<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar ]]> 35486 "Lymphatic Vessels: Where Biotransport Meets Immunity"

Melody Swartz, Ph.D.
William B. Ogden Professor
Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering 
University of Chicago

Register HERE for Zoom Link

ABSTRACT
While the traditional view of lymphatic vessel function is to drain excess fluid from peripheral tissues and return them to the blood circulation, there is a growing appreciation for lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) as important players in immunity, as they are the first cells that come into direct contact with peripheral antigens, cytokines, danger signals and immune cells travelling from peripheral tissues to lymph nodes. They also form conduits in the lymph node that direct different molecules to different cells, for example to B cells and immature dendritic cells, in turn helping to regulate the spatial and temporal kinetics of antigen presentation. We aim to understand how lymphatic vessels and their transport functions affect and regulate immunity, and further, how that might be manipulated for immunotherapy. In contrast to passive drainage, we found that LECs actively transport fluid and solutes, which not only regulates the kinetics of antigen transport to the lymph node but also modulates local interstitial flow. Furthermore, LECs can directly regulate immune cells – for example, by taking up and cross-presenting exogenous antigens to educate naïve T cells towards a memory phenotype. In chronic infection and cancer, lymphatic vessels can expand (lymphangiogenesis) and we explore how this affects adaptive immune responses. On the translational side, we are engineering novel strategies to exploit lymphangiogenesis for cancer immunotherapy.  Beyond cancer, our findings suggest that LECs may be potential targets for immunomodulation in vaccination, autoimmunity, and allergy.  

BIO
Swartz started her independent career as an assistant professor at Northwestern University in the Department of Biomedical Engineering before moving to the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), where she was promoted to full professor and eventually served as director of the Institute of Bioengineering.

Trained as a bioengineer, Prof. Swartz uses quantitative approaches in immunobiology and physiology, including biotransport and biomechanics, to develop a deeper understanding of how the lymphatic system regulates immunity in homeostasis and disease, particularly in cancer and chronic inflammation. Her lab applies this knowledge to develop novel immunotherapeutic approaches in cancer, including lymph node-targeting vaccine approaches, as well as in vitro model systems that recapitulate relevant features of the tumor-immune interface.

Among her many honors, Swartz was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2023, National Academy of Medicine in 2020, elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2018, and named a MacArthur Fellow in 2012.

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community.

]]> Christina Wessels 1 1687375149 2023-06-21 19:19:09 1708001671 2024-02-15 12:54:31 0 0 event "Lymphatic Vessels: Where Biotransport Meets Immunity" - Melody Swartz, Ph.D. - University of Chicago

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2024-04-25T11:00:00-04:00 2024-04-25T12:00:00-04:00 2024-04-25T12:00:00-04:00 2024-04-25 15:00:00 2024-04-25 16:00:00 2024-04-25 16:00:00 2024-04-25T11:00:00-04:00 2024-04-25T12:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2024-04-25 11:00:00 2024-04-25 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Biotech Building]]> Event inquiries
Brandon Dixon, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[2023-2024 Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar ]]> 35486
Rashid Bashir, Ph.D.
Grainger Distinguished Chair of Engineering
Dean, College of Engineering
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Register HERE for Zoom Link

ABSTRACT
Integration of biology, medicine, and engineering and especially fabrication methods at the micro and nano scale offers tremendous opportunities for solving important problems in biology and medicine and to enable a wide range of applications in diagnostics, therapeutics, and tissue engineering. Specifically, microfluidics and Lab-on-Chip can realize applications in detection of disease markers, counting of specific cells from whole blood, and for identification of nucleic acids using sensitive and specific, point-of-care and personalized technologies. The implication of these technologies for advancing personalized medicine for diagnosis of infection and stratification of sepsis would be discussed. Moving up the scale from nanotechnology and microfluidics, 3D bio-fabrication methods for biohybrid polymer devices can also be used to develop instrumented tissues for drug screening and biohybrid robotics.

