Where Do Al-Aqsa Protests Leave the Islamic Movement in Israel?

External News Details
Media
  • Assistant Professor Lawrence Rubin Assistant Professor Lawrence Rubin
    (image/jpeg)

Lawrence Rubin, associate professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech, was quoted in “Where Do Al-Aqsa Protests Leave the Islamic Movement in Israel?” for Al-Monitor.

Excerpt:

Lawrence Rubin, associate professor at the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech, has written about the Islamic Movement and its founder, Sheikh Abdulla Nimr Darwish, who tried to take the organization in a pragmatic direction.

The movement was initially established in 1971, and although it had no official connection to the Muslim Brotherhood, many of its ideologies and philosophies often reflected those of the Brotherhood, which was founded in the Egyptian town of Ismailia in 1928. 

Rubin wrote, “The movement split in the mid-1990s when a hardline faction did not accept the majority’s decision to run for national elections in the Israeli parliament. Led by Sheikh Ra’ed Salah, this faction, later called the Northern Branch by others, claimed it would not legitimize the state by participating in an Israeli national institution.”

For the full article, read here

 

Additional Information

Groups

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP), Sam Nunn School of International Affairs

Categories
Institute and Campus
Keywords
Middle East
Status
  • Created By: oadebola3
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Aug 10, 2017 - 10:22am
  • Last Updated: Aug 14, 2017 - 1:41pm