Ph.D. Defense by Marco Terzariol

Event Details
  • Date/Time:
    • Wednesday December 10, 2014
      8:00 am - 10:00 am
  • Location: Sustainable Education Building (SEB) Room 122
  • Phone:
  • URL:
  • Email:
  • Fee(s):
    N/A
  • Extras:
Contact
No contact information submitted.
Summaries

Summary Sentence: PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF HYDRATE BEARING SEDIMENTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND IMPLICATIONS

Full Summary: No summary paragraph submitted.

 

Ph.D. Thesis Defense Announcement

 

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF HYDRATE BEARING SEDIMENTS: CHARACTERIZATION AND IMPLICATIONS

 

by:

Marco Terzariol

 

Advisor: 

Dr. J. Carlos Santamarina (CEE)

 

Committee Members: 

Dr. J. David Frost (CEE), Dr. Paul W. Mayne (CEE), Dr. Robert C. Bachus (CEE),

and Dr. Guillermo H. Goldsztein (MATH)

 

Date & Time: December 10th, 2014 9:00 am

Location:  Sustainable Education Building (SEB) Room 122

 

ABSTRACT

The amount of gas trapped in hydrates is larger than conventional oil and gas reserves, thus methane hydrate is a promising energy resource. High water pressure and relatively low temperature needed for hydrate stability, restricts the distribution of methane hydrate in continental shelves and permafrost regions. Stability conditions add inherent complexity to coring, sampling, handling, testing and data interpretation, and have profound implications on potential production strategies. New guidelines are identified for sampling equipment and protocols. Then, a novel technology is developed for handling, transfer, and testing of natural hydrate bearing sediments without depressurization in order to preserve soil structure. Natural samples from the Nankai Trough, Japan, are tested as part of this study. In-situ testing prevents dissociation and the consequences of sampling and handling disturbance. A new multi-sensor in-situ characterization tool is designed and prototyped as part of this research. The tool includes advanced electronics and allows for automated stand-alone operation. Finally, a robust analytical model is developed to estimate the amount of gas that can be recovered from hydrate bearing sediments using depressurization driven dissociation. Results highlight the complexity of gas extraction from deep sediments, and inherent limitations.

  

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
No
Groups

Graduate Studies

Invited Audience
Public
Categories
Other/Miscellaneous
Keywords
PhD Defense; graduate students
Status
  • Created By: Danielle Ramirez
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Dec 4, 2014 - 5:36am
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 10:10pm