PhD Defense by Tan Zu

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday November 9, 2016
      2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
  • Location: Montgomery Knight Building: Rm 317
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Summary Sentence: EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SPRAY-FORMATION PROCESSES IN TWIN-FLUID JET-IN-CROSSFLOW AT JET-ENGINE OPERATING CONDITIONS

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Ph.D. Thesis Defense

by

Tan, Zu Puayen

(Advisor: Prof. Ben T. Zinn)

 

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF SPRAY-FORMATION PROCESSES IN

TWIN-FLUID JET-IN-CROSSFLOW

AT JET-ENGINE OPERATING CONDITIONS

 

2:00 PM, Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Montgomery Knight Building

Room 317

 

ABSTRACT:

            Jet-in-crossflow (JICF) fuel-injection is widely applied in modern jet-engines to provide rapid fuel-atomization and mixing. However, “classical” JICF places large amounts of fuel into the low-velocity region near the injector wall, which can cause flashback and fuel-coking on the wall. A nascent fuel-injection technique called Twin-Fluid (TF) JICF is being considered as a way to mitigate Classical-JICF’s shortcomings. In TF-JICF, air is co-injected around the fuel jet to modify its atomization and penetration characteristics. Designers expect TF-JICF to enhance the fuel’s penetration away from the wall (i.e., reduce near-wall fuel concentrations). However, the performance of TF-JICF is currently not well understood, especially at the high pressures found in jet-engines. This dissertation work addresses the knowledge gap by experimentally investigating a TF-JICF where liquid Jet-A fuel was co-injected with pressurized nitrogen into a crossflow of air. The crossflow and injection conditions were varied over wide ranges that cover those conditions reported in the available TF-JICF literature, as well as those expected for jet-engines. The resulting TF-JICF fuel sprays were imaged by shadowgraphy, and their penetrations, dispersions and atomization processes were analyzed.

            For a fixed fuel flow-rate, different levels of air-injection velocities were found to cause different spray characteristics (see figure below). A mild injection of air inhibited the atomization of the initial fuel jet, thus reducing the near-wall fuel concentration and flashback/wall-coking risks. A very strong injection of air “propelled” the fuel very far away from the wall while also enhancing atomization. On the other hand, medium levels of air-injection were generally non-beneficial towards fuel-injector design. Four TF-JICF regimes were identified (i.e., Classical-JICF, Air-Assist JICF, Airblast JICF and Airblast Spray-in-Crossflow) based on these characteristics and their formation mechanisms.

 

The reading committee will include:

Prof. Ben T Zinn (AE)

Prof. Jerry Seitzman (AE)

Prof. Jeff Jagoda (AE)

Dr. Eugene Lubarsky (AE)

Prof. Caroline Genzale (ME)

 

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  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Oct 25, 2016 - 3:26pm
  • Last Updated: Oct 25, 2016 - 3:26pm