PhD Defense by Bryan Wiltgen

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Friday September 28, 2018
      2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
  • Location: GVU Café, TSRB 2nd Floor
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: Design Evaluation through Simulation and Comparison in Biologically Inspired Design

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Title: Design Evaluation through Simulation and Comparison in Biologically Inspired Design

 

Bryan Wiltgen

Computer Science Ph.D. Candidate

School of Interactive Computing

College of Computing

Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Date: September 28, 2018

Time: 2pm – 4:30pm EST

Location: GVU Café, TSRB 2nd Floor

 

Committee

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Dr. Ashok K. Goel, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology (Advisor)

Dr. Nancy Nersessian, School of Interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Mark Riedl, School of interactive Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Spencer Rugaber, School of Computer Science, Georgia Institute of Technology

Dr. Jeannette Yen, School of Biology, Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Abstract

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Biologically inspired design is a form of creative analogical design where practitioners take inspiration from nature to develop design solutions, such as using inspiration from owl wings to help reduce the noise made by a train.  Although analogical reasoning typically provides no guarantee of correctness and thus evaluation should be an important activity in the domain, there is only sparse existing computational work on supporting evaluation in biologically inspired design.  My dissertation develops a computational technique called Design Evaluation through Simulation and Comparison (DESC) to help designers evaluate design concepts in the early, conceptual stage of design.

DESC consists of two methods to evaluate functional models of designs.  They are called Simulation and Comparison. The first simulates the model’s processes through qualitative, quantitative, and functional reasoning, and it uses those results to check the model’s claims about process and function.  The second analogically compares the model against an alternative model of the same design topic that acts as a proxy for ground truth or an alternative understanding/vision.  To support this approach, my dissertation also develops a novel analogical mapping technique called Compositional Mapping that uses problem decomposition and constraint satisfaction.

I evaluated DESC in two ways.  I evaluated DESC through computational experimentation that demonstrated Simulation and Comparison’s capability to evaluate functional models of designs, and it provided preliminary evidence that Compositional Mapping is superior to a well-known mapping technique.  Additionally, I conducted a pilot study with human participants to test DESC’s usefulness as a support tool.  Results provided preliminary evidence that using DESC improves participants’ functional models of design topics.

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Graduate Education and Faculty Development

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Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students, Undergraduate students
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Phd Defense
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Sep 17, 2018 - 10:15am
  • Last Updated: Sep 17, 2018 - 10:15am