<![CDATA[Office of Hispanic Initiatives Celebrates 2021 Hispanic Heritage Month]]> 34932 Hispanic Heritage Month takes place annually Sept. 15 through Oct. 15 across the nation as a time to recognize and celebrate the various contributions, cultures, and extensive histories of the American Hispanic and Latinx communities. “Hispanic Heritage Week” was first observed in 1968 under President Lyndon Johnson, but was extended to a monthlong period under President Ronald Reagan in 1988.

The period was chosen for its significance to Hispanic/Latinx communities: Sept. 15 is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Mexico and Chile celebrate independence days on Sept. 16 and 18, respectively. Día de la Raza (Day of the Race) is also recognized in the U.S. and in some Latin American countries on Oct. 12 as the anniversary of Christopher Columbus’ arrival in what would become known as North, Central, and South America. The day also centers around honoring the native people, traditions, and cultures of the Americas.

The Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion's Office of Hispanic Initiatives (OHI) will sponsor and co-sponsor a host of virtual and in-person events open to faculty, staff, and students in celebration of 2021 Hispanic Heritage Month, which carries the national theme "Esperanza: A Celebration of Hispanic Heritage and Hope."

“The overall number of Hispanic/Latinx students at Georgia Tech continues to grow and Hispanics/Latinxs are now the largest ethnic minority in the U.S.,” Jorge Breton, director of OHI said. “Hispanic Heritage Month is a great opportunity to celebrate and recognize the economic, scientific, cultural, and social contributions of these communities, especially as the Institute – and society at large – makes efforts to be more diverse, equitable, and inclusive.”

Diley Hernández, associate vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion added, “Hispanic Heritage Month is always a special time of reflection for the Hispanic/Latinx community. This is a time for coming together, gathering strength in our values, our cultural practices, and through our common stories. It is especially during difficult times like these that the deep sense of community that is so prevalent in our cultures becomes a centerpiece of our resiliency and fuels our hope. Tenemos esperanza en un mejor futuro pues sabemos que estamos juntos en esta lucha por un mundo más justo para todos.” [“We are hopeful for a better future because we know we are together in this fight toward a most just world for all.”]

Some of the 2021 Hispanic Heritage Month events include:

Latinos/Hispanics in STEM: A Career Path Series Featuring Dr. Nicole Mendoza
Tuesday, Sept. 21, 4-5 p.m.

Nicole Mendoza, senior researcher in Wind Energy Systems at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, will share her story as part of the GoSTEM Latinos/Hispanics in STEM: A Career Path Series. The seminar series shares experiences of successful professionals of Latino/Hispanic heritage working in various fields including academia, private industry, and government. (Presented by the Latino Organization of Graduate Students (LOGRAS), the GoSTEM Program, and the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.)

The Afro-Latinx Experience Panel  
Wednesday, Sept. 29, noon-1 p.m.

Afro-Latinx members of the Georgia Tech community will share personal experiences,  through compelling and inspiring conversations during the Afro-Latinx Experience Panel. Viewers will learn about the panelists’ experiences growing up in their communities as Afro-Latinos. The conversation will also focus on the Afro-Latinx perspective on racial injustice, racism and colorism, as well as proactive approaches to identify solutions. (Co-hosted by OHI, the Hispanics Or Latinos and Allies (HOLA) Employee Resource Group (ERG) and the Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) IDENTIFY@GTRI ERG.)

Keynote Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture
Wednesday, Oct. 6, 3-4:30 p.m.

As part of the Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Intercultural Lecture Series, the 2021 Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture will feature Dr. Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa, world-renown neurosurgeon and neuroscientist. (Co-sponsored by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and the GoSTEM Program.) Register here.

Mini World Cup 
Friday, Oct. 1, 1:30-5:30 p.m.

Students will display their commitment to teamwork and love for football (also known as “soccer”) by participating in friendly competition on the West Campus Roe Stamps Fields. (Hosted by the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (GT-SHPE, with support from OHI.)

For a full lineup of events, registration, and more information, visit hispanicoffice.gatech.edu/events/hispanic-heritage-month.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1632246757 2021-09-21 17:52:37 1632949169 2021-09-29 20:59:29 0 0 news Georgia Tech's Office of Hispanic Initiatives will sponsor and co-sponsor a host of virtual and in-person events open to faculty, staff, and students in celebration of 2021 Hispanic Heritage Month.

]]>
2021-09-20T00:00:00-04:00 2021-09-20T00:00:00-04:00 2021-09-20 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
650967 650967 image <![CDATA[2021 Hispanic Heritage Month Theme poster (photo credit: National Council of Hispanic Employment Program Managers)]]> image/jpeg 1632247057 2021-09-21 17:57:37 1632335223 2021-09-22 18:27:03 <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month]]>
<![CDATA[OMED Welcomes Incoming First-Year Students to 41st Challenge Program ]]> 34932 The 2021 Challenge program welcomed incoming first-year Georgia Tech students this summer, representing the 41st year OMED: Educational Services (OMED) has hosted the five-week, summer-intensive academic program. 

Participants resided on campus in Perry, Matheson, and Hopkins residence halls June 26-July 30 while preparing for college life by addressing the “7Cs:” computer science, chemistry, calculus, communication, career development, cultural competency, and community service. The students attended courses taught by Georgia Tech professors to obtain an academic head start into the Institute’s curriculum. 

More than 20 years of data reflect that students who participate in Challenge graduate from Tech at a higher rate, with superior academic performance, than their non-Challenge counterparts. 

“We are excited to host Challenge in a slightly re-opened campus environment,” OMED Assistant Director of Outreach Initiatives and Director of the Challenge program Jelani Liddell said.  

“Also, tthese student participants are excited to learn in-person again. When you think about it, they've had to learn virtually for nearly two years now," Liddell continuted. "Their 11th and 12th grade development may have been different. That's why I feel our program is even more critical at this time to give our participants a snapshot of in-person college life and help them adjust, not only academically, but socially and emotionally as well.” 
 
In addition to the academic rigor, participants made new friends during the opening weekend cookout and scavenger hunt; took part in dinners with corporate partners; performed community service activities; and battled the rapids of the Ocoee River during the annual white water rafting excursion. 

This year included a new team project assignment where students joined in small groups to design and present social equity and STEM team projects. Judges rated the projects, which were to include a video and in-person group presentation. 