BIO
Rashid Bashir completed his Ph.D. from Purdue University in Oct. 1992. From Oct. 1992 to Oct. 1998, he worked at National Semiconductor in the Analog/Mixed Signal Process Technology Development Group, where he was promoted to Sr. Engineering Manager. At National Semiconductor, he led the development and commercialization of 4 analog semiconductor process technologies.He joined Purdue University in Oct. 1998 as an Assistant Professor and was later promoted to Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a Courtesy Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. In Oct. 2007, he joined the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as the Abel Bliss Professor of Engineering, and Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering & Bioengineering. He was the Director of the Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory (mntl.illinois.edu), a campus-wide clean room facility, from Oct. 2007 to Aug. 2013 and the Co-Director of the campus-wide Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (www.cnst.illinois.edu), a "collaboratory" aimed at facilitating center grants and large initiatives around campus in the area of nanotechnology. In Oct. 2016, he was named the Grainger Distinguished Chair in Engineering. From Aug. 2013 to Aug 2017, he was the head of the Bioengineering Department. From 2017 to 2018 he was the Executive Associate Dean and the Chief Diversity Officer of the new Carle-Illinois "Engineering-Based" College of Medicine at UIUC. In Nov 2018, he was appointed as the 15th Dean of the College Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The College was named Grainger College of Engineering in honor of W. W. Grainger in 2019.

He has authored or co-authored over 250 journal papers, over 200 conference papers and conference abstracts, and over 100 invited talks, and has been granted 45 patents. He is a fellow of 8 international professional societies (IEEE, AIMBE, AAAS, APS, IAMBE, RSC, BMES, and NAI). His research interests include bionanotechnology, BioMEMS, lab on a chip, interfacing of biology and engineering from the molecular to the tissue scale, and applications of semiconductor fabrication to biomedical engineering, all applied to solving biomedical problems. Prof. Bashir's key technical contributions and achievements lie in the area of BioMEMS and biomedical nanotechnology, especially in the use of electrical- or mechanical-based label-free methods for detection of biological entities on a chip. In addition, he has also made key contributions to 3-D fabrication methods that can be used for tissue engineering and development of cellular systems. He has been involved in 3 startups that have licensed his technologies (BioVitesse, Inc., Daktari Diagnostics, and, most recently, Prenosis, Inc.).

In addition to leading his own research group, he was the PI on an NSF IGERT on Cellular and Molecular Mechanics and Bionanotechnology (2009-2016) and PI on an NIH Training Grant on Cancer Nanotechnology (2009-2016). He is also the campus lead and Co-PI on an NSF Science and Technology Center (STC) on Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems (headquartered at MIT, with partners at Georgia Tech and UIUC) (2009-2015, and renewed for another 5 years 2015-2020). He was also Deputy Director of the NSF Nanobio Node of the NcN (Network for Computational Nanotechnology). He also served on the external advisory board of the NIH-funded P41 BioMEMS Resource Center at Harvard/MGH and the NIH-funded Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence at Stanford University, and on various editorial boards.

He holds the Grainger Distinguished Chair in Engineering, tenured appointment in bioengineering, and affiliate appointments in electrical and computer engineering, mechanical science and engineering, materials science and engineering, and molecular and integrative physiology.

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community.
 
]]> Christina Wessels 1 1687368474 2023-06-21 17:27:54 1704201988 2024-01-02 13:26:28 0 0 event "Intersection of Engineering and Biology across the Scales: Opportunities for Personalized Diagnostics and Printing Cellular Machines" - Rashid Bashir, Ph.D. - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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2024-02-01T11:00:00-05:00 2024-02-01T12:00:00-05:00 2024-02-01T12:00:00-05:00 2024-02-01 16:00:00 2024-02-01 17:00:00 2024-02-01 17:00:00 2024-02-01T11:00:00-05:00 2024-02-01T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2024-02-01 11:00:00 2024-02-01 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Biotech Building]]> Event inquiries
W. Hong Yeo, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[2023-2024 Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar ]]> 35486 "Adventures in the GI Tract: Engineering Drug Delivery and Sensing Solutions for an Extreme Environment"

Giovanni Traverso, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Register 
HERE for Zoom Link

ABSTRACT
Giovanni Traverso, Ph.D., will aim to review ongoing efforts towards the development of drug delivery and sensing technologies capable of operating in extreme environment like the gastrointestinal tract. Specifically, he will present advances in materials science, device development and translational efforts towards addressing medication non-adherence and the dosing of macromolecules.

