<![CDATA[Husbands Fealing Appointed Assistant Director of NSF Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences]]> 27165 Kaye Husbands Fealing, dean of Georgia Tech’s Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, has been appointed assistant director of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences (SBE).

Husbands Fealing first joined Georgia Tech as professor and chair of the School of Public Policy in 2014 before being named dean in 2020. Under her leadership as dean, the College has seen consistent growth in enrollment and sponsored research, development of new degrees and programs, and various programs consistently earn national rankings. Her time as the chair of the School of Public Policy resulted in similar growth, achievements, and impact. She also co-chaired the Arts@Tech Institute Strategic Planning Committee and has served on the Institute for Data Engineering and Science Council and the Intellectual Property Advisory Board.

Husbands Fealing is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and an elected fellow of both the National Academy of Public Administration and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She was awarded the 2023 Carolyn Shaw Bell Award from the American Economic Association’s Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession, as well as the 2017 Trailblazer Award from the National Medical Association Council on Concerns of Women Physicians. She is a member of the International Women’s Forum, Georgia Chapter. She serves on AAAS’ executive board and is a board member for the Society for Economic Measurement.

“From her time as chair to her service as dean, Dean Kaye’s decade of service at Tech has left an undeniable mark on the Institute, and I am proud to have served alongside her,” said Steve McLaughlin, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs. “She is a trusted leader and an accomplished administrator and scholar, and we wish her well in this next chapter at the National Science Foundation.”

Husbands Fealing came to Tech from the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota. Before that, she served as a study director at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. Her career began at Williams College, where she started as assistant professor in the Economics Department and left after 20 years as the William Brough Professor of Economics. Additionally, she held visiting professorships at Smith College and Colgate University, and a research associate position at MIT.

Husbands Fealing has a long history with the NSF, having served in several different capacities including as the inaugural program director for NSF’s Science of Science and Innovation Policy program and as the co-chair of the Science of Science Policy Interagency Task Group, chartered by the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Policy Council. She also served as an economics program director at NSF. Husbands Fealing also serves as chair of NSF’s Committee on Equal Opportunities in Science and Engineering and as a member of NSF’s Directorate of STEM Education Advisory Committee.

SBE is one of eight NSF directorates and supports basic research focused on human behavior and social organizations, as well as how social, economic, political, cultural, and environmental forces affect the lives of people from birth to old age, and how people, in turn, shape those forces. The directorate is also home to one of the 13 statistical agencies in the United States, the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics. Husbands Fealing’s appointment begins on April 22.

Provost McLaughlin will announce plans for interim leadership for the College soon, along with more details on a search for the next dean.

]]> Susie Ivy 1 1709223529 2024-02-29 16:18:49 1709223578 2024-02-29 16:19:38 0 0 news Kaye Husbands Fealing, dean of Georgia Tech’s Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, has been appointed assistant director of the National Science Foundation Directorate for Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences.

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2024-02-29T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-29T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-29 00:00:00 Office of the Provost

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673262 673262 image <![CDATA[Dean Husbands Fealing.jpeg]]> Dean Husbands Fealing

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<![CDATA[Renters Need Better Policies To Cope With Natural Disasters, New Research Shows]]> 34541 After Hurricane Katrina, 29% of single-family homes were damaged in Louisiana versus 35% of rental units, but while 62% of homeowners received disaster recovery assistance, only 18% of renters got similar aid.

Louisiana isn’t unique. Renters are an especially vulnerable population after natural disasters. They are generally less able to afford to move but are more likely to pay exorbitant markups when rental options are depleted. How renters are affected after a disaster is a key indicator of climate vulnerability, yet most political discourse and public policies focus on single-family homeowners.

New joint research from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Brookings Institution is some of the first to expose the disaster impact on rental housing markets, examining whether the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) disaster recovery policies work effectively to protect renters.

The researchers sought to answer the question of how the rental market shifts after a natural disaster and whether rents increase. They used data from 2000 to 2020 that broke down rental rates by ZIP code and quarter in major metro areas in California, Michigan, Arkansas, Georgia, and Florida. Any presidentially declared major disasters were included, totaling 180,000 ZIP code-based rental rate data points. The researchers combined federal emergency information with proprietary rental price data and stakeholder interviews. Brookings also hosted a workshop to provide qualitative insights and lived experiences from federal, state, and local government officials; tenants; and nonprofit organizations.

“I think the marriage between the two, the quantitative analysis and qualitative insights, is something that really makes this report unique,” said Brian An, assistant professor in the School of Public Policy in Georgia Tech’s Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.

Their quantitative analysis showed that rents do increase after disasters — by 4 to 6% for the first disaster; rents elevate for the first three years and then stabilize over the next few years, but they do not revert to the initial rate for at least five years. Subsequent disasters also increase the rent by 2 to 3 percentage points and have lasting impacts. On average, ZIP codes in high climate-risk areas where multiple disasters often serially occur experience 12% higher rents.  

Renters need more representation, according to the qualitative analysis. Stakeholders wanted better renter protections even outside of disasters but also noted that disaster relief needed to be more equitable and come from federal resources.

Policy typically favors single-family homeowners over renters in multifamily apartments. But after Hurricane Katrina, HUD imposed new rental development requirements in the Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Recovery (CDBG-DR), the largest federal funding for disaster recovery. For their analysis, the researchers scanned thousands of pages in federal register notices to track what types of rental development requirements were in place in the largest federal funds and whether those stipulations improved renters’ situation. They found rents appreciated at a much slower rate in areas with the CDBG-DR grants than those without.

The An group’s analysis suggests that the new requirements embedded in CDBG-DR seem to be working, but a more thorough investigation is needed. For example, in its follow-up study, the team is investigating which requirements are more effective than others and whether similar policies could be more broadly applied to help renters. The authors also note that more fundamental policy changes for renters are imperative, such as universal renter protections, disaster assistance prioritizing low-income renters, and state and local government requirements to enforce tenant protections and rental housing in exchange for federal funding.

“We embarked on this research for evidence-based policymaking,” An said. “While CDBG-DR has played a major role in disaster recovery, no one has examined their efficacy on rental housing until now. A major part of the challenge was due to the complexities in tracking the fund allocation notices and understanding nuanced rental requirements. But rigorous efforts and evaluations can inform policy design, our research demonstrates.”

After the report was published by Brookings, HUD’s Office of Policy Development and Research invited the researchers to present their findings to its staff.

“The unique academic-practitioner collaboration with philanthropic support is what made our research policy relevant, with actionable insights,” An said. “We need more policy research and evidence to build a resilient future for all renter populations.”

Martin, C., Drew, R., Orlando, A., Moody, J., Rodnyansky, S., An, B., Jakabovics, A., Patton, N., and
Donoghoe, M. (2023). “Disasters and the rental housing community: Setting a research and policy agenda.” Brookings Institution. https://www.brookings.edu/wp-content/uploads/2023/09/Disasters-and-the-Rental-
Housing_final.pdf

]]> Tess Malone 1 1709072996 2024-02-27 22:29:56 1709214504 2024-02-29 13:48:24 0 0 news New joint research from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Brookings Institution is some of the first to expose the disaster impact on rental housing markets, examining whether the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) disaster recovery policies work effectively to protect renters.

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2024-02-27T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-27T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-27 00:00:00 Tess Malone, Senior Research Writer/Editor

tess.malone@gatech.edu

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662636 662636 image <![CDATA[Hurricane Damage]]> image/jpeg 1666880902 2022-10-27 14:28:22 1666880902 2022-10-27 14:28:22
<![CDATA[Marking Two Years of War in Ukraine. What Does the Future Hold in Store?]]> 34600 Saturday, Feb. 24, marks two years since Russian forces invaded Ukraine. Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts experts have closely tracked the conflict from the frontlines to potential fault lines in Western support for Ukraine, as well as the potential impact on the global economy. We asked some of these scholars to offer their insights into how the way the war has evolved in the past year, and what to look out for going forward.

Our experts:

 

How has Russia responded to developments in the last year?

Breedlove: I probably said last year that they were failing and that they were not adaptive, and they were rather rigid, and they were. They have had bad planning, bad logistics, bad general officership, bad decisions, and brought the wrong people to the battlefield. It's just been horrible. But that now is changing. Mr. Putin is having to face up to the fact that he can't keep doing that. He’s going into an election. Support for what even people in Russia are now calling a war is beginning to fall. As we say in America, we’re running out of money, now we have to think. Well, Mr. Putin is running out of troops, so now he has to think. And we’re now starting to see some adaptations in the use of air power and some better tactics more suited to small-unit warfare.

 

What has Ukraine done well?

Breedlove: Ukraine has just absolutely rearranged Russia in the Black Sea. They have essentially made the northern 20% of the Black Sea untenable for Russia, and Russia has had to relocate major assets to the south and east. And whenever they're trying to move in and out of Crimea, especially, Ukraine is making them pay and making them pay dearly. They’ve adapted small, commercial, over-the-counter drones and made them into a very lethal flighting fleet: Russia is still losing tanks to $270 drones. And their surface and under-surface naval drone capability is in the middle of defeating the northern part of the Black Sea fleet. That is beyond astounding. They are really leading the world in that way, and we are learning from them.

 

What military aid does Ukraine most need from the West?

Breedlove: Victory is not about any one bright shiny object. What Ukraine needs is what the United States would take to this fight if we were involved militarily. They need air superiority to enable modern maneuver warfare, and they need the sensor capabilities to discriminate targets from friends and to command and control. Then we can talk about the thing everybody wants to talk about: the ability to shoot, whether it’s a Patriot, a THAAD, or an F-16. You throw a bunch of F-16s out there in the middle of the battlefield, they'd do some pretty good work, but they would do amazing work if they were hooked to a capability to sense, discern, target, shoot.

Bell: The two most critically needed enhancements in Ukraine’s military inventory are modern air superiority fighter aircraft (e.g., the F-16s now being delivered, but in larger numbers) and long-range “deep strike” fires such as the U.S. ATACMS system already provided, but in the longer-range missile version, as well as the German-made Taurus long-range missile. These systems could alter the course of the war in Ukraine’s favor, especially if their use were to be concentrated on a deliberate strategy of denying Russia any military presence on or access to Crimea.  Were that goal to be achieved, it would constitute a “strategic defeat” for Putin since Russian ambitions have for centuries prioritized control of Crimea. That might increase the admittedly long odds that Putin might see value in negotiating an acceptable outcome to this conflict.

