<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27875 "Turning Fat Into Bone and Muscle"

Warren Grayson, PhD
Assistant Professor
Johns Hopkins University

Warren Grayson, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Johns Hopkins’ Biomedical Engineering and Translational Tissue Engineering Center. He obtained his B.Sc. in Chemical & Process Engineering at The University of the West Indies, his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Florida State University, and completed his postdoctoral training at Columbia University in New York. His research interests focus on engineering musculoskeletal grafts for craniofacial and orthopaedic tissue regeneration. Dr. Grayson’s previous work on bioreactor design and engineering anatomically shaped bone grafts has received national and international coverage in the New York Times, BBC, and Science Translational Medicine, among others.  He has been recognized by the Maryland Science Center as an Outstanding Young Engineer and has received awards from the Orthopaedic Research Society and the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. Currently, his lab focuses on spatial and temporal regulation of stem cell differentiation in 3D constructs to generate clinically useful engineered grafts.

 

Suggestions for potential speakers are always welcome, please contact Marissa Cooke

]]> Marissa Cooke 1 1378986174 2013-09-12 11:42:54 1492118640 2017-04-13 21:24:00 0 0 event The Stem Cell Engineering Center (SCEC) seminar series showcases enabling technologies and fosters new interdisciplinary and multi-investigator collaborations. The seminars are open to all faculty or trainees interested in stem cell engineering research.

]]>
2014-03-11T12:00:00-04:00 2014-03-11T13:00:00-04:00 2014-03-11T13:00:00-04:00 2014-03-11 16:00:00 2014-03-11 17:00:00 2014-03-11 17:00:00 2014-03-11T12:00:00-04:00 2014-03-11T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-03-11 12:00:00 2014-03-11 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Marissa Cooke

(404) 385-6905

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236941 236941 image <![CDATA[Warren Grayson, PhD]]> image/jpeg 1449243659 2015-12-04 15:40:59 1475894911 2016-10-08 02:48:31 <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Grayson Lab website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27875 "Engineering Biomechanical Cues to Control Stem Cell Fate"

Taby Ahsan, PhD
Assistant Professor
Tulane University


Taby Ahsan, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Department at Tulane University and a member of the FDA Cell, Tissues, and Gene Therapies Advisory Council (CTGTAC). She got her B.S.E. degree at the University of Pennsylvania, PhD in Bioengineering with Robert Sah, PhD, at the University of California, San Diego, and completed her postdoctoral training with Robert Nerem, PhD, at Georgia Tech. In addition, Ahsan worked in industry for a few years at the tissue engineering company Advanced Tissue Sciences. The Ahsan research laboratory focuses on using the physical microenvironment to control stem cell fate in the context of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

 

Suggestions for potential speakers are always welcome, please contact Marissa Cooke

]]> Marissa Cooke 1 1378889194 2013-09-11 08:46:34 1492118640 2017-04-13 21:24:00 0 0 event The Stem Cell Engineering Center (SCEC) seminar series showcases enabling technologies and fosters new interdisciplinary and multi-investigator collaborations. The seminars are open to all faculty or trainees interested in stem cell engineering research. 

]]>
2014-02-20T11:00:00-05:00 2014-02-20T12:00:00-05:00 2014-02-20T12:00:00-05:00 2014-02-20 16:00:00 2014-02-20 17:00:00 2014-02-20 17:00:00 2014-02-20T11:00:00-05:00 2014-02-20T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-02-20 11:00:00 2014-02-20 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Marissa Cooke

 (404) 385-6905

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236181 236181 image <![CDATA[Taby Ahsan, PhD]]> image/jpeg 1449243659 2015-12-04 15:40:59 1475894911 2016-10-08 02:48:31 <![CDATA[Ahsan Lab website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]>
<![CDATA[College of Science: Special Seminar]]> 27875 "Rejuvenation of Aged Skeletal Muscle"

Young C. Jang, PhD
Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

Harvard University


Age-related loss of muscle mass and function, also known as sarcopenia, is a significant problem that has serious implications for quality of life in the elderly. Although the precise mechanism of sarcopenia is not completely understood, several lines of evidence suggest that the functional decline in skeletal muscle stem cells and inability to repair after injury, contribute directly to age-associated deterioration of skeletal muscle. Our data using heterochronic parabiosis and stem cell transplantation models suggests that the circulatory system serves as an important source of such signals. In particular, exposure of aged muscle, to a “youthful” systemic environment appears to reverse many indicators of age-related pathology and restores robust muscle regeneration after injury. Our ongoing analyses of the molecules responsible for these effects point to discrete metabolic and hormonal mediators as key effectors of this systemic rejuvenating response. Systemic regulators also appear to influence age-related changes in the integrity of neuromuscular junctions and presynaptic motor neurons, either directly or through perturbation of myofiber stability and repair. Interestingly, we have found significant differences in the impact of denervation on muscle stem cell function in a mouse model based on muscle stem cell transplantation, suggesting an age-dependent influence of motor neuron damage/degeneration on muscle repair potential. Taken together, these data point to complex regulatory interactions within the muscle stem cell niche in determining muscle repair potential in aged individuals, and suggest that targeting these interactions could provide new avenues to reverse age-dependent loss of muscle function and accelerate recovery after muscle injury.


]]> Marissa Cooke 1 1389799852 2014-01-15 15:30:52 1492118606 2017-04-13 21:23:26 0 0 event This special seminar is being hosted by the College of Science.

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2014-01-24T12:00:00-05:00 2014-01-24T13:00:00-05:00 2014-01-24T13:00:00-05:00 2014-01-24 17:00:00 2014-01-24 18:00:00 2014-01-24 18:00:00 2014-01-24T12:00:00-05:00 2014-01-24T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-01-24 12:00:00 2014-01-24 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> <![CDATA[Seminar announcement]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27875 "Materials-Directed Myogenesis of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and their Therapeutic Use"

Adam Engler, PhD
Assistant Professor
University of California, San Diego


Adam J. Engler, PhD, is an assistant professor of Bioengineering at UC San Diego and is affiliated with the Material Science and Biomedical Sciences Programs. He also is a resident scientist at the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine. His research focuses on how physical properties of the niche influence stem cell function and misregulate muscle function and heart performance during disease and aging. Engler earned his B.S.E. degree in bioengineering and a PhD in mechanical engineering and applied mechanics at the University of Pennsylvania in the lab of Dennis Discher, PhD. Engler then moved to Princeton University's Department of Molecular Biology as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the lab of Jean Schwarzbauer, PhD, where his work was funded by the National Cancer Institute. Engler is the 2008 recipient of the Rupert Timpl and Rita Schaffer Young Investigator Awards from the International Society for Matrix Biology and the Biomedical Engineering Society, respectively. He is also a 2009 NIH Innovator Award recipient, a 2010 Young Investigator Awardee from the Human Frontier Science Program, and 2013 DoD IDEA awardee for his work on the extracellular matrix and cancer stem cells.