BIO
Giovanni Traverso is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Associate Physician in the Division of Gastroenterology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), Harvard Medical School. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees from Trinity College, University of Cambridge, UK, and his PhD from the lab of Prof. Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins University where he developed non-invasive tests for the detection of colon cancer. For his post-doctoral research, he worked in the laboratory of Professor Robert Langer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) where he developed a series of novel technologies for drug delivery as well as physiological sensing via the gastrointestinal tract.  His current research program is focused on developing the next generation of drug delivery systems to enable efficient delivery of therapeutics through the gastrointestinal tract as well developing novel ingestible electronic devices for sensing a broad array of physiologic and pathophysiologic parameters.


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community.

]]> Christina Wessels 1 1687370216 2023-06-21 17:56:56 1702304345 2023-12-11 14:19:05 0 0 event "Adventures in the GI Tract: Engineering Drug Delivery and Sensing Solutions for an Extreme Environment" - Giovanni Traverso, Ph.D. - Massachusetts Institute of Technology

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2024-02-08T11:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08T12:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08T12:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08 16:00:00 2024-02-08 17:00:00 2024-02-08 17:00:00 2024-02-08T11:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2024-02-08 11:00:00 2024-02-08 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Biotech Building]]> Event inquiries
Alex Abramson, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[2023-2024 Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar ]]> 35486 "Cryogenically Suspending and Rewarming Living Biological Systems"

John Bischof, Ph.D.
Distinguished McKnight University Professor 
Medtronic-Bakken Endowed Chair for Engineering in Medicine 
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Minnesota

Register 
HERE for Zoom Link

ABSTRACT 
This talk will explore several breakthrough technologies from the Gen-4 NSF Engineering Research Center ATP-Bio (Advanced Technologies for the Preservation of Biological Systems).  The goal of ATP-Bio is to achieve cryogenic suspension of cell, tissue, organ and whole organism “testbed” systems for societal benefits in healthcare, food and sustainability and biodiversity.  Engineering approaches to achieve this based on manipulation of temperature, pressure and concentration including supercooling, partial freezing, isochoric (isovolumetric) and vitrification (glass forming) approaches will be introduced.  We will also discuss rapid and uniform rewarming of materials from these states so that they are both viable and functional for specific applications. Highlights include the first robust drosophila embryo and zebrafish embryo cryopreservation, the first scalable pancreatic islet cryopreservation, and the first cryopreservation of a whole rat kidney for up to 100 days.

BIO 
Bischof works in the area of thermal bioengineering with a focus on biopreservation, thermal therapy, and nanomedicine. His awards include the ASME Van Mow Medal and Fellowships in societies including Cryobiology, JSPS, ASME, AIMBE and IAMBE.  He has served as the President of the Society for Cryobiology and Chair of the Bioengineering Division of the ASME.  Bischof obtained a B.S. in Bioengineering from U.C. Berkeley (UCB) in 1987, an M.S. from UCB and U.C. San Francisco in 1989, and a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from UCB in 1992. After a Post-doctoral Fellowship at Harvard in the Center for Engineering in Medicine, he joined the faculty of the University of Minnesota in 1993. Bischof is a Distinguished McKnight University Professor in the Departments of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, and the Medtronic-Bakken Endowed Chair and Director of the Institute for Engineering in Medicine, and Director of the new NSF Engineering Research Center ATP-Bio.


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community.

]]> Christina Wessels 1 1687376812 2023-06-21 19:46:52 1702300953 2023-12-11 13:22:33 0 0 event "Cryogenically Suspending and Rewarming Living Biological Systems" - John Bischof, Ph.D. - University of Minnesota

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2024-03-28T11:00:00-04:00 2024-03-28T12:00:00-04:00 2024-03-28T12:00:00-04:00 2024-03-28 15:00:00 2024-03-28 16:00:00 2024-03-28 16:00:00 2024-03-28T11:00:00-04:00 2024-03-28T12:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2024-03-28 11:00:00 2024-03-28 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Biotech Building]]> Event inquiries
Ross Ethier, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[2023-2024 Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar ]]> 35486 The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community.

