Center for Space Technology and Research to host seminar on Voyager spacecraft

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Dr. Stamatios Krimigis will visit the Georgia Tech Center for Space Technology and Research (CSTAR) Jan. 12, 2015 at 6 p.m. to share his experiences as Principal Investigator on several NASA spacecraft.

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Dr. Stamatios Krimigis will visit the Georgia Tech Center for Space Technology and Research (CSTAR) Jan. 12, 2015 at 6 p.m. to share his experiences as Principal Investigator on several NASA spacecraft. Part of the CSTAR Distinguished Seminar Series, Dr. Krimigis will present "The Voyager spacecraft after 37 years in space: The quest for traveling beyond our solar system," with fascinating highlights of over 30 years of scientific discoveries. Please join us for a Welcome Reception at 6 p.m., followed by the seminar at 7 p.m

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  • Dr. Stamatios M. Krimigis, Principal Investigator Voyager Dr. Stamatios M. Krimigis, Principal Investigator Voyager
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Dr. Stamatios Krimigis will visit the Georgia Tech Center for Space Technology and Research (CSTAR) Jan. 12, 2015 at 6 p.m. to share his experiences as Principal Investigator on several NASA spacecraft. Part of the CSTAR Distinguished Seminar Series, Dr. Krimigis will present "The Voyager spacecraft after 37 years in space: The quest for traveling beyond our solar system," with fascinating highlights of over 30 years of scientific discoveries. Please join us for a Welcome Reception at 6 p.m., followed by the seminar at 7 p.m

Dr. Krimigis' experience includes work on Voyagers 1 and 2 to the outer planets and the Voyager Interstellar Mission, and the Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn and Titan.  He and colleagues proposed and implemented the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) mission and oversaw its landing on the asteroid Eros on February 12, 2000, the first ever landing on an asteroid. He has designed and built instruments that have flown to all eight planets, and also the New Horizons mission currently headed to Pluto. 

Dr. Stamatios Krimigis received his B.S. Physics from the University of Minnesota (1961), his M.S. (1963) and Ph.D. (1965) in Physics from the University of Iowa, and served on the faculty there. In 1968 he moved to the Applied Physics Laboratory of Johns Hopkins University, became Chief Scientist in 1980, Space Department Head in 1991, and Emeritus Head in 2004. The Space Department has designed, built and operated more than 65 spacecraft, and expanded its activities to planetary missions during his tenure.

He has published more than 560 papers in peer-reviewed journals and books on the physics of the sun, interplanetary medium, planetary magnetospheres, and the heliosphere, with over 11,000 citations. He is recipient of NASA’s Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal three times (1981, 1986, 2014), is a Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS), American Geophysical Union (AGU), American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), recipient of COSPAR’s Space Science Award in 2002, a recipient of the Basic Sciences Award of the International Academy of Astronautics (1994) where he chairs the Board of Trustees for Basic Sciences, awardee of the Council of European Aerospace Societies  CEAS Gold Medal for 2011, recipient of the Jean Dominique Cassini Medal of the European Geophysical Union, the AIAA James Van Allen Space Environments Medal, both for 2014, a member of the Academy of Athens since 2005 occupying the Chair of “Science of Space”, and chairman of Greece’s National Council of Research and Technology (2010-2013). He holds Honorary Doctorates from the Universities of the Aegean, Athens, and the International Hellenic University.

About the Center for Space Technology and Research (CSTAR):
The Center for Space Technology and Research (C-STAR) organizes, integrates, and facilitates Georgia Tech's space science and technology research activities. C-STAR brings together a wide range of Georgia Tech faculty who are active in space-related research and functions as a focal point for the growth of the space industry in the state of Georgia. C-STAR personnel are advancing the frontiers of astrophysics, Earth science, planetary science, robotics, space policy, space technology, and space systems engineering. C-STAR was established in 2013 and is led by Robert D. Braun (Director) and Thomas Orlando (Associate Director). C-STAR is actively engaged in partnerships with NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Georgia Department of Economic Development Center of Innovation for Aerospace, and the Georgia Space Grant Consortium.

 

 

 

 

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Center for Space Technology and Research (CSTAR)

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Aerospace
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  • Created By: Doug Goodwin
  • Workflow Status: Archived
  • Created On: Dec 19, 2014 - 6:36am
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 11:17pm