PhD Defense by Mengnan Zhang

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Tuesday March 26, 2019
      1:00 pm - 3:00 pm
  • Location: Engineered Biosystems Building, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Seminar Room (EBB 1005)
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: Analysis of the role of miRNAs in ovarian cancer metastasis

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Bioinformatics

in the

School of Biological Sciences

 

Mengnan Zhang

 

will defend her thesis:

Analysis of the role of miRNAs in ovarian cancer metastasis

 

Tuesday, March 26th, 2019

1:00 PM Eastern Time

Engineered Biosystems Building, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Seminar Room (EBB 1005)

 

Thesis Advisor:

Dr. John F. McDonald

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Committee Members:

Dr. Jung H. Choi

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Dr. I. King Jordan
School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Dr. Fredrik O. Vannberg

School of Biological Sciences

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Dr. Ronghu Wu

School of Chemistry & Biochemistry

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Abstract

Cancer mortality is primarily due to metastasis. Metastasis is a complex multi-step process involving, on the molecular level, regulatory control of two key development pathways: epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and it reciprocal, mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). MiRNAs are small regulatory RNA molecules that play key roles in the regulation of EMT/MET. In this thesis, I examine the role of miRNAs in regulating EMT/MET in ovarian cancer. In the first study, I show that sequentially divergent miRNAs converge to regulate the EMT/MET process through both direct and indirect regulatory changes. In the second study, I explore the impact of genetic difference between different cancer cell lines on the function of miRNAs to regulate the EMT/MET process. In the third study, I evaluate the importance of post-transcriptional/translational changes in the metastasis of a stage III ovarian cancer patient and the role played by miRNAs in regulating the process.

 

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
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Graduate Studies

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Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students, Undergraduate students
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Other/Miscellaneous
Keywords
Phd Defense
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Mar 11, 2019 - 2:01pm
  • Last Updated: Mar 11, 2019 - 2:01pm