Carla Eroglu, Ph.D.
Vice Chair of Research 
Chancellor's Distinguished Professor of Cell Biology
Professor of Neurobiology
Duke University School of Medicine
HHMI Investigator

Cagla Eroglu, Ph.D., completed her undergraduate degree in Chemical Engineering and Master of Science degree in Molecular Biology and Genetics in her hometown, Ankara, Turkey. Then she moved to European Molecular Biology Laboratories in Heidelberg, Germanyfor her Ph.D. In her Ph.D., Eroglu investigated the structure function relationship of metabotropic glutamate receptors which are G-protein coupled receptors. She found that these receptors directly interact with sterols within the membrane and these lipid-protein interactions regulate the affinity of mGluRs for glutamate. For her postdoctoral studies, Eroglu moved across the globe and joined the lab of Ben Barres, Ph.D., at Stanford. There she studied how astrocyte-secreted Thrombospondins promote formation of excitatory synapses via interacting with the gabapentin receptor Cacna2d-1. In 2008, Eroglu started her lab in Duke University Cell Biology department. The Eroglu lab investigates how astrocytes, and other glial cells, control the formation, maturation and refinement of synaptic circuits. 

 

]]> Christina Wessels 1 1687377760 2023-06-21 20:02:40 1702051893 2023-12-08 16:11:33 0 0 event Cagla Eroglu, Ph.D. - Duke University School of Medicine

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2024-11-14T11:00:00-05:00 2024-11-14T12:00:00-05:00 2024-11-14T12:00:00-05:00 2024-11-14 16:00:00 2024-11-14 17:00:00 2024-11-14 17:00:00 2024-11-14T11:00:00-05:00 2024-11-14T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2024-11-14 11:00:00 2024-11-14 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Biotech Building]]> Event inquiries
Annabelle Singer, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[2023-2024 Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar]]> 35486 The Bioengineering Seminar Series is jointly hosted by Georgia Tech's Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB) and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

Klaus Ley, M.D.
Georgia Research Alliance Bradley Turner Eminent Scholar in Immunology
Co-Director, Immunology Center of Georgia
Professor, Department of Physiology
Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University


Klaus Ley is exploring the role our immune response plays in atherosclerosis, and his aim is to develop a vaccine and drugs that leverage human immunity to tackle the disease.

For more than two decades, Ley has applied his knowledge of immunology to understand the role that immune cells play in atherosclerosis. White blood cells swim in the blood, helping to protect the body from infection. To do their job, they must adhere to the blood vessel wall. In a chronic disease like atherosclerosis, this happens over and over again, eventually making the lumen narrower and the wall harder. So, instead of helping to solve a problem, the immune cells turn against the body — they actually hasten the atherosclerosis process.

It is this autoimmune reaction – and how to prevent it or reverse it – that Ley thinks is key in reducing the risk of atherosclerosis beyond what current drugs and lifestyle changes can achieve.

Unlike a vaccine for COVID-19 or measles, which prime the body against an external pathogen, Ley is working on what is called a “tolerogenic” vaccine for atherosclerosis. The aim of a tolerogenic vaccine is to prevent or reverse an autoimmune reaction. His team has already shown, in model systems, that a pathway exists for this vaccine to guard against atherosclerosis. They now need to identify the exact equivalent component that will have the same success in humans, who have a much more complex immune system.  

Ley believes a discovery by his team may well lead to new drug treatments for atherosclerosis in the next few years. In a 2022 paper published in Science, he describes a new class of olfactory (smell) receptors, some of which are important in atherosclerosis. They found that some of the same smell receptors in our noses are also present in immune cells inside the lining of our arteries. These immune cells, called macrophages, can use these receptors to detect the presence of a chemical called octanal that is generated when fats and cholesterol accumulate in the arteries. 

Octanal – which, incidentally, is what causes foods to smell rancid when left out in the heat – can start an inflammatory response in the macrophages. When this happens, the researchers found, atherosclerosis worsens.

The presence of these smell receptors inside macrophages in the blood vessel wall was not known before Ley’s discovery. Many existing drugs target similar receptors in treatments for other ailments. Ley and his team plan to work on finding just the right drug that will stop the macrophages from attacking the body instead of helping it.

By studying concentrated white blood cells of diverse populations, Ley seeks to understand how immune responses in atherosclerosis differ — and why. This exploration  uses blood from patients with atherosclerosis (or not), and it's essential to developing vaccines and treatments that work for as many people as possible.

As co-director of the new Immunology Center of Georgia, Ley will build on his research while also recruiting candidates to establish a world-class immunology research center focusing on vaccines, cancer immunology and vascular immunology.