 

Suggestions for potential speakers are always welcome, please contact Marissa Cooke

]]> Marissa Cooke 1 1376922980 2013-08-19 14:36:20 1492118641 2017-04-13 21:24:01 0 0 event The Stem Cell Engineering Center (SCEC) seminar series showcases enabling technologies and fosters new interdisciplinary and multi-investigator collaborations.  The seminars are open to all faculty or trainees interested in stem cell engineering research.

]]>
2014-01-14T11:00:00-05:00 2014-01-14T12:00:00-05:00 2014-01-14T12:00:00-05:00 2014-01-14 16:00:00 2014-01-14 17:00:00 2014-01-14 17:00:00 2014-01-14T11:00:00-05:00 2014-01-14T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-01-14 11:00:00 2014-01-14 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Marissa Cooke

(404) 385-6905

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230851 230851 image <![CDATA[Adam Engler, PhD]]> image/jpeg 1449243602 2015-12-04 15:40:02 1475894903 2016-10-08 02:48:23 <![CDATA[Engler Lab website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Crash Course]]> 27875 The NSF-funded Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) trainees will be offering a stem cell crash course Thursday, October 10. The short course will include an introduction to stem cell biology and stem cell research, important review papers in the field, and information on what resources, through the Stem Cell Engineering Center and core, are available at Georgia Tech to aid in your stem cell research.

The NSF-IGERT program in Stem Cell Biomanufacturing was awarded to Georgia Tech in 2010 to educate and train the first generation of Ph.D. students in the translation and commercialization of stem cell technologies for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. 

]]> Marissa Cooke 1 1380877541 2013-10-04 09:05:41 1475892306 2016-10-08 02:05:06 0 0 event  Introduction course to stem cell biology and research

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2013-10-10T16:00:00-04:00 2013-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 2013-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 2013-10-10 20:00:00 2013-10-10 21:00:00 2013-10-10 21:00:00 2013-10-10T16:00:00-04:00 2013-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-10-10 04:00:00 2013-10-10 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Marissa Cooke

(404) 385-6905

 

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242601 242601 image <![CDATA[NSF IGERT logo]]> image/jpeg 1449243704 2015-12-04 15:41:44 1475894919 2016-10-08 02:48:39 <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Ethics and Policy Seminar]]> 27875 "Backwards by Design: Building Ethics, Law, and Policy into a Stem Cell Science Curriculum"

Christopher Thomas Scott, PhD
Director, Program on Stem Cells in Society
Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics

The Greek notion of didacticism emphasized instruction through entertainment. Modern use of the term didactic refers to teaching that is boring, pedantic, and overly factual. During a research project examining the professional decisions of stem cell scientists, we observed how they understand and communicate ethics, policy, and law-related topics. How could we more effectively teach these subjects within the context of science scholarship? This talk describes an experiment at Stanford University that channels the old Greek spirits to teach students more about ethics, law, and policy - by lecturing less.  


]]> Marissa Cooke 1 1382007336 2013-10-17 10:55:36 1475892316 2016-10-08 02:05:16 0 0 event As science and technology continue to advance, so do ethical viewpoints surrounding these developments. It is important to educate and explore the issues, scientifically and ethically.

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2013-10-22T14:30:00-04:00 2013-10-22T15:45:00-04:00 2013-10-22T15:45:00-04:00 2013-10-22 18:30:00 2013-10-22 19:45:00 2013-10-22 19:45:00 2013-10-22T14:30:00-04:00 2013-10-22T15:45:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-10-22 02:30:00 2013-10-22 03:45:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Aaron Levine, PhD

 

(404) 385-3329

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246731 246731 image <![CDATA[Christopher Thomas Scott, PhD]]> image/jpeg 1449243758 2015-12-04 15:42:38 1475894924 2016-10-08 02:48:44 <![CDATA[Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics]]> <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[School of Public Policy]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Matthias Lutolf, PhD - École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EFPL)

Probing and manipulating stem cell fate in microarrayed artificial niches

Abstract
Proper tissue maintenance and regeneration relies on intricate spatial and temporal control of biochemical and biophysical niche cues, instructing stem cells to acquire particular fates. Despite rapid progress in the identification of relevant niche proteins and signaling pathways using in vitro models, to date, many stem cell types cannot be efficiently cultured in vitro. To address this challenge, we have been developing biomaterial-based approaches to display and delivery stem cell regulatory signals in a precise and near-physiological fashion, serving as powerful artificial microenvironments to study and manipulate stem cell fat. In this talk I will discuss some of our recent efforts to develop 'microarrayed artificial niches' allowing key biochemical and biophysical characteristics of stem cell niches to be mimicked and the physiological complexity deconstructed into a smaller, experimentally amendable number of distinct signaling interactions. The systematic deconstruction of stem cell niches may serve as a broadly applicable paradigm for defining and reconstructing artificial niches to accelerate the transition of stem cell biology to the clinic.

 

Biography:

Matthias Lutolf is Head of the Laboratory of Stem Cell Bioengineering at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EFPL). He was trained as a Materials Engineer at ETH Zurich where he also carried out his Ph.D. studies on the development of a novel class of biomaterials for tissue engineering and cell biology (awarded with ETH medal, 2004). In 2005, with fellowships from the Swiss National Science Foundation and Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, Lutolf joined the Baxter Laboratory in Stem Cell Biology at Stanford University to study microenvironmental regulation of adult stem cells. In 2007, Lutolf received a European Young Investigator (EURYI) award to start up his independent research group at EPFL. By interfacing advanced biomaterials engineering, microtechnology and stem cell biology, a major goal in his lab is to uncover mechanisms of stem cell fate regulation by developing and applying 'artificial niches' which allow probing stem cell biology at the single cell level under well-defined biochemical and biophysical conditions.

 

The Stem Cell Engineering seminar series brings leaders in the field to Georgia Tech to share their most recent work and advances.  The seminars are open to all faculty, trainees and staff interested in stem cell engineering research.  Please visit the Stem Cell Engineering Center website or the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience website for a list of upcoming and previous speakers. Suggestions for potential speakers are always welcome - email Megan Richards.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1357125399 2013-01-02 11:16:39 1475892100 2016-10-08 02:01:40 0 0 event Matthias Lutolf, PhD, will speak as a BME Young Innovator and guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on March 26, 2013 in the Petit Institute. Joint Seminar from BME Young Innovators and Stem Cell Engineering Center.

 

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2013-03-26T12:00:00-04:00 2013-03-26T13:00:00-04:00 2013-03-26T13:00:00-04:00 2013-03-26 16:00:00 2013-03-26 17:00:00 2013-03-26 17:00:00 2013-03-26T12:00:00-04:00 2013-03-26T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-03-26 12:00:00 2013-03-26 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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179491 179491 image <![CDATA[Matthias Lutolf]]> image/jpeg 1449179039 2015-12-03 21:43:59 1475894825 2016-10-08 02:47:05 <![CDATA[Lutolf Profile]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Prabhas Moghe, PhD - Rutgers University

Forecasting and steering stem cell fates in engineered microenvironments

Abstract:
How stem cells parse microenvironmental cues and make functional decisions is one of the major research endeavors in the Moghe laboratory at Rutgers.  This talk will be divided into two parts.  The first part, focused on profiling of stem cells, will review a high content imaging approach to obtain multidimensional descriptors of stem cell organization.  These descriptors of the stem cell phenotypes and mechanobiology can be used to parse stem cell subpopulations and gene expression much earlier than readouts enabled by traditional biochemical assays.  An example of how this strategy can be used to rank-order differentially osteogenic polymeric biomaterials will be highlighted.  The toolbox can also be applied to track the evolution of lineage restriction, cancerous transformation of adult stem cells, or follow minute organizational changes in nuclear proteins regulating cell cycle and epigenetic modifications.  The second part of the talk will focus on understanding how three-dimensional substrates regulate stem cell phenomena, including self-renewal and directed differentiation, with an emerging focus on neural reprogramming of human pluripotent stem cells.