The cohort of just over 100 students included nine Georgia Tech Enhancing Science, Technology, EnginEering, and Math Educational Diversity Scholars (ESTEEMED); five National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering Scholars​; and four Achieve Atlanta Scholars. 20% of eligible incoming underrepresented minority students participated in the program. 

The program capped with a closing banquet sponsored by Amazon and BP on July 29 in the Georgia Tech Hotel Ballroom. Challenge counselors (former Challenge participants who guide and support current participants throughout the program) and student participants offered reflections. Academic awards were presented by course instructors, along with scholarship awards by BP, the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, and OMED. 

The 2021 Challenge program was supported by the following corporate partners: Amazon, BP, Capital One, Eaton, John Deere, Marathon, P&G, PwC.

To learn more about the Challenge program, visit omed.gatech.edu/programs/challenge

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1628856147 2021-08-13 12:02:27 1628866990 2021-08-13 15:03:10 0 0 news OMED welcomed incoming first-year students to its 41st annual challenge program, a five-week, summer-intensive academic program.

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2021-08-06T00:00:00-04:00 2021-08-06T00:00:00-04:00 2021-08-06 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
649654 649657 649656 649655 649658 649654 image <![CDATA[The 2021 Challenge Program Cohort]]> image/jpeg 1628857332 2021-08-13 12:22:12 1628857332 2021-08-13 12:22:12 649657 image <![CDATA[A panel of instructors spoke with parents on move-in day. Challenge participants took courses taught by Georgia Tech professors.]]> image/jpeg 1628857573 2021-08-13 12:26:13 1628857573 2021-08-13 12:26:13 649656 image <![CDATA[Participants learned the "7Cs:” computer science, chemistry, calculus, communication, career development, cultural competency, and community service.]]> image/jpeg 1628857475 2021-08-13 12:24:35 1628857475 2021-08-13 12:24:35 649655 image <![CDATA[The five-week Challenge program closed with an awards banquet for participants and their guardians.]]> image/jpeg 1628857416 2021-08-13 12:23:36 1628857416 2021-08-13 12:23:36 649658 image <![CDATA[Students received certificates, rewards, prizes, and scholarships at the closing banquet.]]> image/jpeg 1628857667 2021-08-13 12:27:47 1628857667 2021-08-13 12:27:47
<![CDATA[ Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Welcomes Diley Hernández as Associate Vice President]]> 34932 Following a national search, Diley Hernández was selected as associate vice president of Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) at Georgia Tech. Hernández began her new role on July 6, reporting to Archie Ervin, vice president for IDEI and chief diversity officer.

As associate vice president of IDEI, Hernández will assist with the office’s execution of the 2030 Strategic Plan vision for diversity, equity, and inclusion and will team with campus partners to strengthen the depth and complexity of teaching and learning about diversity, equity, and inclusion. She will also work with the Institute’s six ADVANCE professors -- and other faculty members -- staff leaders, and campus units to support diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives for prospective and current students, faculty, and staff.

She will also be instrumental in overseeing facilitation of the faculty implicit bias workshops hosted by IDEI and the ADVANCE Program.

Hernández has been at Georgia Tech since 2011. She was most recently employed as a senior research scientist with Tech’s Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC) where she also served as program director of its GoSTEM Program, established with support from The Goizueta Foundation to “help pave a path toward STEM higher education for K-12 Latinx students in Georgia.” She was also an adjunct lecturer with the School of Psychology.

Hernández began her psychology studies at the University of Havana and received her B.A. in psychology from New Mexico State University. She then completed an M.A. and a Ph.D. in educational psychology at the University of Arizona. Her areas of specialization include motivation, learning and cognition, instructional methods, human development, cross-cultural studies in education, and social psychology.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1625775108 2021-07-08 20:11:48 1625789091 2021-07-09 00:04:51 0 0 news Following a national search, Diley Hernández was selected as associate vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. She began her new role on July 6.

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2021-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2021-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2021-07-07 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
648653 648653 image <![CDATA[Diley Hernández, Ph.D.]]> image/jpeg 1625775147 2021-07-08 20:12:27 1625775147 2021-07-08 20:12:27
<![CDATA[Career Alliance Aligns Recent and Soon-to-Be Graduates with Post-Graduation Success]]> 34932 The Career Alliance @ Georgia Tech is a new initiative that provides students with focused support for success in today's competitive job market. The program assists traditionally underrepresented students who disproportionately have not received sustained career preparation. It also supports those who have faced historical institutional barriers that have hindered their full preparation for career success.

The Alliance hosted an inaugural three-week Career Immersion Summer Residential Program from May 16 to June 5. Hosted by the Georgia Tech Career Center and Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Office of Minority Educational Development (OMED), the campus welcomed 24 student participants for an on-campus experience full of professional development workshops, interview and branding courses, and off-campus experiential learning opportunities such as internships, co-ops, shadowing apprenticeships, and student assistantships. Participants also received one-on-one career coaching and mentoring from corporate partners to assist them with identifying ways to align their passions with their majors and desired career paths. Part of the sponsorship for the immersion program came from an OMED grant awarded by the P&G Higher Education Grant Program.

“The ideation behind the Career Alliance and its immersion program emerged from different anchors, yet converged strategically to launch an innovative, equity-focused, student data-driven initiative,” said Sybrina Atwaters, OMED director. “It not only brought together faculty, staff, and students, but also alumni, corporate leaders, and vendors from more than eight Georgia Tech units, 16 companies, three Tech alumni affinity groups, and seven local businesses. The immersion program is a notable example of how units at Georgia Tech align to champion collaboration in serving all students equitably while meeting institutional goals.”

The Career Alliance was launched in spring 2021, inspired through Georgia Tech's participation in the Taskforce on Higher Education and Opportunity where 38 academic institutions across the nation have been collaborating to prepare the nation’s “most vulnerable college students for success and stability in the post-Covid-19 pandemic economy.” The Taskforce represents 2.5 million students at two-year and four-year public and private institutions including The University of California, Los Angeles; The University of Oregon; Virginia Tech; and Atlanta's Spelman College.

Sonia Alvarez-Robinson, executive director of Georgia Tech Strategic Consulting, serves as Georgia Tech's Taskforce representative. She, along with Atwaters and James Barricelli, executive director of the Career Center, form the Career Alliance's steering committee.