]]> Christina Wessels 1 1686943811 2023-06-16 19:30:11 1696603193 2023-10-06 14:39:53 0 0 event "Breakdown of Tolerance to Self in Atherosclerosis"

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2023-10-26T11:00:00-04:00 2023-10-26T12:00:00-04:00 2023-10-26T12:00:00-04:00 2023-10-26 15:00:00 2023-10-26 16:00:00 2023-10-26 16:00:00 2023-10-26T11:00:00-04:00 2023-10-26T12:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2023-10-26 11:00:00 2023-10-26 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[IBB website]]> Event inquiries

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<![CDATA[2023-2024 Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 “'Smart' Biodegradable Polymers at Nano- and Micro-scales for Medical Applications"

Thanh Duc Nguyen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Department of Biomedical Engineering 
Institute of Materials Science 
University of Connecticut 

ABSTRACT
The ability to transform safe medical polymers (e.g. the ones used for resorbable surgical sutures) into desired 3D forms/shapes/structures at nano and micro scales with “smart” electrical functions, while sustaining the materials’ excellent biocompatibility and biodegradability, provides significant applications in different biomedical fields, ranging from tissue engineering and controlled drug/vaccine-delivery to medical implanted devices. In this talk, I will first present our recent research works to develop novel single-administration self-boosting vaccine microarray patch which can also be used to deliver other therapeutics like antibodies to replace traditional non-effective, painful, costly and inconvenient hypodermic injections. I will then present our recent works to create biodegradable piezoelectric polymers, which can generate electricity under deformation and vice versa, offering a variety of exciting applications in biodegradable implanted force sensors, bionic self-stimulated tissue scaffolds and medical brain-treatment ultrasound transducers. 

BIO 
Thanh Duc Nguyen is currently an associate professor of both Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Connecticut (UConn). He joined UConn since the beginning of 2016 after finishing his postdoctoral fellowship with Robert Langer at MIT. His research is highly interdisciplinary and at the interface of biomedicine, materials and nano/micro-technology. Nguyen invented a platform technology, so-called SEAL (StampEd Assembly of Polymer Layers), to create sophisticated 3D microstructures of safe medical polymers without using any potentially toxic additives, an advantage which can not be achieved by current high-resolution 3D printing. His research group at UConn has adapted and further improved the SEAL method to create a novel self-boosting microarray (MA) vaccine patch which can be applied on the skin at a single time to deliver multiple longitudinal does of thermally stabilized vaccines over a long period, simulating the effect of multiple injections in the traditional prime-boost vaccination regime. The MA patch is not only applicable to different vaccine types (e.g. protein, viral particles, nucleic acid like mRNA etc.) but also other therapeutics like antibodies to treat and prevent infectious diseases caused by pathogens like pneumococcal bacteria, SARS-COV-2 and HIV virus. The other theme of Nguyen research is the field of “biodegradable piezoelectrics” in which his lab pioneered new biodegradable piezoelectric materials which can self-produce electricity under applied force and vice versa. Using different piezo-biomaterials, derived from safe polymers like the ones used for surgical sutures, his lab developed bionic self-stimulated tissue scaffolds, implanted force-sensors and ultrasound transducers to respectively regenerate damaged tissues, monitor vital intra-organ pressures and enable the delivery of medicines through the blood-brain barrier. Nguyen’s works have been published in prestigious journals including Science, Nature Nanotech, Science Translational Medicine, Nature Biomedical Engineering, PNAS etc. He received several awards including the CRS (Controlled Release Society) Transdermal and Mucosal Delivery Focus Group Young Investigator Award (2021), ACell Young Investigator Award (2020), MIT top innovator under 35 for Asia Pacific (2019), NIH Trailblazer Award for Young and Early Investigators (2018), SPIE Rising Researcher Award (2019), Young Investigator Award in Biosciences and Bioengineering of Applied Sciences (2019), and the SME Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award (2018) etc. 


