Phd Defense by Cristian Voicu Crisan

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday March 24, 2021
      11:00 am - 1:00 pm
  • Location: Atlanta, GA
  • Phone:
  • URL: Bluejeans
  • Email:
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    N/A
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: Antimicrobial Dynamics of the Vibrio cholerae Type VI Secretion System

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Biology

In the

School of Biological Sciences

 

Cristian Voicu Crisan

 

Will defend his dissertation

 

Antimicrobial Dynamics of the Vibrio cholerae Type VI Secretion System

 

Wednesday, March 24th, 2021

11:00 AM

 

https://bluejeans.com/953791122

 

 Thesis Advisor:

Dr. Brian Hammer, Ph.D.

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Committee Members:

Dr. Raquel Lieberman, Ph.D.

School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Dr. Matthew Torres, Ph.D.

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Dr. Thomas DiChristina, Ph.D.

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Dr. Loren Williams, Ph.D.

School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

 

ABSTRACT: Vibrio cholerae is a common bacterial inhabitant of marine ecosystems and some pathogenic strains cause life-threatening cholera disease when ingested by humans. Like approximately 25% of all Gram-negative bacteria, V. cholerae uses the Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) to translocate cytotoxic proteins into adjacent target cells. After sequencing a diverse set of V. cholerae isolates, I characterized two novel T6SS toxins, which I named TleV1 and TpeV. TleV1 is a predicted phospholipase that is lethal when expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli cells and kills target bacteria when delivered in a T6SS-dependent manner. Unlike other V. cholerae T6SS effectors, TpeV does not share homology to known proteins and does not contain motifs or domains indicative of function. E. coli cells expressing periplasmic TpeV have a disrupted membrane potential and are permeabilized. I determined that V. cholerae can use TpeV to permeabilize and eliminate target cells in a T6SS-dependent manner. Human, animal and plant pathogens encode tpeV homologs adjacent to known T6SS genes, indicating that the toxin is a representative member of a large protein family. While many studies have investigated the regulation and toxins of the T6SS, few have examined defensive responses elicited by target cells. I demonstrated that multiple human commensal E. coli strains, which are susceptible to killing via the T6SS, display a significant survival improvement when co-cultured with V. cholerae in the presence of glucose. I identified that the E. coli glucose-responsive gene regulator CRP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate receptor protein) controls resistance against T6SS attacks. E. coli cells with a crp gene disruption are protected against V. cholerae T6SS attacks even in the absence of glucose. In conclusion, I have shown that V. cholerae isolates employ a diverse repertoire of T6SS toxins and described a molecule that confers resistance to T6SS attacks in E. coli cells. My work has expanded our understanding of secreted antimicrobial proteins and the complex dynamics of interbacterial competitions.

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Phd Defense
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Mar 10, 2021 - 4:56pm
  • Last Updated: Mar 10, 2021 - 4:56pm