<![CDATA[Tristan Al-Haddad featured in Research Horizons]]> 28816 http://www.rh.gatech.edu/front-office/shape-shifting-sculpture

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1462204909 2016-05-02 16:01:49 1653584976 2022-05-26 17:09:36 0 0 news 2016-05-02T00:00:00-04:00 2016-05-02T00:00:00-04:00 2016-05-02 00:00:00 Tia Jewell - Communications & Events - School of Architecture - Georgia Tech

]]>
<![CDATA[Recovering History with Digital Design]]> 34590 School of Architecture Assistant Professor Danielle Willkens can do amazing things with digital architecture reconstructions, including taking people back to Selma, Alabama in 1965.

Georgia Tech team exhibit, which won a People’s Choice Award while on display in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History recently, will be on display in the School of Architecture. Willkens leads the team of student researchers who created the exhibit.

The exhibit, “Walking in the Footsteps of History,” immerses visitors in the spatial and cultural context of Selma, Alabama, around the time of “Bloody Sunday,” March 7, 1965. Willkens’ team put the exhibit together for this year’s Accelerate Creativity and Innovation Festival.

“This exhibit explores a geospatial timeline of the marches in the region, largely focusing on the time between the prayer vigil held in Marion, AL on the evening of February 18th, 1965, resulting in the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson, to the arrival of the marchers to the Alabama Capitol Building on March 25, 1965,” Willkens said.

Although focused on the past, the exhibit serves as part of an ongoing effort to preserve and restore historically significant places that have been ignored.

“Our exhibit hopes to prompt a deeper inquiry into the city of Selma,” Willkens said, “advocating for the preservation of sites frequently ignored in the conversation: Good Samaritan Hospital (the only site that treated Black patients in the region), Brown’s Chapel and the surrounding complex known as the George Washington Carver Homes, and the area around the Bloody Sunday conflict site that is in a precarious state of decline.”

Contemporary digital reconstructions such as this offer visitors the chance to connect with history more directly than previously possible. Viewers can explore documents too fragile for public access, or tour sites which are hard to access or no longer exist.

“In many ways, this is a visualization of civil rights conflict archaeology, and we hope that our project’s methods for capturing contemporary digital documentation of associated sites (3D scans of sites, aerial photogrammetry, and 360 videos) and melding this content with rich historical narratives and archival images, videos, oral histories, and documents can become a reputable workflow for other sites, bringing history to life in new ways.”

The exhibit uses multiple media interfaces to stimulate viewer engagement. “This is an interactive exhibit, where the model with projection mapping, the touchscreen interfaces, VR experiences, and interpretive column complement each other to tell a broader story about Selma, the marches in 1965, and the ongoing struggle to protect voting rights,” Willkens said.

Willkens has been working in Selma since 2015, collaborating with researchers from Auburn University. “Our collaborations also expanded to include city officials, museum professionals, librarians, archivists, and teachers from Selma, as well as people from the Department of Transportation, tourism offices, the local interpretive centers for the National Park Service, and local entrepreneurs,” Willkens said.

“Amid all of our project partners, it has been most enlightening and rewarding to collaborate with a few of the remaining foot soldiers and their descendants who have been working so hard to preserve and disseminate the full story of Selma.”


Research and exhibit design team
•    Danielle Willkens, PhD, Assistant Professor
•    Junshan Liu, GT Visiting Scholar and Associate Professor 
•    Sydnee Henry, M.Arch candidate
•    Sean Li, BS Architecture candidate
•    Sakshi Nanda, MS in Urban Design candidate
•    Patricia J. Rangel, M.Arch candidate
•    Christian Waweru, BS Architecture candidate
•    Eden Wright, M.Arch candidate
•    Thomas Bray, BS Architecture 2021
•    So Min Park, BS Architecture 2021

GT Arts 
-    Aaron Shackleford, Director 
-    Kara Wade, Student and Artist Engagement Coordinator 
-    Nathalie Matychak, Assistant Director - Producing & Residency

]]> km86 1 1650308103 2022-04-18 18:55:03 1650309163 2022-04-18 19:12:43 0 0 news A Georgia Tech team exhibit about Selma, Alabama, 1965, which won a People’s Choice Award while on display in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History recently, will be on display in the School of Architecture.

]]>
2022-04-18T00:00:00-04:00 2022-04-18T00:00:00-04:00 2022-04-18 00:00:00 657413 657418 657419 657420 657421 657413 image <![CDATA["Walking in the Footsteps of History" exhibit team poses with exhibit and People's Choice Award]]> image/jpeg 1650306359 2022-04-18 18:25:59 1650306359 2022-04-18 18:25:59 657418 image <![CDATA["Walking in the Footsteps of History" exhibit team member gives historical context to visitors using projection-enhanced 3D model of Selma.]]> image/jpeg 1650306823 2022-04-18 18:33:43 1650306823 2022-04-18 18:33:43 657419 image <![CDATA[Tracie Todd at "Walking in the Footsteps of History" exhibit in the Smithsonian]]> image/jpeg 1650307088 2022-04-18 18:38:08 1650307088 2022-04-18 18:38:08 657420 image <![CDATA["Walking in the Footsteps of History" exhibit at the Smithsonian, empty]]> image/jpeg 1650307285 2022-04-18 18:41:25 1650307285 2022-04-18 18:41:25 657421 image <![CDATA[Detail shot of "Walking in the Footsteps of History" exhibit across city model, showing VR setups]]> image/jpeg 1650307517 2022-04-18 18:45:17 1650307517 2022-04-18 18:45:17
<![CDATA[Russell Gentry Chairs State Sustainable Building Materials Committee]]> 34590 Russell Gentry, director of the Digital Building Lab, has been appointed chair of the newly created Sustainable Building Material Technical Advisory Committee. The committee will work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by creating a method for calculating the net carbon held in existing wooden structures.

Trees naturally capture carbon dioxide, the most significant greenhouse gas, and Georgia already has a registry for carbon held by living trees. But trees used for construction also hold about half their weight in carbon, Gentry said.

“So if you have 100,000 pounds of wood in your building, then there’s 50,000 pounds of carbon that’s sequestered in that wood [for the life of the building].”

Gentry will lead the committee’s approach as they create a carbon-tracking process for trees used in construction. Wood building materials will then be part of the state’s carbon registry, which will allow carbon credits to be bought and sold.

The committee also relies on Valerie Thomas, the Anderson-Interface Chair of Natural Systems in the H. Milton School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, to determine net carbon benefit of sustainable materials versus conventional construction materials.

Thomas brings expertise in life cycle assessment to the committee. She looks at the whole life of the building material, from manufacture to disposal, to develop an accurate idea of environmental impact.

“Some of the part I’m especially tasked with is, ‘How do you quantify this? How much is it?’,” Thomas said.

It’s not as simple as adding up the weight of lumber used and dividing by half. “We have transportation, sawmills, and treatment,” she said, “and we’re probably using fossil fuels to do it.”

The environmental cost of all those processes must be compared to the costs of processes associated with concrete and metal frame buildings.

To make sure the credit for captured carbon is meaningful, “We have to look at all that to make sure the comparison is quantitatively sensible.”

California and Canada's British Columbia have related carbon-tracking systems, which provide incentives for using their timber in construction.

“Georgia is the largest forestry state in terms of structural lumber production,” said Gentry, “but we don’t have a lot of mass timber being produced from Southern Pine, so that’s considered to be a competitive disadvantage for the southeastern United States.”

This amendment to the current carbon registry provides incentive to use Georgia timber in construction, rather than bringing it in from other states. It will also help builders prove their commitment to greener development, Gentry said.

“Mass timber ties the logging and forestry industry -- a core business of rural Georgia -- to Atlanta where we have this huge influx of people. Cities need to build lots of multifamily housing, but in a thoughtful and environmentally conscious way,” said Gentry.

“This project speaks so well to both Georgias, and I think that’s part of the challenge we see in many things right now, is knitting that together. If there’s a win on both sides, it’s a good win.”

Building Taller and Cleaner with Mass Timber

At the Digital Building Lab, Georgia Tech researchers develop new ways of using mass timber in commercial construction.

“Mass timber is a process of cutting a tree up into lots of small pieces, essentially observing and removing the defects and then putting those boards back together to make huge pieces of wood,” said Gentry.

“This could be a panel of wood 10 feet by 40 feet by a foot and a half thick,” he said. “That's like a piece of plywood on steroids. That can become a floor system in a 20-story building.”

Mass timber is a relatively new technology: in 2021 Georgia building codes were updated to allow for timber buildings taller than 5 stories using the new mass timber technology. These changes allow for taller and more cost-competitive mass timber buildings.

Very few buildings in the state use mass timber technology. Two local examples are the Kendeda Building, on the Georgia Tech campus, and T3 West Midtown, a 7-story office building in Atlantic Station, near the Georgia Tech Campus.

Although the committee is not the first research group to look at carbon held in buildings, they will still have to develop new models to compare how much wood construction captures carbon as compared to traditional steel, Thomas said.

But, she said, the research is so new that “we can’t just look at what everybody else does and say, ‘that's what we're doing’.”

According to Thomas, the committee is “defining the regulations that will make it possible to have mass timber buildings that sequester carbon in the state of Georgia, and I expect that the procedure we use will be used by others also in the USA and in other countries. So we’re directly applying our expertise to support the state of Georgia.

One implicit consequence of the amended carbon registry is that it “encourages building these innovative types of buildings in Georgia,” said Thomas.

“I grow my tree. I cut it down. I make a building with it so it's just sitting over there for hopefully a very long time. And then I grow another tree. So I'm taking carbon out of the atmosphere and putting it into buildings on a continuing basis.”

For carbon sequestration to have an impact on the environment, “we're not talking one or two buildings in Atlanta. It has to be really large scale,” said Thomas.

“If we’re going to get the climate stabilized at 1.5 degrees centigrade increase, we’ve got to have some kind of technology for taking carbon out of the atmosphere.”

Growing a New Industry at Georgia Tech

And cultivating a new type of construction is no small endeavor, Gentry said.

“The mass timber problem is one of integration. It’s not like there’s a specific problem with adhesive bond lines or the density of wood. The real problem is the entire ecosystem that it’s going to take to make a mass timber industry in Georgia.”

Mass timber components require development of sophisticated manufacturing techniques.

“There’s tremendous capital expense for the presses that make these materials, and automation and CNC equipment that cuts these things into the kind of interlocking shapes that come to the job site and make these buildings so easy to erect,” Gentry said.

“In the Digital Fabrication Lab (DFL) we have much of that equipment. Our students are learning to run that equipment, and so this semester our students are exploring the design and economic potential of mass timber, looking at not only design of buildings, but also the technical aspects of prefabricating the components and bringing them to the site.”

The fact that Gentry and his students can prototype and deliver these building components right from the DFL amplifies the impact, he said. “I think one of the huge strengths of Georgia Tech is its ability to deliver not just knowledge, but instances of that knowledge applied.”

Gentry speaks from experience: he’s an alumnus of the Institute as well as a decades-long faculty member of the Schools of Architecture and Civil and Environmental Engineering. So, too is another member of the Sustainable Building Material Technical Advisory Committee, Devon Dartnell (EE '84) Director of Market Analysis and Research at the Georgia Forestry Commission, and a Georgia timberland owner. Dartnell manages the work of the committee for the Forestry Commission.

The legislation identifies the specific viewpoints and expertise required to craft the new sustainable building carbon registry. Members include Edie Sonnie Hall, a life cycle analysis consultant from Washington State; Brian Campa, Principal at Cooper Carry; Jacek Siry, Professor of Forest Economics at the University of Georgia; Troy Harris, Managing Director of Timberland at Jamestown; Ted Miltiades, Director of Construction Codes and Industrialized Buildings at Georgia Department of Community Affairs; and Bill Howard,  General Manager of Claude Howard Lumber Company.

]]> km86 1 1649179704 2022-04-05 17:28:24 1649179704 2022-04-05 17:28:24 0 0 news Russell Gentry, director of the Digital Building Lab, has been appointed chair of the newly created Sustainable Building Material Technical Advisory Committee. The committee will work to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by creating a method for calculating the net carbon held in existing wooden structures.

]]>
2022-04-05T00:00:00-04:00 2022-04-05T00:00:00-04:00 2022-04-05 00:00:00 657002 657003 657004 657002 image <![CDATA[Valerie Thomas and Russell Gentry with mass timber components]]> image/jpeg 1649177670 2022-04-05 16:54:30 1649178322 2022-04-05 17:05:22 657003 image <![CDATA[Kendeda Building under construction, showing mass timber structure]]> image/jpeg 1649178223 2022-04-05 17:03:43 1649191712 2022-04-05 20:48:32 657004 image <![CDATA[Cultivated pine forest]]> image/jpeg 1649178744 2022-04-05 17:12:24 1649178744 2022-04-05 17:12:24
<![CDATA[Dr. Danielle Willkens Publishes Architecture Book for Teens]]> 34569 Dr. Danielle Willkens, assistant professor in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, aims to introduce younger audiences to the field of architecture with her new book Architecture for Teens.

Architecture for Teens offers readers an overview of the basic elements of architecture—structure, program, aesthetics, and region. The book also shares the vast career opportunities for architects that range from residential and commercial design to historic preservation, landscape architecture, urban planning, and more. Using real world examples, Willkens presents architectural projects, colorful illustrations, and thoughtful details of their impact.

Willkens’ book was written with teens in mind to inspire and educate future architecture at younger ages. Even though the book is geared toward teens, it is a book for anyone with an interest in architecture. Architecture for Teens explores architectural movements and designers from pre-history to today while paying special attention toward building a more environmentally responsible world.

Architecture for Teens features projects and interviews by Andrew Daley, AIA of SHoP, Pascale Sablan, FAIA, NOMA, LEED AP of Adjaye Associates and Beyond the Built, Valerie Friedmann, urban planner for the City of Lexington, KY, and Pavan Iyer (Bachelor of Science in Architecture, ’14) , founder of eightvillage.

Willkens joined the School of Architecture in the fall of 2019.  She is a practicing designer, researcher, and FAA Certified Remote Pilot who is particularly interested in bringing architectural engagement to diverse audiences through interactive projects. Her experiences in practice and research include design/build projects, public installations, and on-site investigations as well as extensive archival work in several countries. As an avid photographer and illustrator, her work has been recognized in the American Institute of Architects National Photography Competition and she has contributed graphics to several exhibitions and publications.

Currently, Willkens is a member of the Board of Trustees for the Atlanta Preservation Center, and a member of the Education Committee for the Institute of Classical Architecture and Art’s Southeast chapter. Since 2016, Danielle has participated in the research and documentation project for the spatial reconstruction of Selma’s ‘Bloody Sunday’ and the Edmund Pettus Bridge. She is currently the co-PI, with Auburn Assoc. Prof Junshan Liu, conducting a Historic Structures Report on the Edmund Pettus Bridge, funded by the NPS African American Civil Rights Grant Program. 

Learn more and order your copy of Architecture for Teens.

]]> cwagster3 1 1616772611 2021-03-26 15:30:11 1616777223 2021-03-26 16:47:03 0 0 news Architecture for Teens offers readers an overview of the basic elements of architecture—structure, program, aesthetics, and region. The book also shares the vast career opportunities for architects that range from residential and commercial design to historic preservation, landscape architecture, urban planning, and more. Using real world examples, Willkens presents real architectural projects, colorful illustrations, and thoughtful details of their impact.

]]>
2021-03-26T00:00:00-04:00 2021-03-26T00:00:00-04:00 2021-03-26 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing and Events Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture 
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
645777 645777 image <![CDATA[Architecture for Teens by Danielle Willkens]]> image/jpeg 1616772241 2021-03-26 15:24:01 1616772241 2021-03-26 15:24:01
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Team Awarded NSF Partnerships for Innovation Grant to Change the Game for the Afterlife of Wind Turbine Blades]]> 34569 Wind turbines are, by design, green solutions for the production of power. Wind turbines produce zero carbon emissions; however, the blades themselves pose an environmental challenge as they depreciate. To address this concern, the Georgia Institute of Technology, in partnership with Logisticus Group, was awarded the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) Partnerships for Innovation (PFI) grant.

The PFI Program within the Division of Industrial Innovation and Partnerships (IIP) provides researchers from science and engineering disciplines funded by the NSF with the opportunity to take their research and technology from the discovery phase to the marketplace for the benefit of society. 

Russell Gentry, Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, serves as the project’s principal investigator (PI). The three-year grant continues Gentry’s research on the reuse of retired wind blades and builds on the proprietary technology developed as part of the Re-Wind Tripartite Research program funded by the U.S. NSF, Science Foundation of Ireland, and the Department for the Economy of Northern Ireland.  

“In our foundational NSF grants, our team demonstrated the potential for wind blade re-use and the positive environmental benefits that will come from the re-use of these amazing composite materials in civil infrastructure,” said Gentry. “This potential is embodied in the two patents we are pursuing and in the follow-on Partnership for Industry grant from NSF. The team is now advancing our hardware and software technology and has partnered with companies in the wind energy and electrical transmission industries to pilot these technologies.”

Logisticus Group joins the project as the key provider of transportation for the retired wind turbine blades. As one of the largest wind blade transporters, Logisticus Group brings supply expertise for the complex logistics of transporting decommissioned wind turbine blades, which are approximately 50 meters in length. 

"We are thrilled to partner with Georgia Tech on this project. Their team has always had a passion to conduct research and development on proprietary technology when it comes to reusing wind blades. We feel, as a company, that we need to be a part of the solution to find ways to recycle and repurpose these blades,” said Will Stephan, founder of Logisticus Group.”

Wind turbine blades are made from high-quality Fiber-Reinforced Polymer (FRP) composite materials, which are not biodegradable or recyclable. Currently, turbine blades are landfilled or incinerated at their end-of-life stage. Georgia Tech and Logisticus will conduct research and development to commercialize mass-market architectural, engineering and construction (AEC) products from repurposed FRP composite of decommissioned wind turbine blades.

The team, comprised of Georgia Tech faculty, laboratory staff, and graduate and undergraduate students in architecture and engineering, will develop commercial products using Generative Design software, architecture studios, and workshops, structural and Finite element analysis, life-cycle analysis, light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technology, and full-scale testing of prototypes in Georgia Tech’s 20,000 sq. ft. Digital Fabrication Laboratory

“The success of our project comes from the diverse talents and viewpoints represented on the team. It’s rare to have architects, engineers, and social, geospatial and environmental scientists working on the same fundamental problem,” said Gentry. “As we move to commercialize, we are building an entrepreneurial team and linking with industry. We look forward to seeing our re-use applications implemented in the next three years.” 

Prior to receiving the NSF PFI grant, researchers at Georgia Tech developed proprietary algorithms for a tool called the “Blade Machine” and created unique testing methodologies to rapidly characterize any wind turbine blade currently in production for architectural and structural analysis and design purposes. 

This fall the team is participating in the NSF Innovation Corps (I-Corps) program with Angie Nagle from the University College Cork in Ireland and Chloe Kiernicki, Bachelor of Science in Architecture student at Georgia Tech, serving as entrepreneurial leads.  James Marlow, founding CEO of Atlanta-based Radiance Solar, is serving as the I-Corps team’s industrial mentor.

About the Georgia Tech School of Architecture

The Georgia Tech School of Architecture offers five distinct degree programs – a Bachelor of Science in Architecture, a Master of Architecture, a Master of Science in Architecture, a Master of Science in Urban Design, and a Ph.D. in Architecture.  Embedded in the heart of Atlanta and a part of a top-ranked research institution, the School of Architecture combines research, technology, and design to form a well-rounded, interdisciplinary, future-focused education as students prepare to make an impact on the built environment.  www.arch.gatech.edu

About Logisticus Group

Logisticus Group (LLC), a certified Minority Business Enterprise (MBE), specializes in transportation logistics, project management, and technology solutions serving projects throughout North and South America. At Logisticus Group, we believe our processes, technology solutions, personnel, and business model deliver a more predictable, controlled, efficient, and expedited project. To learn more visit, www.logisticusgroup.com

]]> cwagster3 1 1603380097 2020-10-22 15:21:37 1605542825 2020-11-16 16:07:05 0 0 news 2020-11-16T00:00:00-05:00 2020-11-16T00:00:00-05:00 2020-11-16 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Event Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
641265 641265 image <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Students Work on a Retired Windblade]]> image/jpeg 1605204727 2020-11-12 18:12:07 1605204727 2020-11-12 18:12:07
<![CDATA[Architecture Researcher and Alumna Celebrated Among Healthcare Design Magazine’s 2020 Industry All-Stars]]> 34569 Two of this year’s Healthcare Design Awards (HDC) honorees are School of Architecture alumni with close ties with SimTigrate Design Lab. Zorana Matić-Isautier and Lisa Lim are recognized for their achievements as designers and architects in the healthcare industry.  

Nominations opened for this year’s HCD awards in March, just as COVID-19 cases began to increase in the US. Members of healthcare communities around the world, including Matić-Isautier, began to focus their efforts on safety of the healthcare workers on the frontlines, personal protective equipment (PPE), and efforts to contain the virus. 

Matić-Isautier was awarded Researcher of the Year for her work. As a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Architecture and a graduate researcher with SimTigrate Design Lab, her research aims to bridge the gaps in design as they relate to behavioral choices and health outcomes. Looking at not only healthcare design, but her doctoral thesis is also focused on the bigger picture of design for health, exploring how design affects behavioral choices and how individuals perceive and use health-promoting resources in the Atlanta area.

Over the past several years, Matić has focused on the design of biocontainment units (BCUs), exploring ways in which design can be used to improve staff safety and patient experiences in these spaces.  

Her research on biocontainment unit design dates back to the 2014-2015 Ebola outbreak. Matić-Isautier was a part of a multidisciplinary research program Prevention Epicenter of Emory and Atlanta Consortium Hospitals (PEACH)that produced several peer-reviewed journal publications. She co-authored a publication titled, “Design Strategies for Biocontainment Units to Reduce Risk During Doffing of High-level Personal Protective Equipment,” that underscores the role of design in supporting staff safety and which was published in the Journal of Clinical Infectious Diseases 

Matić-Isautier led the SimTigrate Design Lab’s 2019 collaboration with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA) in the analysis of the layout and organization of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) doffing space in biocontainment units. This research has helped to refine the design of the six BCUs that will go to the new bed tower at CHOA’s, which aims to open in 2025. 

Most recently, Matić-Isautier was the lead author of a white paper titled, “Design Strategies for Biocontainment Units: Creating Safer Environments.” The paper is translated into Mandarin, Korean, Portuguese, and Farsi and made available online, providing useful information for architects, interior designers, and facility managers– everyone who is looking at ways to create safer and more efficient BCUs.

Lisa Lim, an alumna of the Ph.D. in Architecture program and former researcher with SimTigrate Design Lab and Imagine Lab, was named HDC’s Educator of the Year.

Lim joined the Texas Tech University College of Architecture as an assistant professor in 2018, teaching graduate and undergraduate design studios and elective courses in design and health. Lim studied evidence-based design at Georgia Tech. Like Matić-Isautier, Lim studied healthy environments for people and understanding how their behaviors and feelings are impacted by physical environments. She now teaches students about this type of health-driven design.

Lim keeps close ties to SimTigrate Design Lab and contributed to “Design Strategies for Biocontainment Units: Creating Safer Environments,” along with Matić-Isautier, Benton Humphreys, Yeinn Oh, and Jennifer Dubose, which was published by Korea Institute of Healthcare Architecture in 2020

HCD recognized Lim’s accomplishments with her teaching efforts providing real-world and collaborative learning environments to the students. Her research studies healthcare facility design, its effect on teamwork, and its impact on the well-being of healthcare professionals. 

Lim also developed “Visual Power,” that “quantifies interpersonal visual relationships among users of a space, furthering analytical capabilities of the field,” and “Functional Scenario analysis approach” to analyze and evaluate healthcare settings from the users’ perspective. Using this method, researchers are able to quantify spatial features for patients, providers, and family members to improve the comparisons of design options. 

Click here to read more about the 2020 Healthcare Design Awards.

]]> cwagster3 1 1600348246 2020-09-17 13:10:46 1600348246 2020-09-17 13:10:46 0 0 news Two of this year’s Healthcare Design Awards (HDC) honorees are School of Architecture alumni with close ties with SimTigrate Design Lab. Zorana Matić-Isautier and Lisa Lim are recognized for their achievements as designers and architects in the healthcare industry.  

]]>
2020-09-15T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-15T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-15 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
639194 639194 image <![CDATA[Zorana Matić-Isautier and Lisa Lim receive Healthcare Design Awards]]> image/jpeg 1600347906 2020-09-17 13:05:06 1600347906 2020-09-17 13:05:06
<![CDATA[Student Wins Hip Hop + Architecture Design Justice Competition]]> 34569 Students enrolled in the 3.5-year Master of Architecture program are required to complete summer studio following their first year. Keith Kaseman, assistant professor and director of the Spatial Futures Lab, based the summer studio titled “Studio 2020+” on exploring deployable systems to aid in a pandemic state, which served to directly analyze current events and their impact on architecture and infrastructure.

“Studio 2020+ set out to methodically tap into and iteratively cultivate participants’ design imaginations during these unprecedented and incredibly challenging times,” said Kaseman. “Initially calibrated to develop a collective array of architectural typologies tied to projective scenarios within a post-COVID world, the police killing of George Floyd ignited sustained nationwide protests against racism, police brutality, and racial injustice approximately halfway through our five-week long semester.”

“Recalibrating the studio at that point involved a week of attempting to synthesize our raw emotions, while simultaneously building design arsenals and sharpening them towards new directions,” said Kaseman. “With two weeks left, all seventeen students were tasked to initiate and deliver final projects with full freedom to tackle any issue of urgency at hand.”

Master of Architecture students Will Reynolds and Breanna Rhoden decided to examine issues of social injustice in their projects. During their final review, it was suggested by their jurors that Reynolds and Rhoden submit their projects to the Hip Hop + Architecture As Design Justice competition.

The competition was hosted by Michael Ford, also known as The Hip Hop Architect. Ford uses music to critique the built environment in its past, present, and future. In the summer of 2017, the Georgia Tech School of Architecture brought to campus the Hip Hop Architecture Camp, a one-week camp for middle school students in under-represented communities and connects them with professionals in architecture, urban design, and their communities. Students create architectural models, a Hip Hop Architecture track, and a music video to summarize their design. 

The Hip Hop + Architecture As Design Justice competition’s call for submissions asked, “How will spaces look in a Just City? A city which has defeated and dismantled racism? What tools will help us get there?”

On Monday, June 22, it was announced that Reynolds received the top prize in the competition and Rhoden was recognized among the top 20 submissions.

The first rule the recent Design Justice competition required that submissions be “inspired by a Hip Hop lyric, track, or album title focused on imagining better communities.”

In his winning entry, Reynolds referenced lyrics from AmeriKKKan Idol by Joey Bada$$, which says, “The scary part, boys and girls/Is most of these stories don’t make it to the news and reach mass consciousness/It is for sure time that we as a people stand up for acknowledgment/And accomplishment of what we call human rights/It is time to rebel, better yet, raise hell.”

“The intent of this project is to facilitate a new form of justice, one that holds those enforcing the law to a new standard of honesty and transparency,” Reynolds said of his project. “This system of drone outposts is dispersed throughout a city. The structures, or outposts, deploy drones when a civilian reports a police stop. Ideally, this report could be vocally activated with a smartphone –‘Hey Siri, the police are here.’ The drone arrives onsite and records the police throughout the interaction. The information is streamed back to the outpost to be monitored by civilians.”

“These drone outposts would act as a facility to store and maintain drones, store, and broadcast information securely, and create a safe space for civilians,” Reynolds added. “This new building typology could be freestanding or occupy existing structures like the space between billboards.”

“I chose the song by Lil Baby called “The Bigger Picture” because it directly speaks to the Black Lives Matter movement currently taking place across the globe during this unprecedented time and how we have to start by inspiring future generations to create a better future through addressing the problems happening now,” said Rhoden about her project, which proposed a new place of refuge, resiliency, and celebration for the community.

“The social and economic effects of the pandemic along with the systemic injustice has and will continue to affect the mental health of the community,” Rhoden continued. “My hope is that this newfound type of architecture will bring solidarity, confidence, and provide some comfort to those putting their lives on the line protesting for racial equality.

Learn more about the Hip Hop + Architecture As Design Justice Competition.

]]> cwagster3 1 1594917768 2020-07-16 16:42:48 1595003210 2020-07-17 16:26:50 0 0 news Students enrolled in the 3.5-year Master of Architecture program are required to complete summer studio following their first year. Keith Kaseman, assistant professor and director of the Spatial Futures Lab, based the summer studio titled “Studio 2020+” on exploring deployable systems to aid in a pandemic state, which served to directly analyze current events and their impact on architecture and infrastructure. On Monday, June 22, it was announced that Will Reynolds received the top prize in the competition and Breanna Rhoden was recognized among the top 20 submissions.

]]>
2020-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-16 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
637009 637009 image <![CDATA[Center for Autonomous Witness by Will Reynolds]]> image/jpeg 1594917464 2020-07-16 16:37:44 1594917464 2020-07-16 16:37:44
<![CDATA[School Chair Selected to the 2020 Class of American Institute of Architects Fellows]]> 34569 Each year, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) elects a new class of fellows, the highest and most prestigious level of membership among its more than 90,000 professional members.  Fellows of the American Institute of Architects (FAIA) are recognized for their outstanding work and their overall contributions to architecture and society.

This year, Scott Marble, professor and William H. Harrison Chair of the Georgia Tech School of Architecture and founding partner of Marble Fairbanks Architects, joins the ranks of the AIA College of Fellows.

According to the April 2020 edition of the AIA Newsletter to its members, “Fellowship represents recognition of your significant achievement at this point in your life and it signifies the beginning of a new phase of great potential for your passion for the profession. This is your start for doing more.”

One of the responsibilities put forth by the College of Fellows is that fellows continue to use their time and talents to benefit the future of the profession and to mentor the next generation of professional architects.

“Being elevated to a Fellow is a great honor and it re-energizes me to move to the next level of practice and teaching with a greater focus on impacting the educational and professional processes to help the next generation,” said Marble.

“Through design, teaching, research, and practice, he [Marble] has worked to advance the discipline of architecture,” noted the College of Fellows. “His work merges user-centered design with advanced digital tools and technology to create novel and engaging spaces for people.”

Click here to read the AIA College of Fellows May 2020 Special Issue Newsletter.

]]> cwagster3 1 1591022240 2020-06-01 14:37:20 1591030919 2020-06-01 17:01:59 0 0 news Each year, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) elects a new class of fellows, the highest and most prestigious level of membership among its more than 90,000 professional members.  This year, Scott Marble, professor and William H. Harrison Chair of the Georgia Tech School of Architecture and founding partner of Marble Fairbanks Architects, joins the ranks of the AIA College of Fellows.

