Half of Earth’s satellites restrict use of climate data

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  • Mariel Borowitz Mariel Borowitz
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Mariel Borowitz, assistant professor in the Nunn School, wrote, “Half of Earth’s satellites restrict use of climate data,” published by The Conversation.

Excerpt:

Scientists and policymakers need satellite data to understand and address climate change. Yet data from more than half of unclassified Earth-observing satellites is restricted in some way, rather than shared openly. 

When governments restrict who can access data, or limit how people can use or redistribute it, that slows the progress of science. Now, as U.S. climate funding is under threat, it’s more important than ever to ensure that researchers and others make the most of the collected data. 

Why do some nations choose to restrict satellite data, while others make it openly available? My book, “Open Space,” uses a series of historical case studies, as well as a broad survey of national practices, to show how economic concerns and agency priorities shape the way nations treat their data.

Find Borowitz's article on the Conversation website. 

Additional Information

Groups

Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP), Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs

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Keywords
space, Space Policy, data policy, data, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts; Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
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  • Created By: jpalacios9
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: May 1, 2018 - 4:17pm
  • Last Updated: May 1, 2018 - 4:17pm