PhD Proposal by Emily McGuinness

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Monday December 9, 2019
      11:00 am - 1:00 pm
  • Location: MRDC 3515
  • Phone:
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  • Fee(s):
    N/A
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: Vapor Phase Infiltration: Sorption Thermodynamics, Chemical Entrapment Mechanisms, and Hybrid Material Structure-Property Relations”

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

THE SCHOOL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

 

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

 

Under the provisions of the regulations for the degree

 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY

 

on Monday, December 9, 2019

11:00 AM

in MRDC 3515

 

will be held the

 

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE

 

for

 

Emily McGuinness

 

"Vapor Phase Infiltration: Sorption Thermodynamics, Chemical Entrapment Mechanisms, and Hybrid Material Structure-Property Relations”

 

Committee Members:

 

Prof. Mark Losego, Advisor, MSE

Prof. Juan-Pablo Correa-Baena, MSE

Prof. Michael Filler, ChBE

Prof. Ryan Lively, ChBE

Prof. Natalie Stingelin, MSE & ChBE

 

Abstract:

 

Over the past ten years, vapor phase infiltration (VPI) and its variants have emerged from the atomic layer deposition (ALD) community to infuse the bulk of polymeric materials with inorganics, yielding a wide range of properties. In VPI, a metalorganic precursor adsorbs to the polymer surface, absorbs within, diffuses throughout, and ultimately becomes entrapped within the polymer bulk through a variety of mechanisms. VPI has demonstrated numerous applications such as the modification of mechanical properties, increase in electrical conductivity, enhanced UV stability, and changes in photoluminescence. Additionally, VPI has been used to create uniquely patterned nanostructures from the infiltration of block copolymers, stain polymer blends for contrast in phase imaging, enhance gravimetric sensing capabilities, and in creating hybrid photovoltaics.

 

From these property explorations and several fundamental studies, a picture of the relevant thermodynamic and kinetic mechanisms behind VPI has begun to emerge. While these mechanisms are generally understood, their detailed characterization and the derivation of fundamental thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are largely unavailable. Limited work has been conducted determining effective diffusion coefficients in the VPI process, but these investigations must be expanded to additional precursor-polymer systems. Additionally, few studies have been conducted to directly connect underlying inorganic entrapment mechanisms to observed property changes. Finally, few reports exist regarding the durability of these changes in simulated use environments. The proposed work will investigate the fundamental mechanisms behind the VPI process, how they connect to material properties such as solvent stability, and how durable these property changes are for daily use applications.

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
No
Groups

Graduate Studies

Invited Audience
Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students, Undergraduate students
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Other/Miscellaneous
Keywords
Phd Defense
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Nov 25, 2019 - 3:03pm
  • Last Updated: Nov 25, 2019 - 3:03pm