PhD Defense by Emily Kathryn McGuinness

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday August 18, 2021
      12:00 pm - 2:00 pm
  • Location: Atlanta, GA; REMOTE
  • Phone:
  • URL: Bluejeans
  • Email:
  • Fee(s):
    N/A
  • Extras:
Contact
No contact information submitted.
Summaries

Summary Sentence: Vapor Phase Infiltration: Sorption Thermodynamics, Chemical Entrapment Mechanisms, and Hybrid Material Structure-Property Relations

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

THE SCHOOL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

 

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

 

Under the provisions of the regulations for the degree

 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

 

on Wednesday August 18, 2021

12:00 PM

 

via

 

Bluejeans Video Conferencing

https://bluejeans.com/2584737993

 

will be held the

 

DISSERTATION DEFENSE

 

for

 

Emily Kathryn McGuinness

 

"Vapor Phase Infiltration: Sorption Thermodynamics, Chemical Entrapment Mechanisms, and Hybrid Material Structure-Property Relations”

 

 

Committee Members:

 

Prof. Mark Losego, Advisor, MSE

Prof. Juan-Pablo Correa-Baena, MSE

Prof. Michael Filler, ChBE

Prof. Ryan Lively, ChBE

Prof. Natalie Stingelin, MSE/ChBE

 

 

Abstract:

 

Vapor phase infiltration (VPI) creates hybrid organic-inorganic materials by infusing the sub-surface of polymers with vapor phase, metal containing precursors. These materials are often then co-reacted with an oxidant to form a final state (commonly a metal oxide) that is incorporated within the polymer at the molecular to nanoscale level. The chemistries and processes used in VPI direct how the inorganic is included within the polymer and therefore dictate the hybrid material’s ultimate properties. Generally, the whole of the properties evoked via VPI are inaccessible by the organic and inorganic portions alone. In addition to nanoscale incorporation, VPI offers the advantage of leaving the macroscale form of the polymer unchanged, allowing for the post-fabrication modification of polymeric materials such as membranes, fabrics, etc.

 

In this thesis, VPI is explored from a materials science and engineering perspective where characterizing the influence of processing parameters on material structure opens opportunities for new application spaces. Following an introduction to VPI and an assessment of the state of the art in VPI literature, this work explores the influence of VPI processing parameters (temperature, precursor exposure times, precursor dose pressures, etc.) and system chemistries on thermodynamic and kinetic principles. This exploration culminates in a proposed model for mathematically describing VPI processes that feature reactions between polymer functional groups and precursors. This knowledge is then employed to broaden the application space of VPI by studying how VPI can improve the solvent stability of both commodity polymers and polymer membranes. Finally, an exploration of the durability of the hybrid materials created via VPI is conducted. The work is concluded by looking into with future prospects and considerations for the VPI process.

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
No
Groups

Graduate Studies

Invited Audience
Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students, Undergraduate students
Categories
Other/Miscellaneous
Keywords
Phd Defense
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Aug 3, 2021 - 3:40pm
  • Last Updated: Aug 3, 2021 - 3:40pm