Fulbright’s value in international relations scholarship

External News Details

The Obama administration’s FY15 budget request to Congress includes a 13.5 percent cut to the Fulbright Program totaling $30.5 million. As in the case of congressional attempts to cut funding for political science research via the National Science Foundation, these cuts could soon mean that many fewer scholars of international relations and comparative politics will be able to undertake research abroad, thus contributing to a decline in the quality and quantity of scholarship decision makers and the administration depend on to develop United States foreign policy. I (Laura) have asked several former Fulbright Scholars to share their experiences about how the Fulbright program contributes to political scientists’ roles in building knowledge and scholarship about the world. The Obama administration’s FY15 budget request to Congress includes a 13.5 percent cut to the Fulbright Program totaling $30.5 million. As in the case of congressional attempts to cut funding for political science research via the National Science Foundation, these cuts could soon mean that many fewer scholars of international relations and comparative politics will be able to undertake research abroad, thus contributing to a decline in the quality and quantity of scholarship decision makers and the administration depend on to develop United States foreign policy. I (Laura) have asked several former Fulbright Scholars to share their experiences about how the Fulbright program contributes to political scientists’ roles in building knowledge and scholarship about the world. Today, Jarrod Hayes of Georgia Tech guest posts. 

Additional Information

Groups

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Sam Nunn School of International Affairs

Categories
Student and Faculty
Keywords
Fulbright, Hayes, INTA
Status
  • Created By: Vince Pedicino
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Apr 2, 2014 - 11:15am
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 10:27pm