“I am the first in my family to attend college and enter into a skilled-career field,” said rising third-year student Jose Luis Miranda-Hernandez, an architecture major. “The Summer Residential Program has elevated and prepared me. I now feel confident in my abilities to communicate, network, self-advocate, and grow as a student and future professional.”

Participant Malina Hy, an industrial engineering and neuroscience major, said, “Coming into the program, I didn’t know what to expect, but I knew I needed to learn how to navigate the real world — and fast, since I'll be a fourth-year student this fall.

“This program was more than just workshops, networking, and mentorships,” Hy continued. “While we learned the hard skills of how to build a resume and prepare for interviews, we also learned how to be inclusive, curious, and resilient.”

Markyta Holton, OMED program and operations manager, added, “The foundation of the immersion program was pinned on building the mind, beliefs, and skill sets of each student individually, and connecting them to opportunities that will become the foundation of their careers. This first cohort not only developed workforce development skills, but they also created lifelong bonds with each other, their mentors, Georgia Tech alumni, and various community partners.”

The Career Immersion Summer Residential Program capped with an event at the Georgia Tech Hotel featuring reflections from participants and corporate leaders, and an awards presentation by Holton and peer-career student leaders Bijee Jackson and Vinez Lyde. The evening also included remarks by Alvarez-Robinson, Atwaters, and Tech President Ángel Cabrera.

The Career Alliance @ Georgia Tech will continue through 2023 and will measure participant progress after completion.

For more information, visit omed.gatech.edu/career-alliance-georgia-tech.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1624577977 2021-06-24 23:39:37 1624844558 2021-06-28 01:42:38 0 0 news The Career Alliance @ Georgia Tech is a new initiative that provides traditionally underrepresented students with focused support for success in today’s competitive job market. 

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2021-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2021-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2021-06-18 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
648358 648359 648361 648357 648363 648358 image <![CDATA[Career Immersion Summer Residential Program participants and staffers pose during closing program]]> image/jpeg 1624578425 2021-06-24 23:47:05 1624588519 2021-06-25 02:35:19 648359 image <![CDATA[Sonia Alvarez-Robinson addresses participants at the program's orientation]]> image/jpeg 1624579164 2021-06-24 23:59:24 1624579164 2021-06-24 23:59:24 648361 image <![CDATA[OMED Director Sybrina Atwaters addresses the crowd at the immersion program closing]]> image/jpeg 1624579234 2021-06-25 00:00:34 1624579234 2021-06-25 00:00:34 648357 image <![CDATA[Immersion program participant and mentor]]> image/jpeg 1624578326 2021-06-24 23:45:26 1624580072 2021-06-25 00:14:32 648363 image <![CDATA[OMED Program and Operations Manager Markyta Holton poses with Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera at the three-week program's closing]]> image/jpeg 1624579323 2021-06-25 00:02:03 1624579323 2021-06-25 00:02:03
<![CDATA[OMED and Campus Black Student Organizations Join to Host Juneteenth Events at Tech]]> 34932 On June 18, the Office of Minority Educational Development (OMED) and three campus Black student organizations partnered to host what are believed to be the first Juneteenth recognition events at Georgia Tech, which included a virtual discussion and afternoon celebration on Tech Green. One day prior, just days after the U.S. Senate passed a unanimous bill to establish June 19 as Juneteenth National Independence Day, President Joseph Biden Jr. signed it into law, making Juneteenth the country’s twelfth federal holiday.

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. On June 19, 1865, a Union general rode into Galveston, Texas, to announce that the Civil War had ended -- and Black slaves had been freed. Though the Emancipation Proclamation became law in January 1863, it could not be enforced in places still under Confederate control.

Juneteenth has been celebrated across Texas and other parts of the country for years. However, following nationwide protests in 2020 over police brutality and the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and other Black Americans, there has been a renewed interest in the day that celebrates freedom for the last of Black American slaves.

The virtual conversation featured a keynote and presentation entitled Juneteenth and the Black Digital by André Brock, associate professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication.

“I’ve been invited to discuss Juneteenth and its importance on the occasion of its first-ever federal holiday to mark the event,” Brock opened. “Today, using my research on Blackness and digital media, I’d like to offer a way to contextualize where we find ourselves as we begin this double-holiday weekend,” he continued, offering a nod to Father’s Day which followed the day after Juneteenth.

Brock’s scholarship includes published articles on racial representations in videogames, Blackness, and digital technoculture, as well as groundbreaking research on “Black Twitter.” He recently received a sub-grant to further interdisciplinary research into issues of race, difference, and computation.

“We should also remember it [Juneteenth] is Black folks making something out of nothing; a moment of rest to mark the dismantling of an apartheid state -- and its love for slave labor -- and we have continued to celebrate that moment, even as our ancestors endured Reconstruction, the nadir [considered a particularly brutal period in African American history, spanning the end of Reconstruction in 1877 through the early 20th century] and the piece-by-piece construction of Jim Crow laws.”

Brock's rousing presentation was followed by a question-answer session between the scholar and his virtual audience.

Later that afternoon, OMED hosted a celebration on Tech Green complete with food, games, comradery, faculty, staff, and students – including several Georgia Tech men’s basketball and football team members -– and tabling by organizations including Delta Sigma Theta and Zeta Phi Beta sororities and Omega Psi Phi and Phi Beta Sigma fraternities.

The day was supported by partnership with the African Student Association, the Georgia Tech Caribbean Student Organization, and the African American Student Union, the Institute’s oldest Black student organization.

A full recording of the virtual discussion can be viewed at https://youtu.be/p8zc4Vzg_vM.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1624569239 2021-06-24 21:13:59 1624586267 2021-06-25 01:57:47 0 0 news On June 18, the Office of Minority Educational Development and campus Black student organizations partnered to host Juneteenth events, which included a virtual discussion led by Associate Professor André Brock and an afternoon celebration on Tech Green.

