PhD Proposal by Peter Hylton

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Thursday December 15, 2016
      10:00 am - 12:00 pm
  • Location: GIS Conference Room 203: 760 Spring Street
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: E-Retail Effects on Airports and Regional Development

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

THE SCHOOL OF CITY AND REGIONAL PLANNING


GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

Under the provisions of the regulations for the degree

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

on Thursday, December 15, 2016
10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

in the GIS Conference Room 203
760 Spring Street

will be held the

DISSERTATION PROPOSAL DEFENSE
 
for
 
Peter James Hylton

“E-Retail Effects on Airports and Regional Development”
 
The Examiners Are:

Dr. Catherine L. Ross, Chair

Dr. Subhrajit Guhathakurta

Dr. Alan Erera 

Faculty and students are invited to attend this examination.


Abstract:

Electronic retail (e-retail) today accounts for nearly 10% of American retail sales, and its share of sales is rapidly growing.  Both e-retail and brick-and-mortar (B&M) retail sales channels rely on behind-the-scenes logistics facilities to complete sales. However, e-retail’s need for fast, small, and short-notice deliveries to customers’ doorsteps requires a total reconfiguration of the distribution network. In many instances e-retail focuses on airport-centric express carrier transportation networks.  E-retail logistics has the potential to change air cargo demand among airports and to provide a subset of airport regions with greater development potential and that can better accommodate increasing e-retail activity. The paradigm shift in retail logistics has implications for airport planning, regional economic development, and landside freight infrastructure.

 

This proposal outlines a dissertation that explores the patterns and associations guiding America’s e-retail logistics geography, particularly with regard to the profile of e-retail hub regions and the mechanisms driving their status.  Theory suggests a complex relationship between e-retail and airports, with intervening variables, bidirectional influence, and a multifaceted context.  Therefore, this study undertakes three analyses that each examine a different aspect of the airport – e-retail relationship.  The first analysis uses regression analyses and other analytics to examine national-scale interactions between regional airport and air connectivity characteristics, and regional activity in e-retail and brick-and-mortar (B&M) logistics.  The second analysis surveys managers of e-retail and B&M logistics facilities to examine differences in how they value and plan airports and the resulting air cargo characteristics.  The third analysis examines if and how airports are responding to e-retail by studying cargo and e-retail’s inclusion and level of development in airport master plans.  The case study airports are selected based on different levels of actual and potential e-retail cargo.

 

Together these three analyses provide new information on the airport – e-retail relationship.  We may be able to better identify airports and regions likely to experience e-retail cargo growth and better accommodate e-retail logistics.

 

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Graduate Studies

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Keywords
Phd proposal
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Dec 6, 2016 - 3:37pm
  • Last Updated: Dec 6, 2016 - 3:37pm