Biography:

Prabhas Moghe is a Professor and Vice Chair of Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at Rutgers University in New Jersey. He obtained his PhD in Chemical Engineering (Bioengineering) at the University of Minnesota and completed postdoctoral training at Harvard Medical School/Massachusetts General Hospital prior to joining the Rutgers faculty in 1995.

Professor Moghe’s recent research efforts have been focused on the elucidation of stem cell-biomaterial interactions and nanomedicine. He and his colleagues have pioneered the design of polymer therapeutics called nanolipoblockers; advanced a new formalism for high content imaging for profiling of the stem cell phenotype in the emerging field of bio-materiomics; and developed a new generation of rare earth nanoprobes for optical disease tracking. An elected International Fellow of Biomaterials Science and Engineering and of the AIMBE, Professor Moghe has directed two NSF IGERT programs at Rutgers, on Biointerfaces and Integrative Science and Engineering of Stem Cells (www.igert.rutgers.edu), currently co-directs a NIH T32 Postdoctoral Training Program on Translational Regenerative Medicine (www.njbiomaterials.org), and leads a major core, within RESBIO: a National Biomedical Technology Resource Center, funded by the NIH/NIBIB, on Cell Profiling of Polymeric Biomaterials.

The Stem Cell Engineering seminar series brings leaders in the field to Georgia Tech to share their most recent work and advances.  The seminars are open to all faculty, trainees and staff interested in stem cell engineering research.  Please visit the Stem Cell Engineering Center website or the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience website for a list of upcoming and previous speakers. Suggestions for potential speakers are always welcome - email Megan Richards.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1357141308 2013-01-02 15:41:48 1475892100 2016-10-08 02:01:40 0 0 event Prabhas Moghe, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on April 16th, 2013 in the Petit Institute.

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2013-04-16T12:00:00-04:00 2013-04-16T13:00:00-04:00 2013-04-16T13:00:00-04:00 2013-04-16 16:00:00 2013-04-16 17:00:00 2013-04-16 17:00:00 2013-04-16T12:00:00-04:00 2013-04-16T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-04-16 12:00:00 2013-04-16 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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179591 179591 image <![CDATA[Prabhas Moghe]]> image/jpeg 1449179039 2015-12-03 21:43:59 1475894825 2016-10-08 02:47:05 <![CDATA[Moghe Profile]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Two Examples of Engineering Cell Fate: Blood Stem Cell Therapy and Cardiac Drug Screening"

Peter W. Zandstra, PhD
Professor and Canada Research Chair in Stem Cell Bioengineering
CSO, Centre for the Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine
University of Toronto

**Seminar to be videoconferenced at Emory University Hospital, Hurst conference room, 4th floor, E450

Abstract:
Spatial organization and intercellular (between cell) communication networks are important components of the stem cell microenvironment. These higher order interactions maintain homeostasis and coordinate regenerative and developmental cues in multicellular organisms. We have developed a number of new tools to measure and control cell-cell interactions. These include: high throughput systems for screening paracrine interactions between cells; network analysis strategies (and toolboxes) to depict and analyze ligand connectivity between stem cells, their progeny and cells in their microenvironment; and artificial stem cell niches to regulate and control the context and impact of these interactions. In this presentation I will review the key design principles of these tools, and discuss their application in two short examples. In the first example I will describe our recent work in controlling feedback signaling from differentiated cells to grow human blood stem cells in a clinical relevant bioprocess. In the second example I will present our efforts to formulate human pluripotent derived cardiac cells into micro-tissues that allow for high-throughput functional analysis of responses to drug candidates.

Biography:
Research in the Zandstra Laboratory is focused on the generation of functional tissue from adult and pluripotent stem cells. His groups’ quantitative, bioengineering-based approach strives to gain new insight into the fundamental mechanisms that control stem cell fate and to develop robust technologies for the use of stem cells and their derivatives to treat disease. Specific areas of research focus include blood stem cell expansion and the generation of cardiac tissue and endoderm progenitors from pluripotent stem cells. Dr. Zandstra is a Professor in the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering, the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, and the Donnelly Centre at the University of Toronto. He is also a member of the McEwen Centre for Regenerative Medicine and the Heart and Stroke/Richard Lewar Centre of Excellence. He currently acts as Chief Scientific Officer for the Centre for the Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine (www.CCRM.ca). Dr Zandstra’s accomplishments have been recognized by a number of awards and accolades including a Guggenheim Fellowship and the McLean Award. Dr Zandstra’s strong commitment to training the next generation of researchers is evidenced by his role as the Director of the undergraduate Bioengineering Program.


]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1358254041 2013-01-15 12:47:21 1475892120 2016-10-08 02:02:00 0 0 event Joint seminar from Regenerative Engineering and Medicine and Stem Cell Engineering Centers. The Regenerative Engineering and Medicine (REM) research center is a joint collaboration between Emory University and Georgia Tech. REM is specifically focused on endogenous repair or how the body can harness its own potential to heal or regenerate.

The mission of the Stem Cell Engineering Center's (SCEC) is to cultivate researchers from the basic sciences along with investigators from various engineering disciplines to address key hurdles and technological challenges currently impeding the development of stem cell therapeutics and diagnostics.

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2013-02-13T11:00:00-05:00 2013-02-13T12:00:00-05:00 2013-02-13T12:00:00-05:00 2013-02-13 16:00:00 2013-02-13 17:00:00 2013-02-13 17:00:00 2013-02-13T11:00:00-05:00 2013-02-13T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-02-13 11:00:00 2013-02-13 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan McDevitt, CMP
Director of Communications & Marketing
Petit Institute

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183621 183621 image <![CDATA[Peter W. Zandstra, PhD - University of Toronto]]> image/jpeg 1449179062 2015-12-03 21:44:22 1475894830 2016-10-08 02:47:10 <![CDATA[Zandstra lab]]> <![CDATA[Regenerative Engineering & Medicine Website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 "Bioinspired Molecular Sequestering in the Stem Cell Microenvironment"

William Murphy, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of ....
University of Wisconsin-Madison


Biography
William L. Murphy is currently Harvey D. Spangler Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Co-Director of the Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Center at the University of Wisconsin. He received his B.A. in Physics from Illinois Wesleyan University in 1998, Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the University of Michigan in 2002, and was a postdoctoral fellow in Chemistry at the University of Chicago from 2002-2004. His research interests focus on designing and synthesizing “bioinspired” materials, which actively regulate stem cell behavior. Murphy’s research group is using new materials to address a variety of regenerative medicine challenges, including stem cell differentiation, tissue regeneration, and controlled drug delivery. He has published more than 90 manuscripts and book chapters, filed over 20 patents, and received awards that include the National Science Foundation Career Award and the Wisconsin Vilas Associate Award. He serves on numerous industrial and academic advisory boards.

