PhD Defense by Qingshen Jing (Joint PKU)

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Monday June 8, 2015
      8:00 pm - 10:00 pm
  • Location: IPST, RM 114.
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Summaries

Summary Sentence: PATTERNED THIN-FILM TRIBOELECTRIC GENERATOR FOR HARVESTING MICRO-MESO SCALE AMBIENT ENERGY AND KINEMATIC SENSING

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

Qingshen Jing – MSE JPP PKU PhD

 

Time: June 6th 2015, 8:00 am(Beijing Time)

Location: Room 806, Pacific Development Center, Peking University (52th Haidian Road, Haidian district, Beijing)

 

The presentation will be broadcasted live to Georgia Tech

Coordinate Time in GT: June 5th 2015, 8:00 pm (Atlanta, EST)

Location: IPST, RM 114.

 

Committee (with advisor & program affiliation)

Dr. Zhong Lin Wang (GT), co-advisor

Dr. Pingchou Han (PKU), co-advisor

Dr. Meilin Liu (GT)  

Dr. Ching-Ping Wong (GT)

Dr. Shulin Bai (PKU)

Dr. Anyuan Cao (PKU)

Dr. Ruqiang Zou (PKU)

 

Title

PATTERNED THIN-FILM TRIBOELECTRIC GENERATOR FOR HARVESTING MICRO-MESO SCALE AMBIENT ENERGY AND KINEMATIC SENSING

ABSTRACT

Harnessing random micro-meso scale ambient energy (M2SAE), which is widely available in human motions, wind driven vibrations, water surface fluctuations, etc., is not only clean and sustainable, but it also enables self-powered sensors and devices to be realized. In my research, I have fabricated a case-encapsulated triboelectric generator (cTENG) based on the principles of sliding electrification for harvesting M2SAE from reciprocating motions. The cTENG generated an average effective output power of 12.2 mW and a power density of 1.36 W/m2, triggered by direct-applied forces, as well as, inertia force. Based on the success of the patterned cTENG, I have built a self-powered velocity sensor for either rectified linear or rotary motion by sourcing the energy from the triboelectric generator. The triboelectric generated output signals when integrated with a digital circuit and a microcontroller unit can be directly processed into remarkably stable, macro-scale output signals for measurements of (0.1-0.6) ms-1 ± 0.5% for linear velocities and (300-700) rpm ± 0.9% for rotary velocities. I have also fabricated a self-powered, thin-film motion direction sensor by harvesting the operational energy from a close-proximity triboelectrification of two surfaces in relative reciprocation. The mover made by coating a thin polytetrafluoroethylene film with a 2-column, specially arranged array of copper electrodes and the stator is made by coating the top and bottom surfaces of a thin polyimide film with a 2-column aligned array of copper electrodes placed in an alternating pattern. As the mover traverses over the stator, the electrodes in the mover actively generate electric signals of ±5 V to attain a peak power density of ≥ 65 mW/m2 at speeds of 0.3 ms-1. Finally, I have demonstrated a quasi-static angular positioning sensor based on 4-channel encoded pattern on the electrification surface. Under a rotation speed of 100 rad min-1, the output voltage of the sensor reaches as high as 60 V. Angular resolution of 22.5° is achieved and can be further improved by increasing the number of channels. Triggered by the output voltage signal, the rotating characteristics of the steering wheel can be real-time monitored and mapped by being mounted to the sensor. I believe my pioneering demonstration of the applied triboelectric technology will have a huge impact in the industrial commercialization of self-powered devices and sensors.

 

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Keywords
defense, graduate students, joint, MSE, PhD, PKU
Status
  • Created By: Tatianna Richardson
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Jun 1, 2015 - 8:21am
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 10:12pm