MS Defense by Hannah Woods

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday July 3, 2019
      1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
  • Location: MoSE 1201A
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: Rheology and Characterization of High Solids Suspensions for Direct Ink Writing of Energetic Materials

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

THE SCHOOL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

 

GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

 

Under the provisions of the regulations for the degree

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE

 

on Wednesday, July 3, 2019

1:00 PM

in MoSE 1201A

 

will be held the

 

MASTER’S THESIS DEFENSE

 

for

 

Hannah Kathryn Woods

 

“Rheology and Characterization of High Solids Suspensions for Direct Ink Writing of Energetic Materials”

 

Committee Members:

 

Prof. Blair Brettmann, Advisor, ChBE/MSE

Prof. Naresh Thadhani, MSE

Prof. Mary Lynn Realff, MSE

 

Abstract:

 

Direct ink writing is a promising approach for preparing energetic materials with unique geometries that are of great interest in military and civil engineering fields due to their potential to control shock wave propagation and energy focus or dissipation. However, there are significant challenges to overcome in using additive manufacturing to produce energetics, particularly in using inks with high particle content (>60 vol% particles) while maintaining both extrusion capability and print quality. Voids and interfaces in energetics are areas of high risk for hot spot formation, and with the layer-by-layer additive manufacturing process, voids can manifest both in between and within the extruded filaments as well as between printed layers. Concerns associated with the challenges of printing high solids suspensions make understanding the flow and print capabilities of these materials of great importance.

 

The binder used in suspensions for direct ink writing plays an important role in overall flow characteristics of the ink, and therefore has significant impact on final print quality. In this work, glass microspheres in polymer-solvent and photocurable monomer binders are studied as model systems to provide an in-depth study of polymer binder design. This work aims to understand how binder characteristics affect the viscosity and printability of such high solids suspensions. We show that the suspension viscosity is primarily controlled by the particle volume fraction for the photocurable binder system, while both the particle volume fraction and polymer molecular weight influence the viscosity in the case of the polymer-solvent binder system. Both binder types can be tuned to make printable suspensions that result in lines of consistent width and 3D disc-shaped objects, indicating that both paths show promise for future direct ink writing formulations of energetic materials.

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In Campus Calendar
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Graduate Studies

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Keywords
ms defense
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Jun 20, 2019 - 10:45am
  • Last Updated: Jun 20, 2019 - 10:45am