]]>
2020-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-01 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
635851 635851 image <![CDATA[Scott Marble]]> image/jpeg 1591021310 2020-06-01 14:21:50 1591021310 2020-06-01 14:21:50
<![CDATA[Two Interdisciplinary Teams Receive Honorable Mention in ULI Hines Student Competition]]> 34569 Students from the Georgia Tech Schools of Architecture, Building Construction, and City and Regional Planning were selected as honorable mentions in the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Student Competition.

The competition, which kicked off on January 13, is designed to simulate a real-world design, planning, and development project.

This year, the competition enters its 18th year. According to the ULI competition website, "The ULI Hines Student Competition is part of the [Urban Land] Institute’s ongoing effort to raise interest among young people in creating better communities, improving development patterns, and increasing awareness of the need for multidisciplinary solutions to development and design challenges." 

Six teams from Georgia Tech entered this year's competition. Each team must have five graduate students from at least three different disciplines to be eligible to compete.

The assignment for this year's competition explored the redevelopment of a site in Miami with the Florida East Coast Roast Railway splitting the site into the Wynwood and Edgewater neighborhoods. Student groups imagined that the Tri-Rail would begin providing commuter rail service to downtown Miami in 2021. They were tasked with redeveloping the parcels in the site area to accommodate a station in Midtown Miami, and turning the site into “a thriving, mixed-use, transit-oriented neighborhood.”

The Georgia Tech teams selected as an honorable mention submitted projects titled, “ETS” and "SPACES."

Team ETS

On Team ETS were Master of Architecture (M.Arch) students, Zachary Brown and Rand Zalzala, Master of City and Regional Planning (MCRP) student Brock Thompson, and Master of Science in Urban Design (MSUD) students, George Doyle and Eleni Kroi. Building Construction and City Planning part-time lecturer John Threadgill was the faculty advisor for this team. Designer II at Portman Architects, T. Coston Dickinson, was the professional advisor for ETS. 

"The importance of the ULI Hines Student Competition for graduate students is the nature of its interdisciplinary emphasis,” said Doyle. “This competition immerses a diverse group of graduate students with unique post-undergraduate backgrounds and skillsets that allow new ideas and the byproducts of these ideas to become tangible solutions to real-life issues needing resolution or mitigation.”

Team SPACES

On Team SPACES were M.Arch students, Conner Smith and Wanli Gao, Master of Real Estate Development student Nicholas Ferran, MCRP student ShuHui “Giselle” Zhen, and MSUD student, Joel Jassu. School of Architecture professor of the practice, Brian Bell was faculty advisor for SPACES. Associate principal at Perkins&Will, Jeff Williams, AICP was the professional advisor for the team. 

“We had 30 students from across the Institute participate this year on six teams,” said Ellen Dunham-Jones, professor and director of the MSUD program. “I know it’s cliché to say they’re all winners, but seriously, it’s pretty awesome what their collective efforts were able to produce and the learning that went on. The fact that two of the six were recognized by the jury for honorable mentions is icing on the cake! We’ve had 12 placements, including four finalists in nine years. I couldn’t be prouder!”

The work from all six teams is currently on exhibition in the Cohen Gallery located on the second floor of the College of Design’s Architecture East Building.

Click here for the ULI Hines Competition press release.

]]> cwagster3 1 1589481536 2020-05-14 18:38:56 1589578100 2020-05-15 21:28:20 0 0 news Six teams from Georgia Tech entered this year's ULI-Hines Student Competition. Each team must have five graduate students from at least three different disciplines to be eligible to compete. Two teams from Georgia Tech received honorable mentions in this year's competition. 

]]>
2020-03-04T00:00:00-05:00 2020-03-04T00:00:00-05:00 2020-03-04 00:00:00
Zoe Kafkes 
Marketing and Events Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of City & Regional Planning 
zoe.kafkes@design.gatech.edu
 
Carmen New
Marketing and Events Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
635390 635390 image <![CDATA[Team ETS]]> image/jpeg 1589481178 2020-05-14 18:32:58 1589481178 2020-05-14 18:32:58
<![CDATA[Design and Space Syntax Studio Digital Publication Available for Download]]> 34569 The second edition of the Design and Space Syntax Studio is now available for digital download. This year’s publication titled, Home, Architecture, Agency, features projects and essays from students in Professor John Peponis’ Fall 2019 studio, faculty, and Georgia Tech alumni and friends. The research and study continued in the Spring 2020 semester with an undergraduate interdisciplinary studio with the School of Industrial Design.

The studio addressed the question, “Do the digitally enabled interactive technologies, current or foreseeable, have the potential to substantially transform building types?”

“It is in the nature of human construction of boundaries that separation and the definition of discrete domains are coupled to conditional reconnection and the creation of interfaces, whether the latter is structured by the arrangement of space itself, or by the arrangement of things in space,” wrote Peponis. “Thus, home defines both the family and the interface between family and social life.”

Click here to download a copy of Home, Architecture, Agency.

]]> cwagster3 1 1587052342 2020-04-16 15:52:22 1587052342 2020-04-16 15:52:22 0 0 news The second edition of the Design and Space Syntax Studio is now available for digital download. This year’s publication titled, Home, Architecture, Agency, features projects and essays from students in Professor John Peponis’ Fall 2019 studio, faculty, and Georgia Tech alumni and friends.

]]>
2020-04-16T00:00:00-04:00 2020-04-16T00:00:00-04:00 2020-04-16 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
634448 634448 image <![CDATA[Home, Architecture, Agency]]> image/jpeg 1587052167 2020-04-16 15:49:27 1587052167 2020-04-16 15:49:27
<![CDATA[AEC 'Dream Team' Talks Unmanned Aircraft Systems]]> 28816 The First Annual Symposium for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the Built Environment was also the first of its kind at Georgia Tech. It welcomed industry professionals, faculty, and students from the Southeast and abroad.

Faculty from the Schools of Building ConstructionArchitecture, and Civil and Environmental Engineering, in addition to faculty participation from the School of Aerospace Engineering, organized the symposium. The primary goal was to define an industry-engaging, comprehensive agenda for future UAS research in the built environment.  

The symposium featured current research within the Georgia Tech College of Design and the Georgia Tech community; along with presentations from visiting faculty members and industry professionals.

"There were representatives from a wide range of disciplines and sectors working collaboratively to address a common challenge and opportunity for the built environment," said Daniel Castro, the chair of the School. "This is a reflection of the direction that we are heading in the School: using technology and innovative methodologies, collaborating with other disciplines, and producing relevant outcomes for the built environment."

Cutting-edge research showcased optimization of flight plan operations, building inspections, and integrating advanced design technology, building typology for multi-system design production, infrared modeling for energy modeling, multi-robot mapping, and more.

Click link to read full story: https://bc.gatech.edu/aec-dream-team-talks-unmanned-aircraft-systems

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1562694971 2019-07-09 17:56:11 1586895001 2020-04-14 20:10:01 0 0 news The First Annual Symposium for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the Built Environment was also the first of its kind at Georgia Tech. It welcomed industry professionals, faculty, and students from the Southeast and abroad.

]]>
2019-07-09T00:00:00-04:00 2019-07-09T00:00:00-04:00 2019-07-09 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Graduate Recruitment | Marketing and Events
School of Building Construction | College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
404-385-7479 | tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu 
bc.gatech.edu

]]>
623113 623114 623113 image <![CDATA[AEC 'Dream Team' Talks Unmanned Aircraft Systems]]> image/jpeg 1562695057 2019-07-09 17:57:37 1562695057 2019-07-09 17:57:37 623114 image <![CDATA[AEC 'Dream Team' Talks Unmanned Aircraft Systems 2]]> image/jpeg 1562695155 2019-07-09 17:59:15 1562695155 2019-07-09 17:59:15
<![CDATA[Four Architecture Faculty Receive Student Recognition of Excellence in Teaching Award]]> 34569 Each year the Georgia Tech Center for Teaching and Learning awards faculty for their teaching excellence, and this year, four faculty from the School of Architecture have been selected as winners.

On Tuesday, March 10, faculty were honored in the Student Center Ballroom as part of Celebrating Teaching Day. Associate professor and director of Stubbins Gallery, Mark Cottle, Professor and director of the Master of Science in Urban Design program, Ellen Dunham-Jones, associate professor and director of the Master of Science in Architecture program, Russell Gentry, and assistant professor and director of the High Performance Building Lab, Tarek Rakha, received the Student Recognition of Excellence in Teaching: Class of 1934 Award.

The award, previously known as the Class of 1940 Course Survey Teaching Effectiveness Award, was created to celebrate faculty members who received exceptional response rates and scores from their Course-Instructor Opinion Survey, which students complete at the end of each semester. Courses taught during the 2019 calendar year were considered for this award.   

]]> cwagster3 1 1584735987 2020-03-20 20:26:27 1584736011 2020-03-20 20:26:51 0 0 news The Student Recognition of Excellence in Teaching: Class of 1934 Award was awarded to Mark Cottle, Ellen Dunham-Jones, Russell Gentry, and Tarek Rakha.

]]>
2020-03-10T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-10T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-10 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
633703 633703 image <![CDATA[Mark Cottle, Ellen Dunham-Jones, Russell Gentry, and Tarek Rakha]]> image/jpeg 1584735841 2020-03-20 20:24:01 1584735841 2020-03-20 20:24:01
<![CDATA[New Book by Professor George B. Johnston Explores History and Theory of Architectural Practice]]> 34569 George B. Johnston has been a practicing architect, writer, and educator for over 40 years. In his new book, Assembling the Architect: The History and Theory of Professional Practice, Professor Johnston details the origins and history of U.S. architectural practice. The book unravels the competing interests that historically have structured the field and cultivates a deeper understanding of the contemporary profession.

Considered a perfect companion to the Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice, Assembling the Architect is a useful resource for practitioners as well as architecture students.

“By stoking a broader historical awareness of some of the unresolved tensions that have shaped architecture practice, it is hoped that students of architecture will be inspired by the challenge and potential of redesigning practice itself, to be innovators and agents of change,” said Johnston. “Long-time practitioners may also be surprised to learn about the sources of some of the profession’s most taken for granted assumptions.”

Focusing on the period from 1870 to 1920 when the foundations were being laid for the U.S. architectural profession that we recognize today, this study traces the formation and standardization of the fundamental relationships among architects, owners, and builders, as codified in the American Institute of Architects' very first Handbook of Architectural Practice. It reveals how these archetypal roles have always been fluid, each successfully redefining their own agency with respect to the others in the constantly shifting political economy of building. Johnston’s book hit the shelves in early 2020.

“In the coming decade, architects like other professionals will need to re-conceive altogether how to educate themselves and others, not for the singular profession as they have known it, but for the multitude of roles that increasingly automated practice will demand,” said Johnston. “Where professionalizing efforts of a century ago withdrew the architect from both the site of construction and its field of financial interest, new tools have the potential to thrust architects by whatever names back more organically into the heart of the action, into a multitude of pluralist practices where sharp lines separating project instigation, design, and execution are blurred. The challenge will be to avoid the kinds of professional uniformity that nineteenth- and twentieth-century professionalization incurred.”

In order to open a broader discussion around the themes of Johnston’s book, the Georgia Tech School of Architecture will be hosting the Reassembling the Profession Symposium on March 11. Click here to register to attend the symposium.

Click here to learn more about Assembling the Architect.

]]> cwagster3 1 1582222228 2020-02-20 18:10:28 1582741369 2020-02-26 18:22:49 0 0 news George B. Johnston has been a practicing architect, writer, and educator for over 40 years. In his new book, Assembling the Architect: The History and Theory of Professional Practice, Professor Johnston details the origins and history of U.S. architectural practice. The book unravels the competing interests that historically have structured the field and cultivates a deeper understanding of the contemporary profession.

]]>
2020-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-20 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
632722 632722 image <![CDATA[Assembling the Architect]]> image/jpeg 1582217440 2020-02-20 16:50:40 1582217440 2020-02-20 16:50:40
<![CDATA[Associate Professor Perry Pei-Ju Yang Releases New Book on Urban Systems Design]]> 34569 How do we integrate urban design, systems science, and data analytics in the context of the smart city movement? Explore potential answers in the new book, Urban Systems Design: Creating Sustainable Smart Cities in the Internet of Things Era, written by Perry Yang, associate professor for the Georgia Tech Schools of City and Regional Planning and Architecture, and director of the Eco Urban Lab for the Georgia Tech College of Design, and his co-editor and co-author, Yoshiki Yamagata, principal researcher and head of Global Carbon Project International Office at the Center for Global Environmental Research, National Institute for Environmental Studies, address this question in their new book Urban Systems Design: Creating Sustainable Smart Cities in the Internet of Things Era.

Urban Systems Design analyzes the ways in which society utilizes Internet of Things-based sharing platforms in the context of smart community dimensions—energy, transport, urban form, and human comfort—and explores how these platforms can be used to improve community health and welfare. 

With recent achievements in research regarding the potential impact of Internet of Things and big data, Urban Systems Design delves into how to identify, structure, measure, and monitor urban sustainability standards and progress. This book reviews the financial, institutional, policy, and technical needs required for a successful implementation in smart cities. 

“Urban design is becoming data-driven. Empowered by new tools and technologies, cities are now far more designable than ever before. The ability to handle how massive data are captured, analyzed, and applied in cities is now critical to addressing problems occurring in places, neighborhoods, and cities. Urban systems design offers an approach to designing new forms of sustainable, resilient, and socially responsible cities in the face of increasing impact of emerging technologies, big data, and urban automation to people, communities, and their placemaking,” said Professor Yang.

 

Click here to learn more about Urban Systems Design.

]]> cwagster3 1 1581628345 2020-02-13 21:12:25 1581710738 2020-02-14 20:05:38 0 0 news How do we integrate urban design, systems science, and data analytics in the context of the smart city movement? Explore potential answers in the new book, Urban Systems Design: Creating Sustainable Smart Cities in the Internet of Things Era, written by Perry Yang, associate professor for the Georgia Tech Schools of City and Regional Planning and Architecture, and director of the Eco Urban Lab for the Georgia Tech College of Design, and his co-editor and co-author, Yoshiki Yamagata.

]]>
2020-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-13 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
632449 632449 image <![CDATA[Urban Systems Design]]> image/png 1581627884 2020-02-13 21:04:44 1581627884 2020-02-13 21:04:44
<![CDATA[Mark Cottle serves as 2019 Artist in Residence at Neutra VDL Research House in Los Angeles ]]> 34569 This fall, Mark Cottle served as the 2019 Artist in Residence at the Neutra VDL Research House in Silver Lake, Los Angeles.

The iconic modernist house, designed by Richard Neutra in the 1930s to accommodate his office and family, and rebuilt in the 1960s, is now a museum with a program that invites one artist per year to make installations in the house.

Previous artists in residence were Santiago Borja (2010), Xavier Veilhan (2012), Bryony Roberts (2013), Competing Utopias with the Wende Museum (2014), Luis Callejas (2015), Les Frères Chapuisat (2016), Tu casa es mi casa - Frida Escobedo, Pedro y Juana, Tezontle (2017), and BLESS (2018).

Cottle's installation, THE COST OF MONEY, made from recycled plastic shopping bags and twine, is a meditation on the steep human price capital can exact, particularly from the most vulnerable populations, and at enormous expense to the environment.  

Cottle details his installation, stating:

"It was important that the work engage in a respectful yet vigorous dialogue with the architecture.  In the Neutra VDL House ideals and formal gestures of prewar European modernism find a home in Southern California—including the Arcadian notion of the primitive hut—utopian interiors that are, to all intents and purposes, contiguous with the outdoors, a tamed and regained paradise.

Two visions of modern domesticity co-inhabit:  the original 30s version of the house, and the 60s post-fire iteration.  While the two share an interest in layered and nested spaces, in planarity, and in blurring distinctions between inside and outside, the first version's strict modularity and abstract formal rigor lives in tension with the robust material textures and colors of the second.

I was interested in this tension between abstract and material, between spatial and tectonic, and chose to interact with this doubled vision by suspending three tapestries, each approximately nine feet square, at key moments in the house.

The first tapestry, in the courtyard/garden, adds another lamination, floating just in front of the rough stone veneer. The second, at the stair/bridge, hangs in the gap. The third, in the salon, is a free plane, dividing dining and seating areas.

All three are attached to existing drapery tracks and participate in the spatial logic already established in the house.  The patterns and colors reference the immediate landscape:  paving stones and ground cover, clouds seen through branches, reflections on the water."

]]> cwagster3 1 1575297500 2019-12-02 14:38:20 1575297500 2019-12-02 14:38:20 0 0 news This fall, Mark Cottle served as the 2019 Artist in Residence at the Neutra VDL Research House in Silver Lake, Los Angeles. The iconic modernist house, designed by Richard Neutra in the 1930s to accommodate his office and family, and rebuilt in the 1960s, is now a museum with a program that invites one artist per year to make installations in the house.

]]>
2019-12-02T00:00:00-05:00 2019-12-02T00:00:00-05:00 2019-12-02 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.new@design.gatech.edu
]]>
629466 629467 629466 image <![CDATA[THE COST OF MONEY ]]> image/jpeg 1575297217 2019-12-02 14:33:37 1575297217 2019-12-02 14:33:37 629467 image <![CDATA[THE COST OF MONEY Installation]]> image/jpeg 1575297259 2019-12-02 14:34:19 1575297259 2019-12-02 14:34:19
<![CDATA[Architecture Students Take Home First Prize in International Student Design Competition]]> 34569 This year, over 400 entries participants submitted work to HERE+NOW: A House for the 21st Century, an international student design competition administered by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) and sponsored by American Institute of Architecture (AIA) and Custom Residential Architects Network (CRAN®). Of the 400 participants, Georgia Tech School of Architecture students, Kang Song (’19), Dan Lu (’19), Raunak Tibrewala (’19), were awarded first prize.

The project titled, “ANOTHER LIFE—Sustaining Iceland’s Family Fishing Economy” looked at the impact of climate change on the fishing industry in Iceland. With an economic imbalance spurred by a shrinking supply of fisheries and a growing tourism industry, Song, Lu, and Tibrewala addressed both matters by designing a hotel and a house.

“The hotel can provide basic services such as accommodation and meals for tourists, and during the fishing moratorium, fishermen can provide tourism services such as guides,” the students noted in their project description.

“The project is elegantly narrated with visually impactful diagrams and drawings,” a juror commented. “The structure offers the potential to serve as an iconic architectural element along the shoreline of an everyday neighborhood. This project demonstrates a level of restraint-responding to the existing context and natural landscape while deftly incorporating public spaces.”

The Design and Research (D+R) Studio, co-taught by Michael Gamble, associate professor and director of the Master of Architecture program  and Tarek Rakha, assistant professor of High Performance Buildings, assigned students to tackle the ACSA Zero-Energy Urban Housing Competition proposal.

The design of green infrastructure is a subject near and dear to both Gamble and Rakha’s focus areas. From its beginning, Gamble has been involved in the Kendeda Living Building project, a zero-waste, zero-energy initiative unique to the Southeast.

“Our mission at Georgia Tech is to improve the human condition through progress and service,” said Gamble. “The Living Building and the work coming out of the School of Architecture are clear evidence that Georgia Tech is shaping the future, and our students love it.”

Students from the 2016 Portman Prize Studio actively participated in the Living Building Challenge, which was based on the building's zero-waste building initiative. With topics of sustainability and green infrastructure deeply embedded in the School of Architecture, Gamble and Rakha saw this competition as an opportunity to directly address what they were already teaching in their courses.

“Students in the High Performance Building Master of Science in Architecture program employ state-of-the-art environmental performance simulation tools to inform their partners in architectural design,” said Rakha. “The design and performance integration happen through the use of advanced, research-based frameworks as experiential learning methods that enhance energy and comfort in built environment design.”

In addition to Song, Lu, and Tibrewala winning first place, Solangely Rivera Hernandez (’19), Warren Campbell (’19), and Lu received an honorable mention for their submission “Recovery Assemblies: Rapid Deployable Housing Post-Disaster Events.”

Their project looked at the current protocols provided by disaster relief organizations as people are displaced following floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, etc., and created prototypical, temporary, versatile modules that could be adapted to the needs of the user.

Click here to read more about our winners.  

]]> cwagster3 1 1571234487 2019-10-16 14:01:27 1573677423 2019-11-13 20:37:03 0 0 news This year, over 400 entries participants submitted work to HERE+NOW: A House for the 21st Century, an international student design competition administered by the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) and sponsored by American Institute of Architecture (AIA) and Custom Residential Architects Network (CRAN®). Of the 400 participants, Kang Song (’19), Dan Lu (’19), and Raunak Tibrewala (’19) were awarded first place.

]]>
2019-10-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-16 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster New
Marketing & Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
627632 627633 627632 image <![CDATA[First Prize ACSA Here+Now Competition ]]> image/jpeg 1571234135 2019-10-16 13:55:35 1571234135 2019-10-16 13:55:35 627633 image <![CDATA[ACSA Award Winning Student Project]]> image/png 1571234176 2019-10-16 13:56:16 1571234176 2019-10-16 13:56:16
<![CDATA[High Performance Building Program Awarded $1.4 Million by U.S. Department of Energy to Develop Building Envelope Diagnostics and Modeling Using Drones]]> 34569 A research team led by assistant professor Tarek Rakha at the Georgia Tech School of Architecture has been awarded $1.4M in research funding (in addition to $370K cost share commitment) by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (BTO) under the Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers & Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) program. BTO is investing in early-stage research and development for advanced building technologies and systems that will serve as a foundation for future reductions in building energy consumption.

More than half of all U.S. commercial buildings were built before 1970 and are inefficient relative to newer buildings. To address the inefficiency of this older stock, retrofit programs rely on on-site auditing to collect information about buildings’ envelope, lighting, and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems on physics-based, whole-building energy modeling to identify and diagnose specific inefficiencies in these systems and to design and optimize energy-efficiency measure packages that address them.

Envelopes and windows account for over 50% of energy loads in buildings, but collecting detailed and actionable information about them is challenging. A primary challenge is the difficulty in accessing building exteriors above the first or second story. Using humans to perform this inspection is time-consuming, costly, dangerous, and error prone.

The research team is addressing this challenge in a three-year project called Aerial Intelligence for Retrofit Building Energy Modeling (AirBEM). AirBEM will complement human auditing of building interiors with the use of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs or drones) equipped with infrared sensors and onboard processors to audit the exterior envelope. The drones will use Computer Vision (CV) techniques to detect both materials and heat transfer anomalies which suggest construction defects such as air leaks.

“The aspiration for this work is to profoundly inform building retrofit design by radically enhancing the methods and modes of envelope audits,” said Tarek Rakha, who serves as Principle Investigator (PI) for the project. “We want to allow auditors to move past a small number of single-frame images for inspection; we want to enable retrofits to address specific building envelope issues, and want to develop 3D models that designers can interact with when developing retrofit plans.” 

Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) will be led by Georgia Tech as the prime recipient with academic partners including, associate professor Senem Velipasalar and associate professor Ed Bogucz from the College of Engineering and Computer Science at Syracuse University, and professor John Fernández from the School of Architecture and Planning at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Sandeep Ahuja from Pattern R+D software developers will serve as industry partner. RD&D conducted with DOE funding will advance AirBEM from a preliminary proof-of-concept to develop a transformational cyber-physical system that automates diagnostic capabilities of the UAV platform. 

]]> cwagster3 1 1572376392 2019-10-29 19:13:12 1572376392 2019-10-29 19:13:12 0 0 news Research team led by assistant professor, Tarek Rahka, in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture is awarded $1.4M in research funding by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Building Technologies Office (BTO) under the Building Energy Efficiency Frontiers & Innovation Technologies (BENEFIT) program.

]]>
2019-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29 00:00:00 Carmen New
Marketing & Events Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
628320 628320 image <![CDATA[Yasser El Masri (left) and Eleanna Panagoulia (right), incoming High Performance Building Lab (HPBL) PhD students joining Assistant Professor Tarek Rakha (center) this fall to start the AirBEM project.]]> image/jpeg 1572376068 2019-10-29 19:07:48 1572376068 2019-10-29 19:07:48
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Dedicates the Most Sustainable Building of Its Kind in the Southeast]]> 27446 The Georgia Institute of Technology dedicated a new building Oct. 24 that rewrites the rules for sustainability in the Southeast.

In fact, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design isn’t really sustainable at all; more accurately, the newest building on the Atlanta campus is regenerative. And it has reimagined from the ground up what a campus building can be.

“The time for doing less harm is gone,” said Shan Arora, director of The Kendeda Building. “We need to have buildings that provide more than they take.”

That broad guiding principle has produced a building that will, each year, generate more on-site electricity than it consumes and collect and harvest more water than it uses. During construction, the building diverted more waste from landfills than it sent to them.

“The Kendeda Building is an incredible and beautiful example of sustainable design, integration with nature, human inclusion and well-being. It is the most sustainable building of its kind in the Southeast,” said Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera. “Thanks to our partnership with the Kendeda Fund, it will inspire architects, civil engineers, business and policy leaders for generations to come.”

In 2015, The Kendeda Fund committed $25 million for Georgia Tech to design and build a living building on campus in an effort prove a regenerative building was practical even in the Southeast’s heat and humidity. An additional $5 million will support programming activities once the building is certified.

The Kendeda Building is the first academic and research building in the Southeast designed to be certified as a living building by the International Living Future Institute. Over the next 12 months, it will have to prove its bona fides to earn Living Building Challenge 3.1 certification, delivering on its promise to be self-sufficient, healthy, and beautiful while connecting people to light, air, food, nature, and community.

“The dedication of The Kendeda Building represents the culmination of many years of planning and partnership. We are humbled to see the vision come to life, and we hope it can be a model for change across the Southeast,” said Dena Kimball, executive director of The Kendeda Fund. “But the official opening of the building is the starting point, not the finish line. Now the real work begins, as Georgia Tech embraces the goals of the Living Building Challenge and demonstrates what’s required to operate a building that gives more than it takes and creates a positive impact on the human and natural systems that surround it.”

One of the first steps in that effort is getting the on-site water treatment system certified by state environmental regulators. It will be the first rainwater-to-drinking-water system in a commercial building in this part of the country. Arora said that means the project is breaking more new ground for the Georgia Environmental Protection Division.

“We are teaching and learning together, the regulator and the regulated,” he said.

The Kendeda Building will host several events in the fall and then open fully in the spring for classes, when it becomes a living, learning laboratory for education and research.

“Really, the best is yet to come. Our goal is to host as many large and required courses from across campus to give our students access to a building that actually teaches us all something,” said Michael Gamble, associate professor and director of Graduate Studies in the School of Architecture. “It’s not just for those students interested in sustainability as a career. For example, next semester, calculus will be taught in The Kendeda Building.”

Gamble helped lead efforts to embed the concepts of the Living Building Challenge more broadly in the Georgia Tech curriculum, including a series of pilot projects that helped explore the challenge’s requirements. Gamble also led a series of architecture design studios focused on mass timber technology like that used in the building.

“The pilot project program should be a part of every capital project on campus — we’ve learned more and made more connections than we ever thought we would,” Gamble said.

Likewise, Arora said the project team — general contractor Skanska and architects Lord Aeck Sargent and The Miller Hull Partnership — found new sources of materials and created ways of working that now will ripple out to other projects.

“Once you learn how to build and operate a living building, you can’t unlearn it,” Arora said. “Through this process, we’re creating the local supply chain, the workforce, and the best practices for other buildings in the region to use living building elements.”

]]> Joshua Stewart 1 1571935224 2019-10-24 16:40:24 1572037967 2019-10-25 21:12:47 0 0 news The Kendeda Building goes beyond sustainability to be a regenerative building that gives back more than it takes from the environment.

]]>
2019-10-24T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-24T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-24 00:00:00 Joshua Stewart

404.894.6016

]]>
628027 628027 image <![CDATA[Kendeda Building Front Porch]]> image/jpeg 1571866634 2019-10-23 21:37:14 1571866634 2019-10-23 21:37:14 <![CDATA[Facebook Live: Tour The Kendeda Building]]> <![CDATA[Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design]]> <![CDATA[The Kendeda Fund]]> <![CDATA[International Living Future Institute]]> <![CDATA[Living Building Chronicle Blog]]>
<![CDATA[Six Georgia Tech Architecture Students Receive Architecture MasterPrize Awards]]> 34569 The Architecture MasterPrize (AMP) is a program designed to advance the worldwide appreciation for architecture by honoring architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture designs. This year, six Georgia Tech School of Architecture students received AMP awards in the categories of mixed-use architecture, small architecture, and installation and structures.

Master of Architecture (M.Arch) student, Clay Kiningham, won in the categories of Miscellaneous Architecture, Mixed Use Architecture, and Green Architecture with his project Fourth and Foundry–Timber Housing Towers in South Boston. This project serves as a prototype for the future of sustainable timber cities. In the Spring 2019 semester, Kiningham’s project also received the Portman Studio Prize, a competition studio supported by Portman Architects.

Emily Wirt (M.Arch ’19) also placed in the Mixed Use Architecture category. Wirt’s project titled, “Pockets” was designed during her final Design + Research studio. “Pockets are surprising gathering spaces created through simple means,” aaid Wirt. “Moments of exception are embedded within a dense mixed-use building grid, raveling through channels of light, sound, and air.”

Also among the winners from Georgia Tech, Yevgenia (Jane) Ilyasova (Bachelor of Science in Architecture ’19) received an award in the landscape architecture category for Installations and Structures. Ilyasova’s project, “Theater of the Landscape” created a site on Angel Island that would memorialize Asian immigration from around 1890, when they were tragically kept in barracks as they awaited citizenship before being turned away. The new sanctuary would highlight its past while providing a refuge for new and future citizens. Ilyasova is currently pursuing her Master of Architecture degree at Princeton University.

Rachel Cloyd (M.Arch ’19) won in the Small Architecture category with her project titled, “Transform.” Cloyd’s project was designed in Georgia Tech’s Thomas W. Ventulett Chair, Débora Mesa’s Design and Research studio in the Fall 2018 semester, which challenged students to look at the Atlanta Beltline and prototype architectures that influence the debate about contemporary urban values and spaces. Cloyd’s project looked how transportation infrastructure could fulfill another purpose.

M.Arch student, Michael Koliner, also won in the Small Architecture category as well as in the Miscellaneous Architecture category with his Inflatable Tensegrity Structures project. Koliner worked alongside Georgia Tech’s first Ventulett NEXT Fellow, Jonathan Dessi-Olive, part-time lecturer and senior principal with Uzun+Case, Jim Case, and structural engineer with Uzun+Case, Vinay Teja Meda. In early October 2019, this project presented at the International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures Conference in Barcelona, Spain with a pavilion-scale inflatable-tensegrity-structure. 

