Prausnitz Team\'s Microneedle Research Featured on CNN

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Prausnitz Team's Microneedle Research Featured on CNN

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Prausnitz Team's Microneedle Research Featured on CNN

Microneedles May Be More Effective than Traditional Shots
CNN

It's enough to make a kid scream. A shot can be an unpleasant experience for anyone, no matter the age. Funding by government flu grants, researchers at Georgia Tech and Emory University in Atlanta developed a solution - needles so small, you can't feel them. It's as long as one or a few hairs are thick, said Georgia Tech researcher, Mark Prausnitz. They're called microneedles, so tiny they only go part of the way through the skin, just deep enough to work but not enough to hit nerves and actually hurt. Research shows microneedles might be more effective than traditional shots, and perhaps the biggest advantage, they're so simple, people can vaccinate themselves. If all goes well, researchers say in five years, microneedles could make doctors' visits a little more pain-free. Brooke Baldwin, CNN, Atlanta. To view the segment, go to following link to open file: CNN Video

To view Georgia Tech article: Flu Vaccine Given In Microneedle Patches

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Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB)

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Institute and Campus, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Student and Faculty, Life Sciences and Biology, Research
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Keywords
CNN, Flu Vaccine, Georgia Tech, IBB, Mark Prausnitz, Microneedle, Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience
Status
  • Created By: Colly Mitchell
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: May 31, 2009 - 8:00pm
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 11:06pm