Lin’s Article Published in ‘Soft Power with Chinese Characteristics: China’s Campaign for Hearts and Minds’

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Jessica Palacios
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Sam Nunn School of International Affairs

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Summaries

Summary Sentence:

Dalton Lin, assistant professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, has co-authored “China’s Soft Power Over Taiwan,” which was published in the Routledge edited book Soft Power with Chinese Characteristics: China’s Campaign for Hearts and Mi

Full Summary:

Dalton Lin, assistant professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, has co-authored “China’s Soft Power Over Taiwan,” which was published in the Routledge edited book Soft Power with Chinese Characteristics: China’s Campaign for Hearts and Minds. The article written with Yun-Han Chu, professor in the Department of Political Science at the National Taiwan University, is about how China is using its economic prosperity to win over Taiwan. 

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Dalton Lin, assistant professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, has co-authored “China’s Soft Power Over Taiwan,” which was published in the Routledge edited book Soft Power with Chinese Characteristics: China’s Campaign for Hearts and Minds. The article written with Yun-Han Chu, professor in the Department of Political Science at the National Taiwan University, is about how China is using its economic prosperity to win over Taiwan. 

Abstract:

Dalton Lin and Yu-Han Chu argue that even though China's mighty capability of creating economic prosperity should have attracted the Taiwanese people to desire closer economic integration with China, this is not happening on the island. China hopes its economic attraction will lure the Taiwanese people into embracing its agenda of closer economic cooperation and, eventually, political reunification. However, China had put the cart before the horse and demanded that Taiwan commits to this goal of political reunification before its economic attraction has had a chance to transform Taiwanese people's preferences for integration. Embracing China's unification agenda thus seems to be a precondition for enjoying the economic prosperity promised by closer relations with China, and the prerequisite blurs the line between attraction and coercion. As a result, those Taiwanese who advocate for cooperation with China are suspected by their compatriots of kowtowing to Beijing and of working for China's interests. It thus becomes difficult to encourage a sense of affection for China among the Taiwanese public.

Find the book on Amazon. 

A book review by Martha Bayles "Hard Truths About China’s 'Soft Power'” can be found on The American Interest

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Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP), International Affairs Alumni in Washington DC

Categories
Policy, Social Sciences, and Liberal Arts
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Keywords
China, taiwan, soft power, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts; Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
Status
  • Created By: jpalacios9
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Aug 21, 2020 - 1:09pm
  • Last Updated: Aug 21, 2020 - 1:14pm