B.S. in Architecture senior, Jamieson Pye, received an honorable mention in Landscape Architecture in the Installation and Structures category. Pye said that his project was inspired by work from Ensamble Studio. Pye’s project titled, “Incision…a journey through space and time” represents a story of rediscovery by the using discarded, excavated remains of natural terrain to create a new island.

Check out the winning student projects here.

]]> cwagster3 1 1570729295 2019-10-10 17:41:35 1570801497 2019-10-11 13:44:57 0 0 news The Architecture MasterPrize (AMP) is a program designed to advance the worldwide appreciation for architecture by honoring architecture, interior design, and landscape architecture designs. This year, six Georgia Tech School of Architecture students received AMP awards in the categories of mixed-use architecture, small architecture, and installation and structures.

]]>
2019-10-10T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-10T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-10 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
627469 627469 image <![CDATA[Model by Clay Kiningham ]]> image/jpeg 1570728912 2019-10-10 17:35:12 1570728976 2019-10-10 17:36:16
<![CDATA[Ensamble Studio Wins Royal Institute of British Architects Charles Jencks Award]]> 34569 Each year, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) recognizes an individual or a practice that has made an impactful contribution to the theory and practice of architecture by awarding them the RIBA Charles Jencks Award. This year RIBA named Ensamble Studio, led by the Georgia Tech School of Architecture Thomas W. Ventlett III Distinguished Chair in Architectural Design, Débora Mesa and Antón García-Abril, the 2019 Charles Jencks Award recipients.

“We have found an ever-expanding field for exploration and invention in architecture—one where every built work is just the beginning of the next project to come, in constant evolution and full of creative uncertainties,” Said Mesa and García-Abril in response to the award. “One that has the enormous potential to transcend our own actions and become part of bigger ideas, bigger endeavors and greater communities. The RIBA Charles Jencks Award has a challenging mission and a humbling list of recipients, so winning it is as surprising as encouraging. We receive it with great happiness and gratitude, eager to do much more and much better.”

“Débora Mesa and Antón Garcia-Abril are bold in their work, which explores the powerful combination of placemaking, functionality, refinement and beauty, in both urban and rural areas,” said David Gloster, Chair of the RIBA Charles Jencks Award judging panel and RIBA Director of Education. “Ensamble Studio is a highly collaborative practice built on the personal, professional and academic strengths of its staff and is a great example of using creative thinking to navigate architectural challenges.”

Learn more about Ensamble Studio and the 2019 RIBA Charles Jencks Award here.

]]> cwagster3 1 1569010462 2019-09-20 20:14:22 1569010462 2019-09-20 20:14:22 0 0 news Each year, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) recognizes an individual or a practice that has made an impactful contribution to the theory and practice of architecture by awarding them the RIBA Charles Jencks Award. This year RIBA named Ensamble Studio, led by our current Thomas W. Ventlett III Distinguished Chair in Architectural Design, Débora Mesa and Antón García-Abril, the 2019 Charles Jencks Award recipients.

]]>
2019-09-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-20 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
626514 626514 image <![CDATA[Ensamble Studio]]> image/jpeg 1569010158 2019-09-20 20:09:18 1569010158 2019-09-20 20:09:18
<![CDATA[Danielle Willkens to Present Soane Fellowship Lecture ]]> 34569 On Monday, September 23, assistant professor of history and theory in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, Danielle Willkens, will present this year’s Soane Fellowship Lecture co-sponsored by the Center for Architecture and the Society for Architectural Historians.  

Willkens joined the School of Architecture at the beginning of the fall 2019 semester. Willkens is a practicing designer, researcher, and FAA Certified Remote Pilot. Her experiences in practice and research include design/build projects, public installations, and on-site investigations as well as extensive archival work in several countries.

Willkens will present a lecture titled, “Architects Abroad: Seeing, Drawing, and Traveling” at the Center for Architecture located at 536 LaGuardia Place in New York City.  Willkens was the 2007 Soane Fellow. Her lecture will discuss the importance of travel as part of an architect’s educational background, particularly when exploring the nature and scope of Soane’s Grand Tour and Parisian excursions.

Doors open at 6pm, and lecture will begin at 6:30pm EST. Learn more about Willkens’ lecture here.

]]> cwagster3 1 1568380845 2019-09-13 13:20:45 1568380845 2019-09-13 13:20:45 0 0 news The Soane Fellowship Lecture, co-sponsored by the Center for Architecture and the Society for Architectural Historians, welcomes Danielle Willkens as the presenter of this year's Soane Fellowship Lecture. 

]]>
2019-09-13T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-13T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-13 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing & Events Coordinator 
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
626127 626127 image <![CDATA[Danielle Willkens]]> image/jpeg 1568380644 2019-09-13 13:17:24 1568380644 2019-09-13 13:17:24
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Master of Science in Urban Design now STEM Degree Program]]> 34569 The Georgia Tech Master of Science in Urban Design (MSUD) is officially designated as a STEM-accredited degree program by the Board of Regents of Georgia. The STEM designation, which refers to the academic disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, will further benefit highly skilled international students who want to continue to gain work experience in their field of study in the United States following graduation. 

Under the OPT (Optional Practical Training) program, international students who graduate from colleges and universities in the United States are able to remain in the country and receive training through work experience for up to 12 months. Students who graduate from a designated STEM degree program can remain for an additional 24 months on the F-1 STEM OPT extension. 

“This designation helps capture the value of the integration of so many different technological, social, and ecological aspects of our urban design program,” said Ellen Dunham-Jones, director of the MSUD program. 

Georgia Tech has been a leader in urban design education since 1969. In addition to the MSUD, housed in the School of Architecture, students can specialize in urban design in the Master of City and Regional Planning (MCRP) degree or can pursue the M.Arch/MCRP dual degree. All three emphasize a culture of collaboration linking requisite knowledge and expertise across fields of architecture, planning, landscape, and engineering to propose integrated and implementable solutions to the design of urban areas.

The MSUD is the most studio-centric of the three programs with a specific focus on preparing students to produce detailed drawings integrating the design of public infrastructure, public spaces and the subdivision of private land. The MSUD is also distinguished by its exclusive focus on redeveloping our least sustainable areas into more resilient, more equitable, and more prosperous places.

We invite you to Watch the 2019 MSUD Virtual Open House. Applications are open now and the deadline to apply is January 15, 2019. 

]]> cwagster3 1 1568125876 2019-09-10 14:31:16 1568127127 2019-09-10 14:52:07 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Master of Science in Urban Design (MSUD) is officially designated as a STEM-accredited degree program by the Board of Regents of Georgia. The STEM designation, which refers to the academic disciplines of science, technology, engineering and mathematics, will further benefit highly skilled international students who want to continue to gain work experience in their field of study in the United States following graduation. 

]]>
2019-09-10T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-10T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-10 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing & Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
625932 625933 625932 image <![CDATA[Master of Science in Urban Design STEM Designation]]> image/jpeg 1568125795 2019-09-10 14:29:55 1568125795 2019-09-10 14:29:55 625933 image <![CDATA[MSUD Spring 2019 Class Photo]]> image/jpeg 1568125855 2019-09-10 14:30:55 1568125855 2019-09-10 14:30:55
<![CDATA[LeBlanc: Notre-Dame de Paris' Future in the Modern City]]> 34569 Students were gearing up for their last week of studio for the spring semester when the news of the fire at the Notre-Dame de Paris cathedral reached our campus. Walking through the Hinman Research Building, students and faculty circled around monitors as they watched one of the world’s most identifiable structures disappear in smoke and flames.

Associate professor, W. Jude LeBlanc recalled his feelings that day. “I was alerted to the fire by a text from Michael Gamble, a colleague who directs the summer foreign study programs, Modern Architecture/Modern Cities,” said LeBlanc. “I have to admit it was difficult for me to look at the video images. I would move from article to article on the web, and it took a while before I could bear to look at the videos that showed the falling spire, etc. “

LeBlanc's unique skillset includes the design of furniture and objects; architecture, interior design and installations; and planning, infrastructure and urban design, which all contribute to his interesting point of view not only to that of the design of Notre-Dame, but also to his contributions as a faculty member in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture. This summer, LeBlanc traveled to France to lead the Paris portion of the Modern Architecture and Modern City international education program. 

What are your thoughts on the modern designs that are being proposed for the restoration of Notre-Dame?

President Macron’s proposal for an architectural design competition that would result in an edifice “more beautiful than before” should give one pause.  Nonetheless, the call for a competition to potentially improve or alter Notre Dame serves several functions.  

It provides a means to understand and perhaps reassess the past, to consider our best potential futures, and to hopefully better understand the relationship between the two.  There are many examples in which culturally significant historical structures have been successfully altered by contemporary transformations—The Louvre (I.  M. Pie) and the Reichstag (Norman Foster), for example. Each case is different. 

The Cathedral is included in a large World Heritage Site called “Pairs, Banks of the Seine”. My own opinion is that this monument should be restored to its near exact state before the fire. 

This was true for the Campanile of St. Mark’s Square in Venice and even more so here.  The stone vaults of the ceiling must be repaired, and the spire and roof should be restored.

Specifically, what are some of Notre-Dame's significant features and why should they be preserved?

The stone vaulted ceiling. At least one current proposal suggests that the vault should remain open as a skylight, in part to commemorate the inferno.  The original building, at great expenditure, made light filled walls bound together by vaulting and flying buttresses.  Opening a vault to the sky would have the undesirable and unacceptable effect of altering the fundamental schema of the section and its spatial implications. 

The spire.  According to Professor Emeritus Rob Craig, the spire was as important as any other element to the essential quality of the Gothic attitude. Many more were planned throughout the cathedrals of France than were ultimately realized.  This is because they obviously were the last elements to be built and they would have required immense effort. It was correct that Violet le Duc replaced the spire to Notre Dame in 1844, after the original had been removed in 1756 for structural fatigue. 

The hidden structure of the spire transfers load to the corners of the crossing. Violet le Duc became an expert on medieval timber construction before undertaking this project.  In the intervening years, much of his work has acquired an historical aura in its own right--especially the spire.  Luckily, the sixteen bronze statues had been removed at the time of the calamitous fire.

The roof.  The roof form is an important visual element in the silhouette of Notre Dame and therefore of the skyline of Île de la Cité.  Its authentic reconstruction is essential to a proper restoration.  One exception should be considered.  The hidden structure between the vaults and the roof was made of so much old growth timber it was referred to as “la forêt”, the forest.  Replacement of this amount of timber, even if possible, would represent an avoidable environmental loss.

What is the significance of the Notre-Dame Cathedral in relation to classic and modern architecture?

Notre-Dame is considered one of the great examples of French Gothic Architecture. Construction of the cathedral began in 1160 and was largely complete by 1260.  First called the “French Style,” the Gothic style first appeared in the early 12th c. at the Basilica of Saint-Denise. The main characteristic of Gothic design is its emphasis on the vertical made possible by novel applications of the ribbed vault and the pointed arch, along with the innovation of the flying buttress.

The Gothic style would have lasting effects that altered future styles. Michael Dennis argues that the Renaissance and Baroque facades of France are distinct from Italy in recurring visual and spatial verticality.  Structural expressionism, a major strain in modernist theory and practice, had the Gothic and neo-Gothic precedent behind it.

For example, Violet le Duc proposed novel uses of iron in design in the late 1800s. Violet le Duc was the architect in charge of the 19thcentury renovation of Notre Dame and the person responsible for restoring the fleche, or spire, that had been destroyed. He argued, against the neo-classical preference of the time, that the Gothic style was superior, especially in this context. 

What is another example of a notable building’s collapse. How was it restored?

The Notre-Dame fire is reminiscent of another historic building calamity-the collapse of the St. Mark’s campanile in Venice.  The campanile was one of several prominent buildings—the Dodges’ Palace, the Sansovino library and the St. Mark Cathedral—that together made up the main square of the city.

A tower had stood on this location in Venice since the 14th century and took its final essential form in 1513.  After damage over the years, especially due to lighting strikes, the tower was outfitted with a lightning rod in the 18th century.  Nonetheless, in July of 1902, the tower collapsed completely. As in Paris, not a single human life was taken. That very evening, the decision was made to rebuild the tower exactly as it was before the collapse.

The Notre-Dame Cathedral is a monument onto itself, a supreme exemplar of a style of building which has come to signify both Paris and France.  Happily, it appears that both the will and the means exist to restore the cathedral in Paris.

The building is important in art history and in the popular imagination. President Macron’s promise that the cathedral be fully restored is laudable, despite controversies. For example, I would hope that aesthetics would not be pitted against social equity.  

]]> cwagster3 1 1563379936 2019-07-17 16:12:16 1563487051 2019-07-18 21:57:31 0 0 news Students were gearing up for their last week of studio for the spring semester when the news of the fire at the Notre-Dame de Paris cathedral reached our campus. Walking through the Hinman Research Building, students and faculty circled around monitors as they watched one of the world’s most identifiable structures disappear in smoke and flames.

]]>
2019-07-17T00:00:00-04:00 2019-07-17T00:00:00-04:00 2019-07-17 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator II
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
623462 623464 623462 image <![CDATA[Modern Architecture and the Modern City in Paris]]> image/jpeg 1563379526 2019-07-17 16:05:26 1563379526 2019-07-17 16:05:26 623464 image <![CDATA[Modern Architecture and the Modern City Group in Paris]]> image/jpeg 1563380023 2019-07-17 16:13:43 1563380030 2019-07-17 16:13:50
<![CDATA[The Nostalgia of Malls and Why They Are Dying Today ]]> 34569 Professor and director of the Georgia Tech Master of Science in Urban Design program, Ellen Dunham-Jones recently connected with WIRED’s Emily Dreyfuss to discuss mall culture and where it is heading today.

In anticipation of season three of the hit Netflix series Stranger Things, which is poised to emphasize the mall culture of the 1980s, Dreyfuss reached out to Dunham-Jones, an expert in dying malls and how to retrofit them for future use.

Dunham-Jones is the co-author of Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs, which explores retrofits of aging big box stores, malls, and office parks as they provide healthier and more sustainable places for their communities.

“Newspapers like to jump to the headline that it’s online shopping, but that’s more like the nail in the coffin, than it really is the beginning. The decline of the malls really starts in the 90s mostly because we built so many of them that they started to cannibalize each other.” Dunham-Jones says about the decline of shopping malls. However, Dunham-Jones says that she is most interested in when people are looking at the death of these properties as opportunities to help a 20th century suburb address 21st century problems.

Watch Dunham-Jones’ interview with WIRED here.

]]> cwagster3 1 1561755898 2019-06-28 21:04:58 1562682193 2019-07-09 14:23:13 0 0 news Professor and director of the Georgia Tech Master of Science in Urban Design program, Ellen Dunham-Jones recently connected with WIRED’s Emily Dreyfuss to discuss mall culture and where it is heading today.

]]>
2019-06-28T00:00:00-04:00 2019-06-28T00:00:00-04:00 2019-06-28 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
622860 622860 image <![CDATA[Ellen Dunham-Jones]]> image/jpeg 1561755626 2019-06-28 21:00:26 1561755626 2019-06-28 21:00:26
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Professor Receives Honorary Doctorate from the University of Thessaly]]> 34569 On May 8th, 2019, Professor John Peponis received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Thessaly, Greece. The award was conferred in recognition of distinguished contributions to the discipline of architecture, architectural research and architectural education in Greece and abroad.

The University of Thessaly was founded in 1984, and the Department of Architecture was founded in 1999 and celebrated its 30 year anniversary.

During the period 1992-2005 Peponis also worked as a part time professor at the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, where he helped initiate the first post-professional research-based Master of Science degree in architecture. He was also invited to offer lectures at the Universities of Patras and Thessaly.

At the University of Thessaly, he helped organize workshops and coordinate conferences. He was on the organizing committee for the conference on Representation and Thought in Architecture that was run  by professors Trova, Manolidis and Papaconstantinou in 2005, and brought together 250 attendees from all Schools of Architecture in Greece and several schools in Europe and the USA, including Georgia Tech, leading to a major book on the subject. Peponis’s book Chorographies: the architectural construction of meaning, written in Greek, has been widely included in reading lists in all Schools of Architecture in Greece since its publication in 1997.

“The development of new ideas, theories and methods always involves intense and persistent face-to-face communication with like-minded people.,” said Peponis. “Some of the people I have been comparing notes with over the years work at the University of Thessaly. I like to think that this recognition reflects not only on my own work but also on the common intellectual ethos that propels fundamental advances in architecture as a discipline. It is also deeply rewarding to be recognized in one’s home country.”

]]> cwagster3 1 1558361897 2019-05-20 14:18:17 1558361897 2019-05-20 14:18:17 0 0 news On May 8th, 2019, Professor John Peponis received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Thessaly, Greece. The award was conferred in recognition of distinguished contributions to the discipline of architecture, architectural research and architectural education in Greece and abroad.

]]>
2019-05-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-20 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
621791 621791 image <![CDATA[Professor Vaso Trova Gives Professor John Peponis Honorary Degree ]]> image/jpeg 1558361723 2019-05-20 14:15:23 1558361723 2019-05-20 14:15:23
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Students and Faculty Receive Honors at AIA Georgia 2019 Design Awards]]> 34569 The American Institute of Architects, Georgia Association (AIA Georgia) 2019 Design Awards recognized the top architectural projects by practitioners in Georgia and students currently enrolled in the state of Georgia. Twenty-two projects of the 147 entries that were submitted were awarded in the categories of Built, Unbuilt, Renovation/Restoration, Interior Architecture, Residential Over $1M, Residential Under $1M, Student Project, and People’s Choice.

The award ceremony took place on the same day as the Georgia Tech School of Architecture End of Year Show. The End of Year Show gives students an opportunity to showcase their work for an audience of their peers, faculty, family, friends, alumni, and local practitioners. This exhibition is hosted in the Hinman Research Building and the Hinman Courtyard, which underwent a new installation in the fall of 2018.

Design/Build Workshop Project Earns Excellence Award

So it came as no surprise to the School when we learned that the Hinman Courtyard Installation received an excellence award in the student project category. This project took place over three semesters as part of a Design/Build workshop that consisted of multidisciplinary teams who prototyped, detailed, fabricated, and constructed three new installations, which are now in use in the Courtyard. The installation elements include a pavilion, a layered steel veneer wall, and stair seating.

Portman Prize Studio Project Receives Honor

The recognition of our student work did not stop with the Hinman Courtyard. A team comprised of Marco Ancheita, Emily Wirt, and Stephanie Wright received a merit award for their project, “Rigid + Fluid,” which was created for their Spring 2018 Portman Prize Studio taught by Jen Pindyck. This project proposes a Center for Ecological Interpretation and Land Use History at Amicalola Falls.

BLDGS Named AIA Georgia Firm of the Year

One of the strengths of the School of Architecture is that we have faculty who are actively practicing in their fields.

“BLDGS is a recognized firm of local, regional, and national commendation. The Atlanta-based firm has set a precedent for other firms large and small in its design philosophy of individualized solutions and the importance of a contemporary and public focused perspective on design and the built environment,” notes the award announcement by AIA Georgia.

“Equally passionate about both education and architecture, founding principals, David Yocum, and Brian Bell, also serve as professors of the practice at the Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Architecture where they have been able to imbue their dedicated and enlightened view of architecture and environmental impact. BLDGS has elevated the public’s conception of meaningful design and their multi-faceted work shows their belief in architecture as a “community asset.” Their work in both architecture and with the next generation of architects is recognized, celebrated and to be commended and recognized with the 2019 AIA Georgia Firm of the Year Award."

Click here to read the press release for this year’s AIA Georgia Design and Honor Awards.

]]> cwagster3 1 1558034771 2019-05-16 19:26:11 1558097918 2019-05-17 12:58:38 0 0 news The American Institute of Architects, Georgia Association (AIA Georgia) 2019 Design Awards recognized the top architectural projects by practitioners in Georgia and students currently enrolled in the state of Georgia. Twenty-two projects of the 147 entries that were submitted were awarded in the categories of Built, Unbuilt, Renovation/Restoration, Interior Architecture, Residential Over $1M, Residential Under $1M, Student Project, and People’s Choice.

]]>
2019-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-16 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
621741 621741 image <![CDATA[BLDGS Honored as Firm of the Year by AIA Georgia]]> image/jpeg 1558034654 2019-05-16 19:24:14 1558034654 2019-05-16 19:24:14
<![CDATA[Architecture Junior and Senior Studios Participate in Institute-Wide Capstone Design Expo]]> 34569 This spring, 236 teams from 11 schools and programs at Georgia Tech participated in the Capstone Design Expo. Historically, the College of Engineering has dominated the participation at the Expo, but in recent years, the School of Architecture has become more involved, further proving that Georgia Tech also produces a helluva(n) architect, too.

“Our interdisciplinary design studios are based in structured teamwork that includes students from other disciplines on campus,” said Julie Kim, Associate Professor, Associate Chair, and Director of Undergraduate Program in the School of Architecture. “This is central to our curriculum, emphasizing design as a creative pursuit that requires integrated knowledge from various disciplines. With Architecture participating in the Capstone Design Expo, we have an opportunity to share the innovative and collaborative work our students produce to an audience that includes faculty, industry professionals, and students across the Institute.” 

Each semester, architecture students are required to take a studio as part of their curriculum. Juniors and seniors are organized into the Vertical Studio, and this year, 19 teams represented the School of Architecture at the Expo. 

“Our studios this semester took on the challenges of proposing satellite atria for collaborative learning spaces; interrogating maintenance and repair of structures as they age; designing for disaster, while also developing innovative systems in concrete; and considering global culture and community,” said Kim. “By participating in the Expo, our students engage in a larger conversation with their peers across the Institute. It is a reciprocal situation. Others gain awareness of the range of complex issues our students take on just as our own students see how their peers tackle allied concerns. The platform is, then, set for possible future collaborations.”

“Participating was an exciting experience!,” said Jane Ilyasova (Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Architecture, ’19). “Seeing the range of work produced by other Colleges was eye-opening and made me feel proud to be a part of a community of students that work towards making a positive impact through innovation.”

“Typically, a lot of students and staff from other school departments are unaware of what we do as Architecture majors,” added Tia Calhoun, rising senior in the B.S. in Architecture program. “By participating in Capstone, we are able to give the school of Architecture the exposure and recognition  it deserves.”

Architecture is one of the categories in the Spring Capstone Design Expo. This year, Noah Sannes (B.S. in Architecture, ’19) and Christopher Tromp (B.S. in Architecture, ’19) took home the architecture prize for their project titled, “Coalescence.” Coalescence is a hypothetical proposal for a community recreation center within the city of Atlanta. The project is part of the ACSA Built-to-Last: Resilience Design Challenge, a competition focused on innovations in concrete construction.

“Our project specifically was put forth through the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture and sponsored by the Portland Cement Company,” said Tromp. “It pushed for innovations in concrete, which we implemented in our project through innovative uses of existing materials and pushing for a new development of the material that could filter water. Our project had to take into account many different factors from understanding the socio-cultural demographics of the site, innovations in concrete, water management, social resilience, environmental resilience, disaster relief functions and accommodations, and accessibility for the neighborhood and then be presented in a architecturally coherent and aesthetically rich manner.”

“I believe that it is important for us architecture students to showcase our design work to a wide audience,” said Sannes. “At the Senior Design Capstone, I have had the opportunity to discuss sustainability and material innovations with professionals and academics across many fields. I have had the opportunity to receive crucial career advice from visiting architects, as well. My favorite part of Capstone is sharing with others about what architects do - we invent, create, make, model, and visualize!”

]]> cwagster3 1 1558019156 2019-05-16 15:05:56 1558019676 2019-05-16 15:14:36 0 0 news This spring, 236 teams from 11 schools and programs at Georgia Tech participated in the Capstone Design Expo. Historically, the College of Engineering has dominated the participation at the Expo, but in recent years, the School of Architecture has become more involved, further proving that Georgia Tech also produces a helluva(n) architect, too.

]]>
2019-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-16 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
621732 621732 image <![CDATA[Noah Sannes and Christopher Tromp at Capstone Design Expo]]> image/jpeg 1558018916 2019-05-16 15:01:56 1558018916 2019-05-16 15:01:56
<![CDATA[Turning Their Tassels: Joel Jassu]]> 27469 Joel Jassu was born in Banda, Uganda, which was becoming one of the worst slums of the capital city of Kampala during Joel’s childhood. A chance encounter with an American architect visiting the country on a mission trip set him on a course to earning a master's degree in architecture at Georgia Tech.

“It’s a story I don’t think is my own story, I think it’s a story that is shared by so many champions that have come along the way.”

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1556822899 2019-05-02 18:48:19 1557340345 2019-05-08 18:32:25 0 0 news Joel Jassu was born in Banda, Uganda, which was becoming one of the worst slums of the capital city of Kampala during Joel’s childhood.

View Jassu's Video Here

]]>
2019-05-02T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-02T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-02 00:00:00 Evan Atkinson

Institute Communications

]]>
621516 621283 621516 image <![CDATA[Joel Jassu | Commencement Story]]> image/jpeg 1557340327 2019-05-08 18:32:07 1557340327 2019-05-08 18:32:07 621283 image <![CDATA[Joel Jassu]]> image/jpeg 1556827836 2019-05-02 20:10:36 1556827836 2019-05-02 20:10:36
<![CDATA[Merit Award Presented to Rising Bachelor of Science in Architecture Senior]]> 34569 Phuong “Karen” Tran, rising senior in the Bachelor of Science in Architecture program received a 2019 Lyceum Fellowship Competition merit award for her submission titled, “Immersion…”

In the beginning of the 2018 fall semester, Julie Kim, Associate Professor and Associate Chair in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, assigned an article to her Vertical Studio class by Juhani Pallasmaa titled, “Light, Silence, and Spirituality in Architecture and Art.”

Tran was inspired by the article as she began work on her project for the semester. In “’Immersion…,’” Tran says, “a sanctuary arises from darkness, light, and human emotions.”

The 2018 competition, titled “A Sanctuary,” asked students to explore the site of Angel Island, located in the San Francisco Bay, which was formerly a home to the West Coast Immigrant station. In contrast to Ellis Island, immigrants were housed in barracks on the island and suffered from difficult living conditions. The station closed in 1940, and as the competition overview notes, “…the island was seen as a mechanism to exile immigrants in geo-political limbo – there was never a Statue of Liberty welcoming them.” The competition proposed that participants design a new arrival center that would provide a welcoming place of sanctuary to new immigrants.

“’Immersion…’ spawned from a series of abstract charcoal drawings that crafted different spatial experiences,” Tran said as she described her project. “I thought of light and of darkness as materials of space when I drew the charcoal drawings. They were my way of answering the question: “Where does the building disintegrate and we are only left with emotions that light and silence must offer?” From these charcoal studies, I found four essential dimensions that the interplays of darkness and light offer. The four dimensions are of the past, of the future, of time, and of self.  I perceived these dimensions to be different worlds for people to immerse into and lose sight of reality—a haven for the mind, body, and soul.”

Click here to view Tran’s merit award-winning project.

]]> cwagster3 1 1557340174 2019-05-08 18:29:34 1557340174 2019-05-08 18:29:34 0 0 news In the beginning of the 2018 fall semester, Julie Kim, Associate Professor and Associate Chair in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, assigned an article to her Vertical Studio class by Juhani Pallasmaa titled, “Light, Silence, and Spirituality in Architecture and Art.” Phuong "Karen" Tran, rising Bachelor of Science in Architecture student, was inspired by the article as she began work on her project for the semester. In “’Immersion…,’” Tran says, “a sanctuary arises from darkness, light, and human emotions.”

]]>
2019-05-08T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-08T00:00:00-04:00 2019-05-08 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator 
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
621512 621512 image <![CDATA["Immersion..." by Phuong “Karen” Tran]]> image/jpeg 1557340013 2019-05-08 18:26:53 1557340013 2019-05-08 18:26:53
<![CDATA[SimTigrate Researchers and Alumni Are Designing the Future of Healthcare]]> 32550 Several Georgia Tech alumni will bring their expertise to a symposium put on by the SimTigrate Design Lab.

The symposium will feature leading researchers and designers – alumni trained at the SimTigrate Design Lab in the College of Design, as well as current researchers and students – and will look at the ways design and the design process can transform healthcare.

The symposium, titled Designing the Future of Healthcare: Linking Problem, Evidence, and Transformation, will feature a keynote from SimTigrate Director and School of Architecture Professor Craig Zimring.

He expects the symposium “will identify emerging problems facing healthcare. In the late 20th century we realized the harms we do to patients inadvertently through errors and infections. That, combined with the opportunities to build tens of billions of dollars in healthcare facilities, led to evidence showing that design can address problems in safety and errors. The field of evidence-based design has helped improve the experience of millions of patients worldwide by supporting safer, quieter, light-filled, better organized facilities.”

The symposium also will show how healthcare design research and innovative design of primary and in-patient care can help healthcare organizations address their biggest pressures, which include cost and reimbursement, patient and staff safety, patient experience, and chronic disease.

The result will be a view of emerging themes in healthcare design and research and a map of how researchers and designers can be full partners in transformation, Zimring said.

Looking Toward the Future

He said healthcare systems are also facing the problem of the coming tsunami of chronic diseases, as care providers deal with things like diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and depression.

Zimring said the issue now is to identify the problems that are addressable through physical design and technology. Let’s look at evidence and research that our alumni and lab have done that shows that design can address problems of safety, efficiencies, staff processes, and more, he said.

Looking ahead, Zimring said that for the future of healthcare we must create a system which is more efficient, and which keeps people well rather than just curing them when they are sick.

The way forward, he said, is to bring together built environment technology and improvements in process and access in some integrated way, making the built environment part of the fundamental tool kit in providing health care.

Alumni Bring Their Expertise

Alumni in academia and industry will join current SimTigrate students and researchers. Many continue to do research at their universities, lead research centers of their own, and work with researchers in industry.

One of the returning alumni is Joshua Crews (M.Arch 2011), a senior architect and healthcare team leader at Nelson, an architecture firm with an office in Atlanta.

He is expected to talk about the role of research in the design process, and show how researchers and industry work together.

He and his firm are working with Georgia Tech and Emory University to create a facility to support a living laboratory for those diagnosed with mild cognitive impairment. With little existing evidence to draw from, his work will rely on research to inform design decisions, program activities, and more. He will give some insight into the process.

Crews also presents and continues to do research with Jennifer DuBose, SimTigrate associate director.

DuBose and SimTigrate researchers have built a Lighting User Experience or L(ux) Lab with funding from the Pacific Northwest National Lab and fully tunable white lights donated by Signify.

New developments in lighting technology and discoveries about how light impacts the human brain have led to many opportunities to enhance the experience in healthcare environments. Building on literature reviews with the help of SimTigrate alumni and current students, the lab has designed a series of lighting experiments to evaluate the performance, acceptability and impact on behavior of different lighting conditions with a range of spectral properties and intensities.

The findings from the completed experiments on the acceptability of lighting for nursing tasks will be shared.