]]>
2021-06-23T00:00:00-04:00 2021-06-23T00:00:00-04:00 2021-06-23 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
648348 648354 648366 648349 648353 648351 648352 648348 image <![CDATA[President Ángel Cabrera visits Delta Sigma Theta sorority's table at OMED's Juneteenth celebration on Tech Green]]> image/jpeg 1624570063 2021-06-24 21:27:43 1624572014 2021-06-24 22:00:14 648354 image <![CDATA[Associate Professor André Brock led a virtual discussion about Juneteenth and Blackness]]> image/png 1624571889 2021-06-24 21:58:09 1624571889 2021-06-24 21:58:09 648366 image <![CDATA[Student members of Delta Sigma Theta and Omega Psi Phi]]> image/jpeg 1624586199 2021-06-25 01:56:39 1624586227 2021-06-25 01:57:07 648349 image <![CDATA[Juneteenth celebration attendees embrace]]> image/jpeg 1624570340 2021-06-24 21:32:20 1624570340 2021-06-24 21:32:20 648353 image <![CDATA[The afternoon included a student performance]]> image/jpeg 1624571113 2021-06-24 21:45:13 1624571470 2021-06-24 21:51:10 648351 image <![CDATA[OMED team members pose on Tech Green]]> image/jpeg 1624570456 2021-06-24 21:34:16 1624570456 2021-06-24 21:34:16 648352 image <![CDATA[Students enjoy games at the Juneteenth celebration]]> image/jpeg 1624570864 2021-06-24 21:41:04 1624570864 2021-06-24 21:41:04
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Alumnus M. Brian Blake Named Georgia State University President]]> 34932 M. Brian Blake (EE '94), executive vice president for Academic Affairs and provost at George Washington University, has been named the eighth president of Georgia State University by the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. The Georgia Institute of Technology alumnus will become the first Black president in the university’s history.

Blake will succeed Mark Becker, who served for 12 years. As president, Becker led Georgia State to become the largest institution of higher education in the state and one of the top 10 in the nation by student enrollment. Founded in 1913, Georgia State touts a diverse majority-minority student population.

As George Washington University provost, Blake oversaw the academic mission of the institution, including its 14 schools and colleges. Prior to joining George Washington in 2019, Blake was executive vice president for Academics and provost at Drexel University in Philadelphia for four years. He was also vice provost for Academic Affairs and dean of the Graduate School at the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida.

He was an associate dean for Research and professor at the University of Notre Dame College of Engineering, where he provided oversight for research programs and graduate studies. Prior to Notre Dame, Blake was on faculty at Georgetown University, where he was chair of the Department of Computer Science.

A Georgia native, Blake holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Georgia Tech, a master’s degree in electrical engineering from Mercer University, and a Ph.D. in information and software engineering from George Mason University.

Blake begins his tenure as Georgia State University president on August 9.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1624033687 2021-06-18 16:28:07 1624373120 2021-06-22 14:45:20 0 0 news Georgia Tech alumnus M. Brian Blake, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at George Washington University, has been named Georgia State University’s first Black president.

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2021-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2021-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2021-06-18 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
648225 648225 image <![CDATA[M. Brian Blake]]> image/jpeg 1624033787 2021-06-18 16:29:47 1624033787 2021-06-18 16:29:47
<![CDATA[George Floyd – One Year Later]]> 34932 Today marks exactly one year since the death of George Floyd at the hands of Derek Chauvin. The former Minneapolis police officer was convicted on all counts of Floyd’s murder this past April.

The high-profile death of Floyd, who was pinned under Chauvin’s knee for nine minutes and 29 seconds, still brings anguish for many across the world who were already monthslong into the depths of a global pandemic. For some, it provided reason to finally acknowledge that systemic racism and racial violence have been deeply embedded into our nation’s fabric for centuries.

My thoughts last spring were captured in Commitment to Drive Change. One year later, I am still wrapped with sadness and sometimes anger, but I can optimistically reflect on the many changes I have seen around the world and, particularly, within our campus community.

Immediately after May 25, 2020, units across the Institute issued statements denouncing racism and pledging solidarity with the Black community. Campus offices hosted candid discussions on race and its systemic injustices. My office, Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, launched the Race at Georgia Tech discussion series and our Education and Training unit has worked diligently to provide increased diversity, equity, and inclusion trainings to meet high campus demand.

Last November, under the direction of President Ángel Cabrera, we launched the Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council (GTDEIC) to identify issues of campus racial and gender disparity, bias, and inequity. Since then, the Council has actively monitored and assessed Tech’s progress toward achieving the DEI objectives that undergird our vision for a welcoming and inclusive campus community for all students, staff, and faculty. Earlier this year, the GTDEIC and issue-area campus experts began working to create a DEI blueprint plan to create an equitable and inclusive community; to recruit, retain, and develop a diverse community; and to support innovative and inclusive scholarship and teaching. President Cabrera will reveal this plan later this year.

In March, the campus decried the murder of eight victims at three spas in the metro Atlanta area – six of whom were Asian women. The horrifying string of events on that day stirred considerable conversation and action against Asian hate and violence. The Division of Student Life hosted one of Tech’s first Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month series of events a month later.

This past April – one day after the conviction of Chavin – we dedicated a space of healing in the new EcoCommons area. On the site of the former Pickrick Restaurant, where its segregationist owner forcibly and unlawfully removed Black patrons despite the then-fresh passing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, we honored the bravery of the three Black seminary students who attempted to break down the walls of injustice there. The architectural design of this area is intended to inspire reflection and connections, both with nature and with others.

Finally, many around campus are preparing to recognize the 60th anniversary of the matriculation of the Institute’s first Black students this September. In 2019, the Institute honored these three pioneers, and its first Black graduate, with the installation of bronze statues on campus. Our focus for the future is to build upon the momentum we have established toward making the Georgia Tech community a place where our people are treated fairly and included.

I know we have a long road to travel, but these campus developments since last spring bring me some solace that we are headed in the right direction on our journey toward meaningful change to eradicate racial injustice. As members of the Georgia Tech community, we all have a duty to deliver upon its mission to develop leaders who advance technology and improve the human condition. We can only achieve this by leveraging our diversity as an asset to capitalize our human potential.

Archie W. Ervin, Ph.D.
Vice President, Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1621972582 2021-05-25 19:56:22 1622041978 2021-05-26 15:12:58 0 0 news One year after the death of George Floyd, Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, shares a reflection and hope for the Georgia Tech community.

