Smart Swarms Seek New Ways to Cooperate

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  • Dana Randall and Dan Goldman in Goldman’s lab at Georgia Tech. Dana Randall and Dan Goldman in Goldman’s lab at Georgia Tech.
    (image/jpeg)
  • William Savoie William Savoie
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The latest discovery from Georgia Tech physicists may seem like something straight out of Black Mirror. But don't worry, it's not that sinister. School of Physics' Dan Goldman worked with School of Computer Science's Dana Randall  and doctoral student William Savoie to develop an algorithm that orders simple robots to "swarm," or move in complex ways as a group. Imagine the birth of the supervillain Sandman in Spider-Man 3, from loose grains of sand skittering across the desert and then congealing into the shape of a human. The possiblities for these "smarticles" are endless. This story has been reproduced in Scientific American.

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Groups

College of Sciences, School of Physics

Categories
Physics and Physical Sciences
Keywords
School of Physics, College of Sciences, William Savoie, robotics, Dan Goldman
Status
  • Created By: mrosten3
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Feb 16, 2018 - 4:21pm
  • Last Updated: Feb 20, 2018 - 11:41am