The presentation also will include a first look at the plans for testing the use of lighting to enhance cognitive performance in the collaboration between Emory and Georgia Tech in the Mild Cognitive Impairment Empowerment Center in Executive Park in Northeast Atlanta.

Zimring notes that one advantage of working with industry is it gives them the chance to implement their work quickly into the real world.

In bringing back former students, Zimring said one idea was to highlight the achievements of Georgia Tech in the area of healthcare design research and of the many former students around the country.

SimTigrate has helped nurture some of the most effective people in the field and they in turn are training students and engaging the world. “We are celebrating our impact,” he said.

Returning alumni and their current places of employment are:

Current researchers and students are:


This symposium is supported by a grant from the College of Design’s Associate Dean for Research, Nancey Green Leigh.

Register here for the symposium.

]]> Malrey Head 1 1555442298 2019-04-16 19:18:18 1555615711 2019-04-18 19:28:31 0 0 news Featuring the expertise of several distinguished alumni in the field of healthcare design, this symposium looks at the ways design and the design process can transform healthcare.

]]>
2019-04-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-04-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-04-16 00:00:00 Malrey Head
Digital Communications Specialist

]]>
620495 515871 620495 image <![CDATA[The Future of Healthcare Design]]> image/jpeg 1555442926 2019-04-16 19:28:46 1555442926 2019-04-16 19:28:46 515871 image <![CDATA[Craig Zimring Spring 2016]]> image/jpeg 1458923959 2016-03-25 16:39:19 1475895280 2016-10-08 02:54:40
<![CDATA[Podcast Series on Redesigning Cities Officially Launches]]> 34569 The Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture in Atlanta, Georgia is pleased to announce the launch of videos and podcasts from its popular lecture series, REDESIGNING CITIES: The Speedwell Foundation Talks @ Georgia Tech. Through various topics, each lecture addresses issues in urban design by asking, "How should existing cities and their systems be redesigned to address 21st Century challenges?"

Ellen Dunham-Jones, Director of the Master of Science in Urban Design program, brings together a pair of leading experts to address specific challenges including equity, money, social capital, climate change, outdated infrastructure, and disruptive technologies. The brief videos feature a presentation by one of the speakers, while the extended podcasts capture the conversation between the two experts. Podcasts and videos can be accessed on iTunes, YouTube and other popular platforms as well as through the Redesigning Cities website. Follow the series on Twitter @RedesignCities.

The series provides insights and up-to-date thinking about the future of cities. In Episode One, Redesigning Cities with Autonomous Vehicles, Jeff Tumlin of Nelson Nygaard and Harriet Tregoning of New Urban Mobilities (NUMO) point out how autonomy does not change everything that good designers are already doing to make cities more multi-modal. In a following episode, Redesigning Cities for the Collaborative Economy, Gabe Klein described how he was able to quickly install bike lanes as Transportation Commissioner for Washington DC and Chicago. However, Robin Chase, founder of Zipcar, warned that adding bike lanes and transit alone will not  ward off climate change. The speed of change through collaborative platforms such as AirBnb and Lyft hold the only solution to systemic issues like climate change since they more easily capitalize on excess capacity and rapid scaling-up.

In Episode Two, June Williamson of The City College of New York and Allison Arieff of SPUR and author of The New York Times By Design column pointed out that efforts to capture excess capacity must include attention to retrofitting suburbia, too. Noted planner Peter Calthorpe distinguished three types of sprawl around the globe as the principal targets in his discussion of Retrofitting Cities Against Climate Change with Rob Kunzig, senior editor at National Geographic. The concept of the necessity of different solutions for different places was both reinforced and disputed in Episode Three’s fascinating comparison of Detroit and New York City’s efforts to redesign urban parks as social infrastructure by Maurice Cox, Planning Commissioner of Detroit, and Mitchell Silver, Parks and Recreation Commissioner of New York.

Still forthcoming is Episode Six, Gentrification without Displacement? with Joseph P. Riley and Jess Zimbabwe. This final lecture of the series’ inaugural season will take place on Wednesday, April 24 at the Historic Academy of Medicine beginning at 6 p.m.

Dunham-Jones says “It’s been fascinating to listen to two experts have informed, speculative, and candid conversations on such a wide variety of urban topics. I’m delighted that thanks to the Speedwell Foundation we can share the videos and podcasts with the world. It’s time for all of us to think more about redesigning cities.”

]]> cwagster3 1 1555594304 2019-04-18 13:31:44 1555603472 2019-04-18 16:04:32 0 0 news The School of Architecture at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia is pleased to announce the launch of videos and podcasts from its popular lecture series, REDESIGNING CITIES: The Speedwell Foundation Talks @ Georgia Tech

]]>
2019-04-18T00:00:00-04:00 2019-04-18T00:00:00-04:00 2019-04-18 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
611963 611963 image <![CDATA[REDESIGNING CITIES: The Speedwell Foundation Talks @ Georgia Tech]]> image/jpeg 1537910905 2018-09-25 21:28:25 1537910905 2018-09-25 21:28:25
<![CDATA[Built Environment Experts Assemble at Georgia Tech]]> 34569 Researchers and practitioners in the fields of architecture, urban design, urban planning, building science, and data science from across the globe will convene in Georgia Tech from April 7 – April 9, 2019 for the 10th annual celebration of the Symposium on Simulation for Architecture & Urban Design (SimAUD). More than 70 experts from around the globe will meet to present and discuss cutting-edge research and findings, to experience hands-on simulation workshops and to speculate on future challenges and opportunities for the built environment.

SimAUD is a highly selective annual conference supported by the Society for Modeling & Simulation International (SCS) and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).  The conference returns to the United States this year for its 10-year anniversary. Previously, the conference was held in Delft, the Netherlands (2018), Toronto, Canada (2017) and London, United Kingdom (2016). Georgia Tech was selected this year because of the College of Design’s leadership in scholarship and education in design technology. The conference is organized by the Georgia Tech School of Architecture.

This year the program includes four keynote presentations, 11 sessions that showcase 40 single-track, peer-reviewed publications, 8 pre-conference workshops, two professional panels and engaging social events at Georgia Tech and in Atlanta. The conference will also feature a symposium-wide simulation game that will engage participants throughout the three days.

“SimAUD 2019 is going to be a universal celebration of a phenomenal international community of simulation scholars, coming together to discuss state-of-the-art design technology in a truly convergent format,” says SimAUD2019 Program Chair, Tarek Rakha, assistant professor of architecture and high performance buildings in the School of Architecture. “Georgia Tech is both thrilled and honored to host and develop the program for the decennial celebration of this event coming back to the United States, where 12 faculty across Tech’s campus will serve as session chairs and moderators, focusing on a variety of topics ranging from climate modeling to the simulation of people in the built environment. We look forward to welcoming colleagues from all around the world who will disseminate their latest advances in research and innovations for better built environment futures through the lenses of design technology”

“Contemporary architecture practice continuously develops a common digital language to integrate building industry frameworks.” says Scott Marble, Chair of Georgia Tech School of Architecture. “SimAUD 2019 will present critical topics being explored in top academic research centers and architectural practices from around the world. Design technologies have great potential to transform practice in new and innovative ways and through events like this, impactful international synergies are sure to be built to advance this transformation.

“Georgia Tech’s College of Design sets an ideal stage for the 10-year anniversary of SimAUD, leveraging Tech’s technological synergies, along with the College’s strengths in design, planning and creativity.” says Nancey Green Leigh, College of Design Associate Dean of Research. “By bringing together remarkable and established researchers and practitioners in urban planning and design, architecture and building science, visualization and construction, as well as software development, SimAUD 2019, offers promising opportunities for collaboration, innovation and entrepreneurship that to advance Tech’s research agenda.”

“The faculty and students at the Georgia Tech College of Design focus on integrating design and technology. We have developed advanced simulation and visualization models at the building, neighborhood, and city-scale,” said College of Design Dean Stephen P. French. “We are thrilled to host SimAUD and look forward to working with you to push the boundaries of simulation research. Welcome to Georgia Tech!”

The conference runs from Sunday, April 7 through Tuesday, April 9. All sessions are scheduled to take place in the John and Joyce Caddell Building’s Flex Space. The conference offers a platform to unite researchers and practitioners in the fields of architecture, urban design, urban planning, building science, and data science. SimAUD 2019 will feature a range of topics related to simulation with a special emphasis on methods that bridge disciplinary gaps between design, construction, operations, resource management, human behavior, and performance analytics across building and urban scales.

Follow this link to register for SimAUD 2019.

SimAUD 2019 session topics include:
Experiential Climates
Retrofitting Analysis
Data in Mixed Realities
Modeling Urban Energies
Designing Urban Futures
Mediums of Indoor Comfort
Simulating People
Robots that Make
Performative Structures
Design Decision Models
Geometric Explorations

 

About the Georgia Tech School of Architecture

Georgia Tech School of Architecture’s mission is to instill students with a life-long curiosity for the social and cultural meaning of the built environment and a passion to be part of improving the future. The School offers six distinct degree programs that each address the wide spectrum of design, technology, and social and cultural components of the architecture profession. The programs include a Bachelor of Science in Architecture, Master of Architecture, a Master of Science in Architecture, a Master of Science in Urban Design, a dual Master of Architecture and Master of City and Regional Planning, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture.

About Georgia Tech

The Georgia Institute of Technology, also known as Georgia Tech, is a top-ranked public university and one of the leading research institutions in the U.S.A. Georgia Tech provides a technologically focused education to more than 25,000 undergraduate and graduate students in fields ranging from engineering, computing, and sciences, to business, design, and liberal arts.

]]> cwagster3 1 1553086033 2019-03-20 12:47:13 1554316614 2019-04-03 18:36:54 0 0 news SimAUD is a highly selective annual conference supported by the Society for Modeling & Simulation International (SCS) and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM).  More than 70 experts from around the globe will meet to present and discuss cutting-edge research and findings, to experience hands-on simulation workshops and to speculate on future challenges and opportunities for the built environment.

]]>
2019-03-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-03-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-03-20 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator 
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
619444 619446 619444 image <![CDATA[SimAUD 2019]]> image/jpeg 1553085737 2019-03-20 12:42:17 1553101744 2019-03-20 17:09:04 619446 image <![CDATA[SimAUD 2018 ]]> image/jpeg 1553086268 2019-03-20 12:51:08 1553086268 2019-03-20 12:51:08
<![CDATA[Student Project "Looping the Banks" Receives Honorable Mention in ULI Hines Student Competition]]> 34569 Students from the Georgia Tech Schools of Architecture and Building Construction were selected as honorable mentions in the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Student Competition. 

This year, the competition enters its 17th year. According to the ULI competition website, "The ULI Hines Student Competition is part of the [Urban Land] Institute’s ongoing effort to raise interest among young people in creating better communities, improving development patterns, and increasing awareness of the need for multidisciplinary solutions to development and design challenges." 

Seven teams from Georgia Tech entered this year's competition. Each team must have five graduate students from at least three different disciplines to be eligible to compete.

The assignment for this year's competition explored the redevelopment of a site in Cincinnati comprising portions of a highway, the central business district, and the central riverfront along the Ohio River. Student groups took a deep dive into the potential to bridge the highway and combine it with adjacent properties, ultimately to connect both areas to create a sustainable, pedestrian-focused, mixed-use neighborhood.

The competition, which kicked off on January 14, is designed to simulate a real world design, planning, and development project.  This year's assignment focused on Cincinnati’s vision for connecting the central riverfront entertainment district.

The Georgia Tech team selected as an honorable mention submitted a project titled, "Looping the Banks." Conner Smith, Master of Architecture student, served as team leader for Looping the Banks. Also on the team were Master of Architecture student, Wanli Gao, Master of Real Estate Development student, Bryan Katz, and Master of Science in Urban Design students, Jingxin Xu and Siqi Li. School of Architecture professor and director of the Urban Design program, Ellen Dunham-Jones, and School of Architecture professor of the practice, Brian Bell were faculty advisors for this team. Director of the Master of Real Estate Development for the School of Building Construction, Rick Porter, and associate principal at Perkins+Will, Atlanta, Cassie Branum were professional advisors for Looping the Banks. 

According to the group's project proposal, Looping the Banks aims to complete, "a vibrant loop around the Banks riverfront park" while also, "forming a connection between the Central Business District and the Ohio River." 

“I’m really proud of them," Dunham-Jones said. "I love seeing the students work together and produce so much work with people they’ve never really met before. It’s extraordinary, really.”

The work from all seven teams is currently on exhibition in the Cohen Gallery located on the second floor of the College of Design’s Architecture East Building.

Click here for the ULI Hines Competition press release. 

 

]]> cwagster3 1 1550619860 2019-02-19 23:44:20 1550669665 2019-02-20 13:34:25 0 0 news Georgia Tech students from the Schools of Architecture and Building Construction received an honorable mention in the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Student Competition.

]]>
2019-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2019-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2019-02-19 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator 
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
618167 618167 image <![CDATA[Looping the Banks]]> image/jpeg 1550619736 2019-02-19 23:42:16 1550619736 2019-02-19 23:42:16
<![CDATA[Today's Automated Cities Raise Ethics and Privacy Issues]]> 32550 We’ve already seen driverless car experiments, drones surveying highways and disaster sites, e-commerce automated lockers, and digital doorbells monitoring homes. Urban automation’s potential to create disruptive technologies that change cities’ future development is evident, and there is much more to come.

While urban automation delivers city dwellers numerous benefits, its various forms raise issues of access, privacy, safety, trust, and discrimination. Many issues still need to be addressed in its design and deployment, said Nancey Green Leigh, the associate dean for research at the College of Design.

The panelists of the first College of Design Research Forum of 2019 will explore ethical principles and values from a range of perspectives that include, autonomous vehicles, building AI and sensors, urban supply chain, and disability services.

The forum will take place Thursday, January 24, from 11 a.m. to noon in the Caddell Flex Space.

We talked with Leigh ahead of the forum to learn more about the complexity of urban automation.

To start, what are we referring to when we say “urban automation”? Can you give a couple of examples?

There is no one definition of urban automation. Loosely it refers to hardware and software developments that substitute for previous mechanical and human-operated physical or decision-making systems to regulate and service urban functions. These developments are largely enabled by advances in information and communication technologies.

Some present examples include, drones, robots, and sensors. Others will evolve in the future.

How does the topic of urban automation fit in with research at the College of Design?

In planning, it can potentially be used to create smart cities, with optimized functions such as transportation, energy and water use, improving the economy and the environment.

In architecture, urban automation is used to make intelligent buildings that are more energy efficient, and meet human needs of comfort, for example in office environments.

In building construction, it is used in the process of putting up buildings and creating infrastructure. We use drones to survey the physical condition of buildings and roads, and  to access damage of natural disasters and develop more effective responses.

In industrial design, much of that focuses on products we use every day in urban environments, ties into the development of autonomous vehicles, and in the more novel application of wearable technologies,

In music, urban automation can capture and analyze the sounds of a city, helping to track noise pollution, monitor traffic patterns, or generate new musical compositions.

How does your research into the economics of the robotics industry play into this research?

I focus on local economic development planning and how technology drives change that affects the opportunities for work, standards of living, and the strength of local industries that support local economies.

One key point is that the majority of economic activity in our jobs is located in metropolitan areas. We are very much a metropolitan nation, rather than the traditional view of urban and rural nation. So the use of robotics in firms has the potential to make them more competitive and productive. It also has the potential to eliminate jobs, which would affect people’s ability to live in cities and have a high quality of life and standard of living. It also has the potential to change existing work and create new jobs.

My work is focused on understanding this. I’m primarily focused on the manufacturing sector, because that is where robotics are most in use at this point.

What is the most pressing concern that urban automation raises?

The most pressing concern is the reason we are having this forum: ethics and values. We know in many ways that urban automation has the potential to significantly transform the world that we live in. We also know our metro areas have longstanding, yet to be resolved, issues of justice for different communities and demographic groups.

There is a lot of controversy over artificial intelligence, which is a key component of urban automation, and to what extent does it augment, or substitute for, the capacity to make decisions by humans.

All of this has major societal implications. Rather than create the technology without considering these potential impacts, the focus here is on: How do we make choices about the urban automation we use? What is our framework for developing these technologies, to be more conscious of the impact of that?

Relative to that are issues of, "Is it going to be accessible for all? How do we build in safety factors?," because we would hope that “do no harm” is a key criteria for deployment of urban automation.

Will it give us the privacy that we expect to have? Privacy is a highly valued aspect of modern life.

It’s also important to make sure that no one is left out of the benefits that can occur with the best of urban automation has to offer.

How do we address these privacy and ethical concerns?

We don’t yet have all the answers or solutions that we need. That is why it is important to have the discussion that we are planning for in our forum. We need to get these concerns to the forefront of the development of technology.

One pressing concern is informing people about how their data will be used. Much of urban automation is about data collection. That data is used to develop software and hardware, forms of automation, as well as products.

We have some ways to opt out, but it is all primitive and legally driven responses. We need more work on that.

How do we ensure a world that is inclusive and benefits all?

The hope is that urban automation will allow us to optimize the functions of smart cities such as transportation, energy, water use, improve the economy and the environment, and improve access to education and training.

The goal is to improve the functions offered in urban areas and the ability of people to participate in society and the economy.

Urban automation should help the people who create and manage cities achieve goals of “smart cities that are just cities.”

Also on the Panel
Joining Leigh on the panel will be Jason Borenstein, associate director of the Center for Ethics and Technology at the School of Public Policy; Carolyn Phillips, of the Center for Inclusive Design and Innovation (formerly AMAC Research Center); and Dennis Shelden, director of the Digital Building Lab and a professor in the School of Architecture. Leigh is also a professor in the School of City and Regional Planning.

Borenstein will focus on the ethics of autonomous vehicles and other computing technologies. While they hold much promise, he suggests that ethical issues emerging from their design and deployment must be addressed in a consistent and ongoing manner. Ethical issues that autonomous vehicles raise include the privacy of those who ride in them, vulnerability to hacking, and how they may interact with pedestrians or other entities in the surrounding environment.  

Phillips notes that we are at a defining moment as we gather at the crossroads of urban automation, ethics, and individuals with disabilities. The ethical implications when considering individuals with disabilities quickly move beyond beneficence, justice, and autonomy to specific concerns of privacy, safety, and informed choice. As we create disruptive, transformational technologies, it is critical that we pause to ensure we have employed an ethical framework throughout each phase of development and deployment so we can design for true inclusion. 

Shelden will talk about urban automation from the perspective of the built environment -- buildings, infrastructure and cities  – which is increasingly becoming “smart,” as physical spaces and devices in these spaces are connected to simulations and data platforms on the cloud. This presents opportunities for improved understanding of the behaviors of built environments and the interactions of occupants in these environments. At the same time, important questions of information, individuality, and culture are becoming more pressing. Questions of data privacy and ownership, security, and identity that are becoming critical questions for individuals and for societies will become pressing in the design and operation of the built environment.

About the Research Forums

The College of Design Research Forums allow the College community and our friends across the campus to experience the design- and technology-focused research at Georgia Tech. From music technology to product design; from assistive technology to healthcare; from architecture to city planning, we explore the many ways technology can solve critical problems for the way we live.

This forum will be January 24, 2019, 11 a.m. - Noon, in the Caddell Flex Space.

The final research forum of the 2018-19 academic year is scheduled for Thursday, March 7, in the Caddell Flex Space.

]]> Malrey Head 1 1547579933 2019-01-15 19:18:53 1549481908 2019-02-06 19:38:28 0 0 news While urban automation delivers many benefits, its various forms raise issues of access, privacy, safety, trust, and discrimination. These issues raise ethical questions that should be addressed in its design and deployment.

]]>
2019-01-15T00:00:00-05:00 2019-01-15T00:00:00-05:00 2019-01-15 00:00:00 Malrey Head
Digital Communications Specialist
College of Design

]]>
615792 615792 image <![CDATA[Urban Automation]]> image/jpeg 1546453200 2019-01-02 18:20:00 1547758361 2019-01-17 20:52:41 <![CDATA[Research Forum]]>
<![CDATA[Marble Fairbanks Wins 2018 Best of Design Award for Public]]> 34569 On December 5, The Architect's Newspaper announced their 2018 Best of Design Award winners, and Marble Fairbanks, founded by the School of Architecture Chair, Scott Marble, won in the Public category for their addition and renovation of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is one of the world’s leading research facilities devoted providing access to materials documenting black life, and promoting the study and interpretation of the history and culture of peoples of African descent. Marble Fairbanks Architects was hired by the New York Public Library to do extensive renovations and an addition to improve the public experience of the Center.

The design enhances how the Schomburg Center interfaces with the public and with the surrounding Harlem community by displaying portions of its vast collection and current events to the street. Features of the design include high definition LED display systems, interactive information panels, display windows for historical artifacts, and a new landscape plaza with distinctive paving, plantings, and seating adjacent to the display areas. The project also includes a new gift shop and conference room building addition along with interior renovations of the Center’s Manuscripts, Archives & Rare Books Division.

Click here for more information about the award.

Click here for the complete list of winners from the Architect's Newspaper Best of Design 2018 Awards.

]]> cwagster3 1 1544132774 2018-12-06 21:46:14 1544560125 2018-12-11 20:28:45 0 0 news The Architect's Newspaper has announced their 2018 Best of Design Award winners, and Marble Fairbanks, founded by the School of Architecture Chair, Scott Marble, won in the Public category for the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture.

]]>
2018-12-06T00:00:00-05:00 2018-12-06T00:00:00-05:00 2018-12-06 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
615102 615102 image <![CDATA[Schomburg Center]]> image/jpeg 1544132985 2018-12-06 21:49:45 1544132985 2018-12-06 21:49:45
<![CDATA[James Cramer Reflects on George H.W. Bush’s Impact on Universal Design]]> 34569 James P. Cramer, AIA Chief Executive (1988-1994) and part-time lecturer in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture discusses George H.W. Bush's contributions to universial design and its impact on architecture and building construction.

When architects think of the White House and U.S. Presidents who have influenced design thinking, often the examples cited go way back in history.  For instance, President Teddy Roosevelt would occasionally stroll down New York Avenue and 18th Street to the Octagon House to have dinner with architect Cass Gilbert (among others). Dreams for the future were hatched and plans were developed.

But this week we are reminded that there are other examples showing how the White House and the profession often work together across political lines.  One example at the top of all examples this week is the leadership role of President George H.W. Bush and the ADA. The civil rights act for universal design.

On July 26, 1990 the ADA act was signed into law.  This has had the effect of removing architectural barriers to enable the physically marginalized to be respected and for universal design to be adopted.  All across America building codes and professional standards have changed. Construction was slowed and in some cases stopped for modifications. 

ADA became one of the boldest civil rights initiatives of the 20th Century.  We remember this at the time of George Herbert Walker Bush’s passing.  His design leadership working with the profession and across political boundaries is remembered with great admiration and thanks.

]]> cwagster3 1 1544449466 2018-12-10 13:44:26 1544449466 2018-12-10 13:44:26 0 0 news James Cramer, part-time lecturer in the School of Architecture, reflects on George H.W. Bush's contribution to universal design and its impact in the fields of architecture and building construction around the U.S.

]]>
2018-12-05T00:00:00-05:00 2018-12-05T00:00:00-05:00 2018-12-05 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Archtiecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
615169 615169 image <![CDATA[James Cramer with Barbara and George H.W. Bush]]> image/jpeg 1544449338 2018-12-10 13:42:18 1544449338 2018-12-10 13:42:18
<![CDATA[College of Design Diversity and Inclusion Council Starts Diversity Conversation]]> 34569 Georgia Tech’s mission states, “We will be leaders in improving the human condition in Georgia, the United States, and around the globe.” The College of Design Diversity and Inclusion Council, re-established in September 2016, seeks to extend the Institute’s mission by fostering and enabling open dialogue within the College. The Council remains committed to our fundamental goal to broaden and raise awareness on key themes related to diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech.

On September 26, 2018, the Diversity and Inclusion Council welcomed Peggy McIntosh, Senior Research Associate of the Wellesley Centers for Women at Wellesley College in Massachusetts, and founder of the National S.E.E.D. Project on Inclusive Curriculum (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity), to campus to help facilitate a conversation about diversity and inclusion between faculty, students, and staff at Georgia Tech. Kaye Husbands Fealing, Professor and Chair of the Georgia Tech School of Public Policy and member of the Executive Board of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2017-2020), and Robert Kirkman, Associate Professor for the School of Public Policy, were invited to join in the discussion and share their personal experiences with diversity and inclusion. Following the panel discussion, the Council shared additional questions submitted by the audience with McIntosh, Husbands Fealing, and Kirkman for their input.

Question: What practical methods can be employed to restructure our education system to expand inclusion, particularly in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) fields?

Husbands Fealing: One item I would offer here is to have policies and governance on how to conduct searches for faculty, staff and students, where the search or recruiting committees reflect our diverse society (not just the representation we see on campus).

Question: When you are faced with a tricky situation, what would be a good technique to address it while simultaneously bringing awareness to diversity and inclusion?

McIntosh: I sometimes speak autobiographically and say, "When I am faced with this kind of situation, I automatically go to questions about diversity and inclusion in my own head, and whether they bear on the situation." I also sometimes say, "I have a divided mind here -- feeling both x and y." I try not to sound like the expert, but rather to talk about my process of thinking through how tricky situations are placed within contexts that carry power dynamics and bear on equity.

Husbands Fealing: In my experience, I first think about what the final outcome needs to be before I respond to the situation.  In my experience, I find it expedient to respond with facts and poise.  It is important in my view to have my best self-present.  What will be remembered is not the first affront, but what I do in response.

Question: How do you address people that try to ignore their own power in addressing diversity?

McIntosh: I am not sure what is meant by the phrase "try to ignore." When I am with people who have power through privilege, but don't seem to realize it, I just keep saying again and again that privilege brings power with it and that people who have privilege have far more power than most of them have recognized. I keep raising the question of how people will use their power, their unearned power, to weaken systems of unearned power. I think most white people have been trained to think of themselves as not having much power that they can use towards social change. But indeed we white people have considerable power just through being white, even if we grew up with class disadvantage. 

Husbands Fealing: It is important for everyone to understand that (a) diversity is often a benefit to all over time, and (b) if we create opportunities for growth, then diversity is not a zero-sum game. So, getting individuals to understand that the pie can be bigger even if various groups get larger wedges is key.  Of course, fairness is paramount, but what is perceived to be fair is subjective.

Question: Since you are speaking to a roomful of designers – have you noticed any particular physical design features that support or hinder inclusion?

Husbands Fealing: Yes!  Often I am on a stage where there is no ramp to get to the podium or dais. That is a clear signal to someone with a physical disability that they are not welcomed.

McIntosh: I have noticed that in schools, that is school buildings, the design of the front hall makes a big difference. If there are many tables to sit at and many chairs, that can make it feel like a cafe or a conversation nook. This makes students mingle more freely with people who do not look like them. In fact, I have come to say to school faculty groups that I believe they must reengineer and reshape the school entrance hall to prevent depression! In addition, I strongly recommend that small classes be configured as a circles with everyone facing each other, rather than having some look at the backs of heads of others, in rows. The mode called Serial Testimony is a structure for discussion which matches the circle. People can write to me (mmcintosh@wellesley.edu) to request my description of Serial Testimony. My assistant Rachel Nagin adds, "Buildings tell stories about who we are and what we value. Many recently built school buildings are designed much like prisons and built with cheap materials, which tells us quite lot about what we think of our students, especially our public school students. So as you analyze and design spaces, think about what's being valued."

Question: Can you talk about the importance of transparency in hiring and admissions and how that affects diversity and inclusion? Also how can we have increased diversity among faculty and professionals?

Husbands Fealing: This is a really complex question that requires several paragraphs to respond adequately.  So, in a nutshell, recognition that diversity, inclusion, and equity are important in concept and practice is paramount.  Leadership should be all-in, not just making comments in the open but not following through with actions—policies are guidelines to actions.  Often I hear, “Well, we just cannot find anyone…they don’t exist.” That is just not the case, though in some fields there is a low percentage of women or minorities. Networks can be used to find individuals to interview or to work on projects. The one caveat I should mention here—many of us get over worked and need to say “no” sometimes when asked to take on tasks. Junior faculty should be protected from placement on such committees. Yet, there is work to be done.

McIntosh: To increase diversity among faculty and professionals, they must be willing to redesign job descriptions, putting them on a broader base than before. This means rethinking everything that the institution is about. They must make sure that any candidate pool includes people from marginalized groups. Search committees must do the extra work needed and cast their nets wide to get beyond the usual habits of search committees, which include "looking for the best man for the job." 

Question: How can we improve diversity without tokenizing people?

McIntosh: In two universities where I have worked, the decision was made to hire two people of color at least, rather than one, for a previously all-white department, and two or more women for a previously all-male department. This helped to work against the appearance and feelings of tokenism. 

Husbands Fealing: Exactly…this is really important and, again, would take a few paragraphs to give examples of how this could work.  Perhaps the best answer to this question is found in the literature.  Someone should do a brief literature search to give readers of the article ability to explore this topic in more detail.  Attached, please find a report on this topic that a colleague and I prepared for the National Science Foundation (NSF) in fulfilment of a grant from NSF. We also published a special issue of American Behavioral Scientist in May 2018: http://journals.sagepub.com/toc/absb/62/5.

Let’s keep this conversation going! We need to hear from you on other ways we can broaden and raise awareness on key themes related to diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech. Send your questions to Carmen Wagster, carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu, and we will continue this discussion to help us all pursue a more diverse and inclusive community here at Georgia Tech.

The College of Design Diversity and Inclusion Council members include Julie Kim, Associate Chair for the School of Architecture; Catherine Ross, Harry West Professor for the School of City and Regional Planning and Director for the Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development; Jerry Ulrich, Associate Professor for the School of Music; Xinyi Song, Assistant Professor for the School of Building Construction; Michelle Rinehart, ex-officio Council member and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Outreach for the College of Design; Astha Bhavsar, undergraduate student, School of Architecture; and Chirag Venkatesan, graduate student, School of Building Construction.

]]> cwagster3 1 1541786325 2018-11-09 17:58:45 1543521977 2018-11-29 20:06:17 0 0 news The College of Design Diversity and Inclusion Council seeks to foster open dialogue within the College. This fall, the Council invited a panel to share their experiences and start a conversation. The panel also answered questions submitted later.

]]>
2018-11-09T00:00:00-05:00 2018-11-09T00:00:00-05:00 2018-11-09 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
614077 614077 image <![CDATA[College of Design Diversity and Inclusion Panel]]> image/jpeg 1541786052 2018-11-09 17:54:12 1541786052 2018-11-09 17:54:12
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Researchers Take on Reuse of Composite Material Wind Blades]]> 34569 Researchers in the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech have partnered with University College Cork (UCC) in the Republic of Ireland, Queen’s University Belfast (QUB) in Northern Ireland, and the City University of New York (CUNY) to develop the science, logistics, and design concepts to re-purpose composite material wind blades. The oldest wind turbine blades are coming out of service now, due either to the end of their fatigue life, or in many cases, functional obsolesce. The wind industry has no means to recycle or reuse the blades or the materials in them. Consequently, by 2050, it is anticipated that 39.8 million tons of these materials will need to be recycled.