Suggestions for potential speakers are always welcome - email Megan Richards.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1358849857 2013-01-22 10:17:37 1475892130 2016-10-08 02:02:10 0 0 event The Stem Cell Engineering Center (SCEC) seminar series showcases enabling technologies and fosters new interdisciplinary and multi-investigator collaborations.  The seminars are open to all faculty or trainees interested in stem cell engineering research.

]]>
2013-02-28T11:00:00-05:00 2013-02-28T12:00:00-05:00 2013-02-28T12:00:00-05:00 2013-02-28 16:00:00 2013-02-28 17:00:00 2013-02-28 17:00:00 2013-02-28T11:00:00-05:00 2013-02-28T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-02-28 11:00:00 2013-02-28 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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185551 185551 image <![CDATA[William Murphy]]> image/jpeg 1449179081 2015-12-03 21:44:41 1475894833 2016-10-08 02:47:13 <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[William L. Murphy, Ph.D.]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Casim A. Sarkar, PhD - University of Pennsylvania

Synthetic signaling systems for biological discovery and design

Sarkar strives to elucidate fundamental principles that underlie individual biomolecular interactions and molecular networks within cells and to apply this knowledge to the design of new molecular and cellular therapeutics. His research couples techniques from the fields of molecular biology, protein biochemistry, microbiology, and mammalian cell biology with mathematical modeling, engineering analyses, and synthetic biology to develop quantitative, predictive frameworks for the biological processes that he interrogates. Current thrusts in Sarkar's laboratory include designing novel protein therapeutics, engineering cell biosensors, and dissecting signaling networks implicated in cell decision making.

Every semester, the Stem Cell Engineering Center welcomes a keynote speaker to the Georgia Tech stem cell research community to speak on behalf of their university, institution, industry, or research lab in regards to stem cell engineering. This experience is meant to broaden the stem cell research alliance between local researchers and worldwide experts for the purposes of communicating stem cell advancements across the globe while developing future collaborative opportunities.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1344356355 2012-08-07 16:19:15 1475891964 2016-10-08 01:59:24 0 0 event Casim A. Sarkar, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on October 16th in the Petit Institute.

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2012-10-16T12:00:00-04:00 2012-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 2012-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 2012-10-16 16:00:00 2012-10-16 17:00:00 2012-10-16 17:00:00 2012-10-16T12:00:00-04:00 2012-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2012-10-16 12:00:00 2012-10-16 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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<![CDATA[Sarkar Profile]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Balaji Rao, PhD - North Carolina State University

Placental models from human pluripotent stem cells

Dr. Balaji Rao is focused on manipulating molecular interactions through engineered proteins to understand and ultimately control cellular processes. Stem cells are “master” cells that can self-renew as well as develop into many different cell types. Stem cells have great potential in regenerative medicine. They can also be used as a basis to develop model systems for drug evaluation. One of the major challenges in this area is to understand and control the molecular decisions that control stem cell fate. Dr. Rao's approach involves the use of engineered proteins to quantitatively study and ultimately control molecular interactions that govern stem cell fate.

Every year, the Stem Cell Engineering Center welcomes approximately six keynote speakers to Georgia Tech to discuss current advances in stem cell engineering. The center's mission is to cultivate researchers from the basic sciences along with investigators from various engineering disciplines to address key hurdles and technological challenges currently impeding the development of stem cell therapeutics and diagnostics. These seminars are open to all faculty or trainees interested in stem cell research.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1345110428 2012-08-16 09:47:08 1475891968 2016-10-08 01:59:28 0 0 event Balaji Rao, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on November 6th in the Petit Institute.

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2012-11-06T11:00:00-05:00 2012-11-06T12:00:00-05:00 2012-11-06T12:00:00-05:00 2012-11-06 16:00:00 2012-11-06 17:00:00 2012-11-06 17:00:00 2012-11-06T11:00:00-05:00 2012-11-06T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2012-11-06 11:00:00 2012-11-06 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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146681 146681 image <![CDATA[Balaji Rao]]> image/jpeg 1449178751 2015-12-03 21:39:11 1475894779 2016-10-08 02:46:19 <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[Rao Profile]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Elisa Cimetta, PhD - Columbia University

Advanced microscale technologies for the in vitro study of stem cells

Elisa Cimetta obtained her PhD in Chemical Engineering from the University of Padua (Italy) in 2009, with research focused on the design and development of microscale technologies and microfluidic platforms for the in vitro culture of stem cells. She then worked as a post-doctoral research scientist on the design and development of advanced cell culture technologies for the production of functional cardiac human tissue (2009-2010). She is now an Associate Research Scientist in the laboratory of Dr. Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic, further pursuing her research in the development of advanced technologies for the spatial and temporal regulation of culture microenvironments to study and direct stem cell differentiation. Since 2010, she has been working as a New York Stem Cell Foundation-Druckenmiller Fellow. In 2011, Dr. Cimetta graduated from the Postbaccalaureate Business Program from Columbia University.

Every year, the Stem Cell Engineering Center welcomes approximately six keynote speakers to Georgia Tech to discuss current advances in the stem cell engineering field. The center's mission is to cultivate researchers from the basic sciences along with investigators from various engineering disciplines to address key hurdles and technological challenges currently impeding the development of stem cell therapeutics and diagnostics. These seminars are open to all faculty or trainees interested in stem cell research.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1345114438 2012-08-16 10:53:58 1475891968 2016-10-08 01:59:28 0 0 event Elisa Cimetta, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on December 4th, 2012 in the Petit Institute.

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2012-12-04T11:00:00-05:00 2012-12-04T12:00:00-05:00 2012-12-04T12:00:00-05:00 2012-12-04 16:00:00 2012-12-04 17:00:00 2012-12-04 17:00:00 2012-12-04T11:00:00-05:00 2012-12-04T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2012-12-04 11:00:00 2012-12-04 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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146731 146731 image <![CDATA[Elisa Cimetta]]> image/jpeg 1449178751 2015-12-03 21:39:11 1475894779 2016-10-08 02:46:19 <![CDATA[Cimetta Profile]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27224 Human embryonic stem cells can grow indefinitely in culture and generate all parts of the human body. Therefore, these remarkably plastic cells are termed “pluripotent” and represent attractive resources for tissue engineering and human disease modeling. Making these cells in a standardized and predictable manner however has been problematic, because the methods to derive and propagate these cells are either poorly understood or difficult to scale-up. Through two projects, I will describe engineering approaches to 1) identify key parameters that control the kinetics of a new technique of deriving pluripotent stem cells and 2) develop new polymeric materials that can efficiently propagate them. The first project describes stochastic transitions involved in progressing to a pluripotent state through epigenetic reprogramming, and the second project details biomolecules involved in the clonal growth of human cells in a pluripotent state. These modeling and materials engineering frameworks open up opportunities to readily grow sufficient quantities of clinically-grade, standardized human pluripotent cells from routine biopsies or blood samples, ultimately providing a foundation for more active, regenerative, and personalized therapy.


