New Publication Explores the Global Implications of Meat Production and Consumption

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Drawing on concrete examples, the contributors to Global Meat explore the implications of the rise of a global meat industry for a range of social and environmental issues, including climate change, clean water supplies, hunger, workers’ rights, and the t

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Global Meat: Social and Environmental Consequences of the Expanding Meat Industry
edited by Bill Winders and Elizabeth Ransom

Global meat production and consumption have risen sharply and steadily over the past five decades, with per capita meat consumption almost doubling since 1960. The expanding global meat industry, meanwhile, driven by new trade policies and fueled by government subsidies, is dominated by just a few corporate giants. Industrial farming—the intensive production of animals and fish—has spread across the globe. Millions of acres of land are now used for pastures, feed crops, and animal waste reservoirs. Drawing on concrete examples, the contributors to Global Meat explore the implications of the rise of a global meat industry for a range of social and environmental issues, including climate change, clean water supplies, hunger, workers’ rights, and the treatment of animals.

Three themes emerge from their discussions: the role of government and corporations in shaping the structure of the global meat industry; the paradox of simultaneous rising meat production and greater food insecurity; and the industry’s contribution to social and environmental injustice. Contributors address such specific topics as the dramatic increase in pork production and consumption in China; land management by small-scale cattle farmers in the Amazon; the effect on the climate of rising greenhouse gas emissions from cattle raised for meat; and the tensions between economic development and animal welfare.

In addition, HTS Alum Carrie Freshour, now an assistant professor at the University of Washington, is the author of Chapter 6 "Cheap Meat and Cheap Work in the U.S. Poultry Industry: Race, Gender, and Immigration in Corporate Strategies to Shape Labor." See Dr. Freshour's full bio here..

Find Global Meat here..

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School of History and Sociology Student Blog, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, School of History and Sociology

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HSOC Blog, faculty, Research, Publications, Bill Winders, HSOC news, HSOC research
Status
  • Created By: Kayleigh Haskin
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Nov 24, 2019 - 7:09pm
  • Last Updated: Nov 25, 2019 - 2:27pm