These massive structures are composed of high-performance glass and carbon fibers infused with polymeric resins. Separating the fibers and resins is cost-prohibitive, and so the materials cannot be recycled.  The project, titled Re-Wind, will develop applications for the re-purposing of entire blades or large segments of blades.

The Design Thrust of the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded project is led by Georgia Tech and includes Russell Gentry, PI, associate professor and director of the Master of Science in Architecture program, and Tristan Al-Haddad, part-time lecturer, along with Benjamin Tasistro-Hart, a senior in the School of Architecture.  Benjamin received Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) funding from the NSF to participate in the project, and will be traveling to Ireland to assist the scientists and engineers at UCC and QUB with geometric modeling of the blades.

According to Gentry, the project is a perfect fit for the research and academic profile of the School of Architecture. “The faculty and students in the School of Architecture are widely recognized for their ability to deal with complex geometry,” Gentry said. “In addition, with the research history and resources in our Digital Fabrication Laboratory (DFL), we are capable of dealing with a wide range of material systems.” 

Gentry, who chairs the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards committee on Composites for Civil Infrastructure noted, “We have spent the last 25 years developing fiber reinforced composite materials for use in buildings, bridges, and other major infrastructure like wind blades, but have failed to address how these materials can be re-cycled, or even better, re-purposed.  We see the Re-Wind project as the first instance of a number of potential projects focused on the creative re-use of infrastructure materials.”

Thanks to Gentry's civil engineering affiliation, the School of Architecture is able to join forces for courses and research with faculty and students in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering. In the 2019 spring semester, Al-Haddad and Gentry will lead a workshop on wind blade reuse.  Students from the School of Architecture will develop design propositions and prototypes for second lives of wind blades. The design propositions developed at Georgia Tech will be used by colleagues in Ireland to assess ecological, economic, and societal impacts associated with wind blade re-use. The same designs will be used by colleagues at Queen’s University Belfast and the City University of New York to assess the residual fatigue life of the composite wind blades and the structural efficacy of the re-use scenarios.

For more information, see the Re-Wind website and papers from the Re-Wind Design Thrust.

www.re-wind.info

Gentry, Russell, Bank, Lawrence C., Chen, Jian-Fei, Arias, Franco and Al-Haddad, Tristan (2018), “Adaptive Reuse of FRP Composite Wind Turbine Blades for Civil Infrastructure Construction”, 9th International Conference on Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composites in Civil Engineering (CICE 2018), July 17-19, 2018, Paris, France.

Morrow, Ruth, Gentry, Russell and Al-Haddad, Tristan (2018), “Re-Wind: Architectural Design Studio and the Re-Purposing of Wind Turbine Blades”, Proceedings, SEEDS: Sustainable Ecological Engineering Design for Society, Dublin Institute of Technology, Dublin, Ireland, 6-7 September 2018.

Lawrence C. Bank, Franco R. Arias, Ardavan Yazdanbakhsh, T. Russell Gentry, Tristan Al-Haddad, Jian-Fei Chen, Ruth Morrow (2018), “Concepts for Reusing Composite Materials from Decommissioned Wind Turbine Blades in Affordable Housing”, Recycling, 3(1), 3; doi:10.3390/recycling3010003.

]]> cwagster3 1 1539371120 2018-10-12 19:05:20 1542723373 2018-11-20 14:16:13 0 0 news Researchers in the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech have partnered with University College Cork (UCC) in the Republic of Ireland, Queen’s University Belfast (QUB) in Northern Ireland, and the City University of New York (CUNY) to develop the science, logistics, and design concepts to re-purpose composite material wind blades. The oldest wind turbine blades are coming out of service now, due either to the end of their fatigue life, or in many cases, functional obsolesce. The wind industry has no means to recycle or reuse the blades or the materials in them. Consequently, by 2050, it is anticipated that 39.8 million tons of these materials will need to be recycled.

]]>
2018-10-12T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-12T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-12 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
612701 612705 614442 612701 image <![CDATA[Wind Turbines]]> image/jpeg 1539370926 2018-10-12 19:02:06 1539370926 2018-10-12 19:02:06 612705 image <![CDATA[Wind blade parts supplied by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center’s WTTC for the Re-Wind Project, photo credit Mr. Lornie Thomas, WTTC, Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.]]> image/png 1539371389 2018-10-12 19:09:49 1540305214 2018-10-23 14:33:34 614442 image <![CDATA[Tristan Al-Haddad and Russell Gentry join faculty and students from the City University of New York, Queen's University Belfast, and University College Cork, and the advisory board of the Re-Wind project at the Coomagearlaghy/Kilgarvan wind farm in County]]> image/jpeg 1542723350 2018-11-20 14:15:50 1542725395 2018-11-20 14:49:55
<![CDATA[The Land Art Generator Initiative Discusses Georgia Tech Student Work Shortlisted in This Summer’s Design Competition]]> 34569 Anna McCuan and Jamieson Pye, juniors in the Bachelor of Science in Architecture program, were shortlisted this summer for their submission in the Land Art Generator Design Competition for Melbourne, Australia. Their project titled, “Sentinel: Marking Energetic Flows Through Time” is a “design that gives back, while also bringing pause for reflection.”

As noted in McCuan and Pye’s artistic narrative, “Sentinel optimizes the livability of the site at each point in time while offering solutions for its long-term survival amid environmental threats, particularly flooding, caused by torrential rainfall, long term sea-level rise, and rising ambient temperatures.”

Frederick Pearsall, senior lecturer in the School of Architecture and McCuan and Pye’s mentor for this project, encouraged the students to research and explore everything there is to know about Melbourne’s culture, history, and geography, which lead McCuan and Pye to better understand the City of Port Phillip’s drought and flooding challenges.  

Click here to read more about McCuan and Pye’s project from the Land Art Generator Initiative.

]]> cwagster3 1 1539616512 2018-10-15 15:15:12 1539616512 2018-10-15 15:15:12 0 0 news Anna McCuan and Jamieson Pye, juniors in the Bachelor of Science in Architecture program, were shortlisted this summer for their submission in the Land Art Generator Design Competition for Melbourne, Australia. Their project titled, “Sentinel: Marking Energetic Flows Through Time” is a “design that gives back, while also bringing pause for reflection.”

]]>
2018-10-15T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-15T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-15 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
612746 612746 image <![CDATA[Sentinel: Marking Energetic Flows Through Time]]> image/jpeg 1539616490 2018-10-15 15:14:50 1539616490 2018-10-15 15:14:50
<![CDATA[Introducing a New Lecture and Podcast Series to Address Current Issues in Urban Design]]> 34569 How can we redesign existing cities, their systems, and their policies to address 21st century challenges? To advance understanding and to offer inspiration from designers and decision-makers, Mike Messner, alumnus of Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has generously chosen to support a series of public lectures from urban designers, city planners and architects. These public lectures and interviews will be presented by the School of Architecture in the College of Design at Georgia Tech.

The series titled, “REDESIGNING CITIES: The Speedwell Foundation Talks @ Georgia Tech” will devote an evening to each of the topics of equity, social capital, climate change, out-of-date infrastructure, technological disruption, and urban economics. The evening’s program will feature both a presentation and a public conversation between two top experts on that topic. Subjects will range from the impact of autonomous vehicles on cities, gentrification without displacement, and green vs grey infrastructure’s capacity to adapt to climate change, just to name a few.

Organizing and leading this series is Ellen Dunham-Jones, professor and director of Georgia Tech’s Master of Science in Urban Design degree. Dunham-Jones was recently recognized as Architectural Record’s Women Educator of 2018 award and in 2017, Dunham-Jones was ranked among Planetizen’s Top 100 Most Influential Urbanists. Dunham-Jones will oversee the production of videos and podcasts from the series for broad impact.

Messner and his wife, Jenny Messner, created the Speedwell Foundation, an organization focused on restoring and expanding public parks and green spaces in cities around the U.S. Their foundation also helps fund up to 30 study abroad scholarships each year for high school students from central Pennsylvania.

“As a top tier university in the dynamic city of Atlanta, there’s no place better than Georgia Tech to bring together leading minds to work on the biggest challenges facing cities," said Messner. “Jenny and I are thrilled that our family foundation can support this lecture series and the dissemination of the results to the larger public and decisionmakers.”

The School of Architecture plans to host six talks during the 2018-2019 academic year. To stay up-to-date on the upcoming lecture series, please complete this form https://arch.gatech.edu/redesigning-cities-speedwell-foundation-talks-georgia-tech to join our mailing list.

 

]]> cwagster3 1 1537910946 2018-09-25 21:29:06 1538072891 2018-09-27 18:28:11 0 0 news How can we redesign existing cities, their systems, and their policies to address 21st century challenges? To advance understanding and offer inspiration from designers and decision-makers, Mike Messner, alumnus of Georgia Tech’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has generously chosen to support a series of public lectures from urban designers, city planners and architects. These public lectures and interviews will be presented by the School of Architecture in the College of Design at Georgia Tech.

]]>
2018-09-26T00:00:00-04:00 2018-09-26T00:00:00-04:00 2018-09-26 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
611963 611963 image <![CDATA[REDESIGNING CITIES: The Speedwell Foundation Talks @ Georgia Tech]]> image/jpeg 1537910905 2018-09-25 21:28:25 1537910905 2018-09-25 21:28:25
<![CDATA[Soleen Karim, School of Architecture Alum and Co-Founder of Design4Refugees, Featured in Summer Edition of the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine]]> 34569 The refugee crisis in Syria hit close to home for Soleen Karim, graduate of the Dual Master of Architecture and Master of City and Regional Planning (’15) program at Georgia Tech, who’s family fled from Iraq in the time leading up to the Gulf War in 2988. Together with her sister, Kurdeen Karim, she founded Design4Refugees Corp to provide for the needs of people living in refugee camps in their family’s native Iraqi-Kurdistan, as well as those already working to rebuild their lives in America.

In an article published in the Summer 2018 edition of the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine titled, “Helping Strangers in a Strange Land” by Melissa Fralick noted that Karim started Design4Refugees while in graduate school at Tech in 2014. The organization was designed to build shelters that could be implemented in the Iraqi camps serving refugees as they were fled war-torn Syria. Collaborative design and labor supported by a modest crowdfunding budget of $4,000, a community center began to take shape. “It wasn’t me watching and directing—it was me in the dirt with them laying brick,” Karim said. “From that, they developed a trust and connection with us.”

Click here to view Karim's story featured in the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine. 

]]> cwagster3 1 1535548273 2018-08-29 13:11:13 1535548689 2018-08-29 13:18:09 0 0 news Soleen Karim, graduate of the Dual Master of Architecture and Master of City and Regional Planning (’15) program at Georgia Tech, was featured in this summer’s edition of the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine. Together with her sister, Kurdeen Kiram, she co-founded Design4Refugees Corp, an organization that provides for the needs of people living in refugee camps in her family’s native Iraqi-Kurdistan as well as here in the U.S.

]]>
2018-08-20T00:00:00-04:00 2018-08-20T00:00:00-04:00 2018-08-20 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
610531 610531 image <![CDATA[Soleen Karim]]> image/jpeg 1535548170 2018-08-29 13:09:30 1535548170 2018-08-29 13:09:30
<![CDATA[Russell Gentry Appointed Director of the Master of Science in Architecture Program]]> 34569 The Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture has appointed Russell Gentry as the new director of the Master of Science (M.S.) in Architecture program.  

In addition to his new role as director of the M.S. in Architecture program, Gentry will continue his work as associate professor of architecture and civil engineering. Gentry is a licensed structural engineer and an expert in the design, modeling, and testing of complex structures – having recently completed a U.S. Patent for a photovoltaic mounting and racking system using composite materials. He is also the principal investigator on a Department of Energy project to develop self-consolidating concrete for externally-reinforced concrete structures.

Gentry has served as the faculty advisory for the M.S. in Architecture digital design and fabrication concentration. Gentry can often be found in the Digital Fabrication Lab, teaching courses on masonry and fabrication. Gentry also co-teaches a course on environmental impacts and energy use in buildings, Green Construction, and an applied housing studio, Zero Energy Housing, with Georgia Tech colleagues Godfried Augenbroe and Michael Gamble. He is the author of “Building Systems, Controls, and Automation”, published in Design and Construction of High Performance Homes, Franca Trubiano, editor.

The M.S. in Architecture degree provides students holding professional degrees in architecture (B.Arch or M.Arch) or with equivalent degrees in allied fields of design or engineering with researchbased knowledge that is applicable to the advancement of professional practice. Designed to leverage the active research programs in the School of Architecture, the M.S. in Architecture program offers five concentrations, and each concentration is associated with a research facility or lab in the College of Design. Students can pursue concentrations in advanced production, building information and systems, design computation, design and health, and high performance buildings.

]]> cwagster3 1 1534190533 2018-08-13 20:02:13 1534190932 2018-08-13 20:08:52 0 0 news The Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture has appointed Russell Gentry as the new director of the Master of Science (M.S.) in Architecture program

]]>
2018-08-13T00:00:00-04:00 2018-08-13T00:00:00-04:00 2018-08-13 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
609687 609687 image <![CDATA[Russell Gentry]]> image/jpeg 1534190507 2018-08-13 20:01:47 1534190507 2018-08-13 20:01:47
<![CDATA[Origami: The Art of Folding Paper and a Method for Creating Shelter]]> 34569 Origami is much more than the art of folding paper. Georgia Tech students use it as a method for creating shelters and active facades.

In December 2017, students from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Architecture proposed an origami design that earned them an opportunity to travel to Japan to learn from Tomohiro Tachi, a widely-known origami expert and associate professor in graphic and computer sciences at the University of Tokyo.

Master of Architecture students, Leila Moghimi (’18) and Kashmira Ranadive (’18), enrolled in an origami-focused civil engineering course in fall 2017 semester, a course taught by Glaucio Paulino, Raymond Allen Jones Chair and professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

“The reason that we opted for this class,” Ranadive said, “ was because it was parallel to our studio project. Almost the entire studio was in our class except maybe three students. It was kind of like a collaborative exercise between Daniel Baerlecken and Glaucio Paulino.” Moghimi, Ranadive, and their classmates were encouraged by Daniel Baerlecken, associate professor in the School of Architecture, to take the class as it related to the origami-based coursework in his design and research studio.

For the full story, click here. 

]]> cwagster3 1 1529500316 2018-06-20 13:11:56 1531318363 2018-07-11 14:12:43 0 0 news In December 2017, students from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the School of Architecture proposed an origami design that earned them an opportunity to travel to Japan to learn from Tomohiro Tachi, a widely-known origami expert and associate professor in graphic and computer sciences at the University of Tokyo.

]]>
2018-06-20T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-20T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-20 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology
School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
607195 607195 image <![CDATA[Yoshimura Pattern]]> image/jpeg 1529499733 2018-06-20 13:02:13 1529499733 2018-06-20 13:02:13
<![CDATA[Remembering Pat Connell: A Force for Historic Preservation and a Master of Hand Drawing]]> 34569 Throughout Atlanta’s history, the city has notoriously struggled to preserve its original architecture, but Arnall T. “Pat” Connell was a successful champion for maintaining the structural history of Atlanta. Connell passed away Thursday, June 13, 2018, leaving behind an important legacy in both the Georgia Tech School of Architecture and the historic preservation of Atlanta’s architecture.

Connell earned his Bachelor of Science in Architecture in 1953 and completed his Master of City Planning in 1955 from Georgia Tech. After earning his degrees, Connell moved to Columbus, Ohio to serve as the principal planner for the Columbus City Planning Commission. At that time, he also worked as an associate professor of urban planning at The Ohio State University from 1957-1963. In the 1960s, Connell taught at Columbia University and the University of Virginia before returning to Tech to teach classes in urban planning and renewal and historic preservation in the School of Architecture.

“When you look through the Georgia Tech archives, you will see Pat Connell‘s name on all the unsung committee reports from the 1970s that were instrumental in establishing the Master of Architecture degree at our school,” said George Johnston, professor in the School of Architecture. “What’s even more impressive is that Pat had an incredibly vibrant second career and maybe even third after he retired from Georgia Tech. What a great example he was.”

Beyond the classroom, Connell put his passion for historic preservation into action. Shortly after returning to Atlanta, Connell served as chairman of the Atlanta Civic Design Commission. As chairman, Connell helped co-found the Atlanta Landmarks, a group of progressive politicians, civic leaders, and celebrities who joined forces to lead the “Save the Fox” campaign to prevent the demolition of Atlanta’s Fox Theatre.

Of Connell’s influence in saving the Fox Theater, Lane Duncan, senior lecturer in the School of Architecture said, “Pat Connell’s efforts in forming the Atlanta Landmarks in the early seventies not only ‘Saved the Fox’ but became a rallying cry for generations of historic preservation initiatives in the state of Georgia.

Connell was also instrumental in the preservation of the Pasaquan site in Buena Vista, Georgia and Atlanta’s Castleberry Hill preservation and the Sweet Auburn neighborhood revitalization.

Alongside his late wife, Martha, the Connells had an impressive collection of contemporary crafts and fine arts objects. Together, they co-founded the Great American Gallery, Atlanta’s unique contribution to contemporary crafts and fine arts objects. Many of the works that they curated now reside in leading museums and private collections around the U.S.

In 2016, Connell made a generous contribution to Georgia Tech to create the Connell Workshop. This course, taught in the spring semesters by Duncan, explores a wide range of issues in hand drawing, including tone, line, contour, gesture, composition, iterative geometry, and the humanistic forces that shape them. These drawing and critical thinking investigations are divided into two general categories—perception, the way we see the world, and conception, the way we attempt to order the world. 

Of the importance of hand drawing, Connell said, “Drawing requires that all the sensory apparatus of the body participate in the process of creating an image of the observed or imagined stimulus. Unlike the camera, which records only a split-second view of the object, the act of drawing is not time-dependent. The act of image-making informs and instructs the brain to keep looking for all the messages being sent. The image-maker always decides when to make changes and when the work is ‘finished.’ The Gestalt is there for the taking by anyone.”

Duncan remembers Connell as, “A true scholar who believed that hand drawing is a vital ‘technology’ to seeing and understanding the world around us and that it is an essential tool for the architect no matter what generation.” He added, “His contributions to drawing and thinking live on in the work of every student that has taken the class.”

As Scott Marble, Chair of the School of Architecture, reflected on Connell's contributions to the School, he said, "At a time when our entire experience in seeing and creating the physical world is mediated through digital technology of one sort or another, Connell’s commitment to the bodily nature of drawing reminds us, both faculty and students, that thinking and discovering through drawing has enduring value in architectural education."

]]> cwagster3 1 1530277921 2018-06-29 13:12:01 1530813842 2018-07-05 18:04:02 0 0 news Throughout Atlanta’s history, the city has notoriously struggled to preserve its original architecture, but Arnall T. “Pat” Connell was a successful champion for maintaining the architectural history of Atlanta. Connell passed away Thursday, June 13, 2018, leaving behind an important legacy in both the Georgia Tech School of Architecture and the historic preservation of Atlanta’s architecture.

]]>
2018-06-29T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-29T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-29 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
607401 607401 image <![CDATA[Pat Connell courtesy of Susan Sanders]]> image/jpeg 1530277786 2018-06-29 13:09:46 1530628735 2018-07-03 14:38:55
<![CDATA[Ellen Dunham-Jones to Lead Shared Autonomous Vehicle Study]]> 34569 Four communities of varying sizes in the state of Georgia were selected to develop and implement smart design solutions to some of the biggest challenges facing the state, including issues in housing, traffic congestion, sea level rise and shared autonomous vehicles. The Georgia Smart Communities Challenge is a first-of-its-kind opportunity. It offers the selected communities $50,000 in grant funding, a partnership with a Georgia Tech research team, networking opportunities, and access to additional resources to help execute their projects as they move their communities toward “smart” futures.

Ellen Dunham-Jones, School of Architecture professor and director of the Master of Science in Urban Design program, is the assigned researcher for the Shared Autonomous Vehicle Study. Led by the city of Chamblee, this project will explore improvements in mobility using autonomous vehicles that travel from MARTA stations around the community.

According to Ben Limmer, MARTA Assistant General Manager of Planning, "This project pioneers solutions for transit connectivity and sets Chamblee out as a leader in autonomous shuttle technology not only in Georgia, but also the United States."

To view the full article to learn more about the Georgia Smart Communities Challenge, click here.

 

]]> cwagster3 1 1530131897 2018-06-27 20:38:17 1530132686 2018-06-27 20:51:26 0 0 news The Georgia Smart Communities Challenge is a first-of-its-kind opportunity. It offers the selected communities $50,000 in grant funding, a partnership with a Georgia Tech research team, networking opportunities, and access to additional resources to help execute their projects as they move their communities toward “smart” futures. Ellen Dunham-Jones, School of Architecture professor and director of the Master of Science in Urban Design program, is the assigned researcher for the Shared Autonomous Vehicle Study.

]]>
2018-06-27T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-27T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-27 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator 
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
607349 607349 image <![CDATA[Ellen Dunham-Jones Headshot 2018]]> image/jpeg 1530125458 2018-06-27 18:50:58 1530125458 2018-06-27 18:50:58
<![CDATA[Débora Mesa Appointed Thomas W. Ventulett III Distinguished Chair in Architectural Design at Georgia Tech]]> 34569 Débora Mesa, partner with Ensamble Studio, has been appointed by the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture to the Thomas W. Ventulett III Distinguished Chair in Architectural Design (Ventulett Chair).

The Ventulett Chair is made possible by a generous endowment created in honor of Georgia Tech alumnus Tom Ventulett, founding partner of tvsdesign in Atlanta. The intention of the Ventulett Chair is to engage an exceptional practitioner with a record of international leadership and excellence in architecture. As Ventulett Chair, Mesa will teach in the School and develop significant initiatives to heighten the critical importance of design in the architecture, engineering, and construction industry, nationally and internationally.

Mesa will also develop academic initiatives to advance architectural design and construction methodologies in her design studios and seminars. Her vision of research and practice is one in which, as Mesa says, “enthusiasm meets perseverance, imagination meets rigor and leadership meets teamwork.” Mesa aims to cultivate synergies between academy and practice and empower students to have a voice in the making of our cities.

Mesa joined Ensamble Studio in 2003 and became a partner of the firm in 2010. As a European Licensed Architect with a studio based in both Madrid and Boston, Mesa has made her mark as a leader in international practice. Ensamble Studio is a cross-functional team that balances education, research and practice and transcends methodical, technological and disciplinary conventions to address issues as diverse as construction of the landscape to the prefabrication of the house.

Prior to the appointment, Mesa served as visiting professor for the Pratt Institute and in 2017 served as the Benjamin Menschel visiting professor at The Cooper Union. Since 2011, Mesa has been part of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, first as visiting professor and later as a research scientist, after co-founding the Prototypes of Prefabrication Research Laboratory (POPlab) in 2012.

In early 2018, an impressive shortlist of Ventulett candidates visited the Georgia Tech campus to meet with current students and faculty and present a lecture about their current work to the School of Architecture. Joining Mesa on the shortlist were Susannah C. Drake, founding principal of DLANDstudio, and Rozana Montiel, founder and director of Estudio de Arquitectura.  

Previous Ventulett Chairs include Marc Simmons, founding partner of the international design and façade consulting practice Front, Monica Ponce de Leon, current dean of the Princeton University School of Architecture, Nader Tehrani, founder of architectural firm NADAAA and dean of The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture at The Cooper Union, and Lars Spuybroek, founder of art and architecture design firm Nox, and currently a professor in the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech.

]]> cwagster3 1 1525792924 2018-05-08 15:22:04 1528119400 2018-06-04 13:36:40 0 0 news Débora Mesa, partner with Ensamble Studio, has been appointed by the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture to the Thomas W. Ventulett III Distinguished Chair in Architectural Design (Ventulett Chair). The Ventulett Chair is made possible by a generous endowment created in honor of Georgia Tech alumnus Tom Ventulett, founding partner of tvsdesign in Atlanta. The intention of the Ventulett Chair is to engage an exceptional practitioner with a record of international leadership and excellence in architecture.

]]>
2018-05-29T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-29T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-29 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georiga Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
arch.gatech.edu
]]>
606518 606518 image <![CDATA[Debora Mesa Ventulett Chair]]> image/jpeg 1527601973 2018-05-29 13:52:53 1527601973 2018-05-29 13:52:53
<![CDATA[Vernelle A. A. Noel Named Ventulett NEXT Generation Visiting Fellow]]> 34569 Vernelle A. A. Noel will join the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture for the Fall 2018 semester as a Ventulett NEXT Generation Visiting Fellow (NEXT Fellowship).

The NEXT Fellowship is a two-year appointment intended for young faculty who are at the beginning of their careers and are interested in interdisciplinary teaching and research that merges design, technology and culture. The initiative was introduced in the fall of 2017 when Jonathan Dessi-Olive was appointed as the first Ventulett NEXT Generation Visiting Fellow. Noel will join Dessi-Olive for the 2018-2019 academic year.

Noel kicked off her career with an impressive list of accomplishments that will lend themselves to her position as a NEXT Fellow. As a research scientist, computational designer, artist and architect, her work largely focuses on craft and cultural design practices, computational making, and lightweight architecture.

After earning her professional degree in architecture from Howard University, Noel worked with Burt Hill, an international design firm in Washington, D.C. and Ahmedabad, India. She later graduated from Massachusetts Institute of Technology with a Master of Science in Architecture Studies from the Design Computation Group and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in design computing at Penn State University.

Noel taught design computation and digital design and fabrication at the Singapore University of Technology and Design. She is also the founder, creator and editor of Architecture Caribbean, an online platform that showcased and promoted design by Caribbean nationals. In 2015, Noel gave a TEDx Talk titled, “The Power of Making: Craft, Computation, and Carnival” at TEDxPortofSpain.

Ventulett NEXT Generation Fellows teach design studios and workshops at both the undergraduate and graduate level and participate actively in the life of the school. Noel and Dessi-Olive will work together in the 2018-2019 year to advance their individual interests in teaching and design research.

]]> cwagster3 1 1526387568 2018-05-15 12:32:48 1526394887 2018-05-15 14:34:47 0 0 news Vernelle A. A. Noel will join the Georgia Institute of Technology School of Architecture for the Fall 2018 semester as a Ventulett NEXT Generation Visiting Fellow (NEXT Fellowship). The NEXT Fellowship is a two-year appointment intended for young faculty who are at the beginning of their careers and are interested in interdisciplinary teaching and research that merges design, technology and culture.

]]>
2018-05-15T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Insititute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
606178 606178 image <![CDATA[Vernelle Noel]]> image/jpeg 1526387357 2018-05-15 12:29:17 1526387385 2018-05-15 12:29:45
<![CDATA[Sonit Bafna discusses why Central Atlanta Library must be preserved]]> 34569 It is no secret that Atlanta is experiencing significant growth and change throughout the city. The Central Atlanta Library, designed by Marcel Breuer, was completed in 1980, and now in 2018, will be undergoing a $50 million renovation. Sonit Bafna, Associate Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, sat down with Curbed Atlanta to discuss the preservation the library’s Brutalist façade. 

“For a time about 10 or 20 years ago, it became fashionable to criticize Brutalist buildings because they did not age well; they looked a little bit depressing; they were grey in tone, and they sort of were associated with architects imposing their will on the community,” Bafna said. “[The Central Atlanta Library] is Breuer trying to rethink postmodernism in his own terms—and very late in his career.”

Bafna often shares Breuer’s work in his courses at Georgia Tech. In 2016, his design studio used the Central Atlanta Library for a project in which his students created their own versions of the library.

To view Sonit Bafna’s discussion with Curbed Atlanta and to view student projects from Bafna’s 2016 studio, click here.

]]> cwagster3 1 1525965291 2018-05-10 15:14:51 1525967140 2018-05-10 15:45:40 0 0 news It is no secret that Atlanta is experiencing significant growth and change throughout the city. The Central Atlanta Library, designed by Marcel Breuer, was completed in 1980, and now in 2018, will be undergoing a $50 million renovation. Sonit Bafna, Associate Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture, sat down with Curbed Atlanta to discuss the preservation the library’s Brutalist façade.

]]>
2018-05-10T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-10T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-10 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Institute of Technology | School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
arch.gatech.edu
]]>
606045 606045 image <![CDATA[Sonit Bafna, Associate Professor in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture]]> image/jpeg 1525964236 2018-05-10 14:57:16 1525964236 2018-05-10 14:57:16
<![CDATA[Two College of Design teams announced as finalists in ULI Hines Student Competition]]> 34569 Two teams made up of Georgia Tech students from the Schools of Architecture, Building Construction, and City and Regional Planning have been announced as finalists in the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Student Competition. Of 130 entries, only four teams are chosen to proceed to the final round.

Each year, Georgia Tech submits several teams to the competition. This year eight teams and 40 students participated. The finalist projects are called “Absorption” and “The EArL,” standing for the Eastern Arts Link.

The Absorption team included Coston Dickinson (MSUD), Justina Everhart (MCRP), Tara Garland (MRED) Trent Miller (M.Arch), and Carley Rickles (MSUD), advised by Lecturer David Haddow and Greg Catoe of Selig Enterprises.

“In December when we were forming teams, I had no idea what to expect,” said Justina Everhart, MCRP student on the Absorption team. “As I reflect on the whirlwind of the two-week competition period, I am so proud of my team for persisting through the challenge. The competition is structured in a way that demands innovation, collaboration, and enthusiasm. It revived my creative interests and gave me the privilege of learning from four exceptionally talented, interdisciplinary teammates who have since inspired me to pursue more creative, unconventional projects.”

The EArL team included Miram Alzaabi (MSUD), Jonathan Franklin (M.Arch), Clare Healey (MCRP), Zach Lancaster (MCRP), and Paul Steidl (M.Arch/MCRP), advised by Associate Professor Sabir Kahn and Tim Perry of North American Properties.

“We are thrilled to learn that we have been selected as one of four finalists in this year’s competition,” said Zachary Lancaster, MCRP student, on behalf of the EArL team. “We want to thank the faculty, staff and volunteers from the College of Design for all their support and feedback in the process of developing our submission, in particular we want to thank our advisors Sabir Khan and Ellen Dunham-Jones. We are excited to represent Georgia Tech in the finals and look forward to taking our vision of a diverse, high density cultural district in Toronto's emerging east side further.”