]]>
2021-05-25T00:00:00-04:00 2021-05-25T00:00:00-04:00 2021-05-25 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
647745 647745 image <![CDATA[George Floyd mural in Minneapolis, MN (unknown source)]]> image/jpeg 1622000465 2021-05-26 03:41:05 1622000587 2021-05-26 03:43:07
<![CDATA[Tower Awards Celebrate 27th Year]]> 34932 The 2021 Tower Awards were hosted by OMED: Educational Services (OMED) on April 8 and 9 across three ceremonies at the Georgia Tech Hotel. This year marked the 27th year the awards have celebrated the academic achievements of traditionally underrepresented students at Georgia Tech. Undergraduate and graduating graduate students were honored.

“On behalf of the Georgia Institute of Technology and the entire OMED team, I salute each of you for your hard work, your persistence, and your dedication,” said Georgia Tech alumnus and OMED Director Sybrina Atwaters via a recorded message played at the beginning of the ceremonies to honorees. “You join a select and proud slate of Tower Award recipients. Many, like myself, keep our awards in our homes and our offices to remind us of our ability to overcome any obstacle that we may face and to excel to the highest heights of excellence.”

More than 1,700 students were eligible for a Tower Award this year, up from 2020 and 2019.

Award categories included: Ph.D. Awards; Master’s Awards (graduating GPA of 3.5 or higher); Graduating Senior Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher); Sustained Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher); Yearly Awards (GPA of 3.15 or higher over the past three semesters); Transfer/Dual-Degree Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher); and First-Year Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher). Within each award category, except Ph.D. and Master’s Awards, sub-categories included Bronze (GPA of 3.15-3.49); Silver (GPA of 3.50-3.94); and Gold (GPA of 3.95 or higher).

Special awards were also presented: Laurentino Castro, Titilayo Funso, Jadon Pauling, Jasmine Ramirez, and Amelia Smith took home a Student Leader Impact Award; the Georgia Tech Black Alumni Organization Unsung Hero Award was presented to graduating undergraduate student Kusona Fortingo; and women’s basketball player Kierra Fletcher took home the inaugural Women of Color Student-Athlete Impact Award.

Emeka Obikwelu, who successfully defended his dissertation for a doctorate in electrical and computer engineering in February, said “I want to thank the sponsors for this program and, particularly, I want to thank OMED for doing such a great job – for all that they do.”

OMED, part of Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion, was supported by more than two dozen corporate partners and sponsors who provided honorees with messages of support and raffle giveaways at the ceremonies.

To learn more about the Tower Awards, visit the OMED: Educational Services website at: omed.gatech.edu.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1619199615 2021-04-23 17:40:15 1631554623 2021-09-13 17:37:03 0 0 news The 2021 Tower Awards were hosted by OMED on April 8 and 9. This year marked the 27th year the awards have celebrated the academic achievements of traditionally underrepresented minority students at Georgia Tech.

]]>
2021-04-15T00:00:00-04:00 2021-04-15T00:00:00-04:00 2021-04-15 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
646859 646860 646876 646858 646859 image <![CDATA[The 2021 Tower Awards were presented over three ceremonies to accomodate for social distancing.]]> image/jpeg 1619224561 2021-04-24 00:36:01 1619224561 2021-04-24 00:36:01 646860 image <![CDATA[The annual Tower Awards are presented by OMED: Educational Services.]]> image/jpeg 1619224626 2021-04-24 00:37:06 1619447035 2021-04-26 14:23:55 646876 image <![CDATA[The 2021 Tower Awards were supported by more than two dozen corporate partners and sponsors.]]> image/jpeg 1619446791 2021-04-26 14:19:51 1619446791 2021-04-26 14:19:51 646858 image <![CDATA[Amelia Smith]]> image/jpeg 1619224461 2021-04-24 00:34:21 1619447190 2021-04-26 14:26:30
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech’s Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology Host 2021 Distinguished Lecture]]> 34932 On March 9, the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology (WST) at Georgia Tech hosted its 2021 WST Distinguished Lecture event featuring Dr. Ellen Ernst Kossek, Basil S. Turner professor of management and research director of the Susan Bulkeley Butler Center for Leadership at Purdue University. Kossek, an award-winning social scientist who researches work-family-life policy, and most recently the effects of the Covid-19 pandemic on work-life boundaries on women, presented ‘Work-Life Boundaries and Women in Academic STEM: Covid-19's Wake-Up Call for Career Equality.’  

The virtual event marked the 20th year of the WST lecture series. Kossek’s keynote was followed by a panel discussion with Institute faculty members Drs. Terry Blum, Kim Cobb, Kaye Husbands Fealing, and Bonnie Ferri.

Dr. Mary Frank Fox, ADVANCE Professor with Ivan Allen College’s School of Public Policy and WST co-director said, “The WST Distinguished Lecture brings to Georgia Tech eminent leaders who have supported women, science, and technology through research, policy, and initiatives. Dr. Kossek exemplifies this tradition.”

Kossek recently led the writing of a committee report for the National Academies of Science on the effects of Covid-19 for women in academic science. The report, which was issued the same day as the lecture, emphasized Covid-19’s trends, individual coping styles, organizational practices, and opportunities for policy innovation and research. “I hope we can think about -- especially now with the pandemic -- how we can make cultures and work-place structures support healthy living on and off the job, and what we can learn from Covid,” she said.

The study surveyed over 200 national universities on work-life issues and found that the pandemic did not create inequity, but rather magnified it for women, especially reducing chances for faculty women to attain tenure. Some of the issues women faced, the survey reported, were difficulties balancing work and home-life duties -- such as assisting children with virtual learning -- while working from home.

“What we found in the STEM women we interviewed and through comments on the survey is that many women felt really challenged in managing not just workload, but professional and personal identity."

View Kossek’s presentation at: https://youtu.be/_r0XEpkdih0.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1615934818 2021-03-16 22:46:58 1615941651 2021-03-17 00:40:51 0 0 news The Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology (WST) at Georgia Tech hosted its 2021 WST Distinguished Lecture event featuring Purdue University's Ellen Ernst Kossek.