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1660567489 2022-08-15 12:44:49 1662492534 2022-09-06 19:28:54 0 0 event 2022-09-20T12:00:00-04:00 2022-09-20T13:00:00-04:00 2022-09-20T13:00:00-04:00 2022-09-20 16:00:00 2022-09-20 17:00:00 2022-09-20 17:00:00 2022-09-20T12:00:00-04:00 2022-09-20T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2022-09-20 12:00:00 2022-09-20 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Andrés García, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 Tara Deans, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
University of Utah

Tara Deans is an Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Utah. During her Ph.D. at Boston University, Deans focused on synthetic biology in mammalian cells. During her graduate research, she developed a tunable genetic switch coupling repressor proteins and a novel RNAi target design to control gene expression levels. After her graduate work, Deans went to Johns Hopkins University for her postdoctoral fellowship where she sought an area of research with the greatest opportunity for translating synthetic biology into therapeutic applications. Her postdoctoral work focused on interfacing synthetic biology with biomaterials, in addition to working with stem cells for tissue engineering applications.

Deans now runs an applied mammalian synthetic biology laboratory where her lab focuses on building novel genetic tools to study the mechanisms of stem cell differentiation for the purpose of directing cell fate decisions. Recently, Deans received four prestigious awards to support this area of research: 1. the NSF CAREER Award, 2. the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Young Investigator Award, 3. the NIH Trailblazer Award, and 4. the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award. In addition to her research, Deans was named a STEM Ambassador in the STEM Ambassador Program (STEMAP) at the University of Utah to engage underrepresented groups in STEM fields.


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1660576956 2022-08-15 15:22:36 1662492512 2022-09-06 19:28:32 0 0 event 2022-10-27T12:00:00-04:00 2022-10-27T13:00:00-04:00 2022-10-27T13:00:00-04:00 2022-10-27 16:00:00 2022-10-27 17:00:00 2022-10-27 17:00:00 2022-10-27T12:00:00-04:00 2022-10-27T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2022-10-27 12:00:00 2022-10-27 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Ankur Singh, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 Barclay Morrison III, Ph.D.
Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Vice Dean of Undergraduate Programs, FU
Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science
Columbia University

Barclay Morrison and his laboratory study the biomechanics of brain injuries from common occurrences like motor vehicle accidents, falls, and sports-related concussions to reduce their socioeconomic toll by developing better safety systems to prevent injuries and understanding the pathobiology to better treat brain injuries.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in approximately 50,000 deaths and 85,000 permanently disabled persons per year in the United States with an estimated primary care cost of $76 billion per year. The clinical situation is quite dire as there are no drug treatments which target the underlying pathobiology of TBI. This profound need for improvements in the prevention and treatment of TBI is the driving force behind Morrison’s research. The long-term goal of his laboratory is to understand the consequences of mechanical forces on the most complex system of the human body, the brain, and to develop strategies to mitigate and perhaps reverse these injurious effects. His research explores the specific cellular, molecular, and metabolic effects of injury on brain cells in response to precisely controlled biomechanical stimuli. His research program has three main focus areas:

Improvement of prevention strategies through development of critical biomechanical data for the living brain Identification of novel treatment options by understanding the post-traumatic pathobiology in greater detail Engineering new research tools to enhance studies in the first two areas Morrison received a BS in biomedical engineering from John Hopkins University in 1992 and a MSE and PhD in bioengineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1994 and 1999, respectively. 


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1660577401 2022-08-15 15:30:01 1662492483 2022-09-06 19:28:03 0 0 event 2022-11-03T12:00:00-04:00 2022-11-03T13:00:00-04:00 2022-11-03T13:00:00-04:00 2022-11-03 16:00:00 2022-11-03 17:00:00 2022-11-03 17:00:00 2022-11-03T12:00:00-04:00 2022-11-03T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2022-11-03 12:00:00 2022-11-03 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Michelle LaPlaca, Ph.D., Levi Wood, Ph.D. - faculty hosts
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "CRISPR and DNA Repair"

Taekjip Ha, Ph.D.
Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Biophysics, Biomedical Engineering
Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
Howard Hughes Medical Institute

ABSTRACT
Double strand breaks (DSB) are frequently generated, and researchers have discovered many proteins and processes needed to repair the breaks. However, relative timing of sub-stages of DNA repair or even their ordering has been difficult to determine due to the lack of method to synchronize the generation of well-defined breaks in living cells. Exposing cells to X-ray and UV can produce massive DNA damages at a defined time point, but the nature of the damage is ill-defined, and damages are made randomly. CRISPR-Cas systems allow the generation of breaks at specifically defined genome locations, but despite many attempts to develop ligand- or light-inducible CRISPR-Cas systems, the cleavage kinetics remains slow, leading to unsynchronized repair. We developed a very fast CRISPR-Cas9 can generate a DNA break at a defined locus at a well-define (within seconds) time point, allowing us to reveal the mechanisms of break recognition and study DSB repair and other cellular processes with an unprecedented spatiotemporal control. 