The ULI Hines Student Competition brings together students from different disciplines to envision a better built environment. Each team of five students has to have at least three disciplines represented. Teams are tasked with creating a development program for a real site in a North American city, with this year focused on an area near the mouth of Don River in Toronto. The teams have two weeks to compile designs, market-based financial data, and related narratives in a final proposal.

The final round will be held in Toronto on April 5. Students are invited to present to a jury panel and the final winner will be announced. In the weeks to come each team is given the opportunity to expand on their initial proposals, adding more detail. Each finalist team will receive $10,000 and the will receive $50,000. To see the official announcement from the ULI, click here. For more information on the ULI Hines Student Competition, click here.

]]> cwagster3 1 1519332383 2018-02-22 20:46:23 1519332383 2018-02-22 20:46:23 0 0 news Two teams made up of Georgia Tech students from the Schools of Architecture, Building Construction, and City and Regional Planning have been announced as finalists in the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Hines Student Competition.

]]>
2018-02-22T00:00:00-05:00 2018-02-22T00:00:00-05:00 2018-02-22 00:00:00 Zoe Kafkes, Marketing & Events Coordinator II

]]>
566631 566631 image <![CDATA[ULI logo]]> image/png 1471956056 2016-08-23 12:40:56 1475895371 2016-10-08 02:56:11
<![CDATA[Graduate Profile: Kyle Forbes]]> 27469 Like many students, Kyle Forbes spent spring break in Florida this year. But he didn’t go for fun. He went in search of his dream job as a theme park designer.

“I have loved theme parks for a long, long time,” said Forbes, who is graduating this semester with a bachelor’s degree in architecture from Georgia Tech’s College of Design. “I was the weirdo who would build attractions out of his Lego sets.”

He didn’t like just building the rides. He wanted to create the park.

Read his story

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1513262487 2017-12-14 14:41:27 1513262487 2017-12-14 14:41:27 0 0 news Like many students, Kyle Forbes spent spring break in Florida this year. But he didn’t go for fun. He went in search of his dream job as a theme park designer.

]]>
2017-12-14T00:00:00-05:00 2017-12-14T00:00:00-05:00 2017-12-14 00:00:00 Victor Rogers

Institute Communications

]]>
599895 599895 image <![CDATA[Kyle Forbes]]> image/jpeg 1513262477 2017-12-14 14:41:17 1513262477 2017-12-14 14:41:17 <![CDATA[Read the full story]]>
<![CDATA[Building Bridges and Breaking Bridges in Structures I ]]> 34569 Bridges were built this semester in the Georgia Tech School of Architecture Structures I course in a unique exercise that tasked students with responsibilities as designers, engineers and builders. Bridge designs were calculated, reviewed and built throughout the semester, and on November 29, the Structures I class came together at for a special event where they broke the bridges, testing them to failure.

In addition to their own intuition about structures, students used calculation methods introduced in the Structures I class, taught by Jim Case and Chris Putman. Many of the groups also used a graphical (drawing-based) method of calculation called graphic statics to more intuitively design and calculate the forces in their designs. Graphic Statics was introduced this year by Ventulett NEXT Generation Visiting Fellow, Jonathan Dessi-Olive in a series of three lectures given to Structures students in October.

In teams of three to four, students were tasked to design, calculate and build a wooden “bridge” structure that would be tested to failure. Structures were made of balsa wood and glue and had to span 30 inches. The goal was for the teams to design minimum weight wood structures that, when tested to failure, would break at 100 pounds.

The teams made initial design proposals and calculations, which were presented and pinned up for review in early November. The reviewers included engineers from Uzun+Case, as well as Georgia Tech faculty from the Schools of Architecture and Civil Engineering. This valuable review session gave students the opportunity to talk to professionals about their designs, go over calculations, and discuss construction and fabrication strategies.

On November, 29, the teams arrived at the Digital Fabrication Lab with their constructed balsa wood bridges. With the assistance of Professor Russell Gentry, each bridge was tested to failure. Students completed the assignment by writing a report describing their process, analyzing their data collected from load testing, and reflecting on their experience working as designers, engineers and builders.

The following are the winning teams:

Best Strength to weight ratio – and highest capacity:

Tied for failure closest to 100lbs:

]]> cwagster3 1 1513101416 2017-12-12 17:56:56 1513106325 2017-12-12 19:18:45 0 0 news 2017-11-29T00:00:00-05:00 2017-11-29T00:00:00-05:00 2017-11-29 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator
Georgia Tech School of Architecture
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu
]]>
599804 599804 image <![CDATA[Structures I Class Bridge Breaking Project]]> image/jpeg 1513101168 2017-12-12 17:52:48 1513101168 2017-12-12 17:52:48
<![CDATA[BBC World Service Turns to Georgia Tech School of Architecture Professor for a Lesson in Skyscrapers]]> 34569 Georgia Tech’s resident expert on large scale buildings, Benjamin Flowers offered his expertise on skyscrapers and how people react to them on the recent BBC World Services broadcast episode of “The Forum.”

In the episode, “The First Skyscrapers,” which premiered Saturday, November 11, 2017, Flowers joined Bridget Kendall and guest experts, founding director and curator of the Skyscraper Museum, Carol Willis, and architectural author, Thomas Leslie, as they discussed the early days of skyscrapers and how these structures have impacted and shaped city skylines.

Explaining the early reception of growing city skylines, Flowers said, “I think there was an attendant ambiguity about to what extent building tall represented an opportunity but also to what extent it represented a threat to a kind of way of life, where suddenly your access to sun and air was dramatically altered by the creation of structures that changed the skyline but also changed the nature of life at the street scale pretty significantly.”

In the early days of skyscrapers, buildings were constructed to address the scarcity of real estate and the incentive to build tall on limited amounts of land.  Today, skyscrapers are more often about power.

“I think the interesting thing is that if you think about where the tallest building in the world now sits,” he said, “it’s that the very forces that we associate with driving the rise of the skyscraper… simply does not apply in the case of Dubai, where you have a spine of skyscrapers surrounded by a sea of low, four to five story constructions and is surrounded by little or nothing. And so, what you see now is an increasing demand on the part of clients to build tall, not in response to economic considerations or even to considerations of demand.”

Flowers continued, “I think in some ways as of yet, we have not seen the topping out of what the opportunities are.”

To hear Flowers discuss “The First Skyscrapers” on the BBC World Services episode of “The Forum”, visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3csvsf9.

]]> cwagster3 1 1510762486 2017-11-15 16:14:46 1510838609 2017-11-16 13:23:29 0 0 news 2017-11-11T00:00:00-05:00 2017-11-11T00:00:00-05:00 2017-11-11 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing and Events Coordinator II
Georgia Tech School of Architecture

]]>
598821 598821 image <![CDATA[Benjamin Flowers]]> image/jpeg 1510762911 2017-11-15 16:21:51 1510762911 2017-11-15 16:21:51
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech's Racing Roots, Part 2: The Need for Speed]]> 27948 In the decades following World War II, as cars became an American obsession and racing grew ever more popular, countless Tech students, alumni, and faculty continued to gravitate to all things automotive.

Drivers, builders, designers, engineers, executives, and even academics with ties to Georgia Tech made their mark on the worlds of stock car and drag racing.

Read the Full Story:
Georgia Tech's Racing Roots, Part 2: The Need for Speed
]]> Jennifer Tomasino 1 1508510821 2017-10-20 14:47:01 1508511325 2017-10-20 14:55:25 0 0 news 2017-10-20T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-20T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-20 00:00:00 Doug Goodwin

Georgia Institute of Technology
Client Manager | Institute Communications
404-385-4140
Email Doug

]]>
597646 597649 597646 image <![CDATA[Racing Roots part 2]]> image/jpeg 1508510357 2017-10-20 14:39:17 1508510905 2017-10-20 14:48:25 597649 image <![CDATA[Racing Roots part 2 Drag Racing]]> image/jpeg 1508510495 2017-10-20 14:41:35 1508510934 2017-10-20 14:48:54
<![CDATA[Professor John Peponis represented Georgia Tech at the 2017 Congress of the International Union of Architects (UIA) in Seoul]]> 34409 The 2017 congress of the International Union of Architects (UIA) was held in Seoul earlier in September. The theme of the congress was The Soul of the City, aiming to express the need for policy makers, planners and architects to integrate environmental, social and economic aims with the fundamental aim of supporting a good life, fulfilling and creative. Professor John Peponis was one of the contributors to the first keynote forum, chaired by Georgia Tech doctoral alumnus Sung Hong KIM, which addressed Urban Living. Peponis’ presentation emphasized the principles of good city design that are supported by analytical research in the field of space syntax in which Georgia Tech holds a leadership position internationally. These include urban liveliness as a function of street network connectivity, cultural and social openness as a function of the intelligibility of cities, a link between face-to-face and translocal networks as a function of the interrelation of scales or organization, and the sense of richness and diversity which arises from the creation of a mesh of potential destinations that distribute attraction over the street network.

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1506027143 2017-09-21 20:52:23 1506027143 2017-09-21 20:52:23 0 0 news 2017-09-21T00:00:00-04:00 2017-09-21T00:00:00-04:00 2017-09-21 00:00:00 Carmen Wagster
Marketing & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
carmen.wagster@design.gatech.edu

]]>
596317 596317 image <![CDATA[COEX5]]> image/jpeg 1506026688 2017-09-21 20:44:48 1506026688 2017-09-21 20:44:48
<![CDATA[6 Pilot Projects Involve Students in Living Building]]> 34409 When students return to the Georgia Tech campus this fall, they’ll find opportunities to participate in six pilot projects intended to improve the design, construction, operation and evaluation of sustainable buildings.

Each of the projects is tied to the Living Building at Georgia Tech (and is funded in part through the Kendeda Fund gift that’s paying for the building). But the real focus of the pilots is longterm: to leverage both the Living Building at Tech and the university’s academic firepower by developing tools and processes that can improve buildings.

See More at: http://livingbuilding.kendedafund.org/2017/07/26/6-pilot-projects-involve-students-in-living-building/

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1502471696 2017-08-11 17:14:56 1502471696 2017-08-11 17:14:56 0 0 news 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11 00:00:00 School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
arch.gatech.edu

]]>
593765 593765 image <![CDATA[Augmented Reality]]> image/jpeg 1501168195 2017-07-27 15:09:55 1501168195 2017-07-27 15:09:55
<![CDATA[Professor Ellen Dunham-Jones featured as part of the TED BMWi Next Visionaries project]]> 34409 Can we rebuild our broken suburbs? Georgia Tech School of Architecture Professor Ellen Dunham-Jones shares a vision of dying malls rehabilitated, dead "big box" stores re-inhabited, and endless parking lots transformed into thriving wetlands. Professor Ellen Dunham-Jones's TED talk featured as part of the TED BMWi Next Visionaries project.

See More at: https://nextvisionaries.com/video-ted/ted-video-retrofitting-suburbia/

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1502471408 2017-08-11 17:10:08 1502471408 2017-08-11 17:10:08 0 0 news 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11 00:00:00 School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
arch.gatech.edu

]]>
519441 519441 image <![CDATA[E Dunham Jones 03/2016]]> image/jpeg 1459479600 2016-04-01 03:00:00 1475895284 2016-10-08 02:54:44
<![CDATA[PCI Foundation Adds Studio at Georgia Tech]]> 34409 In June, the PCI Foundation recently approved a 4-year grant to the Georgia Technology Institute (Georgia Tech) to run a new Precast Studio in the School of Architecture and the School of Engineering. The program will run for two consecutive semesters each year starting in the fall of 2017.  The first semester (fall) will be a jointly taught architectural design studio in the third year of the graduate program, with additional student participation from our Master of Science program in Digital Design and Fabrication, which is a one year post-­‐professional program. The program will be led by Professor Tristan Al-Haddad.

More Info: http://pci-foundation.org/blog.cfm/Expanding_Our_Reach/PCI_Foundation_Adds_Studio_at_Georgia_Tech/

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1502470953 2017-08-11 17:02:33 1502470953 2017-08-11 17:02:33 0 0 news 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11 00:00:00 School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
arch.gatech.edu

]]>
514621 514621 image <![CDATA[Tristan Al-Haddad, Spring 2016]]> image/jpeg 1458923790 2016-03-25 16:36:30 1475895277 2016-10-08 02:54:37
<![CDATA[It's Gonna Be a Bright, Sunshiny Day]]> 27948 On a sunny afternoon, Norman “Finn” Findley stands with an angel investor beneath a canopy of shiny solar panels that covers a parking lot adjacent to what will be Atlanta’s new football stadium. 

Findley is CEO of Quest Renewables, a startup that licenses Georgia Tech research, and this particular solar canopy is the company's most extensive project to date. When fully operational, the system will generate enough electricity to power nine home games per season.

“It blows people’s minds,” Findley said, explaining to the investor how his company’s QuadPod Solar Canopy system will work. “It still blows my mind a little bit.”

Read the full story: It's Gonna Be a Bright, Sunshiny Day
]]> Jennifer Tomasino 1 1501879148 2017-08-04 20:39:08 1501880573 2017-08-04 21:02:53 0 0 news 2017-08-04T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-04T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-04 00:00:00 Péralte C. Paul
Communications and Marketing Manager
Phone: 404.894.8727
Email Peralte Paul

]]>
594105 594105 image <![CDATA[Quest Renewables]]> image/jpeg 1501879001 2017-08-04 20:36:41 1501879195 2017-08-04 20:39:55
<![CDATA[Data Standards and Workflows Among Topics at DBL Annual Meeting]]> 34462 The Digital Building Lab (DBL) gathered more than 50 people on campus for its annual Members' Meeting and Workshops to get feedback on Georgia Tech’s initiatives in architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) and technology research.

Attendees included DBL members, Georgia Tech researchers, and a number of industry leaders from AISC, Arcom, Autodesk, Component Assembly Systems, Constructivity, HOK, Katerra, NIBS, Nucor, and Vectorworks.

The three-day event was held in May and included a DBL Members’ Meeting and two days of industry workshops with focused discussions on industry advancement.

Dennis Shelden, director of the DBL and an associate professor at the School of Architecture in the College of Design, said, “We were very encouraged by the level of interest shown, from our existing DBL members, new organizations interested in the program, and research faculty. Over the coming weeks we will be reviewing the results of the meeting and connecting DBL members to research projects. We are also ramping up for some really significant activities around the annual DBL Symposium on October 5-6, 2017.”

Georgia Tech faculty and students reviewed research proposals, including “Clash Prediction Based on Space Gridding by Bayesian Analysis in BIM Projects,” “ASE Program Opportunities,” “KBAD: Knowledge Base for Architectural Detailing,” and “Mixed Reality‐Enabled Spatiotemporal City Infrastructure Data‐Capture.”

The first workshop explored subcontracting trades’ data standards and workflows. The DBL has performed data standard and information delivery (IDM / MVD) development for numerous trades over the past decade. A number of new technical developments promise renewed interest and value for this standardization work: extending the data standards to web-based information exchanges and developing overall industry frameworks for data exchange workflows.

Participants received an overview of existing work and discussed potential forward-looking applications of the data to future industry data initiatives. The workshop brought together representatives of the industry trade organizations with leaders of next generation data and exchange initiatives.

The second workshop examined AEC web data services technologies. Web- and internet-data and communications protocols are rapidly evolving as needs for data interoperability and exchange encounter new demands of technology paradigms, including web microservices, web ontology applications (OLWL), and the Internet of Things (IoT). The existing technical frameworks for AEC data exchange (IFC / EXPRESS) are being reconsidered in light of these developments. The workshop’s goal was to initiate a set of research and development tasks to develop out this next generation AEC data architecture.

To view more photos from the event, please visit the DBL Facebook page.

]]> afortson6 1 1495548208 2017-05-23 14:03:28 1497627285 2017-06-16 15:34:45 0 0 news The Digital Building Lab (DBL) brought more than 50 people on campus for its annual Members' Meeting Workshops to get feedback on Georgia Tech's initiatives in architecture, engineering, and construction (AEC) and technology research.

]]>
2017-06-08T00:00:00-04:00 2017-06-08T00:00:00-04:00 2017-06-08 00:00:00 Amy Fortson
amy.fortson@design.gatech.edu

]]>
592534 592535 592536 592534 image <![CDATA[Digital Building Laboratory Members Meeting]]> image/jpeg 1496946240 2017-06-08 18:24:00 1496946240 2017-06-08 18:24:00 592535 image <![CDATA[Research Proposal Review ]]> image/jpeg 1496946456 2017-06-08 18:27:36 1497466299 2017-06-14 18:51:39 592536 image <![CDATA[Workshop on AEC Web Data Services Technologies]]> image/jpeg 1496946493 2017-06-08 18:28:13 1497465924 2017-06-14 18:45:24
<![CDATA[School of Architecture student wins Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Foundation 2017 China Prize!]]> 28816 Congratulations to grad student Hanxue Wei, a winner of the Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) Foundation 2017 China Prize!

Click here to view Wei's submission on density. 

More details: http://www.somfoundation.som.com/award/china-prize 

.

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1494954246 2017-05-16 17:04:06 1494955576 2017-05-16 17:26:16 0 0 news 2017-05-04T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-04T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-04 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu
arch.gatech.edu

 

]]>
591806 591806 image <![CDATA[Hanxue Wei - Submission on Density]]> image/jpeg 1494954789 2017-05-16 17:13:09 1494954789 2017-05-16 17:13:09
<![CDATA[Students take top award for the School of Architecture in the 2017 Spring Capstone Design Expo]]> 28816 Congratulations to Anthony Galvan and Cameron Bradberry for taking the top award for the School of Architecture in the 2017 Spring Capstone Design Expo with their project, River Leap: Soaring River Gardens!

Click here for full story and to review a list of the Spring 2017 Capstone Design Expo Winners.

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1494011674 2017-05-05 19:14:34 1494359671 2017-05-09 19:54:31 0 0 news 2017-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-01 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu
arch.gatech.edu

 

]]>
591590 591589 591591 591590 image <![CDATA[2017 Spring Capstone Design Expo Winning Architecture Project pic2]]> image/jpeg 1494359327 2017-05-09 19:48:47 1494359327 2017-05-09 19:48:47 591589 image <![CDATA[2017 Spring Capstone Design Expo Winning Architecture Project]]> image/jpeg 1494359263 2017-05-09 19:47:43 1494359263 2017-05-09 19:47:43 591591 image <![CDATA[2017 Spring Capstone Design Expo Winning Architecture Project pic3]]> image/jpeg 1494359458 2017-05-09 19:50:58 1494359458 2017-05-09 19:50:58
<![CDATA[Students take home 1ST PLACE in the U.S. Department of Energy, 2017 Race to Zero Student Design Competition!]]> 28816 The Race to Zero encourages students to work with builders, developers, community leaders, and other industry partners to meet stringent design requirements and create marketable, affordable concepts. The annual event took place on April 22-23, 2017, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colo.

https://energy.gov/eere/buildings/2017-race-zero-results

Photo credit: Ellen Jaskol/NREL, DOE Race to Zero

 

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1493835290 2017-05-03 18:14:50 1493993974 2017-05-05 14:19:34 0 0 news 2017-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-01 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu
arch.gatech.edu

 

]]>
591378 591379 591384 591382 591378 image <![CDATA[2017 Race to Zero Student Design Competition]]> image/jpeg 1493925643 2017-05-04 19:20:43 1493925643 2017-05-04 19:20:43 591379 image <![CDATA[2017 Race to Zero Student Design Competition p2]]> image/jpeg 1493925706 2017-05-04 19:21:46 1493926111 2017-05-04 19:28:31 591384 image <![CDATA[2017 Race to Zero Student Design Competition p3]]> image/jpeg 1493926220 2017-05-04 19:30:20 1493926220 2017-05-04 19:30:20 591382 image <![CDATA[2017 Race to Zero Student Design Competition p4]]> image/jpeg 1493925822 2017-05-04 19:23:42 1493925822 2017-05-04 19:23:42
<![CDATA[School of Architecture to be featured in the 2017 Socrates Sculpture Park publication]]> 28816 Organized by The Architectural League of New York and Socrates Sculpture Park, Folly 2017 is a design/build competition that explores the relationship between art and architecture, while also durably addressing and improving the conditions at Socrates Sculpture Park.

This year, associate professors Jude LeBlanc and Russel Gentry, along with gradudate student Matt Peterka took on the challenge and submitted their "Kite/Folly" proposal to be considered in the design/build competion. Although their abstract did not win, the three were premiated and their submission will soon be highlighted on the The Architectural League of New York's website, in addition to being featured in the upcoming 2017 Socrates Sculpture Park publication

Socrates Sculpture Park and The Architectural League launched the annual Folly program in 2012 to create an opportunity for emerging architects and designers to build projects in the public realm and explore the boundaries between architecture and sculpture. Following the precedent of the 2016 competition, Folly 2017 fuses form with utility, merging FOLLY and FUNCTION.

Click here to view their abstract proposal. 

 

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1493232128 2017-04-26 18:42:08 1493234326 2017-04-26 19:18:46 0 0 news 2017-04-26T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-26T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-26 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu
arch.gatech.edu

 

]]>
590977 590977 image <![CDATA[2017 KITE/FOLLY PROPOSAL BY LEBLANC, GENTRY AND PETERKA]]> image/jpeg 1493233860 2017-04-26 19:11:00 1493233860 2017-04-26 19:11:00
<![CDATA[Nancey Green Leigh: We Are 'Shaping a Robotic Future at Georgia Tech' ]]> 32550 For National Robotics Week, we asked Nancey Green Leigh to talk about robotics and what's happening here at the College of Design and Georgia Tech.

Leigh is the associate dean for research in the College and last fall secured a grant from the National Science Foundation National Robotics Initiative to study the U.S. robotics industry and its economic impacts. She also is a professor in the School of City and Regional Planning.

She gave us her thoughts on robotics research and the industry.

1. Why should anyone research the robotics industry?

Robots are being developed and “employed” across the economy, on farms, in factories, warehouses, hotels and hospitals, to name just a few types of businesses using them. They will fundamentally transform daily life and work. Researchers are essential to making that transformation happen from a creative and technical perspective. They also have a key role to play in ensuring that robotics diffusion is not simply imposed upon society in a way the causes winners and losers, but, rather, leads to robotics’ full potential for enhancing all human experience and safeguarding the physical world.

2. How will robots affect city and regional planning?

City and regional planning includes a number of specializations that focus on the world in which we live, such as economic development, environment, housing, land use, and transportation. Robotics diffusion will affect all of these areas, but, currently, the most attention is being given to how autonomous vehicles (a kind of robot) will alter our transportation infrastructure, as well as greatly reduce the number of driver jobs.

3. Your peers are inventing and improving robots: What does Georgia Tech need to do to shape a future with robots?

We are already shaping a robotic future at Georgia Tech, but there is much to be done. Within the College of Design, in a great example of how robots can contribute to the arts and empowering those with disabilities, music Professor Gil Weinberg has developed a marimba-playing robotic musician that uses machine learning for jazz improvisation, as well as a prosthetic robotic arm for amputees that restores and enhances human drumming abilities. Associate Professor Russell Gentry offers a great example for architecture; he is using a Kuka robot for teaching robotic fabrication and for researching humans – robot collaboration in a fabrication setting.

4. What else should the Design academic community research about robots? 

We have a major research focus on assistive technologies involving several schools and research centers of the College of Design and robots will be an increasing part of such technologies. How robots navigate existing street, sidewalk and building infrastructure, and how their presence might influence future design of such infrastructure is another rich research area. And how the deployment of robots in multiple economic sectors affects current and future jobs will be a critical economic development question tying in with many aspects of the Design academic community.

]]> Malrey Head 1 1492191963 2017-04-14 17:46:03 1492607514 2017-04-19 13:11:54 0 0 news Associate Dean for Research Nancey Green Leigh answered a few questions about the future of robotics at the College of Design and Georgia Tech.

]]>
2017-04-14T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14 00:00:00 Malrey Head
malrey.head@gatech.edu

]]>
590453 590453 image <![CDATA[Nancey Green Leigh]]> image/jpeg 1492192677 2017-04-14 17:57:57 1492192677 2017-04-14 17:57:57
<![CDATA[School of Architecture Professor Godfried Augenbroe receives Georgia Tech honor]]> 34409 School of Architecture Professor Godfried Augenbroe will be recognized at the 2017 Georgia Tech Faculty & Staff Honors Luncheon on held Friday, April 21 from noon-1:30pm in the Student Center Ballroom. 

The Faculty & Staff Honors Luncheon recognizes those who have received accolades and awards throughout the previous academic year. More than 75 of Georgia Tech's best and brightest will receive honors at the luncheon. 

Click HERE to RSVP 

Guest parking is available in the Area 2 or Area 3 Visitor lots. Please note, Georgia Tech's Earth Day will also occur on Friday, April 21, so parking may be limited. Guests are encouraged to arrive early. 

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1492015696 2017-04-12 16:48:16 1492112371 2017-04-13 19:39:31 0 0 news 2017-04-12T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-12T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-12 00:00:00 557921 557921 image <![CDATA[Godfried Augenbroe 2016]]> image/jpeg 1470154568 2016-08-02 16:16:08 1475895361 2016-10-08 02:56:01 <![CDATA[FACULTY & STAFF HONORS LUNCHEON]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech student teams receive honorable mentions in 2017 ULI Hines Student Competition]]> 34409 Two Georgia Tech student teams have received honorable mentions in the 2017 ULI Hines Student Competition. Please join us in congratulating the two teams!!!

North West Bond

Chicago Fit

The ULI Hines Student Competition—having just completed its 15th year—offers graduate students the opportunity to form their own multidisciplinary teams and engage in a challenging exercise in responsible land use.

Student teams comprising at least three disciplines have two weeks to devise a comprehensive design and development program for a real, large-scale site full of challenges and opportunities. Submissions will consist of boards that include drawings, site plans, tables, and market-feasible financial data.

11 multi-disciplinary teams from Georgia Tech submitted variously-anchored mixed-use development proposals for a former industrial site on the North Branch of the Chicago River. The 11 submissions are on display as part of the HINES ULI COMPETITION ENTRIES 2017 EXHIBITION until March 11th in the Cohen Gallery aka The Bridge between Arch East and Arch West.

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1489004688 2017-03-08 20:24:48 1489078511 2017-03-09 16:55:11 0 0 news 2017-03-08T00:00:00-05:00 2017-03-08T00:00:00-05:00 2017-03-08 00:00:00 Ellen Dunham-Jones

Professor; Director, Urban Design Program

ellen.dunham-jones@design.gatech.edu

(404) 894-0648

]]>
<![CDATA[2017 Hines Finalists]]> <![CDATA[HINES ULI COMPETITION ENTRIES 2017 EXHIBITION]]>
<![CDATA[Professor Richard Dagenhart leads international collaborative studio with Wang Yi from Tongji University, and Ming-Chun Lee from UNCC]]> 34409 Professor Dagenhart’s teaching focuses on urban design, weaving ecological infrastructure with contemporary real estate development. He is actively involved in international teaching and research, most recently at Tongji University in Shanghai and the School of Architecture’s Modern Architecture and Modern City Summer Program in Europe. This semester, Richard Dagenhart from SoA is joined by Wang Yi from Tongji University, and Ming-Chun Lee from UNCC. Learning from Savannah - Atlanta As It Might Have Been is a collaborative studio joining the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech with Shanghai’s Tongji University College of Architecture and Urban Planning  and the School of Architecture at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. The three schools, with a total of 38 students and four international faculty, visited Savannah for fieldwork February 5-7, followed by a 8 days in a collaborative charrette and lectures at Georgia Tech, and concluding with presentation at in Charlotte. 

Professor Dagenhart shared his experiences in the course:

“An urban design charrette is always a good way for students and faculty to work collaboratively,  creating proposals to address complex problems in only a week or two. Our Learning from Savannah Charrette went a step farther by combining students and faculty from three universities, seven countries and seven languages, and several disciplines - architecture, urban design, city planning, landscape architecture, and real estate development. For the students, the charrette was an immediate immersion into a global and urban world where they will practice their future professions.  And we had a good time, too.”

The students and faculty then returned to their home universities to complete the urban design project on the selected site in Atlanta. In May, representatives from the three schools will meet in Shanghai at Tongji University for comparative studio presentations. A publication will contain and conclude the collaborate studio research+design project. 

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1487645794 2017-02-21 02:56:34 1487704574 2017-02-21 19:16:14 0 0 news Learning from Savannah - Atlanta As It Might Have Been is a collaborative studio joining the School of Architecture at Georgia Tech with Shanghai’s Tongji University College of Architecture and Urban Planning  and the School of Architecture at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte.

]]>
2017-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-20 00:00:00 Richard Dagenhart

Senior Lecturer

richard.dagenhart@design.gatech.edu

(404) 894-4885

]]>
587672 587673 587674 587672 image <![CDATA[Site Visit in Atlanta]]> image/png 1487638549 2017-02-21 00:55:49 1487644854 2017-02-21 02:40:54 587673 image <![CDATA[Savannah Fieldwork]]> image/png 1487638637 2017-02-21 00:57:17 1487644915 2017-02-21 02:41:55 587674 image <![CDATA[Interim Review in Hinman]]> image/png 1487638736 2017-02-21 00:58:56 1487644950 2017-02-21 02:42:30
<![CDATA[School of Architecture Associate Professor Michael Gamble is 1 of 5 from College of Design to win Teaching Effectiveness Award]]> 34409 Georgia Tech students really like our professors!

Five College of Design instructors have won the 2016 Class of 1940 Course Survey Teaching Effectiveness Award. This award is given to a maximum of 40 Georgia Tech teachers who received the best scores on the Course-Instructor Opinion Survey for the question, "Overall, this instructor is an effective teacher".

The prize includes a one-time pre-tax award of $1000 and having their name printed in the Celebrating Teaching Day (March 14, 2017) program.

School of Architecture: Michael Gamble

Michael Gamble, an associate professor in the School of Architecture, won the award for instructing ARCH 6069: Advanced Architecture Design I. Gamble also won the award in 2015, 2013, and 2012. He is the director of graduate studies for the School of Architecture, creative director for Gamble + Gamble Architects in Atlanta, and known for examining the environmental impact of design decisions, notably through his work with housing, energy, and building technologies.

Gamble’s research has received grants from: The Alcoa Foundation, The Kendeda Foundation, Center for Quality Growth and Regional Development, and the National Endowments of the Arts. He also received First Prize for Research in an international competition sponsored by the Environmental Design and Research Association.

School of City & Regional Planning: Dan Immergluck

Dan Immergluck won the 2016 award for instructing CP 6630: Government and Housing Markets. He's won the award twice before, both for CP 6611 | Real Estate Finance and Development.

As a professor in the School of City & Regional Planning, Immergluck teaches courses in statistics, real estate finance, housing policy, and social justice and equity planning. Professor Immergluck’s research concerns affordable housing, neighborhood change, community development finance, economic development, and other topics. His applied research focuses on housing and development issues in Atlanta as well as cities around the country.