]]>
2021-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2021-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2021-03-16 00:00:00 Mary Frank Fox
mary.fox@pubpolicy.gatech.edu

]]>
645447 645447 image <![CDATA[Ellen Ernst Kossek]]> image/jpeg 1615934878 2021-03-16 22:47:58 1626453600 2021-07-16 16:40:00
<![CDATA[Impact Living Learning Community ]]> 34945 Students admitted to Georgia Tech can apply to various living-learning communities this upcoming fall, but we invite your student to apply to the Impact Living-Learning Community! While each community offers a different focus, Impact offers intentional opportunities for incoming students to further explore topics of diversity, equity, and inclusion through experiential and academic programming, while also residing with other students who share that interest in a newly renovated residential space. All admitted students can apply to Impact via their admission portal. Please click the link here to learn more about the Impact Living-Learning Community - https://impactcommunity.gatech.edu/.

]]> tbarker30 1 1614800041 2021-03-03 19:34:01 1614800434 2021-03-03 19:40:34 0 0 news 2021-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2021-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2021-03-03 00:00:00 644961 644961 image <![CDATA[Impact Living Learning Community ]]> image/png 1614800163 2021-03-03 19:36:03 1614800163 2021-03-03 19:36:03
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council Gets To Work]]> 34932 Last November, more than 50 Institute faculty, staff, and students gathered for the initial meeting of the Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council (GTDEIC). The campus representatives were appointed by President Ángel Cabrera, and the group was tasked with monitoring and assessing the Institute’s progress toward becoming a model campus community for diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI). In the months ahead, it will also submit recommendations to Cabrera and the Institute’s executive leadership team for consideration in developing strategic actions.

Enhancing diversity has been one of Cabrera’s top priorities. “Our Diversity and Inclusion Council is one of several action steps announced this past summer to deliver on our promise of inclusion,” Cabrera said in 2020. “As outlined in our new strategic plan, we are striving to remove barriers to access and success, and to build an inclusive community where people of all backgrounds have the opportunity to learn and contribute to our mission.”

Since that initial November meeting, the GTDEIC has launched three working groups comprised of Council members and issue-area experts from across the campus: Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Plan; Campus Climate Assessment; and Covid-19 Impacts on Faculty.

“A diverse and inclusive campus is an empowered and engaged campus,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and GTDEIC chair. “A focus on diversity helps improve productivity, recruitment, and retention. Through these working groups, we will address immediate areas for DEI improvement.”

Pearl Alexander, executive director of Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement and GTDEIC vice chair, added, “One of our groups is crafting a comprehensive DEI plan that will be a blueprint with actionable strategies for implementation within the next five years. Another is redesigning our climate assessment to align with Institute goals for culture transformation, while the third is addressing the impacts of Covid-19 on women faculty and faculty of color. Each working group’s co-leads are working methodically and inclusively to identify strategies that will close gaps and deliver the greatest DEI impact possible. There will be many opportunities for leading, modeling, and living our values to make significant and lasting change.”

The Working Groups

The Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Plan Working Group is developing a blueprint that mobilizes the DEI-related objectives of the new strategic plan, which include: amplify our impact, champion innovation, connect globally, expand access, cultivate well-being, and lead by example. The group will work across three focus areas: creating an inclusive and equitable community; recruiting, retaining, and developing a diverse community of students, faculty, and staff; and supporting innovative and inclusive scholarship and teaching. The final draft of the blueprint will be submitted to Cabrera for review by the beginning of June. The group’s efforts will be supported by Georgia Tech Strategic Consulting (GTSC).

“Diversity today unlocks innovation tomorrow and creates unlimited opportunities for our students, faculty, and staff,” said Rashaad Owens Sr., GTSC consultant. “I believe Georgia Tech is poised for a brighter future with its renewed commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion in the new strategic plan.”

The Campus Climate Assessment Working Group will be led by Keona Lewis, associate director of Institute Diversity Research, and Joseph Ludlum, assistant director for Academic Effectiveness.

“One of the most enlightening tools we have for identifying racial and gender disparities is our campus climate survey,” Lewis said. Originally developed between 2011 and 2013, the survey has provided valuable information on individual and community experiences and their impact on people’s sense of belonging at Tech. “Over the past eight years, we have used what we have learned to address issues such as racial discrimination and bias and the lack of opportunities for the professional development of women staff — and launching Leading Women@Tech, the Inclusive Leader's Academy, and workshops to address bias in hiring promotion retention.”

The group’s goal is to create new research questions to capture data needed to measure the strategic plan’s DEI goals as well as the impact of current initiatives and programming. The Campus Climate Assessment group has formed three sub-teams for survey revisions: faculty, staff, and students. “This will allow us to measure our progress on achieving many of the new DEI objectives in the strategic plan through an exploration of the lived experiences of the Georgia Tech community,” Lewis said.

There are many reasons to be concerned about the short-and long-term impacts of Covid-19 on the well-being and advancement of faculty. “Data strongly suggest that the pandemic might exacerbate existing structural inequities in academia, as the burden of caregiving, differential access to resources, and mental health challenges exact a higher toll on women and underrepresented minority groups,” said Dana Randall, ADVANCE Professor for the College of Computing. “For this reason, the ADVANCE Professors formed this working group to develop a systemic approach to mitigating the impacts of the pandemic on the well-being and career progression of women faculty at Tech.”

“The overarching themes and outcomes we expect from a working group are twofold,” Kim Cobb, ADVANCE Professor for the College of Sciences, added. “First, our effort will aim to prevent the impending loss of women and underrepresented minority faculty from Georgia Tech, either through recruitment elsewhere, negative tenure or promotion outcomes, or by choice due to dissatisfaction with current working conditions and opportunities for advancement. Second, we will aim to improve the well-being and support for those faculty most negatively affected.”

The Covid-19 Impacts on Faculty Working Group will be co-chaired by an ADVANCE Professor and another member of the GTDEIC, with approximately 10 additional tenure-track faculty members. Specific areas the group plans to tackle include: campus climate and workplace satisfaction, promotion and tenure, retention, and the coordination of research and activities around Covid-19 and its impact on faculty.

“Establishing the GTDEIC represents the Institute’s commitment to engage all sectors of the Tech community,” Ervin said. “By identifying opportunities to achieve our aspirations for an inclusive community, and by demonstrating our value to be a community that thrives on diversity as a critical element of campus culture and climate, we are doing just that.”

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1614797546 2021-03-03 18:52:26 1614797733 2021-03-03 18:55:33 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council has launched three working groups comprised of Council members and issue-area experts from across the campus.

