Biomedical Engineering Seminar

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Tuesday January 27, 2015
      10:00 am - 11:00 am
  • Location: Talk: U.A. Whitaker 1103, Videoconferenced at Health Sciences Research Building, room E 182 and Technology Enterprise Park, room 104
  • Phone: (404) 385-0124
  • URL: http://bme.gatech.edu
  • Email:
  • Fee(s):
    N/A
  • Extras:
Contact

Faculty Host: Chris Rozell, Ph.D.

Summaries

Summary Sentence: "Synaptic Inhibition Controls Operating Regimes of the Cerebral Cortex in vivo" - Bilal Haider, Ph.D. - University College London

Full Summary: Biomedical Engineering Seminar - "Synaptic Inhibition Controls Operating Regimes of the Cerebral Cortex in vivo" - Bilal Haider, Ph.D., University College London.

Synaptic Inhibition Controls Operating Regimes of the Cerebral Cortex in vivo”

Bilal Haer, Ph.D.*
Post-Doctoral Fellow
University College London
Institute of Ophthalmology
Department of Visual Neuroscience


Seminar will be made available via videoconference in the Health Sciences Research Building, room E 182 and Technology Enterprise Park, room 104.

 

The cerebral cortex in vivo displays many regimes of spontaneous and sensory evoked activity.  What are the cellular and circuit mechanisms that determine these regimes? What consequences do they have for sensory processing?  And how do these mechanisms vary across behavioral states? 

 To address these questions, I will present three electrophysiological studies of spiking and sub-threshold (synaptic) activity recorded from specific cortical neuron types in vivo.  First, I will show that cortical excitation and inhibition closely balance each other during ongoing spontaneous activity.  I will next show how inhibitory circuits are engaged to produce reliable and precise cortical activity during naturalistic visual stimulation.  Finally, I will show that in the awake cortex, the specific recruitment of inhibitory circuits dramatically sharpens the spatial and temporal resolution of visual processing.  Taken together, these studies suggest a dominant role for cortical inhibitory circuits in the rapid modulation of sensory processing according to the demands of the environment and behavior.

Faculty Host: Chris Rozell, Ph.D.

 

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
No
Groups

Wallace H. Coulter Dept. of Biomedical Engineering

Invited Audience
Undergraduate students, Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students
Categories
Seminar/Lecture/Colloquium
Keywords
biomedical engineer, Cerebral Cortex in vivo
Status
  • Created By: Vickie Okrzesik
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Jan 14, 2015 - 6:58am
  • Last Updated: Apr 13, 2017 - 5:20pm