Georgia Tech Partners to Develop New Micro Gyro Technology for DARPA

Contact

Georgia Tech Media Relations
Laura Diamond
laura.diamond@comm.gatech.edu
404-894-6016
Jason Maderer
maderer@gatech.edu
404-660-2926

Sidebar Content
No sidebar content submitted.
Summaries

Summary Sentence:

Georgia Tech, in partnership with Northrop Grumman, was awarded a research and development contract.

Full Summary:

Georgia Tech is partnering with Northrop Grumman Corporation to develop a new type of Microelectromechanical Systems gyroscope technology for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's Microscale Rate Integrating Gyroscope program.

Media
  • Tech Tower Web Feature Tech Tower Web Feature
    (image/jpeg)

The Georgia Institute of Technology, in partnership with Northrop Grumman Corporation, has been selected to develop a new type of Microelectromechanical Systems (MEMS) gyroscope technology for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)'s Microscale Rate Integrating Gyroscope program.

The technology, developed by Georgia Tech and Northrop Grumman during the initial 12-month award period, will form the basis for a micro resonator gyro capable of achieving navigation grade performance. Utilizing a new MEMS fabrication process, the Georgia Tech-Northrop Grumman team will produce a proof-of-concept micro gyro that can perform as well as current silicon MEMS devices in a smaller size, lighter weight and lower power package.

DARPA's Microscale Rate Integrating Gyroscope program seeks to develop miniature navigation grade gyros for use in personal navigation, unmanned vehicle navigation, GPS denied/challenged locations, and other size and power constrained applications requiring precision navigation.  Georgia Tech, in partnership with Northrop Grumman, was awarded a research and development contract for the preliminary design, development and testing of micro-resonator devices.

"The Northrop Grumman and Georgia Tech team will advance the frontier of micro- and nano-fabrication, enabling the extreme miniaturization of highly stable navigation devices, with small energy dissipation," said Farrokh Ayazi, a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech.  Ayazi is a principal investigator for this project and serves as co-director for the school’s Center for MEMS and Microsystems Technology.

Northrop Grumman contact:

Gina Piellusch, Northrop Grumman Corporation

818-715-2255

gina.piellusch@ngc.com

Related Links

Additional Information

Groups

Home

Categories
No categories were selected.
Related Core Research Areas
No core research areas were selected.
Newsroom Topics
No newsroom topics were selected.
Keywords
college of engineering, DARPA grant, Farrokh Ayazi, Northrop Grumman, School of Electrical and Computer Engineeering
Status
  • Created By: Liz Klipp
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: May 23, 2011 - 10:44am
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 11:08pm