 

What’s the outlook for continued Western aid?

Bell: The EU has just renewed its support for Ukraine’s economy with a 54 billion package. Whether the U.S. Congress can pass the pending supplemental appropriations request from President Biden for $60 billion in further military assistance remains to be seen. The domestic argument over securing the U.S. Southern border is the primary holdup there. However, U.S. support could also be put at risk if Kyiv fails to adequately attack domestic corruption or President Zelenskyy begins to rule in an unacceptably autocratic fashion. Also, priorities could shift if the U.S. military involvement in the Middle East conflicts escalates, or if China were to attempt to reintegrate Taiwan by force.

Koposov: Western fatigue is obvious and understandable, but the key thing is that Western opinion has not yet appreciated the importance of the problems at stake. We still very much live in a state of post-Cold War triumphalism and do not understand that the world has dramatically changed since communism collapsed and that the new challenges to democracy are no less serious than those it had to face in the 20th century. Almost all domestic problems should now be postponed, and the West should mobilize all its resources to get rid of Putin once and forever.

 

Are there any less-often-discussed underlying structural weaknesses in the Russian military-industrial complex that could significantly limit its ability to continue fighting?

Bell: President Putin is clearly worried about possible civil disobedience and public resistance were he to order a general mobilization. This is why he has relied on mercenaries, generous pay, and bonus offers to recruits from distant corners of Russia, and pardon offers to convicts. Nonetheless, if Putin must choose between a wider conscription or conceding defeat to Ukraine, he will most likely choose the former and amplify his already strong public messaging that suffering and sacrifice for Russia are patriotic and good for one’s soul.  Hence no “tipping point” is yet in sight.

Khapaeva: Russian volunteers recruited from the most socially and economically disadvantaged groups can expect to receive a payment for their military service that amounts to a lifetime of earnings. The moment Putin’s administration is cut off from its oil and gas profits, Russians may become much less willing to serve as cannon fodder, creating conditions for changing the general political atmosphere in the country. 

 

Are sanctions having any impact on Russia’s war effort or domestic morale?

Khapaeva: The historical memory of the conditions under which generations lived in this country must be taken into consideration. Russian history is one of regular famines, starvation, food shortages, and an economy of deficit, all which are alive in the collective memory. Living standards in Russia remain far below those of its Western neighbors, but current sanctions cannot even approach that historical level of poverty. Moreover, many Russians consider their memories of misery as testifying to national resilience. This goes well with Putin’s propaganda, which has been successful in presenting state terror as a matter of national pride and heritage.

 

What role can diplomacy play in bringing an end to the conflict?

Bell: A Western diplomatic effort to persuade China and key Global South nations to pressure Russia might persuade Moscow to swiftly end its pursuit of total victory in Ukraine, but such a scenario is unlikely. However, some other avenues do exist to hinder Russia's war effort. For instance, the U.S. could work with fellow permanent UN Security Council members France and the UK and incoming members Japan and South Korea on a “name and shame” campaign to expose and condemn Russia’s blatant violation of UN Security Council resolutions that imposed strict sanctions on North Korea’s military exports and imports related to its illegal and dangerous nuclear and ballistic missile programs. That could help isolate Russia and delegitimize its actions.

Koposov: I do not think there is, or should be, any room for diplomacy at this point. Do we need another Munich?

 

What are the most concerning "wildcard" scenarios you can envision?

Bell: The assassination of Zelenskyy by the Russian FSB or his death in a missile strike, or a collapse of morale within the Ukrainian military.

Khapaeva: If the “vertical of power” cracks, leaders of the estimated 30 private armies in Russia may start acting as independent warlords, fighting for power and resources inside Russia. This could eventually lead to the collapse of the Russian Federation into several states, helping Ukraine and the West to win the war. The decentralization of the Federation was avoided in 1991 – not without Western help – out of fear that nuclear arms would proliferate into the hands of even smaller and less controllable states. Judging from today, that looks like shortsighted politics.

Breedlove: The big wild card is that Mr. Putin understands how to yank our chain, and if Ukraine started winning, the first thing you'd probably hear are new threats around the nuclear power plant in Zaporizhia. We told Russia before the war what we were afraid of: We are afraid of nukes and we're afraid of the war widening. Mr. Putin uses those tools constantly to keep us deterred. But if Russia ends up killing a bunch of NATO people, that's a big wild card and one that is frankly really unsavory to talk about.

 

How will this all turn out?

Bell: If President Biden is re-elected and Congress agrees to continue the delivery of U.S. military weaponry at roughly the same level and in the same categories and types as before, we can expect that neither of the two contesting parties will achieve a decisive breakthrough for the foreseeable future. If President Trump is elected in November, we can expect some sort of dramatic U.S. proposal for an immediate halt to the fighting.  Assuming that is rejected outright by Ukraine and Trump cuts off all U.S. military assistance in response, then Ukraine’s ability to continue to prosecute the war for more than a few more months would be at risk, and its incentives, however unwilling, to seek a negotiated settlement would be increased.

Breedlove: It is my belief that this war will end exactly how Western policy leaders decide it's going to end. If we give Ukraine what they need to win, and we are not doing that now, they will win. If we stop supporting Ukraine, they will lose. And if that happens the fact of the matter is that Russia will again subjugate Ukraine, and many tens of thousands of Ukrainian soldiers and civilians will die in a guerrilla conflict the likes of which Russia has never seen.

 

What are the potential long-term geopolitical ramifications of the war?

Koposov: If Putin wins the war, he will most likely continue with other aggressions, and U.S. leadership in the world will be significantly undermined. China will most likely learn the lesson and imitate him, at least to some extent. And the so-called Global South will become even more anti-American than it is now.

Bell: NATO’s own security is inextricably intertwined in the outcome of this conflict.  As the leaders of the alliance themselves agreed at their summit in Madrid in 2022, Russia’s willingness to prosecute this aggression means that it cannot be excluded that it might also decide to commit aggression against a NATO ally, NATO’s Article 5 collective security commitments notwithstanding.

Khapaeva: If Putin wins, the war will not end Russia’s aggression and put to rest its ambitions to restore the Russian Empire/USSR. An attack on an Eastern European or Baltic NATO state is already avidly discussed by Kremlin propagandists. The West showed a feeble and inconsistent response to Russia’s war against Georgia in 2008 and the 2014 annexation of Crimea. After Russia invaded Ukraine, made-up fear of crossing “Putin’s red lines” led to rationing the arms to Ukraine and enabled Russia to buy time and fortify the front line on the occupied territories. It’s going to be hard to persuade the Russians that they now must obey the international norms they have been violating for the past two decades. Hence, Putin will seek to compromise NATO. If, at that moment, the U.S. decides to instead focus on its “domestic agenda,” NATO’s collapse will become imminent.

]]> mpearson34 1 1708542661 2024-02-21 19:11:01 1708653514 2024-02-23 01:58:34 0 0 news Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts experts assess the state of the Ukraine war on its second anniversary.

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2024-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-21 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673170 673170 image <![CDATA[Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts experts assess the state of the Ukraine war on its second anniversary.]]> Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts experts assess the state of the Ukraine war on its second anniversary.

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<![CDATA[Is NATO Ready for a Russian Invasion?]]> 34600 Gen. Philip Breedlove, International Affairs

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Gen. Philip Breedlove, International Affairs

]]> mpearson34 1 1708628025 2024-02-22 18:53:45 1708628025 2024-02-22 18:53:45 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-17T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[‘Women Rock!’ in Philip Auslander’s Vibrant, Engrossing and Erudite New Book]]> 34600 Philip Auslander, LMC

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Philip Auslander, LMC

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<![CDATA[Oh, the Humanit(ies)! Why Integrating the Liberal Arts and STEM Is a Win-Win for Students, Institutions]]> 34600 Richard Utz, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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Richard Utz, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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<![CDATA[Innovation Matters: The Politics of Innovation]]> 34600 Mark Zachary Taylor, Public Policy

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Mark Zachary Taylor, Public Policy

]]> mpearson34 1 1708627515 2024-02-22 18:45:15 1708627614 2024-02-22 18:46:54 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-14T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Public Policy Student Wins EVPR Award at Research, Innovation, & Development Competition]]> 35777 Ximena Pizarro-Bore, a Ph.D. student in the School of Public Policy, won an Executive Vice President for Research (EVPR) travel grant at the recent Career, Research, Innovation, and Development Conference (CRIDC) poster competition.

Pizzaro-Bore was among 116 graduate students from across Georgia Tech who competed at CRIDC this year. Students presented their research in front of their peers, as well as faculty and staff judges. The event also featured the first-event online poster competition.

Bore is writing her dissertation on federal workers' telework experiences during and after the Covid-19 pandemic.

“It is the organizational perspective that makes this question interesting, following the question, 'What can we learn about knowledge management, cooperation, collaboration, and work-life balance supportive cultures? What protocols or norms need to change for future telework design?'" Pizarro-Bore said.

CRIDC is a collaborative effort of the Graduate Student Government Association and the Graduate Career Development Team from the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate and Postdoctoral Education.

For more information on the event and awards, check out the Office of Graduate and Postdoctoral Education’s original story.

]]> Stephanie Kadel 1 1708542316 2024-02-21 19:05:16 1708542316 2024-02-21 19:05:16 0 0 news Ximena Pizarro-Bore, a Ph.D. student in the School of Public Policy, won an Executive Vice President for Research travel grant at the recent Career, Research, Innovation, and Development Conference (CRIDC) poster competition. 
 

]]>
2024-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-21 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673169 673169 image <![CDATA[Ximena Pizarro-Bore, Ph.D. Student in the School of Public Policy]]> Ximena Pizarro-Bore, a Ph.D. student in the School of Public Policy, won an Executive Vice President for Research travel grant at the 2024 Career, Research, Innovation, and Development Conference (CRIDC) poster competition on Feb. 8.