Speaker Biography
Krishanu Saha studied Chemical Engineering at Cornell University and at the University of California in Berkeley. In his dissertation with Professors David Schaffer and Kevin Healy, he worked on experimental and computational analyses of neural stem cell development, as well as the design of new materials for adult stem cell culture. In 2007 he became a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Professor Rudolf Jaenisch at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research at MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Since 2006 he has done research on human embryonic stem cells. As a Society in Science: Branco-Weiss Postdoctoral Fellow, Kris is expanding his background to investigate the modeling of diseases at the cellular level with human “reprogrammed” stem cell lines.

]]> Megan McDevitt 1 1333351410 2012-04-02 07:23:30 1475891917 2016-10-08 01:58:37 0 0 event Human embryonic stem cells can grow indefinitely in culture and generate all parts of the human body.  Therefore, these remarkably plastic cells are termed “pluripotent” and represent attractive resources for tissue engineering and human disease modeling.  Making these cells in a standardized and predictable manner however has been problematic, because the methods to derive and propagate these cells are either poorly understood or difficult to scale-up.

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2012-04-02T17:00:00-04:00 2012-04-02T18:00:00-04:00 2012-04-02T18:00:00-04:00 2012-04-02 21:00:00 2012-04-02 22:00:00 2012-04-02 22:00:00 2012-04-02T17:00:00-04:00 2012-04-02T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2012-04-02 05:00:00 2012-04-02 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Todd Streelman
Todd McDevitt

 

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<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Katja Schenke-Layland, PhD - Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology

Impact of Extracellular Matrix in Biomedical Research

In addition to cellular components, extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the most important components of all tissue types in the human body. It consists of fibers and networks composed of structural proteins, such as collagen or elastin. The ECM directs cell orientation in the three-dimensional (3D) space, is essential for cell migration and affects cell communication and differentiation. In my presentation, I will focus on non-invasive microscopy methods used to visualize ECM structures - multiphoton-induced autofluorescence microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) imaging as well as Raman spectroscopy - and discuss their application in the areas of matrix biology and regenerative medicine. I would also like to give a quick summary of our groups work in the field of biomaterials and stem cell biology, focusing on stem-/progenitor cell-ECM interactions.

Katja Schenke-Layland, PhD, received a master of science in biology, psychology and sociology in 2001 and her doctorate degree in biology in 2004 from the Friedrich Schiller University (FSU) in Jena, Germany. She worked as a researcher at the Departments of Anatomy (2000-2001) and Cardiothoracic Surgery (2001-2004) at the FSU Jena, Germany before she went to Los Angeles, California where she was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Saban Research Institute at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (2004-2005) and the David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California Los Angeles at UCLA  (2005-2008). In 2008 she was appointed as Assistant Research Professor in the Department of Medicine/Cardiology at UCLA. In January 2010, she became the group leader of the Fraunhofer-Attract Group at the Fraunhofer Institute for Interfacial Engineering and Biotechnology, Department of Cell and Tissue Engineering in Stuttgart, Germany and later accepted the position of deputy department head. Schenke-Layland just recently accepted her call as professor of biomaterials at the University Tübingen.

Every semester, the SCEC welcomes a keynote speaker to the Georgia Tech stem cell research community to speak on behalf of their university, institution, industry, or research lab in regards to stem cell engineering. This experience is meant to broaden the stem cell research alliance between local researchers and worldwide experts for the purposes of communicating stem cell advancements across the globe while developing future collaborative opportunities.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1324483540 2011-12-21 16:05:40 1475891813 2016-10-08 01:56:53 0 0 event Katja Schenke-Layland, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on March 13th in the Petit Institute.

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2012-03-13T13:00:00-04:00 2012-03-13T14:00:00-04:00 2012-03-13T14:00:00-04:00 2012-03-13 17:00:00 2012-03-13 18:00:00 2012-03-13 18:00:00 2012-03-13T13:00:00-04:00 2012-03-13T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2012-03-13 01:00:00 2012-03-13 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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75321 75321 image <![CDATA[Katja Schenke-Layland]]> image/jpeg 1449178046 2015-12-03 21:27:26 1475894688 2016-10-08 02:44:48 <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Schenke-Layland Profile]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Michael Kallos, PhD - University of Calgary

Stem Cell Bioprocess Engineering: Why Bioreactors are Vital for Clinical Applications of Regenerative Medicine


Regenerative medicine aims to replace or repair the function of diseased or damaged tissues or organs. Stem cells are a key player in tissue growth and development and will play a key role in regenerative medicine. In particular, pluripotent stem cells, due to their ability to generate cells from all three germ layers, and their ability to be cultured in the laboratory, have emerged as a promising cell source. Many regenerative medicine applications will require generation of large numbers of stem cells or their differentiated progeny under tightly controlled conditions by using computer-controlled bioreactors. The overall objective of our research is to accelerate the development of technologies for controlled expansion and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells. The aim is to use high-throughput scaled-down bioreactor experiments and predictive modeling to develop robust scalable bioprocesses. Effective, reliable bioprocesses are a key missing link between the science of discovery and the clinical realization of stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapies. This presentation will provide an overview of our activities in this area with a focus on embryonic stem cell expansion and differentiation in stirred suspension bioreactors.

Michael S. Kallos is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering, and the Associate Director of the Pharmaceutical Production Research Facility (PPRF) in the Schulich School of Engineering at the University of Calgary. He is also the Director of the Biomedical Engineering Graduate Program and has an Adjunct position in the Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy in the Faculty of Medicine. His research area is the application of chemical engineering principles, including reactor kinetics, mass transfer and fluid flow to the bioengineering of stem cell expansion and differentiation systems. Recently his focus has been on embryonic stem cell expansion and differentiation to bone and cartilage. He has authored a number of publications, book chapters and presented conference papers and posters at local, national and international meetings. He has also won a number of teaching awards, and was featured in 2009 Avenue magazine's Top 40 Under 40 for Calgary.

Every semester, the SCEC welcomes keynote speakers to the Georgia Tech stem cell research community to speak on behalf of their university, institution, industry, or research lab in regards to stem cell engineering. This experience is meant to broaden the stem cell research alliance between local researchers and worldwide experts for the purposes of communicating stem cell advancements across the globe while developing future collaborative opportunities. The SCEC seminar series speakers range from international stem cell academia to industry professionals and research scientists.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1324482010 2011-12-21 15:40:10 1475891813 2016-10-08 01:56:53 0 0 event Michael Kallos, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on February 21st in the Petit Institute.