Dan is the author of four books, more than four dozen scholarly articles, numerous book chapters and encyclopedia entries, and scores of applied research reports. His scholarship is widely cited, and he has been quoted extensively in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, and other media. He has testified several times before Congress and the Federal Reserve Board.

School of Industrial Design: Young-Mi Choi

Young-Mi Choi, an assistant professor in the School of Industrial Design, won the award for instructing ID 2022: ID Studio II. The class is set up to give students the chance to interact with a variety of users, such as users with spinal cord injuries confined to a wheelchair or users with visual impairments. This allows them to practice engagement techniques with real users, obtain feedback and test their designs.

Choi teaches product development, human factors, and ergonomics. Her research activities focus on applying evidence-based design in innovation and human-centered design. Her research focuses on topics related to the roles played by users, industrial designers, engineers, and marketers during the process of creating new products and assistive technologies. She is also the director of the I³ Lab and a project director with the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Wireless Inclusive Technologies (WIT RERC). She has received the National Science Foundation ADVANCE Program Women of Excellence Award, Outstanding Faculty Award and multiple course teaching effectiveness awards.

School of Industrial Design: Stephen Sprigle

​Stephen Sprigle, a Professor with appointments in Bioengineering, Industrial Design and the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, won the award for instructing ID 6100 -- a required class for students in the Industrial Design and Human-Computer Interaction graduate programs.The class targets the science of design, professional ethics and responsible conduct of research. Students are challenged to think through the trade-offs between various design research methods, and discuss the history and profession of industrial design.

A biomedical engineer with a license in physical therapy, Sprigle directs the Rehabilitation Engineering and Applied Research Lab (REARLab), which focuses on applied disability research and development. The REARLab’s research interests include the biomechanics of wheelchair seating and posture, pressure ulcer prevention, and manual wheelchair propulsion. Its development activities include standardized wheelchair and cushion testing and the design of assistive and diagnostic technologies.

School of Music: Jason Freeman

Jason Freeman, a Professor in the School of Music, won the award for instructing MUSI 6003: Music Technology: History and Repertoire. His artistic practice and scholarly research focus on using technology to engage diverse audiences in collaborative, experimental, and accessible musical experiences. He also develops educational interventions (such as EarSketch) in K-12, university, and MOOC environments that broaden and increase engagement in STEM disciplines through authentic integrations of music and computing. His music has been performed at Carnegie Hall, exhibited at ACM SIGGRAPH, published by Universal Edition, broadcast on public radio’s Performance Today, and commissioned through support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Freeman’s wide-ranging work has attracted support from sources such as the National Science Foundation, Google, and Turbulence. He has published his research in leading conferences and journals such as Computer Music Journal, Organised Sound, NIME, and ACM SIGCSE. Freeman received his B.A. in music from Yale University and his M.A. and D.M.A. in composition from Columbia University.

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1487637201 2017-02-21 00:33:21 1487637460 2017-02-21 00:37:40 0 0 news School of Architecture Associate Professor Michael Gamble is 1 of 5 from College of Design to win Teaching Effectiveness Award. Gamble won the award for instructing ARCH 6069: Advanced Architecture Design I. Gamble also won the award in 2015, 2013, and 2012. He is the director of graduate studies for the School of Architecture, creative director for Gamble + Gamble Architects in Atlanta, and known for examining the environmental impact of design decisions, notably through his work with housing, energy, and building technologies.

]]>
2017-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-20 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu

]]>
519601 519601 image <![CDATA[Michael Gamble 03/2016]]> image/jpeg 1459515600 2016-04-01 13:00:00 1475895286 2016-10-08 02:54:46 <![CDATA[College of Design Story]]>
<![CDATA[College of Design students awarded the CEFPI Walter H. Fairchild Scholarship]]> 34409 The Georgia Chapter of the Council of Educational Facility Planners International (Georgia CEFPI, Inc.) recently announced the winners of the Walt H. Fairchild Scholarship:

Shani Sharif, graduate student at Georgia Tech in Architecture

Shani Sharif, an architect and researcher, is currently pursuing her doctoral studies in Computational Design at the School of Architecture.

Melanie Metal, graduate student at Georgia Tech in Planning

Melani Metal is pursuing a Master of City and Regional Planning in the School of City and Regional Planning.

Georgia CEFPI provided the awards to these two students stating "Your submission was deemed as stellar and your response was succinct and commendable. The selection committee wanted to convey their appreciation for your hard work and the effort you have put into your field of study."

Shani Sharif expressed her appreciation for the award stating "It is a great honor to receive Walter H. Fairchild Scholarship from Georgia CEFPI. I am truly thankful that Georgia CEFPI recognizes students’ academic achievements, and by awarding this scholarship supports and encourages higher education. "

]]> raltiraifi3 1 1486059023 2017-02-02 18:10:23 1486151674 2017-02-03 19:54:34 0 0 news Shani Sharif (PhD in Arch) and Melanie Metal (MCRP) win the Walt H. Fairchild Scholarship.

]]>
2017-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-02 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu

 

]]>
586901 586902 586901 image <![CDATA[Shani Sharif - CEFPI Awards Ceremony]]> image/jpeg 1486141048 2017-02-03 16:57:28 1486141048 2017-02-03 16:57:28 586902 image <![CDATA[Melanie Metal - CEFPI Awards Ceremony]]> image/png 1486141087 2017-02-03 16:58:07 1486141087 2017-02-03 16:58:07 <![CDATA[Winter Social Award Ceremony Photos]]> <![CDATA[CEFPI Scholarship Information]]>
<![CDATA[Reporting from the Front: A Report]]> 28816 REPORTING FROM THE FRONT : A REPORT
 
Mark Cottle, Associate Professor, School of Architecture
 
The prospect of a pilgrimage to the Architecture Biennale in Venice can be daunting.  Each year, an increasing horde of visitors, this year 27 million, descend upon a shrinking population of fewer than 55,000 residents, and it's not easy to experience Venice as a real, living city, much less lose yourself in the melancholy labyrinths that mesmerized Jorge Luis Borges, Italo Calvino, Daphne du Maurier, Patricia Highsmith, Henry James, Thomas Mann, China Mieville, WG Sebald....
 
Instead, you are more likely to encounter "Veniceland".  Mercifully free of the pedicabs and segways that plague other heavily touristed cities, even so, it can be a struggle to make your way through the crowded, narrow streets.  Especially when every bridge over every little canal is clogged with selfie-takers.
 
You can minimize the aggravation by avoiding central areas in favor of quiet neighborhoods in the corners and at the edges.  And by taking your long walks after dinner, when the day-trippers are back on their buses and cruise ships, the streets empty out, and the city assumes the Scooby-Doo spookiness of an abandoned amusement park.
 
Likewise, the Biennale itself can be formidable.  Intended to provide an overview of what may be considered most noteworthy in contemporary architecture around the world, the exposition is vast.  Exhibits fill two complexes, the Giardini and the Arsenale, each of which will usually take a full day to work your way through -- not to mention the many pop-ups and pavilions sprinkled throughout the city.
 
How to determine what warrants careful attention, what you can give a cursory review, and what you can safely blow past?  
 
It helps that each iteration of the Biennale is lensed through a curatorial question or concern.  In 2010, Kazuyo Sejima asked participants to reflect upon how People meet in architecture.  In 2012, David Chipperfield sought Common Ground (and didn't get much IMHO).  In 2014, Rem Koolhaas took a back-to-basics approach with Fundamentals, giving special attention to architectural elements.
 
This year, in REPORTING FROM THE FRONT, Alejandro Aravena foregrounded practices and projects that seek to "improve the quality of life while working on the margins, under tough circumstances, facing pressing challenges."  In accordance with the humanitarian focus, "starchitects" are few and far between.
 
Instead, Aravena invited participation from a large number of lesser-known practices, from all around the world, that he believed merit greater recognition.  Of the 88 invitees, 50 were exhibiting at the Biennale for the first time, and 33 of them were under the age of 40.
 
The momentary respite from the barrage of the usual suspects, continually promoted, already known, has prompted some critics to dismiss the exposition as "decaffeinated".  A pretty snobbish assessment, you could say.  But one can justly concede that the decision to eschew architectural fireworks has resulted in a flatter overall feeling tone.
 
So many fresh voices and perspectives could be expected to provoke a much more interesting and pertinent series of conversations about contemporary practice than the usual fare.  And it did.  It seemed, however, that several of the invitees did not have sufficient experience exhibiting their work, or perhaps lacked the resources to do it properly.  The majority did not follow Aravena's "problem-process-result" formula, ignoring the first two parts in favor of the latter.  As a result, the work often did not rise to the level of visibility, much less legibility.
 
Many of their displays, generally much smaller than those of more established practices, were swallowed up in the vast spaces (almost impossible to see in the deep gloom of the Arsenale's main volume).  It wasn't always clear where one exhibit stopped and the next one started.  Adjacencies often seemed arbitrary rather than enlightening.  And Aravena's short introductory texts ranged between enigmatic and inscrutable.
 
In a smaller setting, one could rightly be expected to put into practice one's faith in the curator, and to invest the time and energy in situ to figure it all out:  what a project or practice is about, why it was included, how it might relate to the others.  Here there wasn't time for that.  Best to mark them in one's program to look up online later.
 
That said, there remain plenty of highlights:
 
In one corner of the Giardini's main building, next to an exquisite secret garden designed by Carlo Scarpa in the sixties, Maria Giuseppina Grasso Cannizzo from Sicily suspended a large enclosure formed of A1 and A4 sheets, clipped-together, printed with construction drawings and photos of her projects.  Attractive in itself, the display seemed generic compared to her work, and not particularly informative.  Her singularly muscular and rigorous buildings resist easy consumption, and this did not do them justice.
 
In another corner, Grafton Architects from Ireland presented just one powerful project:  their recently-completed building for UTEC in Lima, Peru, a magnificent sequel to their brilliant building for the Università Bocconi in Milano.  A short film combined swooning drone footage of the massive structure with footage of the daily lives of a selection of occupants -- a teacher, a student, a security guard, a custodian -- including their daily commutes through the city.
 
Tucked away in the mezzanine, Aires Mateus from Portugal make a compelling case for beauty in the form of an ersatz cave, luxurious as a jewelry store display, with the space itself the treasure, revealing their enormous debt to the Basque sculptor Eduardo Chillida (an important source, in fact, for many Iberian artists and architects, those who are interested in volume more than plane).
 
A few rooms away, Raphael Zuber, a young Swiss architect whose obsessions seem to fall somewhere between Olgiatti and Shinohara, plays another variation on the theme of beauty with a series of precious, hermetic gold models.
 
After indulging in all that formal pleasure, prepare yourself.  Directly below Aires Mateus, London-based Forensic Architects, an architectural research group who work on behalf of human rights groups, present fragments of four investigations:  "from the micro-analysis of a single ruin from a drone strike in Miranshah, Pakistan, to an urban analysis of the city of Rafah in Gaza under Israeli attack; the death of refugees and migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, to the environmental violence along the shifting climatic frontiers of desertification and deforestation."
 
After this you may want to go back outside, have a coffee or a gelato, and take refuge in the architecture-for-architecture's-sake open-air pavilion Aravena commissioned from the Chilean practice Pezo von Ellrichshausen.  This is a surprisingly mature work from such a young firm.  They know exactly what their formal, material, and spatial questions are, and how to address their hankering for solidity in what, by necessity, is a temporary construction.
 
Deeply enmeshed in architectural culture, Pezo von Ellrichshausen quite rightly don't like to name names, preferring to let objects, images, and spaces speak for themselves, alluding indirectly to their antecedents.  Nonetheless, the rough dark-green walls pay explicit homage to the Venetian-red installation David Chipperfield commissioned from Alvaro Siza in 2012, located behind the Arsenale, in the midst of the garden that Kazuyo Sejima commissioned from Piet Oudolf in 2010.  (Both are still there, and must be visited.)
 
Meanwhile, in the cavernous Arsenale, a former rope factory, look in one corner for models and drawings of the TID Tower by Brussels-based firm 51N4E, presently under construction in Tirana, Albania.  Stylishly awkward, and the largest building in the previously isolated country, the project is perhaps more important for the role of socially-engaged high design in the revitalization of the city.
 
It poses an interesting set of questions with the neighboring exhibit by Wang Shu and Amateur Architecture Studio, who present an array of pallets loaded with materials salvaged from demolished traditional buildings in China.
 
Down the way, Khang Ze and ZAO/Standardarchitecture, based in Beijing, have built full-size mockups of their small insertions into traditional hutongs, an important strategy for retaining and strengthening the viability of these rapidly disappearing neighborhoods.  The modesty and careful attention to local particularities of these interventions feel much more appropriate, and believable, than the silver bubbles MAD have been dining out on of late.
 
If you don't yet know about Finnish architects Hollmén Reuter Sandman, here's your chance.  Their claim, to "focus on environmental and aesthetic sustainability", is borne out in the three exemplary projects on display:  a women's center in Senegal, a shelter house in Tanzania, and a school for the children of garbage collectors in Cairo.  It's beautiful work -- conceptually, compositionally, and tectonically precise -- yet also sensitive to local conditions.
 
Grupo EPM, architects attached to Medellin's utility companies, present a short feel-good film together with an array of 3D-printed topographical models of their multiple-award-winning Unidades de Vida Articulada.  The UVAs convert unused municipal land surrounding existing water reservoirs into public parks and cultural facilities.  Perched high on the hilltops, in some of the poorest neighborhoods, yet with stunning views across the valleys, these projects have it all.  
 
You might feel a tad uncomfortable with the luxury-poverty aesthetic purveyed by Studio Mumbai, but you have to admit they know how to take charge of a room.  Here, right next to the unassuming but astonishing infrastructural interventions of Medellin's UVAs, Studio Mumbai place three experiments in low-cost building techniques, configured like sculptures in an art gallery.  A long, stall-like structure, fashioned of bamboo, hemp, cow dung, and lime wash, reportedly gave pause to the Italian health authorities.
 
THE NATIONAL PAVILIONS are fun because you can play a game with yourself about cultural stereotypes:  To what extent do the exhibits representing these countries confirm, qualify, or defy your expectations?  For extra points:  How do they respond to, challenge, or, in some cases, completely ignore Aravena's curatorial charge?  Expert level:  Plot the responses across socio-economic and geopolitical vectors.
 
Spain is a good place to start -- they're right by the front gate of the Giardini -- and their exhibit confirms what we already sensed, that Spanish architecture has been operating at a consistently high level for some time now.  In fact, the recent economic crisis seems only to have reinforced and concentrated their greatest strength:  a readiness to conserve what is already there, and to work with the fragmentary, the contingent, and the in-between.
 
They were awarded the Golden Lion for best national pavilion.  I hope it was on the strength of the solid and admirable built work.  The rooms look great, but, while much lauded for their austerity and rigor (stereotype alert), they tell only half the story.  The drawings and photos of built projects, mounted on boards and attached to skeletal steel stud partitions, privilege the conceptual at the expense of the tactile.
 
This is an existential architecture, made of rough and smooth surfaces, lightness and weight, heat, shadows, and the smell of a sudden rain on dust.  None of which is evident in these bloodless, fleshless rooms.  And there is little on show that you can't see better online or in a magazine.  The catalogue, however, is excellent -- intelligent and beautifully produced -- and you can hold it in your hand!  
 
It's all about sense and sensibility in the adjacent Belgian pavilion, representing a design culture that flourishes in the half-light between cozy Dutch pragmatism and French splendor.  Six building fragments, quirky moments in banal structures, are reproduced full scale in the gallery, juxtaposed with large digitally-manipulated architectural photographs.  The rooms are luminous, spare, and elegant ... enough to allow them the minor affectation of texts penciled directly on the walls in a loose cursive script.
 
I want to send you to the Nordic pavilion because, no matter what's on display there, the building by Sverre Fehn is such an important reference.  This year, inexplicably, the exhibitors have made a construction that completely blocks from view the heart and soul of the space, those mysterious trees.
 
With such a strong building tradition, rigorous craftsmanship (of material and thought), good taste, and the money to indulge it, Switzerland's pavilion is almost always a sure bet for a good show.  This time, however, Christian Kerez installed in their main room a giant white cloud/rock that you could climb inside.  I think he was aiming for "sublime", but the installation wasn't big enough, or surprising enough, and it ended up at "mildly interesting".
 
If the antics of national flagbearers such as Jean Nouvel have led you to associate French architecture with frivolity and formalism, the French pavilion has a surprise or two in store.  Their exhibition puts the spotlight on "enhanced banality", featuring projects and practices that critique and engage the generic landscapes most of us inhabit daily.
 
The four rooms are thoughtfully arranged, each with a different light level, and deploy a range of media:  wall drawings, small drawings, sketch models, large wood detail models, videos.  Both polemical and practical, the twelve projects presented are formally assured, socially engaged, thoughtfully constructed, and, always, elegant.  Notably, not much of it is located in Paris.  One wonders why France did not receive the Golden Lion for best national pavilion.
 
It is possible that the curators of the German pavilion took Aravena's charge more seriously, and with greater urgency, than anyone else at the exposition.  They addressed the current refugee crisis in Europe under the banner "Germany, Arrival Country".  The rooms are a puzzle at first, basically empty, no architectural proposals in evidence, a few stacks of generic white plastic cafe chairs in the corner, large slogans and goofy graphics on the walls.  But the space seems so unexpectedly generous -- with so much light -- what's going on?
 
Then one notices doorways where they shouldn't be, especially not in a classical, symmetrical building, and the light dawns:  Yes, they've actually removed several tons of material (with the promise that they will restore it after the show) in order to double the number of exterior openings.  The new apertures have no doors or windows.  The pavilion is open 24/7.  The building itself is the exhibit -- a bold, physical expression of welcome.
 
More than a glib gesture, the intervention also resonates with the ambivalence many Germans have long felt toward this building, constructed in 1909 by the Italians, to the current Italian taste, then updated by the Germans in 1938 to reflect Third Reich aspirations.
 
The Nazi-era renovations included replacing the wood parquet floor with marble paving -- the very marble that Hans Haacke pulled up, bashed, and put back as rubble in the 1993 Art Biennale.  Haacke's action won the Golden Lion that year (not without controversy).  Before that, in 1976, Joseph Beuys installed a fragment of train tracks as part his piece, "Tram Stop:  A Monument to the Future", which he said was, "a meditation on human suffering".
 
By contrast, the concerns of the exhibit for Great Britain could not be more insular.  Ostensibly about exploring the problematics of inhabiting dense urban environments -- an important topic, particularly in a time of rapidly increasing income inequity -- one that has been taken on with much greater seriousness and depth in the pavilions of Korea and Japan.
 
In the British pavilion it becomes an excuse for a series of adventures in bespoke minimalism.  The visitor wanders through a maze of tall, navy-blue walls, outfitted with gleaming white high-end bathroom fixtures, dressing room fittings, and fluffy white bedding.   
 
The Australia pavilion promotes a vision of the Australian lifestyle, organized around the theme of the swimming pool, which they claim as the locus of community.  We want to believe.  The awkward indoor wading pool, however, surrounded by desultory deck chairs, feels like the stage set it is, and does not make the case.
 
The presenters in the United States pavilion marched to a different drummer with twelve proposals for sites in Detroit.  The exhibit is worth visiting for the hauntingly evocative project by Mack Scogin, Merrill Elam, and their team. 
 
A number of countries who came later to the biennale, and don't have their own dedicated buildings in the Giardini, have been given exhibition space in the Arsenale, behind the exhibits curated by Aravena.  You will likely be feeling very tired at this point, your head about to explode, and will be tempted to skip this part.  But you won't want to miss these three:
 
Slovenian architects Dekleva Gregoric have have filled much of their space with a large wooden bookcase-cum-nest, and asked a number of architects they admire, including Tatiana Bilbao and Pezo von Ellrichshausen, to curate books for them on the topic of home.  A pleasant spot to hang out in and pretend to snoop in a new friend's personal library.
 
Take a moment and sit for a spell in the adjacent Albania exhibit, an almost empty room, sparely strewn with stools that appear to be building rubble, lacquered pink.  Perch for a bit and listen to the soundscape:  Ten texts about migration, by artists and thinkers such as Yona Friedman and Yanis Varoufakis, translated into Albanian, and sung by folk music groups from Tirana.  The piece by Varoufakis, about a call from a pay phone to his daughter living in Australia, is particularly affecting.
 
The last national pavilion to see in the Arsenale is also contemplative, and intensely beautiful:  "Losing Myself", representing Ireland, by architects Niall McLaughlin and Yeoryia Manolopoulou.  Upon entering the space, one is confronted by a sculptural phalanx of robots -- compact white bodies, on brass legs, orange coils extending up into the rafters -- which resolve into an array of sixteen video projectors aiming down.
 
At some point, one forgets these impressive mechanical creatures, entranced by the shifting intricate carpet of floor plans and gardens, in a continual process of being drawn, erased, redrawn, overwritten...
 
The installation takes on the problem of how to design spaces for people with dementia, using as source material research done by Niall McLaughlin's own practice for the Alzheimer’s Respite Centre in Dublin.  McLaughlin's sensitive and beautiful building never appears in the installation.  Only impressions of how it is perceived by its occupants.
 
If you stay for the full 16-minute cycle, you'll hear a condensed version of the ambient sounds in the building over the course of a 24-hour period:  phone calls, chats in the rooms or at the nurses station, a thunderstorm, church bells....
 
You can find out more about the overall project at : http://www.losingmyself.ie
 
The Siza pavilion and Oudolf garden are located in public gardens adjacent to the Arsenale, the Giardini delle Vergini.  Conveniently, you'll go by them if you leave the Arsenal grounds the back way, but you can visit them anytime without a ticket.
 
On walls and the parapets of bridges near the entries and exits to the Biennale grounds, and at several other points around the city, you'll note the words ANONYMOUS STATELESS IMMIGRANTS PAVILION stenciled in large black letters, accompanied by a directional arrow.  Some faded, some refreshed, some new, these stenciled signs started showing up back in 2011, initiated by a number of artists/activists seeking to draw attention to the plight of more than 60 million displaced people around the world.
 
My vote for the best national exhibit of all, the Portuguese pavilion, is also open to the public, located off-campus from the Biennale, on the Giudecca, a short vaporetto ride away.  An added bonus:  On the Giudecca you can wander in neighborhoods far from the madding crowd and visit the canonical mid-eighties housing project by Gino Valle.
 
You'll find the exhibit behind a construction fence, in the ground level of a building shrouded in scaffolding and netting -- a rough, bare space, little more than the concrete structure, temporarily occupied by a quick-footed display of videos and a few wood models.
 
At the entry, one can read how Italian and Portuguese discourse and practice have intertwined over the past half century.  The story, "Where Alvaro meets Aldo, 1966-2016", starts with the publication of Aldo Rossi's The Architecture of the City.
 
It continues ten years later, when Vittorio Gregotti and Peter Eisenman invite Siza and Rossi to participate in a conference at the 1976 Venice Biennale -- together with luminaries such as Aldo Van Eyck, Carlo Aymonino, Denise Scott Brown, Giancarlo de Carlo, James Stirling, John Hejduk, Joseph Rykvert, Oriol Bohigas, Peter Eisenman, and Robert Venturi.
 
In the mid-eighties, Siza, Rossi, and Rafael Moneo are commissioned to design housing for the Giudecca in Venice.  Rossi's project is built, half of Siza's, and none of Moneo's.  At the beginning of this century, work resumes, only to fizzle out in the economic crisis.  This is the actual construction site of the abandoned second phase.  (The first part has been occupied for several years.)
 
The rest of the exhibit is dedicated to four of Siza's housing projects:  in Porto, Berlin, Den Hague, and this one in Venice.  The most engaging part of the exhibit is the short films documenting recent visits Siza made to the residents in each of the four projects.
 
In the building next door, in each apartment he visits, he takes a seat, accepts an obligatory coffee, lights one cigarette with the butt of the previous one, and, in fluent Italian, chats with the people living there, responding charmingly to questions about acoustic separation, windows that stick, faucets that drip....
 
One resident asks him, "why did you give this apartment two balconies instead of one bigger one?  Was it the budget?"  Siza responds, "I wish I could tell you it was the budget.  But it's really my fault.  It was for the composition of the facade; I thought it would look better this way.  But I can tell you that, if I were doing it now, you'd have a big balcony."
 
 
]]> Tia Jewell 1 1482183445 2016-12-19 21:37:25 1482183889 2016-12-19 21:44:49 0 0 news 2016-08-15T00:00:00-04:00 2016-08-15T00:00:00-04:00 2016-08-15 00:00:00 Tia Jewell

Communications & Events

School of Architecture

College of Design

Georgia Institute of Technology

tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu

]]>
585257 585257 image <![CDATA[Pezo Von Ellrichshausen at the 2016 Venice Biennale [photo by author]]]> image/jpeg 1482183610 2016-12-19 21:40:10 1482183610 2016-12-19 21:40:10
<![CDATA[Digital Building Lab Students Make Impression at Conference]]> 32550 Georgia Tech students were out in full force at the semi-annual BIMForum of the Association of General Contractors held in Atlanta recently.

BIMForum is one of the nation’s most important conferences on building information modeling (BIM) – a new development in design and construction using three-dimensional models for architecture, engineering, and construction.

Georgia Tech was the only academic program that had a formal presence at this event, according to Dennis Shelden, one of the event organizers. Students from architecture, civil engineering, and building construction joined the meetings, staffed a booth with an academic poster series, and discussed their work and papers with senior leaders of many of the top construction firms in the country.

Shelden, also director of the Digital Building Lab, said the students were received well. “The professional community was enthusiastic to have our students engaged in the event and to make the connection bridging between educational and professional work,” he said.

Two of those students talked about their experiences.

Keresh Afsari is a Ph.D. candidate in architecture focusing on design computation. She presented two posters at the booth. About six students staffed the booth, which also held work from master’s students as well as research papers from several students who work with the DBL.

One highlight of the conference for Afsari was a session on open BIM and the standardization of BIM data exchange. She called BIM standardization her "passion" and what she has been working on for the past few years.

The key, she said, is standardization and whether different industries -- architecture, construction, and engineering -- can communicate with each other.

Another student at the booth was Jeffrey Collins, a Ph.D. student in architecture and instructor in the undergraduate Media and Modeling class. He co-teaches with Shelden, who is also an associate professor in the School of Architecture.

Collins said he found it interesting to see the representation of industry, academia, professionals, and software manufacturers, and the overlap of what people are working on in all those fields.

He said it is “always beneficial to talk about the work I have done. … My poster is still in progress so it is always nice to think about it for a second, verbalize it to someone else, make sure they understand, and get some feedback.

“We want our work to be beneficial to all of those four categories.”

Overall, Afsari and Collins both felt student attendance at the event was successful.

Afsari said lots of people visited the booth, and she was excited to see people interested in their work.

Collins said there was a “constant flow of people.”

Both said they made connections with industry representatives and exchanged business cards with people who might want to collaborate with the DBL.

According to Shelden, “Many new professional organizations were introduced to the DBL and expressed interest in participating with the activities of the DBL and Georgia Tech. We are in discussions with several of them regarding participation at Georgia Tech as DBL members, research sponsors, co-op student supporters, and educational mentors.”

The event was organized by the Digital Building Lab. Professor Chuck Eastman and Associate Professors Dennis Shelden and Russell Gentry gave a plenary presentation on “BIM 2.0: Data Coordination and Exchange in a Connected World.” Shelden and Gentry worked with the students to organize the event.

]]> Malrey Head 1 1479747711 2016-11-21 17:01:51 1480623844 2016-12-01 20:24:04 0 0 news Students from the Digital Building Lab presented their work at a booth during the BIMForum in Atlanta.

]]>
2016-11-21T00:00:00-05:00 2016-11-21T00:00:00-05:00 2016-11-21 00:00:00 Malrey Head
malrey.head@design.gatech.edu

]]>
584098 584098 image <![CDATA[Students at BIMForum]]> image/jpeg 1479749677 2016-11-21 17:34:37 1480348402 2016-11-28 15:53:22
<![CDATA[Two Design Students Share Their Stories for International Education Week]]> 32550 Two College of Design students are featured in a project this month for International Education Week, a national celebration of the benefits of international exchange.

Tammy VuPham, a first-year student in the School of Industrial Design, and her former roommate at the International House shared their story of rooming together for a year.

Zorana Matic, a Ph.D. student in the School of Architecture and graduate research assistant at the SimTigrate Design Lab , talked with Georgia Tech first lady Val Peterson about deciding to come to Georgia Tech and the United States.

In early September Georgia Tech’s Office of International Education partnered with StoryCorps Atlanta and WREK to record interviews between members of the Tech community. Interviewees included undergraduate and graduate students, professors, administrators, spouses of students, and the first lady of Georgia Tech.

Their stories highlight some of the amazing global experiences and diversity of our community. Listen to them all here.
 

]]> Malrey Head 1 1479740106 2016-11-21 14:55:06 1479749024 2016-11-21 17:23:44 0 0 news Two College of Design students are featured in a project through the Office of International Education with StoryCorps Atlanta.

]]>
2016-11-21T00:00:00-05:00 2016-11-21T00:00:00-05:00 2016-11-21 00:00:00 Malrey Head
malrey.head@design.gatech.edu

]]>
584070 584071 584070 image <![CDATA[Tammy VuPham]]> image/jpeg 1479741789 2016-11-21 15:23:09 1479742009 2016-11-21 15:26:49 584071 image <![CDATA[Zorana Matic]]> image/jpeg 1479741917 2016-11-21 15:25:17 1479741996 2016-11-21 15:26:36
<![CDATA[School of Architecture Announces The Connell Workshop]]> 28816 Lane M. Duncan, AIA Senior Lecturer

“Drawing, properly taught, is the best way of developing intelligence and forming judgment, for one learns to see and seeing is knowledge,” this advice by Eugène Viollet-le-Duc,the iconic 19th century French architect and theorist, is a timeless reminder that the ability to visually explore conceptual thought is fundamental to the study of architecture. These drawings require not only a skilled representation of the external world, but also an ability to translate complex internal, and often competing, ideas onto paper.  

The new Connell Workshop explores a wide range of these issues in hand drawing - tone, line, contour, gesture, composition, iterative geometry, and the humanistic forces that shape them. The School of Architecture is amongst the leading U.S. institutions in this way of critical thinking.  Whether it was charcoal on the walls of pre-historic cave paintings, graphite and ink on vellum through the 20th century, or electronic technology of the 21st century, these media are the basic tools by which we come to understand architectural design. In addition to the issues explored, no small benefit of drawing by hand is the slow, tactile, thought process required - focused thinking.