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<![CDATA[Seven IAC Staff Join Inclusive Leaders Academy]]> 35766 Tracy Kincaid, Andrew McGraw, Kyle Poe, Camille Liverpool, Joshua Smith, Mitzi Williams, and Victoria Thompson will represent Ivan Allen College in the eighth cohort of Georgia Tech's Inclusive Leaders Academy (ILA), joining 66 participants from 30 different departments. Their positions range from career educators to social media specialist to Chair of the School of History and Sociology and more.

The ILA is designed to develop self-awareness, courage, mindfulness, and social intelligence among Georgia Tech faculty and staff. More than 500 participants have graduated from the program since its inception in 2017, and those who complete it earn the title "Culture Champions."

The program is a 16-week immersive learning experience comprising online and instructor-led courses, accumulating an equivalent of 27 hours of learning and practice. The curriculum includes several core components to unlock individual leadership insights while fostering group transformation. 

"We are excited to have another group of people leaders diving into this content together," said Pearl Alexander, the executive director of organizational culture and founder of ILA. "According to feedback, the skills and community developed throughout this program have changed lives for the better." 

"Fostering inclusive leaders who embody our organizational values is paramount to our success," she added. "ILA provides participants with a distinctive opportunity for deep reflection and personal growth." 

Investing in initiatives like the Inclusive Leaders Academy reflects Georgia Tech's mission of fostering an inclusive culture and equipping its leaders with the skills to navigate complex environments. The dedication of Georgia Tech's leaders to this initiative showcases their unwavering commitment to driving positive change within the institution and beyond. 

]]> dminardi3 1 1707767361 2024-02-12 19:49:21 1708531111 2024-02-21 15:58:31 0 0 news Georgia Tech's Inclusive Leaders Academy aims to unlock individual leadership insights while fostering group transformation. 

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<![CDATA[LMC's Brock to Serve on AI Network Advisory Board]]> 36009 Atlanta communities most vulnerable to bias and inequity in artificial intelligence (AI) are the focus of a new Atlanta-based ethics initiative being funded by a $1.3 million Mellon Foundation grant.

The Atlanta Interdisciplinary Artificial Intelligence (AIAI) Network, which is set to formally kick off during an event at Science Gallery Atlanta from 4 to 7 p.m. Oct. 4, brings together computing, humanities, and social justice researchers from Georgia Tech, Clark Atlanta University, Emory University, and community partner DataedX.

Andre Brock, an associate professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication serves on the network’s steering committee. Carl DiSalvo, Georgia Tech School of Interactive Computing professor, and faculty member of the Institute for People and Technology, is an AIAI co-principal investigator (co-PI).

DiSalvo said the idea for the AIAI Network had been in the works for years. However, the researchers now have the needed funding thanks to the Mellon Foundation. The grant allows the network to hire its first graduate students for the 2023-2024 academic year.

A version of this story was first published by the College of Computing.

]]> cwhittle9 1 1708452006 2024-02-20 18:00:06 1708452029 2024-02-20 18:00:29 0 0 news Atlanta communities most vulnerable to bias and inequity in artificial intelligence (AI) are the focus of a new Atlanta-based ethics initiative being funded by a $1.3 million Mellon Foundation grant.

]]>
2024-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-20 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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671373 671373 image <![CDATA[André Brock, associate professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication]]> André Brock, associate professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication.

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<![CDATA[The Politics of Innovation]]> 34600 Mark Zachary Taylor, Public Policy

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Mark Zachary Taylor, Public Policy

]]> mpearson34 1 1708353601 2024-02-19 14:40:01 1708353599 2024-02-19 14:39:59 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Medicaid ‘Unwinding’ Could Lead to Eviction Crisis, New School of Public Policy Research Suggests]]> 34600 The United States may be in for a significant wave of evictions in a year or so, the unintended consequence of work to trim Medicaid rolls expanded during the Covid-19 public health emergency, according to new research from Georgia Tech’s School of Public Policy.

The study, authored by Assistant Professor Ashley C. Bradford and recently published in Health Affairs, found that evictions in Tennessee rose 24.5 percent between 2005 and 2009 relative to other Southern states following the state’s 2005 decision to remove approximately 190,000 people from its Medicaid rolls.

More than 16.4 million people nationwide — 86 times the Tennessee figure from 2005 — have already been taken off Medicaid as states react to a federal law requiring them to return to normal operations after years of expanded eligibility meant to blunt the impact of the pandemic, according to KFF Health News. As many as 24 million people could eventually lose access to Medicaid, according to the outlet.

However, Bradford warns that many aspects of health care administration and the housing market have changed since 2005, so it’s hard to say whether that 24.5% figure in her paper will cleanly translate to the economic and policy environment of 2025. The populations involved in Tennessee’s downsizing and the current national rollbacks are also different, adding more uncertainty.

“I think it’s safe to say that we will see disruptions in housing, but we are not going to be able to see exactly how large those disruptions will be for a few years,” Bradford said.

https://youtu.be/V7YkDwvWgzA?si=FwPKLP24paa6i4_A

Transformed Health Care and Housing Landscapes May Shift Impact

Among other things, where Tennessee’s 2005 Medicaid changes primarily affected working-age childless adults, the researchers say that the current Medicaid rollback is expected to disproportionately affect immigrants and people with disabilities — populations whose budgets are often more sensitive to economic shocks like the loss of health insurance.

On the other hand, according to the researchers, the Affordable Care Act could also reduce financial shocks and evictions for some families. The program first offered health insurance plans — including low- and zero-premium options — in 2013, well after the period Bradford and her co-authors studied in Tennessee.

Another group expected to be affected, older adults, may be somewhat sheltered from evictions due to savings or Social Security income, according to Bradford and her co-authors, Mir M. Ali of the University of Maryland, College Park and Johanna Catherin Maclean of George Mason University.

 

The Link Between Medicaid Loss and Evictions

So, what precisely is the connection between loss of Medicaid and eviction?

In the Tennessee case, the loss of health coverage — which persisted for most families removed from Medicaid in Tennessee in 2005 — would likely have added more financial stress to already strapped budgets. It also may have led to a higher incidence of preventable health issues or the undertreatment of existing chronic health conditions that could have made it harder for people to keep working, according to the researchers. Either situation could be financially devastating, potentially resulting in eventual eviction.

Evictions, in turn, often force people into housing located in areas with fewer employment opportunities and higher crime, further elevating the financial stress on vulnerable populations, leading to a cycle that can lock people — especially those affected by health issues or substance misuse — into nearly inescapable poverty, according to the study authors.

“We know evictions are extraordinarily damaging to families and individuals and can cause generational impacts. So we really need to be able to intervene and help vulnerable people before they get into a cycle where they cannot get out of it on their own,” Bradford said.

Bradford said one policy that could help would be a strong, temporary eviction moratorium similar to the one imposed nationally by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in response to the Covid-19 pandemic in 2021. Policymakers could also consider financial assistance to those being removed from the Medicaid rolls to help them stay on their feet during the transition, she said.

Methodology and Limitations

To reach their conclusions in the recent paper, Bradford and her co-authors used data from the Eviction Lab at Princeton University. They examined county-level eviction data from Tennessee and compared it to those of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Texas, Virginia, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia.

After controlling for variables such as whether political factors could have led to weakened rental protection laws, they found that the average annual eviction filings per Tennessee county increased by 27.6% as compared to counties in the other states in the U.S. Census Bureau’s South region. Eventual evictions increased by the slightly smaller 24.5% figure.

That works out to about 1,000 more annual evictions per Tennessee County than in other Southern states during the same period.

The study does have some limitations in addition to how much has changed since 2005, Bradford notes. She said the database has some gaps, lacks individual-level data, and does not track eviction notices or evictions overturned on appeal, although the latter is believed to be rare.

 

Probing Impact of Substance Abuse, Psychiatric Care Access, on Evictions

Bradford’s earlier research has examined the impact of evictions from other angles. In a 2019 paper published in Health Services Research, she also found that a 1% increase in the eviction rate is associated with an up to 0.596% chance of substance-related deaths for the average U.S. county.

In a 2023 study published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management with co-author Johanna Catherin Maclean, Bradford found that having ten additional psychiatric treatment centers in a county was associated with 2.1% fewer evictions.

The researchers hypothesized that increased access to psychiatric care improved the management of mental health disorders, which can lead to higher rates of employment and lower rates of activities likely to lead to eviction — such as nuisance behaviors or criminal activity.

It was one of the first papers to make a plausible link explaining the relationship between mental health treatment access and eviction, according to the researchers.

Bradford’s most recent paper, “TennCare Disenrollment Led to Increased Eviction Filings and Evictions in Tennessee Relative to Other Southern States,” was published on Feb. 5, 2024, in Health Affairs. It is available at https://doi.org/10.1377/hlthaff.2023.00973.

The School of Public Policy is a unit of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts.

]]> mpearson34 1 1708098965 2024-02-16 15:56:05 1708301263 2024-02-19 00:07:43 0 0 news The study examined Tennessee's 23005 trimming of its Medicaid rolls and the impact on evictions.

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2024-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-16 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673121 673121 image <![CDATA[eviction image.jpg]]> Evictions substantially rose in Tennessee compared to other Southern states after the 2005 removal of 190,000 people from Medicaid there, School of Public Policy Assistant Professor Ashley C. Bradford found in a new study published in Health Affairs. The study offers insights into what might happen after current efforts to return to normal Medicaid operations nationally following the Covid-19 public health emergency.