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2012-02-21T11:00:00-05:00 2012-02-21T12:00:00-05:00 2012-02-21T12:00:00-05:00 2012-02-21 16:00:00 2012-02-21 17:00:00 2012-02-21 17:00:00 2012-02-21T11:00:00-05:00 2012-02-21T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2012-02-21 11:00:00 2012-02-21 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

770-385-0783

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75331 75331 image <![CDATA[Michael Kallos]]> image/jpeg 1449178046 2015-12-03 21:27:26 1475894688 2016-10-08 02:44:48 <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Kallos Profile]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Paul Krebsbach, DDS, PhD, University of Michigan

Pluripotent stem cells: Opening another avenue for craniofacial regeneration

Paul Krebsbach, D.D.S., Ph.D, is the Roy H. Roberts professor of dentistry and professor of biomedical engineering, and chair of the Department of Biologic and Materials Sciences in the School of Dentistry at the University of Michigan. He received a Doctor of Dental Surgery (D.D.S.) degree from the University of Minnesota, and a certificate in periodontology and Ph.D. in biomedical sciences from the University of Connecticut Health Center. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of Michigan, he was a senior staff fellow for three years at the National Institute of Dental and Crainiofacial Research. His research program focuses on the cell and molecular biology of mineralized tissues with an emphasis on gene therapy-directed osteogenesis and the lineage progression of adult and pluripotent stem cells.

Every semester, the SCEC welcomes keynote speakers to the Georgia Tech stem cell research community to speak on behalf of their university, institution, industry, or research lab in regards to stem cell engineering. This experience is meant to broaden the stem cell research alliance between local researchers and worldwide experts for the purposes of communicating stem cell advancements across the globe while developing future collaborative opportunities. The SCEC seminar series speakers range from international stem cell academia to industry professionals and research scientists.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1324471457 2011-12-21 12:44:17 1475891813 2016-10-08 01:56:53 0 0 event Paul Krebsbach, DDS, PhD, University of Michigan, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on "Pluripotent stem cells: Opening another avenue for craniofacial regeneration" on January 17th in the Petit Institute.

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2012-01-17T11:00:00-05:00 2012-01-17T12:00:00-05:00 2012-01-17T12:00:00-05:00 2012-01-17 16:00:00 2012-01-17 17:00:00 2012-01-17 17:00:00 2012-01-17T11:00:00-05:00 2012-01-17T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2012-01-17 11:00:00 2012-01-17 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

770-385-0783

 

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75221 75221 image <![CDATA[Paul Krebsbach]]> image/jpeg 1449178046 2015-12-03 21:27:26 1475894688 2016-10-08 02:44:48 <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Krebsbach profile]]>
<![CDATA[2nd International Conference on Stem Cell Biomanufacturing]]> 27349 The primary purpose of the workshop is to develop an international network for current training objectives and practices in the field of stem cell biomanufacturing.

The meeting will be comprised of a series of sessions focused on:
1) lessons learned from the cell manufacturing industry
2) engineering of advanced technologies
3) cultivating academia-industry partnerships
4) formalizing training programs
5) developing international standards.

Following some short presentations on each topic, significant time will be allotted to encourage ample discussion amongst the workshop participants.

It is the committee's hope that one of the outcomes of this workshop will be a consortium of investigators and organizations focused on the development of innovative training programs and practices, in addition to fostering collaborative academic/industrial partnerships in this timely and critical area of biomanufacturing.

Registration for the workshop will be limited to facilitate personal interactions and allow ample time for in-depth discussion. We are hopeful that you will be able to join us for what should be a very productive meeting in order to lend your experience and perspective to this important topic.

For questions regarding the conference, contact Megan McDevitt 

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1323797758 2011-12-13 17:35:58 1475891694 2016-10-08 01:54:54 0 0 event 2nd International Conference on Stem Cell Biomanufacturing

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2011-12-16T08:30:00-05:00 2011-12-16T12:00:00-05:00 2011-12-16T12:00:00-05:00 2011-12-16 13:30:00 2011-12-16 17:00:00 2011-12-16 17:00:00 2011-12-16T08:30:00-05:00 2011-12-16T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2011-12-16 08:30:00 2011-12-16 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan McDevitt

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71921 71921 image <![CDATA[Rotary stem cells]]> 1449177414 2015-12-03 21:16:54 1475894647 2016-10-08 02:44:07 <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing conference website]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Todd McDevitt Laboratory Website]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 Sharon Gerecht, PhD - Johns Hopkins University

Regulating the Formation of Vascular Networks


The generation of functional vascular networks has the potential to improve treatment for vascular diseases and to facilitate successful wound healing and transplantation of tissue-engineered organs. Progenitor cells are recruited from a bone marrow niche to the site of vascularization, where low oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and cues from the extracellular matrix (ECM) instigate vascular morphogenesis.We demonstrate how dissolved oxygen levels during 2D and 3D culture of endothelial progenitors and cells vary and affect cellular responses including tube formation. We thus develop microbioreactor for long-term cell culture studies with the capability to accurately control and continuously monitor the dissolved oxygen level in the cell microenvironment.

Polymeric hydrogels are similar to the native ECM of many tissues due to their three- dimensional structural and mechanical properties. We show how synthetic, tunable polysaccharide hydrogels can be utilized to determine physical and biological parameters that enable efficient formation of functional vascular networks. One type of hydrogel enables vascular network formation from human progenitor cells in vitro, and further supportes the integration of the human vascular networks with the host’s circulation and blood flow into the hydrogel following transplantation. Another type of customized hydrogel, applied alone onto deep burn wounds in the absence of growth factors, cytokines, or cells, promotes remarkable neovascularization and complete skin regeneration.

Sharon Gerecht, PhD, is an Assistant Professor, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering. Gerecht is a bioengineer whose research focuses on employing engineering fundamentals to study basic questions in stem cell biology and how to apply them for blood vessel regeneration and repair and the limitation of cancer progression. She joined the Johns Hopkins faculty in the summer of 2007, and is also a lead investigator at the NCI funded Johns Hopkins Engineering in Oncology Center and a member of the Institute for NanoBioTechnology at Johns Hopkins. Gerecht is the recipient of the 2008 Allan C. Davis Medal from the Maryland Academy of Sciences, the North America Vascular Biology Organization Junior Investigator Award (2009), the Basil O’Connor Starter Scholar Research Award from the March of Dimes Foundation (2009-2011), the National Scientist Development Award from American Heart Association (2008-2012), and recently the NSF CAREER award (2011-2016). She is the author of more than 55 papers and 14 book chapters in her field, and edited the recent book, Biophysical Regulation of Vascular Differentiation and Assembly. She also serves as an Editorial Board member in PLoS ONE, and as a member in the Unified Peer Review Steering Committee of American Heart Association.

