Eisenhower Fellowships to SCaRP students Carly Queen and Jack Cebe

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Summaries

Summary Sentence:

Two City and Regional Planning students have been awarded Eisenhower Graduate Fellowships.

Full Summary:

U.S. DOT has awarded Eisenhower Fellowships to two Georgia Tech transportation planners. Graduate students Carly Queen and Jack Cebe were selected as recipients of Dwight Eisenhower Graduate Fellowships, which enable students to pursue master's degrees or doctorates at the school of their choice.

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U.S. DOT has awarded Eisenhower Fellowships to two Georgia Tech transportation planners. Graduate students Carly Queen and Jack Cebe were selected as recipients of Dwight Eisenhower Graduate Fellowships, which enable students to pursue master's degrees or doctorates at the school of their choice. 

The Eisenhower program strives to attract qualified students to transportation education and research and advance transportation workforce development. Students that apply to this highly competitive program are reviewed by a National Selection Panel that is composed of prominent transportation professionals; funds are awarded to cover tuition costs, travel and research expenses. 

Cebe is beginning his studies this fall, pursuing a dual masters in city & regional planning and civil engineering. He has been working in the transportation field for the past four years, which he says has given him perspective on some of the greatest needs for transportation practitioners and communities around the United States. His proposed research focuses on finding systematic approaches of integrating transportation, storm water, and green space networks to enhance the attractiveness and functionality of these systems; finding space-saving transportation and land use planning/design solutions that maintain transportation effectiveness while providing safer, more attractive human spaces; and finding tools to better integrate pedestrian, bicycle, and transit modes into local and regional travel demand modeling

Queen, too, is pursuing a dual degree in planning and civil engineering. “Transportation moves me, literally and figuratively; it has long been one of my most profound passions,” she says. That passion has led her to pursue research that focuses on evaluating conventional and unconventional urban transit modes with particular emphasis on safety, reliability, economic, and environmental considerations.  She is investigating the performance, costs and benefits of each mode and the circumstances for which each mode is well suited.

Additional Information

Groups

School of City & Regional Planning

Categories
Economic Development and Policy, Student Research
Related Core Research Areas
People and Technology
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Keywords
Eisenhower, featured, Fellowship, Research, scholarship, Transportation
Status
  • Created By: Jessie Brandon
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Aug 12, 2015 - 4:45am
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 11:19pm