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<![CDATA[The Great Divide]]> 34600 Brian Y. An, Public Policy

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Brian Y. An, Public Policy

]]> mpearson34 1 1708119969 2024-02-16 21:46:09 1708119968 2024-02-16 21:46:08 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Biden Vows Response After US Troops Killed, and Other Mideast Developments]]> 34600 Lawrence Rubin, International Affairs

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Lawrence Rubin, International Affairs

]]> mpearson34 1 1708117493 2024-02-16 21:04:53 1708117492 2024-02-16 21:04:52 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-29T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Medicaid Enrollment Cuts Led to More Evictions, Study Finds]]> 34600 Ashley C. Bradford, Public Policy

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Ashley C. Bradford, Public Policy

]]> mpearson34 1 1708117427 2024-02-16 21:03:47 1708117426 2024-02-16 21:03:46 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-06T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-06T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-06T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Blinken: Israel Has No 'License to Dehumanize']]> 34600 Lawrence Rubin, International Affairs

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Lawrence Rubin, International Affairs

]]> mpearson34 1 1708117360 2024-02-16 21:02:40 1708117359 2024-02-16 21:02:39 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Georgia Lawmakers Investigate Deepfake Election Tricks]]> 34600 Brian Magerko, Literature, Media, and Communication

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Brian Magerko, Literature, Media, and Communication

]]> mpearson34 1 1708117295 2024-02-16 21:01:35 1708117294 2024-02-16 21:01:34 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Faltering Support for Ukraine Is 'Affecting the Solider on the Battlefield', Says Former NATO Commander]]> 34600 Gen. Philp Breedlove, International Affairs

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Gen. Philp Breedlove, International Affairs

]]> mpearson34 1 1708117208 2024-02-16 21:00:08 1708117206 2024-02-16 21:00:06 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Mock Trial Team Charts Record-Breaking Semester]]> 35766 The Georgia Tech Mock Trial team achieved record-breaking success during the Fall 2023 semester, placing in every tournament they attended for the first time in program history. Notable accolades include second place at the Emory Peach Bowl and fifth at the Duke Tobacco Road invitational tournament. 

Individual team members also earned 15 independent awards — the highest number in a semester to date. 

Now, the spring season is starting just as strong.  

In January, the Mock Trial team took home first place at the 19th Annual Ramblin' Wreck Invitational hosted by Georgia Tech — a feat unmatched in the documented history of the team. Mock Trial’s B team, led by Jeremhy Cesar and Sanjeev Viswan, placed first with a 7-1 record and received an Honorable Mention for the Spirit of D.M. Smith Award, recognizing their commitment to honesty, civility, and fair play. The A team, captained by Maya Iyer and Lyla Zedell, secured the fourth-place spot with a 6-2 record.  

"This was truly one of the best and most impressive finishes for GT Mock Trial at our home invitational in one of the best fields we've ever brought in with last year's national champions and runners-up," said team co-coach Andy McNeil. "Our season continues with the Jackson Regional American Mock Trial Association Tournament at the Mississippi College of Law!" 

]]> dminardi3 1 1707923320 2024-02-14 15:08:40 1708017648 2024-02-15 17:20:48 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Mock Trial team achieved record-breaking success during the Fall 2023 semester, placing in every tournament they attended for the first time in program history.

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2024-02-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-14 00:00:00 Di Minardi

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673079 673079 image <![CDATA[GT Mock Trial.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1707924036 2024-02-14 15:20:36 1707924003 2024-02-14 15:20:03
<![CDATA[Ivan Allen College Faculty Earn Summer and Fall 2023 CIOS Honor Roll Placements]]> 35777 Sixteen faculty members from across the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts have been named to the Student Recognition of Excellence in Teaching Honor Roll for instructional excellence in the Fall 2023 semester. They are among 40 faculty members campuswide honored by the Center for Teaching and Learning during the fall semester.

Eleven of the faculty members come from the School of Modern Languages. The School of History and Sociology and the School of Literature, Media, and Communication each had two faculty members honored. One faculty member was from the School of Economics.

The Honor Roll is selected at the end of each term based on scores from the Course Instructor Opinion Survey (CIOS), in which students rate their instructors in areas such as their respect and concern for students, their level of enthusiasm about the course, and their ability to stimulate student interest in the subject matter.

The Fall 2023 honorees are:

In addition, 10 Ivan Allen College faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and staff members were named to the Summer 2023 Honor Roll. They are among 49 others campuswide who made the honor roll.

Six of the honorees are from the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, including two faculty members and three Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellows. Amanda Blocker, an academic program manager in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, was also honored for GT1000.

Three faculty members on the Summer 2023 Honor Roll came from the School of Modern Languages, and one from the School of Public Policy.

The Summer 2023 honorees are:

The Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts congratulates all of the outstanding instructors and scholars named to the Fall and Summer 2023 Honor Rolls on their dedication to providing our students with a welcoming, supportive learning environment and transformative learning experiences.

]]> Stephanie Kadel 1 1707862227 2024-02-13 22:10:27 1707931576 2024-02-14 17:26:16 0 0 news Sixteen faculty members from across the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts have been named to the Student Recognition of Excellence in Teaching Honor Roll for instructional excellence in the Fall 2023 semester. Ten faculty members from the College were named to the Summer 2023 Honor Roll. 

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2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13 00:00:00 Stephanie N. Kadel
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673074 673074 image <![CDATA[Ivan Allen College CIOS Honor Roll Placements, Fall and Summer 2023]]> image/jpeg 1707862236 2024-02-13 22:10:36 1707862236 2024-02-13 22:10:36
<![CDATA[Vanderbilt Professor: Humanities and STEM Can Do More Together, and Here’s How]]> 34600 Even a few years ago, genomics wouldn’t have been an area of research you’d necessarily expect to find humanities and social sciences researchers working shoulder-to-shoulder with their counterparts in STEM fields to find solutions to pressing problems. 

But that’s exactly what Jay Clayton, a professor at Vanderbilt University, achieved with his project examining how film, shows, and social media portray the risks and benefits posed by genetic science. 

Clayton recently visited Georgia Tech to share his experience and model of transdisciplinary collaboration among scholars in science, literature, and the social sciences. During his visit, he gave a talk and presided over a faculty workshop. 

“The discussions of his work at both events confirmed the strong interest and potential in future transdisciplinary efforts in the College and the Institute,” said Richard Utz, senior associate dean in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts. “We should capitalize on the momentum these discussions indicate and follow Dr. Clayton’s example of linking our individual disciplines and their methodologies with those in other units, especially for the sake of our students, who crave experiential learning that not only increases knowledge, but also directly impacts policy and society.” 

The events were co-sponsored by the School of Literature, Media, and Communication; the School of Modern Languages; and the School of Public Policy. The events also brought together colleagues from Georgia Tech’s Center for Integrative Genomics. 

How the Humanities Can Inform Science Policy 

Clayton’s work, which attracted $8 million in National Institutes of Health funding, seeks to better understand how culture affects attitudes towards genetic privacy, demonstrating, Clayton said, “how humanists can collaborate with scientists to have tangible effects on public policy.” 

His team, which includes students in public policy, economics, anthropology, and other fields, examined hundreds of films and shows, including Blade Runner, X-Men films, and medical dramas, coding them for how they portrayed genetic research. They not only discovered changes in attitudes toward genetic privacy over the years but also successfully published 24 articles in refereed journals — most with undergraduate students as co-authors.  

The ongoing work has helped Clayton develop his problem-based approach to research, in which scholars from a variety of disciplines look to examine a single issue and share data but use their own research methods as they work toward synthesizing their conclusions and policy recommendations. 

The model is the subject of Clayton’s 2023 book, Literature, Science, and Public Policy: From Darwin to Genomics

Similarities to VIP 

Whereas the concept may be new to some in the liberal arts, it is likely more familiar to the Georgia Tech community. The Vertically Integrated Project program, founded at Georgia Tech in 2008, involves undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty in large-scale, multidisciplinary projects. 

Ivan Allen College students and faculty are involved with colleagues across campus in numerous VIP projects, including ones examining the intersection of art and AI, linguistics, and the interplay between sports and community transformation. 

You can learn more about VIP programs that are a good fit for Ivan Allen College students at the VIP website

The School of Literature, Media, and Communication; the School of Modern Languages; and the School of Public Policy are units of the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts. 

]]> mpearson34 1 1707919059 2024-02-14 13:57:39 1707919059 2024-02-14 13:57:39 0 0 news Jay Clayton talked to students and faculty about how to integrate the humanities and social sciences into STEM research projects.

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2024-02-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-14 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673077 673077 image <![CDATA[clayton event.jpg]]> Jay Clayton, a professor at Vanderbilt University, spoke to Georgia Tech students and faculty about integrating humanities and social sciences in science policy research.

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<![CDATA[Ivan Allen College Research Conference Expands to Include Undergraduate Students]]> 35777 For the first time, the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts will host a combined undergraduate and graduate research conference, an expansion of the annual Graduate Student Research Conference. The Ivan Allen College Research Conference will be held on Friday, Feb. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Price Gilbert Memorial Library Scholars Event Theater.

“We’re excited to expand the conference to include the entire Ivan Allen College student community,” said Andrew McGraw, academic program manager in the dean’s office. “Undergraduate and graduate students in the College will have an opportunity to form new connections and get feedback from students, faculty, and staff working in similar areas.”

“I know it’s easy to keep your work close to your chest until it’s perfect, but I highly encourage any student interested in participating in the research conference to participate in this event,” said Kallysta T. Jones, who is pursuing a Master of Science in International Affairs, Science, and Technology. “You never know what amazing experiences will come of it.”

Jones would know — she won an award for her paper, “To the Moon and Back: Terrestrial Teachings for the Future of Lunar Governance,” at last year’s conference.

“Participating in IAC’s research conference last year was such a wonderful experience,” Jones added. “Not only did I present my research publicly for the first time, but I also networked with amazing students and passionate researchers. I had the opportunity to receive positive feedback; to be asked questions I hadn’t yet thought of myself; and to learn more about the research being pursued across campus.”

“It was inspiring to witness the diverse research pursuits of individuals within the Ivan Allen College community and to explore potential avenues for collaboration,” said Zhuoqi Helen Dong, a Ph.D. student in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, who won an award for her paper on “Military-Civil Fusion Policies in China: Challenges and Opportunities in Space” at the 2023 conference.

McGraw said all Ivan Allen College students are welcome to present their research “in any form, whether it’s complete or incomplete, from independent study, VIPs, coursework projects, capstone presentations, and everything in between.”

Student research submissions are due by Tuesday, Feb. 20 at 11:59 p.m. via the Student Submission Form.

"The expanded research conference will give our undergraduate students a new opportunity to share their research and make connections with students, faculty, and staff across the Ivan Allen College community,” said Associate Dean for Academic Affairs Shatakshee Dhongde, who is also an associate professor in the School of Economics.

“It offers a supportive environment in which they can receive feedback, explore new avenues of inquiry, hone their presentation skills, and prepare for campuswide as well as national research conferences," added Dhongde.