Every semester, the SCEC welcomes a keynote speaker to the Georgia Tech stem cell research community to speak on behalf of their university, institution, industry, or research lab in regards to stem cell engineering. This experience is meant to broaden the stem cell research alliance between local researchers and worldwide experts for the purposes of communicating stem cell advancements across the globe while developing future collaborative opportunities.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1312379183 2011-08-03 13:46:23 1475891718 2016-10-08 01:55:18 0 0 event SCEC Seminar Series

Sharon Gerecht, PhD - Johns Hopkins University

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2011-11-22T11:00:00-05:00 2011-11-22T12:00:00-05:00 2011-11-22T12:00:00-05:00 2011-11-22 16:00:00 2011-11-22 17:00:00 2011-11-22 17:00:00 2011-11-22T11:00:00-05:00 2011-11-22T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2011-11-22 11:00:00 2011-11-22 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

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69153 69153 image <![CDATA[Sharon Gerecht, PhD - Johns Hopkins University]]> image/jpeg 1449177239 2015-12-03 21:13:59 1475894604 2016-10-08 02:43:24 <![CDATA[Gerecht Lab]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[SCEC Seminar Series schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 Jeffrey Karp, PhD - Harvard Stem Cell Institute 

Controlling the Fate of Cells Post Transplantation

Control of cell fate and its extracellular environment is critical for tissue regeneration and cell therapy. This talk will explore methods to enhance the engraftment of systemically infused stem cells through engineering the surface of cells to induce a robust rolling response. This approach is based on leukocytes ability to target tissues via specific interactions with the vascular endothelium. In addition, a novel strategy to engineer cells with an intracellular depot of phenotype altering agent's will be described that can be used for programming cell fate via both intracrine-, paracrine-, and endocrine-like mechanisms. The talk will also examine the potential of cell surface sensors that can be used to detect signals within the cellular nano-environment with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution and should be useful for elucidating niche biology in vivo.


Every semester, the SCEC welcomes a keynote speaker to the Georgia Tech stem cell research community to speak on behalf of their university, institution, industry, or research lab in regards to stem cell engineering. This experience is meant to broaden the stem cell research alliance between local researchers and worldwide experts for the purposes of communicating stem cell advancements across the globe while developing future collaborative opportunities.

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1311861662 2011-07-28 14:01:02 1475891718 2016-10-08 01:55:18 0 0 event Jeffrey Karp, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on November 8th in the Petit Institute.

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2011-11-08T11:00:00-05:00 2011-11-08T12:00:00-05:00 2011-11-08T12:00:00-05:00 2011-11-08 16:00:00 2011-11-08 17:00:00 2011-11-08 17:00:00 2011-11-08T11:00:00-05:00 2011-11-08T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2011-11-08 11:00:00 2011-11-08 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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69009 69009 image <![CDATA[Jeffrey Karp, PhD - Harvard Stem Cell Institute]]> image/jpeg 1449177228 2015-12-03 21:13:48 1475894602 2016-10-08 02:43:22 <![CDATA[Jeffrey Karp, PhD]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Workshop]]> 27195 Showcasing enabling technologies and fostering new interdisciplinary, multi-investigator collaborations. Open to all faculty or trainees interested or engaged in stem cell engineering research.

Workshop Agenda           

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1303208082 2011-04-19 10:14:42 1475891690 2016-10-08 01:54:50 0 0 event The Stem Cell Engineering Workshop will be held from 1:30 p.m. to 7.pm. on May 9 at the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience at Georgia Tech.

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2011-05-09T14:30:00-04:00 2011-05-09T20:00:00-04:00 2011-05-09T20:00:00-04:00 2011-05-09 18:30:00 2011-05-10 00:00:00 2011-05-10 00:00:00 2011-05-09T14:30:00-04:00 2011-05-09T20:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2011-05-09 02:30:00 2011-05-09 08:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards
Research Program Coordinator
Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience
megan.richards@ibb.gatech.edu 

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<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center]]> <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Article on the workshop]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 Krishnendu Roy, PhD - University of Texas at Austin

Abstract:
Biomaterials and synthetic micro-environments, e.g. scaffolds, bioreactors, drug carriers, etc. can be designed to interact with stem cells and directly influence signaling pathways, differentiation and cell behavior. Most physiological and pathophysiological processes involve complex interactions of cells with their microenvironments.  These interactions often vary both spatially and temporally and provide critical, instructive cues to the cells. In this talk we would specifically focus on engineering artificial niches to control stem cell fate. Specifically, we would present results from our effort to (a) generate complex tissues with spatially varying extracellular matrix (ECM) compositions and mechanical properties from a single stem cell population, and (b) generate functional immune cells from embryonic and adult stem cells using biomaterial and bioreactor-based approaches. We will also briefly discuss our work on designing new biomaterial-based delivery systems for cancer therapies.

Biosketch:
Dr. Krishnendu (Krish) Roy received his undergraduate degree from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT Kharagpur, India) followed by his MS from Boston University and his PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University. Following his PhD, he joined Zycos Inc., a start-up biotechnology company where he served first as a Scientist and then as a Senior Scientist in the Drug Delivery Research group.  Dr. Roy left his industrial position to join The University of Texas at Austin in 2002, where he is currently the General Dynamics Endowed Faculty Fellow in Engineering, Associate Chair for Education and Outreach and Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering. Dr. Roy’s research interests are in the areas of stem cell engineering with particular focus on bioreactor cultures and immune cell generation. He is also interested in controlled drug and vaccine delivery technologies and biomedical polymers with applications in cancer and immunotherapies. He was recently elected Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). Dr. Roy has received numerous awards and honors including the Young Investigator Awards from both the Controlled Release Society (CRS) and The Society for Biomaterials (SFB), the Young Scientist Award from HSEMB, NSF CAREER award, Global Indus Technovator Award from MIT, the CRS Cygnus Award etc. He has also received the translational research award from the Coulter foundation and the bioengineering grant from the Whitaker Foundation. Dr. Roy’s research has been supported through numerous grants from the NIH and NSF as well as an individual investigator award from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT). He serves as a member of the Editorial Boards for the Journal of Controlled Release and the European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1302700336 2011-04-13 13:12:16 1475891686 2016-10-08 01:54:46 0 0 event SCEC Seminar Series

"Engineering Complex Stem Cell Niches:  Generating Therapeutic Cells from Adult and Embryonic Stem Cells"

Krishnendu Roy, PhD - University of Texas at Austin

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2011-04-26T13:00:00-04:00 2011-04-26T14:00:00-04:00 2011-04-26T14:00:00-04:00 2011-04-26 17:00:00 2011-04-26 18:00:00 2011-04-26 18:00:00 2011-04-26T13:00:00-04:00 2011-04-26T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2011-04-26 01:00:00 2011-04-26 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