This new workshop is made possible by a generous gift from a former Georgia Tech professor and alumnus, Arnall T. “Pat” Connell.  Professor Connell came to Georgia Tech in the late 60’s from Ohio State University, Columbia University and the University of Virginia. In the early 70’s Pat became a pioneering champion of historic preservation in the Atlanta area. He organized a small group of forward thinking politicians, civic leaders and celebrities to found the “Save the Fox” movement, resulting in Atlanta’s beloved Fox Theatre being saved from the wrecking ball.  He and his late wife Martha, co-founded the Great American Gallery, Atlanta’s unique contribution to contemporary crafts and fine arts objects. Many of the works that they curated now reside in leading museums and private collections around the U.S.

Pat’s great legacy at Georgia Tech is his unwavering belief in the value of personal, hand crafted expression in the act of drawing. His support has allowed Lane Duncan to carry on critical investigations in both perception and conception - the way we see the world and the way we attempt to order the world. This work includes life drawing, examination of the work of Renaissance artists such as Raphael and Michelangelo, studies in Euclidean, projective, and Islamic metaphorical geometries and “idea capture” design sketching.    

Mr. Duncan describes Professor Connell as, “A true scholar who believes that hand drawing is a vital ‘technology’ to seeing and understanding the world around us and that it is an essential tool for the architect no matter what generation.”

Drawing requires that all the sensory apparatus of the body participate in the process of creating an image of the observed or imagined stimulus. Unlike the camera, which records only a split-second view of the object, the act of drawing is not time-dependent. The act of image-making informs and instructs the brain to keep looking for all the messages being sent. The image-maker always decides when to make changes and when the work is ‘finished.’ The Gestalt is there for the taking by anyone. – Pat Connell, 2016

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1477503773 2016-10-26 17:42:53 1478550658 2016-11-07 20:30:58 0 0 news 2016-11-07T00:00:00-05:00 2016-11-07T00:00:00-05:00 2016-11-07 00:00:00 For more information on The Connell Workshop, contact Lane Duncan, AIA Senior Lecturer at lane.duncan@design.gatech.edu

]]>
Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu 

]]>
583167 583168 583170 583167 image <![CDATA[The Connell Workshop 2016]]> image/jpeg 1477504451 2016-10-26 17:54:11 1477504900 2016-10-26 18:01:40 583168 image <![CDATA[Lane Duncan & Pat Connell 2016]]> image/jpeg 1477504683 2016-10-26 17:58:03 1477504683 2016-10-26 17:58:03 583170 image <![CDATA[The Connell Workshop 2016 - Pic 2]]> image/jpeg 1477505320 2016-10-26 18:08:40 1477505320 2016-10-26 18:08:40
<![CDATA[School of Architecture Students Win the 2016 Barbara G. Laurie NOMA Student Design Competition]]> 28816 Students from the Georgia Tech School of Architecture chapter of the National Organization of Minority Architecture Students (NOMAS) took first place in this year’s Barbara G. Laurie NOMA Student Design Competition held in conjunction with the National Organization of Minority Architect’s (NOMA) annual conference in Los Angeles, California, October 12 – 15, 2016.

The Barbara G. Laurie NOMA Student Design Competition provides architecture students as well as students from related design disciplines with an opportunity to showcase their talents to design industry professionals from across the nation. This year, the competition challenged student teams to design the African American Cultural Museum and Community Center along Leimert Park Boulevard in the Leimert Park to support the already vibrant culture in the area (2016 Student Design Competition Brief). 

The Georgia Tech team included Bachelor of Science in Architecture student Skylar Royal, and Master of Architecture students James Waldon (President of GT NOMAS), Abaan Ali, Ricardo Baez, Jhordan Channer, Alexandria Davis, Lubi Dimitrova, Akeema Edwards, Jessyca Reese, Lauren Wells, Ming Yu and Joylyn Stroud (Civil Engineering). Faculty advisors Professor John Peponis, Professor Herman Howard, and part-time faculty Jihan Sherman mentored the team. 

Master of Architecture student Ali Abaan said, "The success of the design process was based on how we cohesively combined each persons interpretation of what the project should be. Its our individual statement piece formed into one design. As a result, the collaborative insertions of every single team member is imprinted in the final product."

Teams were encouraged to not only provide an identity for the struggling community, but integrate sustainability (energy and water efficient, day lighting, etc), design landscaping/site elements, activate the streetscape along Degnan Boulevard, as well as defend the financial feasibility of the design. Correlated diagrams, plans, sections, 3D perspectives, and details were used to effectively convey concepts and design intent.

“It was exciting to work with such a diverse group of students,” stated James Waldon, President of GT NOMAS, “not just on our skill level, but also within our own cultural backgrounds. Using these differences to our advantage, we were able to merge our ideas and backgrounds into an excellent design. The experience was great practice for professional development while celebrating minority contributions in architecture.” 

http://www.noma.net/

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1476998387 2016-10-20 21:19:47 1477504023 2016-10-26 17:47:03 0 0 news 2016-10-25T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-25T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-25 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu

]]>
583075 582896 582897 583075 image <![CDATA[GT NOMAS Wins the 2016 Barbara G. Laurie Annual Student Design Competition]]> image/jpeg 1477413725 2016-10-25 16:42:05 1477413735 2016-10-25 16:42:15 582896 image <![CDATA[NOMA Georgia Tech - 2016 Competition Pic 1]]> image/jpeg 1476998811 2016-10-20 21:26:51 1476998870 2016-10-20 21:27:50 582897 image <![CDATA[NOMA Georgia Tech - 2016 Competition Pic 2]]> image/jpeg 1476998902 2016-10-20 21:28:22 1476998918 2016-10-20 21:28:38
<![CDATA[Architecture Professor at Georgia Tech to Receive the 2016 Society Award of Excellence by ACADIA]]> 28816 Architecture Professor at Georgia Tech to Receive the 2016 Society Award of Excellence presented by ACADIA at the University of Michigan on October 28

Georgia Institute of Technology architecture professor Charles Eastman is scheduled to receive the 2016 Society Award of Excellence presented by the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) at the University of Michigan Taubman College in Ann Arbor, Michigan on Friday, October 28, 2016.

“This award honors Professor Eastman’s seminal role in founding and leading ACADIA in its earliest years, his pioneering work in the area of Building Information Modeling, Parametric Design, Collaborative Design, Visualization and Fabrication, and many other achievements. His influence in the field of digital design is second to none.” - ACADIA

Eastman is a pioneer of AEC CAD, developing research 3D and early solid and parametric modeling systems for the building industry starting in the middle 1970s. Trained as an architect at Berkeley, he focused on tool development for practitioners with the 'Building Description System' and 'Building Product Modeling', later re-branded as Building Information Modeling. He started the PhD program in Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University and founded ACADIA. He did a parametric modeling start-up (called FORMTEK) in the early 1980s and then joined University of California, Los Angeles, where he was for eight years before beginning his career at Georgia Tech in 1996 as a professor, and founder of the Digital Building Laboratory.

His research group at Georgia Tech addresses interoperability issues and platform level functionality. This includes precast concrete, steel fabrication, reinforced concrete workflow analyses, implementation of exchange models (Venugopal et al. 2012), and developing integration environments using CIS/2 and IFC.

http://www.arch.gatech.edu/charles-eastman

http://2016.acadia.org/awards.html 

]]> Tia Jewell 1 1477340989 2016-10-24 20:29:49 1477503798 2016-10-26 17:43:18 0 0 news Professor Charles Eastman is scheduled to receive the Society Award of Excellence presented by the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) at the University of Michigan Taubman College in Ann Arbor, MI on Friday, October 28, 2016

]]>
2016-10-24T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-24T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-24 00:00:00 Tia Jewell
Communications & Events
School of Architecture
College of Design
Georgia Institute of Technology
tia.jewell@design.gatech.edu

 

]]>
557681 557681 image <![CDATA[Chuck Eastman 2016]]> image/jpeg 1470084718 2016-08-01 20:51:58 1475895358 2016-10-08 02:55:58
<![CDATA[Nancey Green Leigh Receives Grant to Study the U.S. Robotics Industry and Economic Impacts]]> 32550 College of Design Associate Dean for Research Nancey Green Leigh is the principal investigator of a new $784,887 grant from the National Science Foundation National Robotics Initiative to study the U.S. robotics industry and the economic impacts of robotics technology.

Leigh, also a professor in the School of City and Regional Planning, is co-PI with Henrik Christensen, former director of Georgia Tech’s Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines. He is now director of the Contextual Robotics Institute at the University of California, San Diego.

The two-year grant will enable researchers to generate data and conduct analyses about the U.S. robotics industry and the economic impacts of robotics technology. The work will advance the understanding of the relationship between 21st-century technology and work, meeting a need to assess robots as more than just advanced manufacturing technology.

According to Leigh, much of existing discussion on robots and industry has been speculative. The data that does exist ends at 2007.

The project will have several components, but the researchers will start by surveying the manufacturing industry about its robot use and employment patterns, followed by a survey of systems integrators. They also will perform case studies with representatives from all stages of the robotic supply chain.

In the end, this research is expected to inform policymakers, workers, and corporate leaders as they make decisions in anticipation of the use of robots throughout the economy. Employment structures, the changing nature of work, among other factors will be some day be impacted, the grant proposal states.

 

]]> Malrey Head 1 1476722621 2016-10-17 16:43:41 1477072330 2016-10-21 17:52:10 0 0 news 2016-10-17T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-17T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-17 00:00:00 Malrey Head
malrey.head@design.gatech.edu

]]>
59790 59790 image <![CDATA[Nancey Green Leigh]]> image/jpeg 1449176227 2015-12-03 20:57:07 1475894398 2016-10-08 02:39:58
<![CDATA[AMAC and CATEA Research Centers Celebrate Milestones]]> 32550 Decades of accessibility research culminates in major milestones this week for two research centers in the College of Design. And you’re invited to the celebration!

AMAC Accessibility Solutions and Research Center this year marks 10 years of providing products and services to those with disabilities.

Also this year, the Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access (CATEA) moved from its location in a church on 10th Street to join AMAC in the same building on Means Street.

Being in the same building led the two Centers this year to create the Centers for Inclusive Design Innovation, which has already received funding for a project.

The Centers want to mark these milestones at an open house Thursday at their offices at 512 Means St., from 4-7 p.m.

Visitors will have the opportunity to tour their space, see demonstrations, such as AMAC’s braille machines used for tactile printing, and their student disability accommodation software.

CATEA will show various posters and demonstrations from current and past research projects. That includes the posters submitted to the TechSAge Design Competition for the GatePal app featured on the College of Design, and the TechSAge ALIGN app, which was mentioned in Atlanta Magazine and nominated for a Groundbreaker Award.

Transforming Accessibility in the College of Design

Although the approaches of the two Centers are different, they both use technology to assist people with disabilities and those aging with limitations.

Focused on helping students with disabilities, AMAC first offered services in 2006 at the University of Georgia. The Center moved to the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2010. Center Director Christopher Lee, along with Noel Gregg and other colleagues at UGA, were the inspiration behind AMAC. Gregg worked with AMAC for a few years and has since retired.

Today AMAC has more than 50 staff members who serve 800 member institutions and hundreds more who use their services on an as-needed basis. Not bad for a Center that started with 14 members serving 100 universities.

During the past 10 years, AMAC faced challenges, “including reducing the high cost of accommodations … and integrating a business model that would leverage existing business partners,” Lee said in a statement.

AMAC overcame these challenges and Lee transformed the Center into “an international research and development organization focused on inclusive design in corporate offices, government organizations and nonprofit environments,” he said.

One of AMAC’s biggest grants is the First in The World Grant from the U.S. Department of Education which funds the research of the Center for Accessible Materials Innovation (CAMI). The multi-million-dollar grant will help the center study the graduation gap between students with disabilities and their peers without.

CATEA started as the Center for Rehabilitation Technology (CRT) in 1980, and became the Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access in 1999.

CATEA’s focus today is on resources to help employers make accommodations decisions, promote accessible STEM education, and resources to promote health and wellness among seniors while also serving their accessibility needs.

In the past dozen years, CATEA had three national Rehabilitation Engineering Research Centers funded by the federal government’s National Institute on Independent Living, Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR).

These are the largest ($4.5-$4.75 million over 5 years) and most prestigious awards made by NIDILRR, and funded CATEA projects: “Workplace Accommodations” (2003-2013), “Wheeled Mobility” (2004-2016), and currently “TechSAge” (2013-2018). Current funding also includes a $2.5 million, 5-year study to demonstrate that universal design is a more effective strategy than ADA-required workplace accommodations to engage workers with disabilities.

According to CATEA Director Jon Sanford, by dollar amount, AMAC and CATEA account for about 70 percent of the outside funding in the College, with CATEA as the second largest research center in the College of Design.

Building Georgia Tech’s Accessibility Legacy

The move to create the Centers for Inclusive Design Innovation (CIDI), gives AMAC and CATEA, the two largest centers in the College, the opportunity to collaborate on a larger level, Sanford said.

“CATEA has expertise in research, particularly related to technology and the environment. AMAC has expertise in training and service provision, particularly related to information technology and assistive technology. These complementary programs can strengthen each other,” he noted.

“For example, the new Assistive Software Knowledgebase project was actually awarded to CIDI, and will use the expertise of both CATEA and AMAC.

“CIDI provides an umbrella to show one face to the outside world without losing the identities and name recognition of either center,” Sanford said.

]]> Malrey Head 1 1476203710 2016-10-11 16:35:10 1476812507 2016-10-18 17:41:47 0 0 news 2016-10-11T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-11T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-11 00:00:00 582403 582403 image <![CDATA[AMAC and CATEA Research Centers Celebrate Milestones]]> image/jpeg 1476212645 2016-10-11 19:04:05 1476812892 2016-10-18 17:48:12
<![CDATA[School of Architecture presents papers at presented papers at the 33rd Annual eCAADe Conference in Vienna, Austria]]> 27803 Three School of Architecture professors (Thanos Economou, Daniel Baerlecken and Russell Gentry) and two Georgia Tech students (Heather Ligler and James Park) presented papers at the 33rd Annual eCAADe Conference in Vienna, Austria.

Dr. Economou gave the keynote address on the second day of the conference, titled “Fundamentals Reconsidered: Facts, Fictions, Fabrications”.

A number of GT expats also attended the conference including Myrsini Mamoli (PhD Architecture, 2014, now Assistant Professor at LSU), Tomas Grasl (Fulbright Scholar,2006, founding partner at SWAP Architects, Vienna), and Christian Lange (Visiting Assistant Professor, 2007, now Assistant Professor at Hong Kong University).

]]> Ann Hoevel 1 1443472817 2015-09-28 20:40:17 1475896780 2016-10-08 03:19:40 0 0 news Three Georgia Tech professors (Thanos Economou, Daniel Baerlecken and Russell Gentry) and two Georgia Tech students (Heather Ligler and James Park) presented papers at the 33rd Annual eCAADe Conference in Vienna, Austria.

]]>
2015-09-28T00:00:00-04:00 2015-09-28T00:00:00-04:00 2015-09-28 00:00:00 453191 453191 image <![CDATA[eCAADe Conference]]> image/jpeg 1449256297 2015-12-04 19:11:37 1475895197 2016-10-08 02:53:17
<![CDATA[SoA Associate Professor Awarded Teaching Effectiveness Award]]> 27824 Shaunitra Wisdom 1 1418899094 2014-12-18 10:38:14 1475896666 2016-10-08 03:17:46 0 0 news Please join us in congratulating School of Architecture Associate Professor Michael Gamble, recipient of CETL’s 2015 “Course Survey Teaching Effectiveness Award,” created to recognize excellence in teaching at Georgia Tech.

 

Based on his response rates and scores on the Course-Instructor Opinion Survey (CIOS), Michael will receive a one-time pre-tax award of $1000. In addition, he will be recognized and acknowledged in the program for Celebrating Teaching Day, taking place March 26, 2015

 

Congratulations Michael, and thank you for all your hard work!

]]>
2014-12-18T00:00:00-05:00 2014-12-18T00:00:00-05:00 2014-12-18 00:00:00 163111 163111 image <![CDATA[Michael Gamble 2015/16]]> image/jpeg 1449178908 2015-12-03 21:41:48 1475894799 2016-10-08 02:46:39
<![CDATA[Learn more about our top 20 ranked architecture program]]> 27814 Learn more about our top 20 ranked architecture program, http://bit.ly/1uiVddd

]]> Lisa Herrmann 1 1415708651 2014-11-11 12:24:11 1475896650 2016-10-08 03:17:30 0 0 news 2014-11-11T00:00:00-05:00 2014-11-11T00:00:00-05:00 2014-11-11 00:00:00 Lisa

]]>
344361 344361 image <![CDATA[arch video cover]]> image/jpeg 1449245654 2015-12-04 16:14:14 1475895068 2016-10-08 02:51:08
<![CDATA[School of Architecture students travel to South Africa for summer building project]]> 27814 In July, the School of Architecture will be sending a group of 15 undergraduate and graduate architecture students to Cape Town, South Africa, to support the construction of the Guga Children’s Theater, a part of the Guga S’Thebe Cultural Center. The goal of the trip is two-fold – to enhance architecture education through hands-on design-build experience and to teach the importance of sustainability and global social responsibility. The students will implement the designs they developed during their 2013 and 2014 spring architecture design studios in collaboration with the local community and practitioners, skilled craftsmen, and architecture students from three partner universities – Peter Behrens School of Architecture (PBSA) Düsseldorf, RWTH Aachen University, and the University of Cape Town.

Located in the Langa Township outside of Cape Town, the project provides a place for local children and adolescents to discover the power of the arts through dance, music, and performance. With over 300,000 visitors annually, the Guga S’Thebe gladly welcomes this new 6,500 square foot facility to support their mission to teach and transform local youth and adolescents through the cultural arts. The project includes a multi-functional room for dance and music, areas for rehearsals, balconies, recording studio, a combination of small individual rooms for learning in small groups, a large multi-functional room, exterior stage, and a soup kitchen. The architecture promotes an awareness of sustainable solutions to low cost building construction by combining re-used or recycled post consumer industrialized waste materials with traditional earth construction methods.

The architecture students practice a sustainable handling of material, expanding their own knowledge base of material re-use and construction assembly into the community as they guide locals in learning these adapted methods of assembly. The program anticipates that students will return from this experience with a new global awareness of the power of architecture to inspire and improve the human spirit through a sustainable approach.

AIT Magazine has been instrumental in launching, and continuing to raise awareness for, the project thanks to their ongoing efforts in organizing events related to it. With completion slated for 2015, the project has already received two awards for sustainability from the STO Foundation, as well as Georgia Tech’s Dennis Award for Global Engagement.

To learn more about the project and ways to contribute, please contact Assistant Professor Daniel Baerlecken at daniel.baerlecken@coa.gatech.edu. To help de-fray the cost of construction supplies, the team has set up a fundraising page at indiegogo.com, http://bit.ly/1ubp43t, for those who would like to be a part of this project.

]]> Lisa Herrmann 1 1403170287 2014-06-19 09:31:27 1475896597 2016-10-08 03:16:37 0 0 news 2014-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2014-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2014-06-19 00:00:00 Lisa Herrmann

Director of Communications

College of Architecture

404-385-0693

]]>
305211 305211 image <![CDATA[Guga S'Thebe]]> image/jpeg 1449244637 2015-12-04 15:57:17 1475895012 2016-10-08 02:50:12
<![CDATA[Dunham-Jones' "Retrofitting Suburbia" is Published in Mandarin]]> 27824 Professor Ellen Dunham-Jones' award winning co-authored book, Retrofitting Suburbia, was published in Mandarin in June. On October 9 she gave a keynote lecture on the topic at the International Forum on Urbanism at National Cheng Kung University in Taiwan. This comprehensive guide book for urban designers, planners, architects, developers, environmentalists, and community leaders illustrates how existing suburban developments can be redesigned into more urban and more sustainable places.

]]> Shaunitra Wisdom 1 1382002074 2013-10-17 09:27:54 1475896509 2016-10-08 03:15:09 0 0 news 2009 Architecture & Urban Planning PROSE Award winner is re-published in Mandarin

]]>
2013-10-17T00:00:00-04:00 2013-10-17T00:00:00-04:00 2013-10-17 00:00:00 246621 246621 image <![CDATA[RetroFitting Suburbia]]> image/jpeg 1449243758 2015-12-04 15:42:38 1475894924 2016-10-08 02:48:44
<![CDATA[SKIN, an installation by Assistant Professor Gernot Riether with Damien Valero, Jerôme Cognet, and Jérôme Pougnant is part of Traverse Vidéo 2012 in Toulouse, France]]> 27616 The aim of the installation was to incorporate the human body with art and architecture into a hybrid space. A volume was defined by 320 different variations of a single cell that were networked into one continuous self-supporting surface. Video and sound was used to create an anatomic volume that morphs from microscopic (under the skin) to the macroscopic. The spectator moving through the space becomes the actor by involving his or her body with the object.


The installation by Damien Valero, Jerôme Cognet, Gernot Riether and Jérôme Pougnant will be on display at the Centre Culturel Bellegarde till March 24, 2012

Project Team:
Crimson Changsup Lee, Sabri Gökmen

The project was fabricated at the DFL, Digital Fabrication Laboratory at Georgia Tech.

Special thanks to Andres Cavieres.

]]> Anne McCarthy 1 1331820613 2012-03-15 14:10:13 1475896312 2016-10-08 03:11:52 0 0 news 2012-03-15T00:00:00-04:00 2012-03-15T00:00:00-04:00 2012-03-15 00:00:00 117041 117041 image <![CDATA[Skin_Gernot]]> image/jpeg 1449178241 2015-12-03 21:30:41 1475894736 2016-10-08 02:45:36 <![CDATA[Link to Centre Culturel Bellegarde]]> <![CDATA[Link to Ladepeche]]>
<![CDATA[Andreotti's SpielRaum: Benjamin et l'architecture Now Available]]> 27213 Architecture Professor Libero Andreotti recently released SpielRaum: Benjamin et l'architecture (Paris, Editions La Villette 2011), now available in bookstores and online.

The book focuses on Walter Benjamin's contribution to architectural thinking through four groups of essays addressing, respectively, nineteenth century interiors and the notion of dreamspace; twentieth century collective dreamworlds and the relationship between architecture, cinema, and the popular press; Benjamin`s writings on architecture in relation to art history, architectural theory, and philosophy; and Benjamin's relevance to architecture today.

The lavishly illustrated book includes contributions by Georges Teyssot, Martin Bressani, Marc Gringon, and Jean Luis Deotte, Lutz Robbers, Esther Leslie, Esthelle Thibault, Veronique Fabbri, Ken Knoespel, Betrand Lemoine, and Frances Hsu, Philippe Duboy, Antoine Picon, Mario Carpo, Nadir Lahiji, and Diane Morgan, including an extended preface by Andreotti, and an introductory essay by the noted philosopher Jean Paul Dollé.


INTRODUCTION
Seventy years after his death, Walter Benjamin’s popularity shows no sign of abating. A veritable torrent of books, conferences, exhibitions, films, commemorations attest to his rising status as XXth century’s most influential European cultural critic. Almost every area of the humanities, from history to philosophy, film and media studies, literary criticism, politics, and art, has felt the impact of Benjamin’s work. Within this farflung zone of influence, architecture occupies a special place, as the subject of what some consider to be Benjamin’s most important project, the Passagen-Werk, and the source of seminal reflections on the metropolitan experience, wish images, tactility, the aesthetics of shock, and the aestheticisation of politics -- to mention only some notions familiar to architectural scholars. For more than a generation now, Benjamin’s ideas have spread through architectural studies, opening up many new areas of research; yet despite its impact, Benjamin’s thinking on architecture has rarely been made the object of focussed or systematic study. As a result, the precise nature of his influence, the import of his ideas, and the questions of interpretation they pose for architectural scholars today remain largely unexamined.

One reason for this neglect is practical : Benjamin’s reflections on architecture are scattered across of large body of writing, often buried in discussions of apparently remote subjects. Furthermore, as any reader can attest, his writings do not lend themselves to easy summary, tending rather to generate different and at times even strongly divergent interpretations (depending on whether one wishes to emphasize, for instance, Benjamin’s role as a Marxist historian, or Frankfurt school philosopher, or Jewish mystic). To this, one must add the hagiographic approach of many of his devotees, which -- ironically for someone who welcomed the decline of aura -- does not generally encourage open and rational debate. This book is one effort to rescue Benjamin from the fate that so often befalls ‘difficult’ writers : to be often quoted but rarely read. Its goal is to consider critically Benjamin’s thinking from a point of view that is already in some part shaped by his work, to assess its effect on the history, theory, and practice of architecture, and consider its relevance today.

Spielraum : Benjamin and Architecture originated with a symposium organized in Paris in late 2007 under the title Architecture and the Technological Unconscious. Sponsored jointly by the College of Architecture of the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Ecole Nationale Superieure d’Architecture de Paris La Villette, the conference brought together scholars from a variety of countries and disciplines to consider Benjamin’s writings from a historical, philosophical, and theoretical perspective. One of the goals of the meeting was to revisit notions that have played such an important role in recent years : among them the decline of aura, mechanical reproducibility, and the esthetics of shock. At the same time, as indicated in the conference’s title, the aim was to consider these issues from the standpoint of Benjamin’s larger concern for the new forms of experience generated through architecture and technology – particularly the new perceptual realms opened up by the press, photography, radio, cinema, up to and including the recent revolution brought on by digital media.

This volume presents, in a slightly different order that nevertheless respects the main sequence of themes, papers delivered at this event, including some commissioned after. The contributors make no claim to address all the questions Benjamin’s work raises for scholars, practitioners, and educators in the architectural field. Their goal is rather to open up Benjamin’s thinking to rigorous reflection, analysis and criticism, to highlight the centrality of architecture in his thought and to evaluate its influence on a field that has been profoundly shaped by his work. As Jean Paul Dollé makes clear in his foreword, Benjamin’s thinking is structured around a whole series of antinomies that remain, today, less than ever resolved. Central among them is the question of the ownership and control of the great power unleashed by technology, of the alienations it inflicts on the human sensorium, as well as the new possibilities it opens for expanded and more democratic forms of participation. Today, after more than half a century of accelerated change that has increased immeasurably technology’s power to control human hearts and minds, the same questions – reformulated in terms appropriate to the present – are as urgent as ever. At a time when, as Hal Foster notes in his afterword, architecture’s relentless integration into an increasingly global and centralized economy has resulted in the new market-driven phenomena of branding and celebrity architecture, Benjamin’s reflections are one necessary starting point for any theory of architecture that aspires to a degree of social and political relevance.

]]> Teri Nagel 1 1327413298 2012-01-24 13:54:58 1475896257 2016-10-08 03:10:57 0 0 news Lavishly illustrated book focuses on Walter Benjamin's contribution to architectural thinking.

]]>
2012-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2012-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2012-01-24 00:00:00 85911 85911 image <![CDATA[Spielraum : W. Benjamin et l’architecture]]> image/jpeg 1449178110 2015-12-03 21:28:30 1475894706 2016-10-08 02:45:06
<![CDATA[PhD Student Named Grand Valley Young Architect of the Year]]> 27213 Lorissa MacAllister, AIA, NCARB, LEED, a PhD student in the School of Architecture, was recently awarded young architect of the year in Grand Valley Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. She also has been nominated to Young Architect of the Year for the State of Michigan.

]]> Teri Nagel 1 1321878815 2011-11-21 12:33:35 1475896242 2016-10-08 03:10:42 0 0 news Lorissa MacAllister is a doctoral candidate in the School of Architecture.

]]>
2011-11-21T00:00:00-05:00 2011-11-21T00:00:00-05:00 2011-11-21 00:00:00 Georgia Tech School of Architecture, 404-894-4885

]]>
72899 72899 image <![CDATA[Lorissa MacAllister]]> image/jpeg 1449177962 2015-12-03 21:26:02 1475894665 2016-10-08 02:44:25
<![CDATA[Brandon Clifford Wins the 2011 SOM Prize and a $50,000 Fellowship]]> 15436 CHICAGO, IL – The Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) Foundation has announced this week that Brandon Clifford, who received his Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2006, and completed his Master of Architecture degree at Princeton University in May 2011, has been selected as the Recipient of the prestigious 2011 SOM Prize, a $50,000 Research and Travel Fellowship. 

In the interval between graduation from Georgia Tech and the commencement of his graduate studies at  Princeton,  Brandon’s professional experiences  have included guest lectureships and participation on Juries at US schools of architecture; designer of Installations and participant in design Exhibits in the U.S., Europe, and Asia; as well as a writer of frequently published articles in design journals and professional publications. In continuing an interest in translating past methods of making into a contemporary digital process. 

Brandon plans to utilize his Research Fellowship to travel to countries on four (4) continents to carry out his research on the topic, “Volume:  Researching Past Methods of Stereotomy.”  As Brandon explained, “We have lost the ability to work with Volume.  So much of the discussion surrounding digital design has focused on the surface… This research is intended to mine the lost knowledge of stereotomy  (the art of cutting solids, most typically stone) as a way to inform our contemporary methods of making with the dimension of volume.”

Commencing in September 2011, Brandon will hold the position of LeFevre Emerging Practitioner Fellow at The Ohio State University, where he will teach and carry out research on the broader topic of stereotomy in the digital era, with the intent to leverage the knowledge gained through his SOM Foundation Fellowship travel and research to augment the research he will undertake at OSU.

The SOM Prize is awarded annually through a national competition.  In July 2011, the SOM Foundation received 105 portfolio submissions from students at 45 US schools having accredited programs in architecture, design and urban design.  The submissions were judged on the quality of the design portfolios, research proposals and travel itineraries.

The mission of the SOM Foundation Travelling Fellowship Program is to assist young architects, designers and engineers in expanding their professional education through the observations of culture, history, building and design that can only be achieved through travel.  Prior Fellows have travelled to Asia, North Africa, and South America, as well as Europe and the United States.

The programs of the SOM Foundation are funded through an endowment established by the partners of the architectural firm, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM).  The Foundation’s activities are wholly separate from those of the firm.

In this 30th year of Foundation Awards, the Fellowships continue to offer recent graduates the rare opportunity to travel in connection with carrying out in-depth research, collaborate with other professionals and pursue independent study outside the realm of established patterns.  

To date, the Foundation has awarded more than $1,000,000 to architecture, design and engineering students who have gone on to distinguish themselves in professional and academic careers.

 

 

]]> Automator 1 1314351865 2011-08-26 09:44:25 1475896199 2016-10-08 03:09:59 0 0 news CHICAGO, IL – The Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) Foundation has announced this week that Brandon Clifford, who received his Bachelor of Science in Architecture degree from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2006, has been selected as the Recipient of the prestigious 2011 SOM Prize, a $50,000 Research and Travel Fellowship. 

]]>
2011-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2011-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2011-08-26 00:00:00 Casey Hall, Administrative Manager II
School of Architecture, Ga Tech
(404) 894-1095
casey.hall@coa.gatech.edu

]]>
64544 64544 image <![CDATA[photo of Tech Tower]]> image/jpeg 1449176753 2015-12-03 21:05:53 1475894567 2016-10-08 02:42:47