The Graduate Student Research Conference has been hosted by the Graduate Student Advisory Board and the Ivan Allen College Office of the Dean for over a decade. For the first time this year, the Undergraduate Student Advisory Board will also be hosting the conference.

The conference will feature an undergraduate research poster session, networking reception and lunch, and graduate paper presentations. There will also be awards for the best graduate paper presentations.

For more event details, information, and schedule, visit the Ivan Allen College Research Conference event listing.

]]> Stephanie Kadel 1 1707864874 2024-02-13 22:54:34 1707865198 2024-02-13 22:59:58 0 0 news For the first time, the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts will host a combined undergraduate and graduate research conference, an expansion of the annual Graduate Student Research Conference. The Ivan Allen College Research Conference will be held on Friday, Feb. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Price Gilbert Memorial Library Scholars Event Theater.

]]>
2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13 00:00:00 Andrew McGraw
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673075 673075 image <![CDATA[Graduate student Zhuoqi Helen Dong (International Affairs) presents “Military-Civil Fusion Policies in China: Challenges an Opportunities in Space” at the 2023 Graduate Student Research Conference.]]> image/jpeg 1707864884 2024-02-13 22:54:44 1707864884 2024-02-13 22:54:44
<![CDATA[Ivan Allen College Faculty Members Join Energy, Policy, and Innovation Center Affiliate Program ]]> 34600 Nine full-time Ivan Allen College faculty members are among 13 named to the new Faculty Affiliates program in Georgia Tech’s Energy, Policy, and Innovation Center, a unit of the Strategic Energy Institute (SEI). 

Two other appointees hold joint or courtesy appointments in the College. 

The new affiliates will serve as informal advisors helping guide the Center’s work, enhance opportunities for interdisciplinary research, and help connect faculty members and policymakers throughout the Southeast. 

Interim SEI director Laura Taylor, also the chair of the School of Economics, expects the program to “lead to more enrichment opportunities for students, and more awareness of the research intersections of energy technology, economics, and public policy,” according to SEI’s announcement of the appointments. 

The full-time faculty Ivan Allen College faculty members named to the program are: 

Economics: 

Public Policy: 

Valerie Thomas, the Anderson-Interface Chair of Natural Systems and professor in the School of Industrial & Systems Engineering — and a joint appointee in the School of Public Policy — was also named to the program. Rounding out the IAC-affiliated appointments is Joe F. Bozeman III, who holds a courtesy appointment in the School of Public Policy. His primary appointment is assistant professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 

U.S. News & World Report recently ranked Georgia Tech as the top public university and No. 3 nationwide in energy and fuel research. 

]]> mpearson34 1 1707860702 2024-02-13 21:45:02 1707861090 2024-02-13 21:51:30 0 0 news The new affiliates will serve as informal advisors helping guide the Center’s work, among other things.

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2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-13 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673072 673072 image <![CDATA[Ivan Allen College faculty join Energy, Policy, and Innovation Center.]]> Ivan Allen College faculty join Energy, Policy, and Innovation Center.

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<![CDATA[Prompt Engineering: The Art of Getting What You Need From Generative AI]]> 35777 If you’ve spent even an hour or two on ChatGPT or another generative AI model, you know that getting it to generate the content you want can be challenging and even downright frustrating.

Prompt engineering is the process of crafting and refining a specific, detailed prompt — one that will get you the response you need from a generative AI model. This kind of “coding in English” is a complex and tricky process. Fortunately, our faculty at the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts at Georgia Tech are engaged in teaching and research in this exciting emerging field.

I met with Assistant Professor Yeqing Kong in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication to talk about prompt engineering. She shared three approaches to crafting a prompt that she has collected from leading experts, and invited me to try them out on a prompt. Read the full story.

]]> Stephanie Kadel 1 1707776452 2024-02-12 22:20:52 1707854495 2024-02-13 20:01:35 0 0 news An Ivan Allen College communicator went to prompt engineering school with Assistant Professor Yeqing Kong. In this article, she shares what she learned.

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2024-02-12T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-12T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-12 00:00:00 Stephanie N. Kadel
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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673059 673059 image <![CDATA[AI Prompt Engineering]]> image/png 1707776524 2024-02-12 22:22:04 1707776524 2024-02-12 22:22:04
<![CDATA[Retired Justice Robert Benham Receives Ivan Allen Jr. Prize ]]> 27713 The Honorable Robert Benham has spent his life breaking racial barriers as the first African American to hold various positions in the field of law. He was the first African American to establish a law practice in his hometown of Cartersville, Georgia, the first president of the Bartow County Bar Association, the first judge on the Georgia State Court of Appeals, and the first African American to win a statewide election since Reconstruction. His public service career was defined by a commitment to safeguarding civil liberties. For these reasons, the retired justice is the recipient of the 2024 Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage, which honors individuals who have stood up for moral principles at the risk of their careers, livelihoods, and even their lives.

Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera presented the award to Benham during a luncheon at the Biltmore Thursday.

“Like other pioneers know too well, the price for being the first can be incredibly high,” said Cabrera. “Justice Benham admits it wasn’t easy. He faced discrimination, isolation, insults, and threats. But he didn’t stop. Instead, he let his love for the law, his dedication to his community and home state of Georgia, his commitment to country, and his pull to public service drive him, no matter the obstacles.”

Following the award presentation, a symposium featuring a panel of legal experts explored the theme of Leaders in “Progress and Service”: Lives in the Law. Panelists included Gerogia Supreme Court Justice Charles Bethel, Georgia Tech’s General Counsel Danette Joslyn-Gaul, former Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court Harold Melton, and Director of the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services Candice Broce. Roberta Berry, Georgia Tech associate vice provost for undergraduate education, moderated the panel.

The lawyers shared their views of the law and of lawyers, both as advocates for their clients and as members of the judiciary. They also connected the discussion to the life of Justice Benham.

“Everything about Justice Benham’s career and his professional life has been about giving back,” said Joslyn-Gaul. “He has been honored many times, and 99.9% of the awards are for his selflessness. That kind of professional life and service to others, as a lawyer, is exceptional.”

The Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage is named for former Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen Jr., a graduate of Georgia Tech, who at great personal and political risk was the only southern white elected official to testify before Congress in support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

]]> Victor Rogers 1 1707486946 2024-02-09 13:55:46 1707507254 2024-02-09 19:34:14 0 0 news Georgia judicial pioneer honored for his commitment to safeguarding civil liberties.

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2024-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-09 00:00:00 Victor Rogers

Institute Communications

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673027 673028 673029 673027 image <![CDATA[Retired Justice Robert Benham]]> Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera presented the Ivan Prize Jr. Prize for Social Courage to the Honorable Robert Benham. (Photo by Allison Carter)

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673028 image <![CDATA[Retired Justice Robert Benham]]> The Honorable Robert Benham, recipient of the 2024 Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage, with his wife Nell, his son Austin, and daughter-in-law Aleesha. (Photo by Allison Carter)

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673029 image <![CDATA[Symposium at Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage]]> Roberta Berry, Georgia Tech associate professor of public policy, moderated a panel of legal experts exploring the theme of Leaders in “Progress and Service”: Lives in the Law. Pictured (L-R): Berry, Director of the Georgia Division of Family and Children Services Candice Broce, former Chief Justice of the Georgia Supreme Court Harold Melton, Georgia Supreme Court Justice Charles Bethel, and Georgia Tech’s General Counsel Danette Joslyn-Gaul. (Photo by Allison Carter)

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<![CDATA[More on Justice Robert Benham ]]>
<![CDATA[Putin's Chances of Winning Ukraine War Look Bright]]> 34600 Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

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Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

]]> mpearson34 1 1707492013 2024-02-09 15:20:13 1707492013 2024-02-09 15:20:13 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-14T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Ukraine Will Win the War — if the US Helps, Former NATO Commander Says]]> 34600 Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

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Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

]]> mpearson34 1 1707491949 2024-02-09 15:19:09 1707491949 2024-02-09 15:19:09 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-15T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-15T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-15T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Russia to Crush Ukraine Without West's Support, NATO Ex-Chief Warns]]> 34600 Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

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Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

]]> mpearson34 1 1707491862 2024-02-09 15:17:42 1707491862 2024-02-09 15:17:42 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-16T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-16T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-16T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Putin Is Losing Troops at an 'Unfathomable Rate' | Gen. Breedlove]]> 34600 Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

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Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

]]> mpearson34 1 1707491770 2024-02-09 15:16:10 1707491770 2024-02-09 15:16:10 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-24T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[US Attacking an Iranian 'Capital Asset' Will Send a Clear Message: Gen. Philip Breedlove]]> 34600 Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

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Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

]]> mpearson34 1 1707491591 2024-02-09 15:13:11 1707491591 2024-02-09 15:13:11 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-30T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-30T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-30T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[US Attacking an Iranian 'Capital Asset' Will Send a Clear Message: Gen. Philip Breedlove]]> 34600 Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

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Gen. Philip Breedlove, Nunn School

]]> mpearson34 1 1707491428 2024-02-09 15:10:28 1707491428 2024-02-09 15:10:28 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2024-02-08T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Can Solar Geoengineering Save the World? ]]> 35766 The concept of solar geoengineering — blocking the sun's radiation to slow Earth's warming — is no longer just the realm of science fiction. In 2023, the U.S. government and the UN released reports on the topic. Whether or not solar geoengineering can save the world is up for debate, and Tony Harding, an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy, is contributing to the conversation. 

Harding is an alumnus of the School of Economics and returned to Georgia Tech after a postdoc at Harvard University. He studies the impact of innovative technology on climate change policy and governance, focusing on solar geoengineering. In the eight years he's been researching it, Harding said it's the scale of the conversation that's changed the most: not what the researchers are speaking about, but who they're speaking to. 

"A lot of people in the climate policy and academic realms were hesitant to talk about solar geoengineering, and I think that’s starting to change," Harding said. "There's definitely wider acceptance of at least talking about it, and in that way, pathways to having spaces to talk about it and research funds are opening up." 

As the idea of solar geoengineering picks up steam, Harding invites everyone to join the conversation, starting with learning about what it is, how it works, and whether or not this once-niche proposition really can save the world. 

What is Solar Geoengineering? 