BIO
Taekjip Ha is a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Biophysics, and Biomedical Engineering at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is also an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He uses sophisticated physical techniques to manipulate and visualize the movements of single molecules to understand basic biological processes involving DNA and other molecules. His study is focused on pushing the limits of single-molecule detection methods to study protein–nucleic acid and protein-protein complexes and the mechanical basis of their interactions and functions – both in vitro and in vivo – that are important for genome maintenance.

Ha received his undergraduate degree in Physics, from Seoul National University, Seoul, Republic of Korea in 1990. He earned his Ph.D. In Physics from the University of Berkeley in 1996. After postdoctoral training at Stanford University, he was a Physics professor at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign for fifteen years until 2015.

Ha serves as a member of Editorial Boards for Science, Cell, eLife, PRX, Structure, PCCP, Physical Biology and Cancer Convergence. He is a member of the National Academy of Science and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1660577437 2022-08-15 15:30:37 1662492461 2022-09-06 19:27:41 0 0 event 2023-01-19T11:00:00-05:00 2023-01-19T12:00:00-05:00 2023-01-19T12:00:00-05:00 2023-01-19 16:00:00 2023-01-19 17:00:00 2023-01-19 17:00:00 2023-01-19T11:00:00-05:00 2023-01-19T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2023-01-19 11:00:00 2023-01-19 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Cheng Zhu, Ph.D. - faculty hosts
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 K. Dane Wittrup, Ph.D.
C.P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

In the Wittrup lab, we are interested in developing design principles for effective cancer biopharmaceuticals. We are particularly interested in cancer immunotherapy, the process of provoking a therapeutic immune response against tumors. Most of our projects include the following elements:


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, and they are open to all in the bio-community. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1660577890 2022-08-15 15:38:10 1662492397 2022-09-06 19:26:37 0 0 event 2023-01-10T11:00:00-05:00 2023-01-10T12:00:00-05:00 2023-01-10T12:00:00-05:00 2023-01-10 16:00:00 2023-01-10 17:00:00 2023-01-10 17:00:00 2023-01-10T11:00:00-05:00 2023-01-10T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2023-01-10 11:00:00 2023-01-10 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John Blazeck, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Distinguished Lecture]]> 27195 "Regenerative Medicine: Current Concepts and Changing Trends"

Anthony Atala, M.D.
G. Link Professor and Director, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine
W. Boyce Professor and Chair of Urology
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Virtual Event - REGISTER HERE for participation link


ABSTRACT
Patients with diseased or injured organs may be treated with transplanted tissues. There is a severe shortage of donor organs and tissues which is worsening yearly due to the aging population. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material sciences, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that may restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Stem cells may also offer a potentially limitless source of cells. 3D bioprinting is being utilized for potential tissue engineering therapies, and Body-on-a-Chip technologies are being applied for drug discovery and personalized medicine. Applications of these new technologies that may offer novel diagnostics and therapies for patients with tissue injury and organ disease will be described. Recent advances that have occurred in regenerative medicine will be reviewed.

BIO
Anthony Atala, MD, is the G. Link Professor and Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and the W. Boyce Professor and Chair of the Department of Urology at Wake Forest University. His work focuses on growing human cells, tissues and organs. Fifteen applications of technologies developed in Dr. Atala's laboratory have been used clinically in human patients.

Dr. Atala was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences (now the National Academy of Medicine), to the National Academy of Inventors as a Charter Fellow, and to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. Atala is a recipient of the US Congress funded Christopher Columbus Foundation Award, bestowed on a living American who is currently working on a discovery that will significantly affect society; the World Technology Award in Health and Medicine, for achieving significant and lasting progress; the Edison Science/Medical Award; the Fast Company World Changing Ideas Award; the R&D Innovator of the Year Award; and the Smithsonian Ingenuity Award.

