7 Strategies for Smarter Investments

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Amelia Pavlik
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Presentations on these money management topics are available under the Bank at Work Seminars & Expo tab at ohr.gatech.edu/bewell
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Summary Sentence:

Whether you’re saving for retirement or your child’s college tuition, understanding the investing options available to you is key to your success.

Full Summary:

Whether you’re saving for retirement or your child’s college tuition, understanding the investing options available to you is key to your success.

Whether you’re saving for retirement or your child’s college tuition, understanding the investing options available to you is key to your success.

On July 19, a workshop offered as part of the Be Well Seminar Series, hosted by the Office of Human Resources, focused on women and money management. (However, the advice would work for members of both sexes.)

During the presentation, David Edmisten, financial solutions advisor at Merrill Edge, offered the following investing strategies.

  • Know your tolerance. Be real with yourself about your financial and emotional tolerance for risk. For example, if you are retiring in a few years, you will probably feel more comfortable with less risky investments such as bonds and cash. 
  • Roll over 401(k)s from previous jobs. Companies go out of business and something could happen to your money. Put it in an individual retirement account (IRA) that you have control over.
  • Participate in a spousal IRA. If you are married to someone who isn’t in the workforce, encourage him or her to participate in a spousal IRA.
  • Keep your investments diversified. This protects you if, for example, the stock market crashes. 
  • Revisit your investments regularly. Redistribute the amount you have invested in stocks, bonds, etc. based on where you are in your savings goal timeline.  
  • Make sure your beneficiary information is accurate. Whenever you have children or get married or divorced, be sure to update this information to ensure that any money goes to the right people.
  • Find a qualified financial planner. Ask your friends for suggestions. Interview a few people and then make a choice. This person is going to handle your money, so don’t make a snap decision. Also, don’t commit to more than a year with this planner. That way, you can move on if the person isn’t doing what you need him or her to.  

For the full presentation, click here.

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Keywords
Banking, Be Well series, faculty, Investing, money management, Office of Human Resources, OHR, staff
Status
  • Created By: Amelia Pavlik
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Jul 22, 2013 - 1:17pm
  • Last Updated: Oct 7, 2016 - 11:14pm