The most commonly proposed method of solar geoengineering, which also goes by names such as solar radiation modification or climate intervention, uses sulfate aerosols. When injected into the Earth's stratosphere, they reflect a small amount of the sun's radiation — less than 1% — and reduce Earth's surface temperature. This option is the most popular, and the one Harding studies, because we have natural examples, he explained. Volcanoes release sulfates when they erupt, and the largest ones are strong enough to push them into the stratosphere.  

"So we have evidence from the past that if sulfate aerosols make it up to the stratosphere, there's a cooling effect," he said. "This natural analog gives us a bit more belief that it's going to work at least in some of the ways we expect it to in the real world and not just on a computer." 

The other two types of solar geoengineering researchers consider most seriously are marine cloud brightening to reflect incoming sunlight and Cirrus cloud thinning to let light escape more easily. Each one has pros and cons. For example, marine cloud brightening would only occur over the deepest and darkest parts of the ocean, Harding said, "which would have a non-uniform cooling effect and could lead to certain adverse outcomes. " 

Stratospheric aerosol injection has a more uniform distribution and cooling effect that better mimics the warming we're experiencing. However, it comes with its own concerns, one of which is that the cooling isn't permanent.  

"If something happened to stop the deployment of the aerosols, whether it was for political or technological reasons, we would bounce right back and experience a rapid heating that we've never experienced before, and could have catastrophic impacts," Harding said. 

What are the Costs and Benefits of Solar Geoengineering? 

This question is where Harding's research makes the most impact. As an economist, he examines the costs and benefits of solar geoengineering to highlight the tradeoffs involved. Harding has published articles on how solar geoengineering could impact other climate change mitigation policies, how it affects income inequality, and the value of reducing uncertainty around solar geoengineering

"Making it clear what the different tradeoffs are around climate policies is super important for informing decision-making," he said. "On one side, we have these really, at their core, basic scientific questions around whether solar geoengineering will work and if it can scale up. But it's also an interesting question from a governance and economics perspective. Solar geoengineering has global repercussions, the decision will affect the entire world. How do we develop governance structures, conversations, and inclusivity to ensure we're making a choice for the collective good?"  

For example, one of the downsides of using sulfate aerosols for solar geoengineering is negative health effects. But it also has the benefit of preventing temperature-related deaths. So, how do they compare? Harding's recently submitted paper, which is not yet peer-reviewed, finds that the benefits of reduced deaths outweigh the adverse health effects of solar geoengineering "by at least an order of magnitude — if not two orders of magnitude," he said.  

Harding notes that a more comprehensive comparison of risks and benefits is still required, but in the context of the two health impacts he examined, “Yes, it’s a concern, and something we should consider, but we need to put it in perspective that the benefits are significantly greater than that negative effect." 

Why is Solar Geoengineering Controversial? 

Uncertain health outcomes? Check. What else makes solar geoengineering so controversial that some academics want a ban on public funding, experiments, patents, deployment, and support for the technology in international institutions? 

There is a running theme in climate conversations that discussing adaptation policies reduces the focus on cutting emissions, Harding said, and the concerns around solar geoengineering are the same: not just that it will pull research funds from mitigation efforts, but that it will pull attention from dealing with the source of the warming as well. (His 2023 paper examines this problem.

Although he disagrees, others believe that researching solar geoengineering also makes it more likely that we deploy it, Harding explained. So, for those against the technology, disrupting research efforts to prevent the idea from moving further makes sense. 

What's Next? 

As with any unfamiliar and emerging technology, questions arise, such as, will this go horribly wrong and destroy the planet? Or, will it be the solution to all of our problems? 

"Putting my realistic hat on, it's probably somewhere in between," Harding said. "It's always hard to predict the future, but I can propose what I think is a realistic hope for where it can go." 

Harding anticipates more research and is hopeful for continued discourse between academics and the public. 

"The first and most important thing to do is make people aware of this technology and educate them about it," Harding said. "We have to understand how general people, outside of policymakers, feel about it — because that matters a lot." 

He also wants to see more serious international policy discussions around governing solar geoengineering to prevent a situation where one person or country deploys it independently. Whether it's a moratorium on its use or another agreement, international guidelines would help legitimize research without fears of a rogue actor, he explained. 

Final Takeaway 

To package it all up into a neat little tagline, "Solar geoengineering is a really new technology that could alleviate a lot of suffering in the case of climate change. But there's a lot of uncertainty, and it needs a lot more attention to quell any concerns about catastrophe," Harding said.  

"The most salient concern is that we put a lot of faith in solar geoengineering, invest a lot of resources, and slow down emissions cuts because we think we have a silver bullet. And then we get to 2080 and realize it doesn't work as expected. That's a very real concern. But the one that receives less attention is if we put solar geoengineering aside and don't spend the resources investigating it. Then we get to 2080 and realize, 'Wow, this technology could have worked and relieved a lot of suffering.' I think it's important to understand the flip side of that." 

]]> dminardi3 1 1706634850 2024-01-30 17:14:10 1707320464 2024-02-07 15:41:04 0 0 news As the idea of solar geoengineering picks up steam, Tony Harding, an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy, invites everyone to join the conversation — starting with learning about what it is, how it works, and whether or not this once-niche proposition really can save the world. 

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2024-01-30T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-30T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-30 00:00:00 Di Minardi
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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<![CDATA[Dean's Report Highlights Momentum in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts]]> 36009 The Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts is defying enrollment trends in liberal arts and building momentum to expand its positive impact. Read the 2022-23 Dean's Report.

]]> cwhittle9 1 1706720552 2024-01-31 17:02:32 1706720785 2024-01-31 17:06:25 0 0 news The Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts is defying enrollment trends in liberal arts and building momentum to expand its positive impact.

 

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2024-01-31T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-31T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-31 00:00:00 672914 672914 image <![CDATA[dean's report cover - text.jpeg]]> image/jpeg 1706720643 2024-01-31 17:04:03 1706720643 2024-01-31 17:04:03 <![CDATA[]]>
<![CDATA[Birchfield Rises to the Rank of Officer of France’s National Order of Merit]]> 36009 Vicki Birchfield, a professor in Georgia Tech’s Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, received one of France’s highest civilian honors for her continued dedication to furthering Franco-American relations. Birchfield rose to the rank of Officer of France's National Order of Merit, 13 years after being honored as “Chevalier,” or Knight of the National Order of Merit.

A heartfelt ceremony took place at Georgia Tech, where speakers from both Georgia Tech and the Consulate General of France in Atlanta spoke about the unbreakable thread that has long connected Birchfield to France. Georgia Tech Provost Steve McLaughlin spoke, along with Rami Abi Akl, French Attaché for Science and Technology in the Southeastern United States, and Anne-Laure Desjonquères, the Consul General of France in Atlanta.

All speakers were united in highlighting Birchfield’s many accomplishments, celebrating her enduring and deep connection to France. She remains committed to providing students with opportunities to better understand French politics and culture.

Provost McLaughlin spoke of Birchfield’s pivotal role in furthering Georgia Tech’s commitment to International Initiatives by giving more students access to learning about France and the European Union. From her leadership in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs as co-director of the Center for European and Transatlantic Studies, and director of Tech’s immersive summer European Union study abroad program, to her role in developing Tech’s successful First-Year Semester Abroad (FYSA) program at Georgia Tech-Europe, Birchfield has shown an unwavering devotion to scholarship and to her students.

Abi Akl and Consul General Desjonquères both spoke with great respect and affection for the evening’s honoree. In describing Georgia Tech’s most dedicated Francophile, Abi Akl was astonished that every time he met with her, he learned something new about France, things that were not found in textbooks. Calling out Birchfield for her “Francophile-ness,” the Attaché spoke of Birchfield’s commitment to helping develop and direct Georgia Tech’s First Year Semester Abroad Program at Georgia Tech-Europe. The program brings fifty lucky incoming first-year Georgia Tech students to Metz to jumpstart their journey to global citizenship and leadership. Abi Akl noted that, “Beyond the great learning experience, this program has been fostering the next generation of transatlantic leaders that tomorrow's world will need to tackle the upcoming challenges.”

Next, Consul General Desjonquères told of Birchfield’s many accomplishments, all linked through a “deep and enduring love of France.” After reviewing Birchfield’s remarkable academic and professional career, with a focus on European politics, the European Union, comparative politics, and international political economy, the Consul General remarked, “Your work has not only enriched academic discourse but has also contributed significantly to the broader cultural and intellectual exchange between France and the United States.”

Thanks to her remarkable devotion to France, continually advancing French-American friendship and understanding, Birchfield was honored with a promotion from the rank of “Knight” of France's National Order of Merit to “Officer.” As Birchfield is bilingual, the Consul General ended her remarks in French, reminding the audience that thanks to the FYSA program, many students were leaving their home country for the first time, concluding, “These students are of course always welcome in my home country.”

Surrounded by a crowd of beloved family and friends, Birchfield was pinned with the medal of Officer of the National Order of Merit by Pierre Keichinger, French Army Liaison Officer, who traveled from his post in Alabama to bestow the medal on behalf of the French government.

A visibly moved Birchfield addressed the crowd, thanking so many who were in the audience, from Provost Steve McLaughlin to Bernard Kippelen, vice provost for international initiatives; Steven Girardot, vice provost for undergraduate education; and Amy Bass Henry, executive director, office of international education. She also acknowledged the staff of the Georgia Tech-Europe Atlanta office, thanking Iyonka Strawn-Valcy, Catherine Bass, Andrea Gappell, Alina Opreanu, and Allie Snyder. She expressed gratitude to Cassie McGinnis, former FYSA program and operations manager, and Elizabeth Reese, the new program and operations manager, in the office of undergraduate education, who gave their all to ensure smooth operations of the First-Year Semester Abroad program at Georgia Tech-Europe. Not in attendance, but also thanked, were leadership, faculty, and staff at the Metz campus, including Abdallah Ougazzaden, president of GT-Europe, and French lecturer, Sonia Serafin.

Several of Birchfield’s former FYSA students were in the crowd, a testament to a professor who has forever impacted their lives. Second-year international affairs major, Zoe Glickman, was drawn to Georgia Tech by Birchfield, saying, “In my admission’s essay to Tech, I wrote about wanting to learn from Dr. Birchfield as one of the reasons I wanted to come to Tech. I was in the second cohort of FYSA in 2022, and when I heard Dr. Birchfield was the director of FYSA, I knew that it was a perfect program for me.” Glickman is currently a teaching assistant for Birchfield’s global citizenship course, and she finds Birchfield’s enthusiasm and dedication to her students contagious.

