Karlovitz Lecture 2015: Dr. Geoffrey West

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday March 11, 2015
      5:30 pm
  • Location: Clary Theater, Bill Moore Student Success Center
  • Phone:
  • URL:
  • Email:
  • Fee(s):
    None
  • Extras:
Contact

Monica Halka
Georgia Tech Honors Program
404-385-7533

Summaries

Summary Sentence: Growth, Innovation and the Accelerating Pace of Life From Cells and Ecosystems to Cities and Economies; Are They Sustainable?

Full Summary: The Georgia Tech Honors Program and the College of Sciences welcomes Dr. Geoffrey West, distinguished professor and past president of the Santa Fe Institute.

Media
  • Geoffrey West Geoffrey West
    (image/png)

The Georgia Tech Honors Program and the College of Sciences welcomes Dr. Geoffrey West, distinguished professor and past president of the Santa Fe Institute, for its 2015 Karlovitz Lecture. West is a theoretical physicist whose primary interests have been in fundamental questions in physics, especially those concerning the elementary particles, their interactions and cosmological implications. His recent work explores scaling laws in systems that may seem very different, but are, in many ways, more similar than we have realized.

Topic:
Growth, Innovation and the Accelerating Pace of Life From Cells and Ecosystems to Cities and Economies; Are They Sustainable?

Abstract:
Why do all companies and people die whereas cities keep growing and life continues to accelerate? Why do we stop growing, live on the order of 100 years and sleep 8 hours a day? And how are these related to innovation, wealth creation, social networks, urbanisation and global sustainability?

Cities are the prime source of crime, pollution, disease, global warming, and energy and resource consumption but are also the hubs of innovation, wealth creation and power. Despite being our greatest challenge, there is no integrated, quantitative, predictive science-based framework for understanding their dynamics, growth and organization. Ideas for such a unified theory, inspired by a network-based framework for understanding diverse properties of organisms (including metabolism, growth, mortality, cancer) will be discussed. Like organisms, many characteristics of cities worldwide, including wages, patents, diversity, crime, disease and infrastructure, scale systematically and predictably with size, suggesting universal principles underlying their dynamics that transcend history, geography and culture. This has dramatic implications for growth, development and long-term global sustainability.

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Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
Yes
Groups

General, College of Sciences

Invited Audience
Undergraduate students, Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students
Categories
Seminar/Lecture/Colloquium
Keywords
Green Buzz, QEP
Status
  • Created By: Michael Hagearty
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Jan 16, 2015 - 4:41am
  • Last Updated: Apr 13, 2017 - 5:20pm