2014 Petit Institute Distinguished Lecture

Event Details
Contact

Megan McDevitt

Summaries

Summary Sentence: "Breakthroughs in Imprint Lithography and 3D Additive Fabrication to Advance NextGen Drug Delivery Technologies" - Joseph M. DeSimone, PhD - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and North Carolina State University

Full Summary: The Parker H. Petit Distinguished Lecture Series is held each fall at the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience. The Distinguished Lecture Series brings nationally and internationally recognized bioengineering and bioscience leaders to the Petit Institute community to give their perspective on the future of biotechnology.

Media
  • Joseph M. DeSimone, PhD - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University Joseph M. DeSimone, PhD - University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University
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"Breakthroughs in Imprint Lithography and 3D Additive Fabrication to Advance NextGen Drug Delivery Technologies"


Joseph M. DeSimone, PhD 
Chancellor’s Eminent Professor of Chemistry at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State and of Chemistry at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

There is a renaissance underway today in research that is being fueled by the DIY (do-it-yourself) culture that is generally referred to as the “Makers Movement”.  The maker culture exploits new tools for fabrication and encourages invention and rapid prototyping.  Such tools in combination with an innovative mindset will make major impacts on drug delivery technologes going forward.  This lecture will describe two breakthroughs in the Makers Movement—Particle Replication in Non-wetting Templates (PRINT), which is an off-shoot of imprint lithography being used to mold individual drug particles and drug delivery vehicles, and Continuous Liquid Interface Printing (CLIP), which represents a pioneering advance in 3D additive manufacturing that is continuous, moldless and no longer layer-by-layer. Both PRINT and CLIP will have a profound and complementary impact on drug delivery. 

Biography:
Joseph DeSimone is the Chancellor's Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and William R. Kenan, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University and of Chemistry at UNC. DeSimone is also an adjunct member at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. DeSimone has published over 300 scientific articles and has 140 issued patents in his name with over 80 patents pending.

DeSimone is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences (2012) and the National Academy of Engineering (2005). He is also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2005). DeSimone has received over 50 major awards and recognitions including the 2014 Kathryn C. Hach Award for Entrepreneurial Success from the ACS; 2013 Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors; 2012 Walston Chubb Award for Innovation by Sigma Xi; the 2010 AAAS Mentor Award in recognition of his efforts to advance diversity in the chemistry PhD workforce; the 2009 NIH Director’s Pioneer Award; the 2009 North Carolina Award; the 2008 $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize for Invention and Innovation; the 2007 Collaboration Success Award from the Council for Chemical Research; the 2005 ACS Award for Creative Invention; the 2002 John Scott Award presented by the City Trusts, Philadelphia, given to "the most deserving" men and women whose inventions have contributed in some outstanding way to the "comfort, welfare and happiness" of mankind; the 2002 Engineering Excellence Award by DuPont; and the 2002 Wallace H. Carothers Award from the Delaware Section of the ACS.

DeSimone, an innovative polymer chemist, has made breakthrough contributions in fluoropolymer synthesis, colloid science, nano-biomaterials, green chemistry and most recently 3D printing. He pioneered supercritical CO2-based polymerization reactions and the self-assembly of molecules in compressible media. He has shown the benefit of novel fluoro-elastomers for soft lithographic applications, including the synthesis of shape-controlled nano-biomaterials. DeSimone is the co-founder of several companies including Micell Technologies, Biostent, Liquidia Technologies and EIPI Systems. DeSimone received his BS in Chemistry in 1986 from Ursinus College in Collegeville, PA and his Ph.D. in Chemistry in 1990 from Virginia Tech.

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Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
Yes
Groups

Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB)

Invited Audience
Undergraduate students, Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students
Categories
Seminar/Lecture/Colloquium
Keywords
IBB
Status
  • Created By: Colly Mitchell
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Apr 24, 2014 - 9:13am
  • Last Updated: Apr 13, 2017 - 5:22pm