Birchfield has come a long way since her mother helped her scrape together enough money for her first trip to France, thus launching what would become a lifelong love affair with the country. She spoke of what a privilege it is to wake up every day and pursue her passion. A humble Birchfield said, “Receiving this honor from France, a country and culture that has so significantly shaped my life’s work, is the most deeply meaningful distinction I could imagine, and it will certainly be a highlight of my career here at Georgia Tech. “

]]> cwhittle9 1 1705531173 2024-01-17 22:39:33 1706566429 2024-01-29 22:13:49 0 0 news Vicki Birchfield, a professor in the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs at Georgia Tech’s Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, was promoted from the rank of Knight to Officer of France's National Order of Merit. Birchfield was recognized for her deep commitment to French-American relations and friendship through her ongoing scholarship and role in educating students about France and the European Union.

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2024-01-17T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-17T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-17 00:00:00 Andrea Gappell
Communications Program Manager, Georgia Tech-Europe

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<![CDATA[Public Accommodations and Inclusion at Tech]]> 34600 Todd Michney, HSOC, and Janet Murray, LMC

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Todd Michney, HSOC, and Janet Murray, LMC

]]> mpearson34 1 1706560789 2024-01-29 20:39:49 1706560789 2024-01-29 20:39:49 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-26T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-26T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-26T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Japan Is Now the 5th Country to Land on the Moon — the Technology Used Will Lend Itself to Future Lunar Missions]]> 34600 Mariel Borowitz, INTA

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Mariel Borowitz, INTA

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<![CDATA[Black Twitter Remains Unbothered in Elon Musk's X]]> 34600 André Brock, LMC

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André Brock, LMC

]]> mpearson34 1 1706559886 2024-01-29 20:24:46 1706559923 2024-01-29 20:25:23 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-29T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Mock Trial Coach Named Interim Co-Director of Law, Science, and Technology]]> 34600 School of Public Policy alumnus and lecturer Andy McNeil, PubPol 2001, has been named interim co-director of the Law, Science, and Technology program.         

He will work with Chad Slieper, who has been selected to co-lead Georgia Tech’s next Quality Enhancement Plan and will continue on at LST as co-director. 

McNeil’s responsibilities will include pre-law advising and coordinating student-centered events. He also will serve as the primary instructor for the Pre-Law Seminar class (PUBP3610). Slieper will focus on recruiting and overseeing the program’s part-time attorney faculty and coordinating course schedules. 

After graduating from Georgia Tech in 2001, McNeil attended Syracuse University College of Law. He graduated in 2005 and later joined the Atlanta home office of King & Spalding, focusing on intellectual property matters. His career also has included roles at Morris, Manning & Martin and co-founding a wholesale apparel company. McNeil serves as the primary legal advisor on a non-profit board focusing on children and veterans with physical disabilities. 

In 2007, he became co-coach of the Georgia Tech Mock Trial team, which routinely ranks among the nation’s most competitive squads.  

]]> mpearson34 1 1705938044 2024-01-22 15:40:44 1706116994 2024-01-24 17:23:14 0 0 news Andy McNeil is a 2021 graduate of the School of Public Policy.

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2024-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-22 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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672831 672831 image <![CDATA[andy mcneil image.jpg]]> LST Co-Director Andy McNeil.

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<![CDATA[Bullinger to Join APPAM Policy-Setting Council]]> 34600 Lindsey Rose Bullinger, an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy, has been elected to the leadership body for the Association for Public Policy Analysis and Management (APPAM). 

The APPAM Policy Council sets the organization’s policy and strategy. 

Bullinger was elected as an academic researcher. 

“It’s a great privilege to serve the APPAM community and perform the strategic work to advance its mission,” Bullinger said. “I am delighted to elevate my service to my ‘home’ organization, one that I care about so deeply.” 

 The council meets two times a year, and each member serves on at least one of APPAM’s committees. 

APPAM seeks to improve public policy and management through research, analysis, and education. It hosts an annual research conference, most recently held in Atlanta, publishes a peer-reviewed journal, and engages with policymakers and students. 

Bullinger’s research primarily focuses on how public policies affect children’s and families’ health and well-being, particularly those from low-income families. She has conducted extensive research on topics such as the effects of opioid treatment programs on child well-being, the impact of the minimum wage on child maltreatment and parenting behaviors, and the association of expanded child tax credit payments with child abuse and neglect-related emergency room visits. 

Her work has been published in numerous prestigious journals, including the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, JAMA Pediatrics, Health Affairs, the Journal of Health Economics, and Review of Economics of the Household, among others. 

She has received funding for her work from organizations, including the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy, the Spencer Foundation, and the Pew Charitable Trusts. 

]]> mpearson34 1 1706110710 2024-01-24 15:38:30 1706110888 2024-01-24 15:41:28 0 0 news As part of the council, the School of Public Policy assistant professor will help set APPAM's policy and strategy.

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2024-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-24 00:00:00 Michael Pearson
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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665851 665851 image <![CDATA[Lindsey Rose Bullinger]]> image/jpeg 1676499213 2023-02-15 22:13:33 1676565962 2023-02-16 16:46:02
<![CDATA[What Can Space Teach Us About Sustainability? ]]> 35766 Humans have looked to the stars for guidance for thousands of years — and when it comes to questions of sustainability, the practice is no different.  

The best way to deal with climate change is a heated topic of debate here on Earth — laws are created, nonprofits are formed, investments are made, and lobbyists have their say — but the concept also transcends terrestrial boundaries. As we navigate the complexities of shifting to a more sustainable world, it turns out there is a lot we can learn from and apply to our ventures in outer space.  

Researchers in the Ivan Allen College think big to explore questions of sustainability on Earth, in outer space, and on a cosmic scale.  

The Importance of Megaregions 

Brian Woodall, a professor at the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, uses satellite data to rethink how we understand and address sustainability in our cities. He directs the Sustainable Megaregion Research Project with Mariel Borowitz, an associate professor in the Nunn School, and experts across Georgia Tech.  

The group uses data generated by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to draw definitive boundaries around Earth's megaregions — large, densely-populated areas such as the Boston-Washington corridor, Greater Tokyo, and the Amsterdam-Brussels-Antwerp triangle. Then, the researchers combine light emissions and other datasets to analyze CO2 emissions, urban buildup, green space, population density, transportation infrastructure, and more.  

"In this way, satellite data is critical in our efforts to fashion a comparative, time-sensitive, and data-driven system for delineating megaregion boundaries," Woodall said. "Then, we can assess their effectiveness in addressing sustainable development challenges." 

According to the project website, three-quarters of America's population and employment growth will occur in just eight to ten megaregions by 2050. To ensure sustainability in the face of climate threats, we must build resilience and protect critical infrastructure in these areas, the group says. 

Political Parallels 

However, whether it’s in megaregions or across international borders, it's no secret that humans don't always get along. Lincoln Hines, an assistant professor in the Nunn School, studies the politics of outer space with a focus on the Chinese space program. He says that comparing sustainability challenges on Earth to those in space — such as the 100 million+ pieces of space junk littering Earth's orbit — underscores the political nature of these problems and their international nature.  

"The politics of space sustainability largely reflect the politics of sustainability on Earth, as humans continue to confront difficult collective action problems in both domains," Hines explains. "Neither global warming nor space debris care for the human constructs of sovereignty and national borders." 

Tony Harding, an economist and assistant professor in the School of Public Policy, echoes this sentiment.  

"We have this public good, which is space and near Earth's orbit, where we put satellites. And because no one is in control and has property rights in that area, we end up with an overuse and a lot of space junk," he says. "This parallels the Tragedy of the Commons problem we see on Earth — we have issues with climate change because we're all contributing a small amount to the problem and not facing the full cost of it." 

Harding studies the costs and benefits of solar geoengineering, which uses atmospheric particles to reflect the sun's radiation to slow global warming. Whether it's adding sulfate to the skies or cleaning up Earth's orbit, an intergenerational perspective is helpful, he says.  

"Should we develop geoengineering technology so the next generation has the choice to use it? Should we leave them with millions of pieces of space debris just because we don't want to clean it ourselves?" 

Second Time's a Charm(?) 

Despite the growing space debris problem, Borowitz emphasizes that we can proactively address the challenges of space sustainability and learn from our mistakes on Earth.  

"It's still early on in space, so we have the opportunity to think about sustainability from the beginning and address these issues before the debris is completely out of control," she says. "We are on an unsustainable path at the moment, but we can adjust before anything goes wrong." 

She adds that as interest and activity on the moon ramp up, the same questions apply. Because the moon doesn't have wind or weather like we do on Earth, when something changes its surface it can stay like that for thousands of years.  

"So it's really another place where you've got to do it right the first time," Borowitz says. "This is the test, right? The test for humanity — can we do it differently?" 

Sustainability on a Cosmic Scale 

Chris Michaels, a Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Scholar in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, thinks about space from a symbolic perspective: What would happen if we scale up our consciousness to the level of the cosmos? Michaels teaches a course on modern terraforms and says contemplating the vast reaches of space can challenge us to think about sustainability in new ways. 

"The idea of space serves as a new frontier to be explored and colonized. If humans can migrate to other planets and make them home, then sustainability on Earth may look quaint and outdated," he says. "Humans tend to experience time on an atomized scale around their individual lives and have trouble thinking as concretely about the long term. But imagine if humans had a life span of 500 years, or they thought and acted less as individuals and more as members of a human race that extends thousands or even millions of years into the future. Thinking and acting on this larger scale would better align us with the geological timescales of the Earth, where sustaining our lives goes hand in hand with sustaining the Earth." 

The sprawling expanse of space is more than just an escape route from our troubled planet, and pondering it helps us shift our perspective from that of the starring role in our little galaxy to a bit character in a much larger play. 

Traditional Inspiration, New Solutions 

From satellite-driven research to geopolitical challenges and cosmic contemplation, humans continue to look to the stars for inspiration and information on keeping our planet and its orbit healthy. 

When it comes to our mandate for more sustainable living, it's not just about protecting our home but how we fit into the wider universe. Becoming better caretakers of our planet connects us to our past and future, here on Earth and out among the stars. 