]]>
2021-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2021-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2021-03-03 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
644949 644949 image <![CDATA[The Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council is made up of over 50 faculty, staff, and students.]]> image/png 1614797697 2021-03-03 18:54:57 1614802542 2021-03-03 20:15:42
<![CDATA[Ph.D. Student Earns 2021 Focus Fellowship from Georgia Tech's Office of Minority Educational Development]]> 33939 School of Interactive Computing (IC) Ph.D. student Kantwon Rogers was awarded a 2021 Focus Fellowship by Georgia Tech’s Office of Minority Educational Development (OMED).

The award recognizes participants in the Focus Program who have demonstrated academic excellence, community leadership, and been granted admittance to a graduate program. The Focus Program aims to introduce minority students to graduate school in hopes of increasing the number who pursue higher degrees.

Rogers attended the Focus Program five years ago as an undergraduate student at Georgia Tech.

“It helped me learn about grad school and set me up for success,” Rogers said of the program.

The award, which carries a prize of up to $2,500 per student based on funds available and number of awardees, is not based on specific research but recognizes overall accomplishments. In an application essay, Rogers shared how OMED was pivotal to is success at Georgia Tech.

As an undergraduate, he participated in the Challenge Program, a five-week academic residential program for incoming first-year students. Later, he became a counselor in the same program, an OMED tutor, a Focus participant, a Focus panelist, and last summer a computer science (CS) instructor in the Challenge program.

“It was really spooky because I was teaching the new Challenge students in the exact same room that I sat in when I was learning CS for the first time in Challenge a decade ago,” Rogers said. “Truly full circle. OMED has truly been a foundation for me here at Georgia Tech, and I am eternally grateful.”

Rogers’ research focuses on human-robot interaction, investigating the effects that intelligent agent verbal deception has on human interaction.

“Animals deceive. Humans deceive. Should robots and AI deceive?” Rogers poses in his research tagline.

Additionally, the work aims to provide AI systems the ability to autonomously produce contextually meaningful and successfully deceptive utterances while determining when it is appropriate to verbally deceive humans.

He is advised by IC Chair Ayanna Howard.

]]> David Mitchell 1 1613581028 2021-02-17 16:57:08 1613581728 2021-02-17 17:08:48 0 0 news 2021-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-17 00:00:00 David Mitchell

Communications Officer

david.mitchell@cc.gatech.edu

]]>
585962 585962 image <![CDATA[Kantwon Rogers 2]]> image/jpeg 1484253211 2017-01-12 20:33:31 1484253211 2017-01-12 20:33:31
<![CDATA[Naomi Davis: Behind the Mask]]> 34932 Naomi Davis is a Georgia Tech student who you may have seen around… sort of. The second-year business administration major’s photo donned in a Tech protective face mask taken this past summer has made its rounds in several campus publications. And, the Institute's internal image portal lists the photo in its 'most viewed' category. Get to know more about the music-lover and Office of Minority Educational Development (OMED) volunteer.

Q: Tell us about yourself, Naomi.

"My name is Naomi Davis and I am a second-year student majoring in business administration with a concentration in information technology management. On campus, I am involved with the Georgia Tech Society of Black Engineers, the African American Student Union, and the Sports Business Club. I'm also a member of Heard Atlanta which is a collective for writers, poets, and lyricists.

"I love music and sports; I play tennis and basketball. I mostly write and perform hip hop, rap, and alternative rap music. (My artist name is NTiGer.) I have been engineering music since age six and been writing songs since the fifth grade. I’m often asked, ‘What can’t you do?,’ referring to my versatility."

Q: What made you want to attend Georgia Tech?

"I’m an Atlanta native and I’ve always loved the midtown area. In ninth grade, I participated with a math internship program here [Georgia Tech]. While in high school, I began to fall in love with the campus and knew I wanted to attend. I'm the first in my family to attend a PWI [predominately white institution] for an undergraduate degree."

Q: What drew you to participate with OMED?

"What drew me to OMED was the Challenge Program, OMED’s numerous resources, and the great people who run OMED. OMED also has a lot of opportunities and events throughout the year that are very fun. Everyone in OMED – from the student participants to the staffers – is a family and I really like the energy that I get every time I step into the Chapin Building [home of OMED, located in Harrison Square]."

Q: Tell us about the work you’ve done for OMED.

"As an incoming first-year student, I participated in the Challenge Program; that was my first taste of OMED. Challenge was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had and I will never forget it. I got to meet so many people and recognized all the support that I would have throughout my time here on campus. I was hired as a Challenge counselor for the 2020 program. Needless to say, Challenge 2020 was very different because it was hosted in July, just a few months after the coronavirus pandemic was announced and the campus went into quarantine-mode. OMED organized the program extremely effectively and safely."

Q: Your photo in a Georgia Tech protective fask mask taken during the 2020 Challenge Program opener has gone somewhat viral on campus. How do you feel about that?

"It’s been crazy! It was opening day and I was just chilling on the steps in CULC [Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons]. This guy, I think his name is Chris, [Chris Moore, Institute Communications photographer] came up to me and asked if he could take a picture and share it. I thought it was just going on the Challenge landing page on the OMED website; I was wrong. People started to send me screenshots of my face everywhere in publications around the campus."

Q: You opened for Jason Derulo at Homecoming in 2020. How did that come about?

"One of the things on my college bucket list was to perform as part of Georgia Tech’s Homecoming Concert. I had been working on some popular songs, so I knew I could turn people up. I really wanted to take part because I knew I could bring something different to our Homecoming Concert (being a Black woman rapper/artist). The Student Center Programs Council treated me with lots of respect and were excited to see my performance. I got lots of great feedback from people after my performance and I would love to do it again."

Q: What are your hopes for the rest of your time as a Georgia Tech student?

"My hopes are to meet and network with as many people as I can. With the pandemic going on, this might be a little hard. But still, I hope to gain all the experience I need to be successful after I graduate and enter the workforce."

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1613408333 2021-02-15 16:58:53 1614220415 2021-02-25 02:33:35 0 0 news A photo of second-year student Naomi Davis in a Georgia Tech protective face mask has gone viral around campus.

