The French, German and Irish Consuls General gave their countries’ perspectives on Brexit

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Summaries

Summary Sentence:

On February 28 the Consuls General of France, Germany and Ireland discussed their countries’ approaches to the up-coming negotiations surrounding the UK’s departure from the EU.

Full Summary:

On February 28 the Consuls General of France, Germany and Ireland discussed their countries’ approaches to the up-coming negotiations surrounding the UK’s departure from the EU.

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  • Consul Generals on Brexit Consul Generals on Brexit
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On February 28 the Consuls General of France, Germany and Ireland discussed their countries’ approaches to the up-coming negotiations surrounding the UK’s departure from the EU.  There was a notable degree of congruence among their countries’ preferences.  They all three expressed regret at the UK’s decision to leave.  Each stressed that it is imperative that the UK not have a better deal than the remaining member states.  French Consul General Louis de Corail stressed that this was not about “punishing” the UK, but recognition that being a member of a “club” comes with responsibilities as well as privileges, and one cannot claim the latter without the former.  German Consul General Detlev Ruenger underlined that this was important so as not to encourage other countries to leave the EU.  The Consuls General stressed that given that constraint, each of their governments was as close-as-possible an economic relationship with the UK.  Irish Consul General Shane Stephens underlined that Ireland is expected to be most severely affected economically by the UK’s departure.  In fact the fall in the value of the British pound in the wake of the referendum has adversely affected Irish exports, particularly agricultural exports, to the UK.  Consul General Ruenger pointed out that the UK’s economy is as large as that of the smallest 20 EU member states.  Consul General de Corail noted that France has its largest trade surplus with the UK.  Both the French and German Consuls General remarked that their governments are keen to continue security cooperation with the UK.  The Irish Consul General stressed the importance of finding a solution that does not disrupt the Northern Ireland peace process, including preserving the Common Travel Area.  Both the German and Irish Consuls General expressed concern that the UK’s departure might tip the political balance in the EU in a way that would be to the detriment to their countries.

Additional Information

Groups

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs

Categories
Policy, Social Sciences, and Liberal Arts
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Keywords
Brett, Georgia Tech International Affairs, Ireland, Consulate General of France, Germany
Status
  • Created By: jpalacios9
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Mar 15, 2017 - 3:26pm
  • Last Updated: Mar 15, 2017 - 3:26pm