]]> dminardi3 1 1706042994 2024-01-23 20:49:54 1706045406 2024-01-23 21:30:06 0 0 news Researchers in the Ivan Allen College think big to explore questions of sustainability on Earth, in outer space, and on a cosmic scale.  

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2024-01-23T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-23T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-23 00:00:00 Di Minardi

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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<![CDATA[Study: More Than 1,500 Estimated Births in Wisconsin After Abortion Access Was Paused After Roe v. Wade Was Overturned]]> 34600 Daniel Dench and Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

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Daniel Dench and Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695650 2024-01-19 20:20:50 1705695650 2024-01-19 20:20:50 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Wisconsin Birth Rates Rise Following Dobbs Decision: A Study By IZA Institute]]> 34600 Daniel Dench and Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

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Daniel Dench and Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695573 2024-01-19 20:19:33 1705695573 2024-01-19 20:19:33 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[New Research Analyzes How Abortion Bans in Kentucky and Midwestern States Affected Birth Rates]]> 34600 Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

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Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695496 2024-01-19 20:18:16 1705695496 2024-01-19 20:18:16 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-02T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[A Journalism of Belief and Belonging]]> 34600 André Brock, LMC

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André Brock, LMC

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695432 2024-01-19 20:17:12 1705695432 2024-01-19 20:17:12 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-03T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-03T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-03T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Why I Welcome New York City’s Congestion Pricing Plan]]> 34600 Lindsey Bullinger, INTA

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Lindsey Bullinger, INTA

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695351 2024-01-19 20:15:51 1705695351 2024-01-19 20:15:51 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-03T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-03T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-03T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Some States With Abortion Bans Saw Slightly More Births, New Analysis Finds]]> 34600 Daniel Dench and Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

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Daniel Dench and Mayra Pineda-Torres, Econ

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<![CDATA[Israel-Hamas Updates]]> 34600 Lawrence Rubin, INTA

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Lawrence Rubin, INTA

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695198 2024-01-19 20:13:18 1705695198 2024-01-19 20:13:18 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Space Experts Optimistic on Astrobotic's Chances for Next Moon Mission]]> 34600 Mariel Borowitz, INTA

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Mariel Borowitz, INTA

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695109 2024-01-19 20:11:49 1705695109 2024-01-19 20:11:49 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Atlanta Poet Travis Denton Records the Many Poetic Moments Along Life's Journey]]> 34600 Travis Denton, LMC

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Travis Denton, LMC

]]> mpearson34 1 1705695040 2024-01-19 20:10:40 1705695040 2024-01-19 20:10:40 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Recycling Habits Are Hard to Break, New Research Shows ]]> 35766 New research from Dylan Brewer, an assistant professor at Georgia Tech's School of Economics, and Samantha Cameron, an alumna of the School and Ph.D. student at the University of California-Davis, suggests that pausing recycling programs may not have long-term effects on recycling habits.   

Their new paper, published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, is "the first empirical test of the hypothesis that recycling habits will degrade if recycling programs are not maintained," the researchers said. 

Brewer and Cameron examined a natural experiment in New York City, where the government paused the recycling program from 2002 to 2004. By comparing recycling rates in New York City to rates in Massachusetts and New Jersey, where recycling continued uninterrupted, the researchers found that "from 2006 to 2008, [NYC] recycling rates were unaffected by the pause. The finding of a quick rebound in recycling is consistent with persistent skills and habits in recycling." 

Recycling is often unprofitable, so this is a valuable insight for policymakers weighing the management and continuity of recycling programs during economic fluctuations. 

While cities maintain recycling programs during unprofitable periods for many reasons — it preserves environmental benefits and can prepare for future program profitability despite potential short-term financial strains — Brewer and Cameron's study shows that continuing programs over concerns that workers and people using the service will lose their recycling skills may be unfounded.  

Still, there are some caveats. NYC is unique in many ways, including a 1989 law making recycling mandatory. However, a closer look by the researchers showed that law enforcement did not heavily influence the return to recycling. Instead, habit and skill retention, pause duration, continuous waste collection programs — NYC still collected paper, metal, and organic material during the pause — and the simplicity of recycling processes played pivotal roles. Still, the researchers recommend further exploration to understand habit persistence in recycling behaviors across diverse settings. 

"Our results are relevant to policymakers considering whether to discontinue an unprofitable arm of a municipal recycling program," Brewer and Cameron conclude. "This natural experiment suggests that recycling rates can recover quickly, at least when the pause is short, and other municipal waste services continue. The quick recovery implies that policymakers need not be concerned that recycling rates will take a long time to rebuild." 

“Habit and Skill Retention in Recycling” was published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management in November 2023. It is available at https://doi.org/10.1002/pam.22554  

]]> dminardi3 1 1704833859 2024-01-09 20:57:39 1704834013 2024-01-09 21:00:13 0 0 news After a two-year pause, New York City residents returned to their previous recycling habits within a year of the program's restart.

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2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09 00:00:00 Di Minardi

Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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<![CDATA[Priti Bhatia Honored With APPA Pacesetter Award]]> 35777 Priti Bhatia, the director of facilities and capital planning for the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, was one of three people nationwide to receive the 2023 Pacesetter Award from the Association of Physical Plant Administrators (APPA). The award is given annually to individuals who have made significant contributions to their region and to their APPA chapter.  

“The APPA is a leading organization in educational facilities, and it is a tremendous honor to be recognized,” said Bhatia. “Ongoing learning is crucial for personal and professional development to maintain a competitive edge and global connectivity in today’s rapidly evolving world. Setting the pace as a lifelong learner is an investment in one’s future, providing numerous benefits both in the workplace and in personal life.” 

The APPA Board recognized Bhatia for her numerous contributions to the organization, including her service on the Southeastern Regional APPA Board and her presentations at national and regional meetings, among others. The award also recognizes Bhatia’s demonstrated dedication to personal and professional development, to promoting women’s roles in facilities and campus planning leadership opportunities, and to institutional excellence.  

Bhatia and other award winners will be honored at the APPA spring conference, which will be held in Nashville in April. 

]]> Stephanie Kadel 1 1704832874 2024-01-09 20:41:14 1704833145 2024-01-09 20:45:45 0 0 news Priti Bhatia, the director of facilities and capital planning for the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, was one of three people nationwide to receive the 2023 Pacesetter Award from the Association of Physical Plant Administrators (APPA). Bhatia and other award winners will be honored at the APPA spring conference, which will be held in Nashville in April. 

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2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-09 00:00:00 Stephanie N. Kadel
Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts

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672701 672701 image <![CDATA[Director of Facilities and Capital Planning Priti Bhatia Receives the APPA 2023 Pacesetter Award]]> Director of Facilities and Capital Planning Priti Bhatia Receives the APPA 2023 Pacesetter Award

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<![CDATA[What Does the Future Have in Store for Me?]]> 36009 As a kid, you may have looked to a not-so-technical device to predict your future: the Magic 8 Ball. This all knowing sphere told us whether we would pass the big math test or if our crush liked us back. Here we have Georgia Tech’s own version of the classic kid’s toy: a panel of faculty, staff, and alumni experts in a range of areas, including Marilyn Brown, Regents' Professor and Brook Byers Professor of Sustainable Systems in the School of Public Policy; Sybrina Atwaters, EE 94, M.S. HSTS 2009, Ph.D. HSTS 2014; and Donald Beamer, ECON 2005who will answer our now more complicated questions and tell us what they think our world will look like in the next 20 years and beyond.

Read the full article on the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine website.

]]> cwhittle9 1 1704816531 2024-01-09 16:08:51 1704819899 2024-01-09 17:04:59 0 0 news As a kid, you may have looked to a not-so-technical device to predict your future: the Magic 8 Ball. Here we have Georgia Tech’s own version of the classic kid’s toy: a panel of experts who will answer our questions about what the world will look like in the next 20 years and beyond.

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<![CDATA[Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage Recognizes Georgia Judicial Pioneer]]> 36009 On Thursday, Feb. 8, Georgia Tech’s Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage will be presented to Retired Justice Robert Benham. The annual award honors individuals who have stood up for moral principles at the risk of their careers, livelihoods, and even their lives.

A lifelong resident of Georgia, Benham was appointed to the Supreme Court of Georgia by Gov. Joe Frank Harris in December 1989. He was the first African American appointed to the Supreme Court of Georgia in its more than 140 years. In 1990, he won a statewide election to a full term on the Supreme Court. He served as chief justice from 1995 to 2001 and remained on the court until his retirement in 2020.

"Justice Benham's long career of public service was defined by a commitment to safeguarding civil liberties and an unflinching belief in serving communities and doing the right thing," said Ángel Cabrera, president of Georgia Tech. "He was a key figure in the integration of his hometown and a breaker of barriers. Achieving those ‘firsts’ meant he was shunned, ostracized, and threatened, but he still showed great social courage and leadership, even when the risks were high."

Justice Benham earned a bachelor’s degree in political science from Tuskegee University in 1967 and attended Harvard University. In 1970, he obtained a J.D. from the University of Georgia’s Lumpkin School of Law and a Master of Laws degree from the University of Virginia in 1989.  

After law school, he served in the U.S. Army Reserve, attaining the rank of captain. He then served briefly as a trial attorney for Atlanta Legal Aid Society. He later returned to his hometown of Cartersville, where he started a private law practice, served as special assistant attorney general, and served two terms as president of the Bartow County Bar Association. Justice Benham was the first African American to establish a law practice in Bartow County.

The Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage is named for former Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen Jr., a graduate of Georgia Tech, who at great personal and political risk was the only southern white elected official to testify before Congress in support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

For more on the prize and its previous recipients, visit ivanallenprize.gatech.edu.

]]> cwhittle9 1 1704744574 2024-01-08 20:09:34 1704745276 2024-01-08 20:21:16 0 0 news On Thursday, Feb. 8, Georgia Tech’s Ivan Allen Jr. Prize for Social Courage will be presented to Retired Justice Robert Benham. The annual award honors individuals who have stood up for moral principles at the risk of their careers, livelihoods, and even their lives.

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2024-01-08T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-08T00:00:00-05:00 2024-01-08 00:00:00 Victor Rogers
Institute Communications

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