Dr. Atala’s work was listed twice as Time Magazine’s top 10 medical breakthroughs of the year, and as one of 5 discoveries that will change the future of organ transplants. Dr. Atala’s work was ranked in 2019 by the Project Management Institute as one of the top 10 most impactful biotech projects from the past 50 years. Dr. Atala was named by Scientific American as one of the world’s most influential people in biotechnology, by U.S. News & World Report as one of 14 Pioneers of Medical Progress in the 21st Century, by Life Sciences Intellectual Property Review as one of 50 key influencers in the life sciences intellectual property arena, and by Nature Biotechnology as one of the top 10 translational researchers in the world.

Dr. Atala has led or served several national professional and government committees, including the National Institutes of Health working group on Cells and Developmental Biology, the National Institutes of Health Bioengineering Consortium, and the National Cancer Institute’s Advisory Board. He was a Founder of the Tissue Engineering Society, the Regenerative Medicine Society, the Regenerative Medicine Foundation, the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine, the Regenerative Medicine Development Organization, the Regenerative Medicine Manufacturing Society, and the Regenerative Medicine Manufacturing Consortium.

Dr. Atala works with several journals and serves in various roles, including Editor-in-Chief of: Stem Cells- Translational Medicine; Therapeutic Advances in Urology; and BioPrinting. He is the editor of 25 books, has published more than 800 journal articles and has applied for or received over 250 national and international patents.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1580995339 2020-02-06 13:22:19 1631718853 2021-09-15 15:14:13 0 0 event 2021-09-23T12:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23 16:00:00 2021-09-23 17:00:00 2021-09-23 17:00:00 2021-09-23T12:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-09-23 12:00:00 2021-09-23 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[IBB website]]> Vahid Serpooshan, Ph.D. - faculty host

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141991 632149 141991 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449178723 2015-12-03 21:38:43 1475894774 2016-10-08 02:46:14 632149 image <![CDATA[Anthony Atala, M.D. - Wake Forest School of Medicine]]> image/jpeg 1580995379 2020-02-06 13:22:59 1620741861 2021-05-11 14:04:21 <![CDATA[Atala profile]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 Virtual event - REGISTER here for participation link

"Genome Folding, Unfolding, and Refolding in the Human Brain"

Jennifer Phillips-Cremins, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Dean’s Faculty Fellow in Engineering and Medicine New York Stem Cell Foundation
Robertson Investigator Department of Genetics
Perelman School of Medicine Department of Bioengineering
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
University of Pennsylvania 


RESEARCH
The Cremins lab investigates the epigenetic mechanisms regulating development and function of the mammalian central nervous system. We map and analyze neuronal epigenomes in three-dimensions using quantitative, genome-wide technologies. We also perturb epigenomes by employing state-of-the art genetic engineering strategies (e.g. CRISPR/Cas9, optoepigenetics). To test our hypotheses, we primarily use embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell models of neuronal differentiation and disease. Our long-term goal is to discover how genome architecture controls genome function, applying this to study fundamental mechanisms controlling neuronal phenotype and, by extension, the onset and progression of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disease states.

BIO
Jennifer Phillips-Cremins, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor and Deans' Faculty Fellow in Engineering and Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania with primary appointments in the Departments of Bioengineering and Genetics. Dr. Cremins obtained her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in the laboratory of Andres Garcia. She then conducted a multi-disciplinary postdoc in the laboratories of Job Dekker and Victor Corces. Dr. Cremins now runs the Chromatin Architecture and Systems Neurobiology laboratory at UPenn. Her primary research interests lie in understanding the long-range chromatin architecture mechanisms that govern neural specification and synaptic plasticity in healthy neurons and how these epigenetic mechanisms go awry in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. She has been selected as a 2014 New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Investigator, a 2015 Albert P. Sloan Foundation Fellow, a 2016 and 2018 Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow, 2015 NIH Director's New Innovator Awardee, 2020 NSF CAREER Awardee, and a 2020 CZI Neurodegenerative Disease Pairs Awardee.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1623334951 2021-06-10 14:22:31 1631202776 2021-09-09 15:52:56 0 0 event 2021-09-09T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09T14:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09T14:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09 17:00:00 2021-09-09 18:00:00 2021-09-09 18:00:00 2021-09-09T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-09-09 01:00:00 2021-09-09 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Karmella Haynes, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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650593 650593 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> image/jpeg 1631188207 2021-09-09 11:50:07 1631188955 2021-09-09 12:02:35