SCS Seminar - Srini Devadas - Tardis: Time Traveling Coherence Algorithm for Distributed Shared Memory

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Friday August 28, 2015
      11:00 am - 12:00 pm
  • Location: Klaus 1116E & W
  • Phone:
  • URL:
  • Email:
  • Fee(s):
    N/A
  • Extras:
Contact

Francella Tonge

ftonge3@cc.gatech.edu

Summaries

Summary Sentence: SCS Seminar - Srini Devadas - Tardis: Time Traveling Coherence Algorithm for Distributed Shared Memory

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Media
  • Srini Devadas Srini Devadas
    (image/png)

Abstract:

A new memory coherence protocol, Tardis, is presented. Tardis uses timestamp counters representing logical as opposed to physical time to order memory operations and enforce sequential consistency in any type of shared memory system. Tardis is unique in that as compared to the widely-adopted directory coherence protocol, and its variants, it completely avoids multicasting and only requires O(log N) storage per cache block for an N-core system rather than O(N) sharer information. Tardis is simpler and easier to reason about, yet achieves similar performance to directory protocols on a wide range of benchmarks run on 16, 64 and 256 cores. (Jointly worked with Xiangyao Yu)

Bio:

Srini Devadas is the Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he has been on the faculty since 1988. He served as Associate Head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, with responsibility for Computer Science, from 2005 to 2011. Devadas's research interests span Computer-Aided Design (CAD), computer security and computer architecture and he has received significant awards from each discipline. In 2015, he received the ACM/IEEE A. Richard Newton Technical Impact award in Electronic Design Automation. He received the IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award in 2014 for inventing Physical Unclonable Functions and single-chip secure processor architectures. Devadas's work on hardware information flow tracking published in the 2004 ASPLOS received the ASPLOS Most Influential Paper Award in 2014. His papers on analytical cache modeling and the Aegis single-chip secure processor were included as influential papers in "25 Years of the International Conference on Supercomputing." He is an IEEE and ACM Fellow.

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
Yes
Groups

College of Computing, School of Computer Science

Invited Audience
Undergraduate students, Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students
Categories
Seminar/Lecture/Colloquium
Keywords
College of Computing, Georgia Tech, School of Computer Science, Srini Devadas
Status
  • Created By: Quincy Robbins
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Aug 17, 2015 - 9:15am
  • Last Updated: Apr 13, 2017 - 5:18pm