‘Faustian Bargain’: Defense Fears over Australian University’s $100m China Partnership

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  • Margaret E. Kosal Margaret E. Kosal
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Margaret Kosal, professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology, was quoted in The Guardian September 19 article “‘Faustian Bargain’: Defense Fears over Australian University’s $100m China Partnership.”

Excerpt: 

A central concern of many experts is the potential military application of technologies being developed in partnership with foreign companies. They caution that emerging technologies are often so complicated that scientists can’t forecast how their work will be used, including whether it might have so-called “dual use” civilian/military applications. The monitoring of the development and use of cutting-edge technologies is a particularly thorny issue, given the level of specialization required to understand the implications of such research, and the complexities of attempting to control constantly evolving technologies.

“These are highlighting some of the real challenges of the 21st century, when what is military research and what is civilian research don’t really have meaningful distinctions,” says Margaret Kosal, from the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Institute of Technology, who conducts research on potential proliferation threats of nanotechnology.

For the full article on “‘Faustian Bargain’: Defense Fears over Australian University’s $100m China Partnership” visit The Guardian website.

Additional Information

Groups

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP)

Categories
Institute and Campus
Keywords
fautism, China, partnership, fear, Australia
Status
  • Created By: ralu3
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Sep 27, 2017 - 10:46am
  • Last Updated: Oct 11, 2017 - 10:12am