8 Books to Read Over Winter Break

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Emma Ryan
Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development

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If you want to crack open a book over winter break, we've got you covered.

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If you want to crack open a book over winter break, we've got you covered. 

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Article by Emma Ryan

Cracking open a book or two is a great way to relax over the break between semesters. If you could use a few suggestions on what to peruse, we’ve got you covered. Read on for eight titles that come highly recommended by members of the Georgia Tech community.  

Bravey by Alexi Pappas. As Olympic athlete, writer, and filmmaker Alexi Pappas chronicles her career, she shares her struggles with mental health and post-Olympic depression, and everything she’s learned about confidence, optimism, and following your dreams. “Pappas’ writing is spunky and authentic, and makes for a great read,” said Ann Blasick, a career coach and corporate relations manager for the Master of Science in Analytics in Industrial and Systems Engineering.  

Poet Warrior by Joy Harjo. In her second memoir, U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo weaves together stories of past and present in poetry and prose to shed light on her journey as wife, mother, and artist. “I find poetry to be healing in these tumultuous times and have been moved to tears by Harjo’s work,” said Lanie Damon, a graduate career development advisor. “Let yourself slow down; read her work aloud.” Damon also recommends An American Sunrise, one of Harjo’s books of poems.  

Lead From the Outside by Stacey Abrams. In this memoir, Rep. Stacey Abrams breaks down the leadership strategies that have served her in her career and offers practical exercises to help you become a better leader. “As graduate students, we are often asked to be leaders, but being an underrepresented minority can make that position difficult,” said PJ Jarquin, third-year Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. student. “This book draws from her life experiences to show how Abrams navigated those challenges to become an unconventional leader.”  

The Gifts of Imperfection by Brené Brown. This New York Times bestseller offers 10 “guideposts” for living more authentically and embracing imperfection. Recommended by both Clarence Anthony Jr., assistant director of Graduate Career Development, and Lydia Pendleton, a corporate relations manager in Aerospace Engineering, The Gifts of Imperfection takes you on a journey toward self-discovery, self-acceptance, and self-love.  

Anxious People by Fredrik Bakman. When a bank robber bursts into an apartment open house and takes everyone in it hostage, the eight strangers in the room begin to realize that they have secrets to share and more in common than they might have thought. “This is one of my favorite fiction books ever!” Blasick said. “It’s a quirky, unexpected story that will make you smile and trust in the goodness of people.” 

The 5 Love Languages by Gary Chapman. Regardless of whether you’re  in a romantic relationship, Luoluo Hang, vice president for Student Engagement and Well-Being, recommends this book for a better understanding of your relationships with your friends, co-workers, and family. “When conflicts in a relationship exist, they often come back to a mismatch in ‘love languages,’” Hang said. “We all assume others love the same way that we do, but that is not true. Understanding how the other person receives feelings of love and friendship can really improve the quality of your relationships.”  

The 2-Hour Job Search by Steve Dalton. If you’re getting started on your job hunt over the break, Kevin Stacia, an MBA career coach and corporate relations manager at the Scheller College of Business MBA Career Center, recommends The 2-Hour Job Search for a manageable, step-by-step guide. “If you want your job search to be productive and efficient, this book is a must read,” he added.

The Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. For some recreational reading, Hang recommends this historical science-fiction series, which follows its lead character across wildly different eras while she experiences pivotal moments in history. “The books have romance, action, adventure, treachery, intrigue, grief, and joy, and a truly rich narrative that provides a wonderful escape for me!” Hang said. Outlander currently has eight books in the series and has been adapted into a STARZ television show.   

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Graduate Studies

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  • Created By: eryan32
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Dec 2, 2021 - 2:54pm
  • Last Updated: Dec 6, 2021 - 11:20am