Phd Proposal by Jessica Fisch

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday December 6, 2017
      12:30 pm - 3:30 pm
  • Location: Architecture (East) 214
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  • Fee(s):
    N/A
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: Does Green Infrastructure Promote Equitable Development? The Mediating Role of Social Capital in Assessing Impacts

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

THE SCHOOL OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING


GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Under the provisions of the regulations for the degree

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

on Wednesday, December 6, 2017
12:30 PM to 3:30 PM

in

Architecture (East) 214

will be held the

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE

for

Jessica Fisch

“Does Green Infrastructure Promote Equitable Development? The Mediating Role of Social Capital in Assessing Impacts”

The Examiners Are: 

Dr. Michael Elliott, Chairperson

Dr. Jennifer Hirsch, School of City and Regional Planning

Dr. Dan Immergluck, Georgia State University

Dr. Robert Kirkman, School of Public Policy

Dr. Bruce Stiftel, School of City and Regional Planning

 

Faculty and students are invited to attend this examination.

 

Abstract:

Planners, policymakers, and elected officials increasingly view investments in green infrastructure, parks and other green development as opportunities for spurring economic growth, increasing environmental quality, and providing social and recreational amenities in urban areas. However, as planners and city leaders focus on these impacts of green projects, research has proposed that equity concerns--such as access for low-income and marginalized groups, affordability, and displacement--are often not adequately addressed, leading to ‘environmental gentrification.’ At the same time, several works have argued that networks of stakeholders have the potential to support more equitable development, thereby counteracting the potential for gentrification. To date, research has not fully examined the conditions under which more equitable outcomes for green infrastructure projects might be supported and the role of social capital development in addressing these concerns.

To address these concerns, this study seeks to clarify the mechanisms through which green infrastructure planning might support social capital development surrounding housing affordability, gentrification and displacement, and community benefits concerns. Further, it seeks to clarify the mechanisms through which social capital impacts green infrastructure planning and implementation, and policy development surrounding housing affordability, gentrification, and community benefits. The research will examine these interrelationships in two case cities with a prominent focus on planning for green infrastructure, and that allow for variation in political context and in project scale and form. Cases include the Atlanta Westside neighborhoods of Vine City, English Avenue, Washington Park, Bankhead, and Grove Park, which have focused heavily on green infrastructure planning, and the Washington D.C. neighborhoods surrounding the 11th Street Bridge Park project, including Anacostia and Fairlawn. In clarifying interactions between social capital and green infrastructure planning processes and outcomes, the research will enhance our understanding of how social capital might support an increased focus on equity concerns in green infrastructure planning, as well as on the importance of contextual factors such as state and local political context.

 

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
No
Groups

Graduate Studies

Invited Audience
Faculty/Staff, Public, Undergraduate students
Categories
Other/Miscellaneous
Keywords
Phd proposal
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Nov 21, 2017 - 1:04pm
  • Last Updated: Nov 21, 2017 - 1:04pm