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65552 65552 image <![CDATA[Krishnendu Roy, PhD - University of Texas at Austin]]> image/jpeg 1449176863 2015-12-03 21:07:43 1475894579 2016-10-08 02:42:59 <![CDATA[Roy lab]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 Controlling the expansion and differentiation of stem and progenitor cells in vivo and in vitro is an important goal in regenerative medicine and for the development of patient-based, disease-relevant cellular models. This usually achieved by exposing stem and progenitor cells to specific types and doses of cytokines, growth factors and extracellular matrix proteins. This can also be achieved by directly modulating the activity of signaling enzymes or transcription factors using genetic engineering strategies or by delivering bioactive molecules in the cell cytosol or nucleus.  In this seminar, I will first describe our investigation of the mechanisms responsible for the combinatorial cytokine dependence of stem/progenitor cell fate decisions. During the development of embryonic and adult tissues, there is stage-specific, sequential expression of cytokine receptors during differentiation. We hypothesized that combinatorial cytokine dependence arises in cell subsets in unique transitional stages where cell fate decision can be regulated by combinations of early- and late-acting factors. We used adult bone marrow erythropoiesis (red blood cell development) as a model system since it depends on the sequential action of stem cell factor (SCF), an early-acting cytokine and erythropoietin (EPO), a late-acting cytokine. We have identified a subset of hematopoietic progenitor cells which fate decisions depend on both the SCF and EPO signals. The integration of the EPO and SCF signals was found to take place in the MAPK pathway and was found depend on a molecular mechanism that controls the dynamics of the ERK signal. Next, I will describe some work on the differentiation of neural precursor cells isolated from human olfactory epithelium (OE). These neural precursor cells can be easily harvested from a minimally invasive nasal biopsy, making them a valuable cell source to study human neural cell lineages in health and disease. We examined the impact of changes in glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) activity on the fate of adult human OE neural precursors in vitro. In these experiments, ATP-competitive (6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime and CHIR99021) and substrate-competitive (TAT-eIF2B) inhibitors were used in order to eliminate potential confounding effects on cell fate due to off-target kinase inhibition. The results indicated that GSK-3 inhibition promotes the early stages of neuronal differentiation and decrease proliferation in cultures of adult human neural precursors. This finding provides insights into the mechanisms by which alterations in GSK-3 signaling affect adult human neurogenesis, a cellular process strongly suspected to play a role in the etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. The different investigations described above both required the use of tools to examine how signal transduction operates in single live cells. We mostly used multicolor flow cytometry in these studies but we have also explored several applications for single-cell capillary electrophoresis (CE). Therefore, in the last part of the seminar, I will explain how single-cell CE and mass spectrometry (MS) can be combined to examine the fate of enzyme activity reporters and inhibitors in single mammalian cells with a resolution at the single amino acid level.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1301309462 2011-03-28 10:51:02 1475891678 2016-10-08 01:54:38 0 0 event SCEC Seminar

"Strategies to Measure and Modulate the Activity of Signaling Enzymes Involved in Stem Cell Fate Decisions"

Julie Audet, PhD - University of Toronto

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2011-04-19T12:00:00-04:00 2011-04-19T13:00:00-04:00 2011-04-19T13:00:00-04:00 2011-04-19 16:00:00 2011-04-19 17:00:00 2011-04-19 17:00:00 2011-04-19T12:00:00-04:00 2011-04-19T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2011-04-19 12:00:00 2011-04-19 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

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65550 65550 image <![CDATA[Julie Audet, PhD - University of Toronto]]> image/jpeg 1449176863 2015-12-03 21:07:43 1475894579 2016-10-08 02:42:59 <![CDATA[Audet lab]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 Abstract: Microsystems have the potential to impact biology by providing new ways to manipulate cells and the microenvironment around them.  Simply physically manipulating cells or their environment—using microfluidics, electric fields, or optical forces—provides new ways to organize cell-cell interactions.  Our lab has been using cell manipulation to study cell-cell interactions in stem cell self-renewal, differentiation, and nuclear reprogramming.  To control diffusible signaling and study its influence on cell fate, we have developed arrays of microfluidic perfusion culture chambers that use fluid flow to create a convection-dominated transport environment.  This in turn provides a more controlled soluble microenvironment in which to study diffusible signaling in self-renewal and neural specification.  Using these systems, we have identified the existence of previously unknown autocrine loops involved in fate specification, and have delineated the effects of shear itself on self-renewal.  We are also developed ways to control cell-cell interactions by creating patterns of multiple developmentally important cell types.  For example, by using micropatterning to spatially arrange embryonic stem cells with respect to supporting cells found in the early blastocyst, we have been able to recapitulate early developmental steps in vitro.  Together, the ability to control cell placement and diffusible signaling provide news ways to exploit stem cells’ potential for both basic science and applied biotechnology.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1297264950 2011-02-09 15:22:30 1475891645 2016-10-08 01:54:05 0 0 event Stem Cell Engineering Seminar Series

Joel Voldman, PhD - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Microscale Manipulation of Cells and Their Environment for Controlling Stem Cell Fate

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2011-03-10T11:00:00-05:00 2011-03-10T12:00:00-05:00 2011-03-10T12:00:00-05:00 2011-03-10 16:00:00 2011-03-10 17:00:00 2011-03-10 17:00:00 2011-03-10T11:00:00-05:00 2011-03-10T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2011-03-10 11:00:00 2011-03-10 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Todd McDevitt - Director, Stem Cell Engineering Center

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<![CDATA[Voldman Lab]]>
<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 Stem Cell Engineering Seminar Series

"Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease: The Industrial Approach" - Joe Gold, Senior Director, Stem Cell Biology & Research Operations, Geron Corporation

Geron Corporation

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1372602891 2013-06-30 14:34:51 1475891547 2016-10-08 01:52:27 0 0 event Stem Cell Engineering Seminar Series - "Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Therapy for Cardiovascular Disease: The Industrial Approach" - Joe Gold, Senior Director, Stem Cell Biology & Research Operations, Geron Corporation

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2010-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2010-10-29T13:00:00-04:00 2010-10-29T13:00:00-04:00 2010-10-29 16:00:00 2010-10-29 17:00:00 2010-10-29 17:00:00 2010-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2010-10-29T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2010-10-29 12:00:00 2010-10-29 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan McDevitt
IBB
Contact Megan McDevitt
404-385-7001

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<![CDATA[Stem Cell Engineering Center Seminar Series]]> 27487 Sean Palecek, PhD - University of Wisconsin-Madison

Regulating human pluripotent stem cell differentiation via chemical cues and intercellular interactions

Sean Palecek started the lab in Fall 2000, after serving as a post-doctoral researcher with Stephen Kron at the University of Chicago. Sean graduated from from the University of Delaware, majoring in chemical engineering with a minor in biology. He began graduate studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, working with Doug Lauffenburger in the Department of Chemical Engineering and Alan Horwitz in the Department of Cell and Structural Biology. Sean moved with Lauffenburger moved to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, continuing his collaboration with Horwitz, and completing his PhD at MIT.

Every semester, the SCEC welcomes a keynote speaker to the Georgia Tech stem cell research community to speak on behalf of their university, institution, industry, or research lab in regards to stem cell engineering. This experience is meant to broaden the stem cell research alliance between local researchers and worldwide experts for the purposes of communicating stem cell advancements across the globe while developing future collaborative opportunities.

]]> Megan Richards 1 1329389205 2012-02-16 10:46:45 1475891885 2016-10-08 01:58:05 0 0 event Sean Palecek, PhD, will speak as a guest of the Stem Cell Engineering Center on January 26th, 2010 in the Petit Institute.

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2010-01-26T08:30:00-05:00 2010-01-26T09:30:00-05:00 2010-01-26T09:30:00-05:00 2010-01-26 13:30:00 2010-01-26 14:30:00 2010-01-26 14:30:00 2010-01-26T08:30:00-05:00 2010-01-26T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2010-01-26 08:30:00 2010-01-26 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Megan Richards

404-385-0783

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109921 109921 image <![CDATA[Sean Palecek]]> image/jpeg 1449178201 2015-12-03 21:30:01 1475894728 2016-10-08 02:45:28 <![CDATA[Palecek Profile]]> <![CDATA[SCEC website]]> <![CDATA[Stem Cell Biomanufacturing IGERT]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>