A New Breakthrough Could Make Organic Electronics Far More Efficient

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  • Seth Marder, Regents Professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and COPE’s founding director. (Photo by Georgia Tech.) Seth Marder, Regents Professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and COPE’s founding director. (Photo by Georgia Tech.)
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  • Stephen Barlow Stephen Barlow
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Organic materials represent the future of electronics, thanks partly to their low cost. But organics aren't the best conductors of electricity, which is why organic semiconductors have to be "doped," or treated with special chemicals, to help realize their potential in advances like flexible electronics, more efficient energy storage, and better displays for televisions and smartphones. Seth Marder and Stephen Barlow of the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry contributed to a new study on a doping system that improves organic semiconductivity by a factor of a million. Marder is a Regents' Professor and founding director of Tech's Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics (COPE), and Barlow is a research scientist.  

Additional Information

Groups

College of Sciences, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Center for the Science and Technology of Advanced Materials and Interfaces (STAMI)

Categories
Chemistry and Chemical Engineering
Keywords
College of Sciences, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, organic electronics, organic semiconductors, doping, Seth Marder, Stephen Barlow, center for organic photonics and electronics
Status
  • Created By: Renay San Miguel
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Nov 20, 2017 - 2:43pm
  • Last Updated: Nov 21, 2017 - 11:47am