Countries Fail to Share Satellite Climate Data

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  • Mariel Borowitz, PhD Mariel Borowitz, PhD
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Mariel Borowitz, assistant professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology, was quoted in the Science Magazine, April 13, article, “Countries Fail to Share Satellite Climate Data.” The Sam Nunn School of International Affairs is part of the Georgia Tech Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.

Excerpt:

From 1957 to 2016, space-faring nations launched 458 government-operated, Earth-observing satellites, which gather data for weather forecasts and climate studies. But data from just 38% of the satellites are shared without restrictions, Mariel Borowitz, a space policy researcher at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, notes in her new book Open Space: The Global Effort for Open Access to Environmental Satellite Data. Whereas Europe and the United States have set the standard for open data, she says, Russia and Japan tend to restrict their availability, for example, by requiring agreements and conditions that can be cumbersome. And sometimes countries attempt to sell satellite data, as in the case of Canada's RadarSat series. Nations less experienced in launching satellites often build them as technology demonstrations, with little thought to data dissemination. Still, Borowitz notes, data sharing is on the rise. “It's getting significantly better.”

For the full article, visit the Science Magazine website.

Additional Information

Groups

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs

Categories
Institute and Campus
Keywords
Space Policy, data, sharing, satellite, environmental
Status
  • Created By: ralu3
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Apr 17, 2018 - 10:24am
  • Last Updated: Apr 17, 2018 - 10:24am