosthesis performing reach-to-grasp actions. Overall, findings from these studies reveal motor and parietal activity characteristic of development of sensorimotor models of prosthesis use, while observing actions performed with a prosthesis show diminished recruitment of brain areas specialized for determining the intention of others when observing their actions. These finding provide insight into the important role of sensory information in both prosthesis use and observation.

 

 

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
No
Groups

Graduate Studies

Invited Audience
Faculty/Staff, Public, Undergraduate students
Categories
Other/Miscellaneous
Keywords
Phd Defense
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Jul 6, 2022 - 11:01am
  • Last Updated: Jul 6, 2022 - 11:01am