]]>
2021-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-15 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
644250 644249 644251 644250 image <![CDATA[This photo of Naomi Davis taken during OMED's 2020 Challenge program has appeared in several campus publications.]]> image/jpeg 1613408674 2021-02-15 17:04:34 1613408674 2021-02-15 17:04:34 644249 image <![CDATA[Davis is a self-described "sneakerhead," who owns more than 20 pairs of designer sneakers.]]> image/jpeg 1613408541 2021-02-15 17:02:21 1613408541 2021-02-15 17:02:21 644251 image <![CDATA["I hope to gain all the experience I need to be successful after I graduate and enter the workforce."]]> image/jpeg 1613408761 2021-02-15 17:06:01 1613408975 2021-02-15 17:09:35
<![CDATA[Angela Davis Talks Activism and Reform at 2021 Black History Month Lecture]]> 34932 Esteemed activist, author, and educator Angela Davis delivered a virtual keynote address at Georgia Tech’s 2021 Black History Month Lecture on Feb. 10. A pioneer in international civil rights and Black feminist movements, Davis has been a prominent figure for decades, working as an academic and authoring more than 10 books on race, class, gender, prison abolition, and the criminalization of marginalized communities.

The lecture was seen by more than 1,700 unique viewers.

“We are thankful to Carter G. Woodson for initiating the observance in 1926 of what was then called Negro History Week,” she opened, referring to the historian and one of the first scholars to study African American history. Woodson became known as the “Father of Black History.” “This week is precisely the week we would be celebrating [Negro History Week] in those days.”

Decades later, Black History Month became, in Davis’ words, “the 28 days that are allocated to us to reflect not only on the contributions of Black people, but on the meaning of the phenomenal collective struggle for freedom that stretches back to the days when the first Africans were forcefully brought to the Americas.”

She was born in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1944, growing up in the infamous “Dynamite Hill” neighborhood, which gained its name from frequent bombings to drive out middle-class Black residents in the 1950s and 1960s, including the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing that killed four girls in 1963. Davis attended segregated schools but reflected on the resilience her early upbringing and surroundings afforded her, saying, “Even as we boldly challenged racial segregation, I later came to understand what a gift it was to be able to grow up in a community that realized that resistance was at the core of our visions of new futures. We learned how to resist not so much as a choice, not as an extracurricular activity, but rather as a condition of life — as a condition of our collective conviction that we would someday be free.”

After completing high school in New York (via a program that placed Black students from the South into integrated schools in the North), she would go on to study at Brandeis University in Boston; the Sorbonne in Paris; the University of Frankfurt in Germany; and the University of California, San Diego. In 1969, she received a doctorate in philosophy from Humboldt University in what was then East Berlin.

Davis noted the critical role that Black women have played in advancing civil rights in the U.S., beginning with early suffrage movements. “Especially because I am speaking virtually here at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, I want to pay tribute to Stacey Abrams,” the 2018 Georgia Democratic nominee for governor and the first Black woman of a major political party to win a gubernatorial nomination. Through her voting rights advocacy, Abrams is largely credited with helping President Joseph Biden Jr. win the state of Georgia in the 2020 presidential election and for delivering two Democratic Georgia Senate seats in January. “There’s been a long history of Black women not only saving the Black community but saving the country.”

The lecture, sponsored by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and the Georgia Tech African American Student Union (AASU), included a question-and-answer session moderated by AASU members Shelbe Johnson and Kemuel Russell.

Viewers asked Davis several questions on criminal justice reform. A common theme throughout much of her scholarly work has been the social issues associated with incarceration and the criminalization of communities hardest hit by poverty and racism. She rose to national prominence in 1970 for her arrest — and subsequent acquittal — in a high-profile criminal case for which she spent 18 months in jail and on trial after being placed on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitives list. In 1997, she helped found Critical Resistance, which aims to dismantle prison systems worldwide. 

Her teaching career has taken her to San Francisco State University and the University of California, Berkeley. She also has taught at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Vassar College, Syracuse University, and Stanford University. Most recently she spent 15 years at the University of California Santa Cruz, where she is now a distinguished professor emerita of history of consciousness and of feminist studies.

“I was hired to teach at UCLA in 1969,” she said, but before she could teach, she was fired for being a member of the Communist Party. “When I think back on the campaign to save my job, I had an enormous amount of support, including from white students and white faculty. What I attempted to do was to develop what we might call an intersectional approach. I was at the same time involved in campaigns to free political prisoners — campaigns against racism against prisoners,” Davis continued, while describing herself as a prison abolitionist rather than a prison reformer. “I took the position that people who supported me and my right to teach at UCLA should also support people in prisons who were facing far worse forms of oppression because of their political beliefs.”

Davis will return to teach at UCLA this spring, but noted her slight disdain for the fanfare her return has already brought to the campus. “I don’t want to be accepted. I still want to make trouble – I like John Lewis’ notion of ‘good trouble,’” a nod to the late civil rights giant and Georgia congressman. “So whereas I am going to be teaching at UCLA again, I will continue to critique the institution, call out the racism, point to the heteropatriarchy, and point to their support of capitalist systems.”

Davis paused when asked a final question about how Black people can best handle racial trauma.

“For so long, we haven’t acknowledged racial trauma. I think what is exciting about this current era is that so many people are taking holistic approaches, teaching us how to make sense of these issues. It’s important how you incorporate acknowledgment of people’s trauma into the very work of organizing against racism.

“Since this is the last question, I just want to point out that we can’t let up. We can’t stop. We should recognize that this is the time that the real work is getting done.”

The lecture can be viewed for a limited time here.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1613063833 2021-02-11 17:17:13 1613155738 2021-02-12 18:48:58 0 0 news Activist, author, and educator Angela Davis delivered a virtual keynote address at Georgia Tech’s 2021 Black History Month Lecture on Feb. 10. The lecture was seen by more than 1,700 unique viewers.

]]>
2021-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-11 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
644132 644133 644134 644137 644136 644132 image <![CDATA[Angela Davis gave a keynote speech at the 2021 Georgia Tech Black History Month Lecture]]> image/jpeg 1613065124 2021-02-11 17:38:44 1613065505 2021-02-11 17:45:05 644133 image <![CDATA[Davis was joined by Georgia Tech African American Student Union members Shelbe Johnson and Kemuel Russell for a question-and-answer session]]> image/jpeg 1613065152 2021-02-11 17:39:12 1613065584 2021-02-11 17:46:24 644134 image <![CDATA[Davis' work and activism has spanned worldwide for more than 50 years]]> image/jpeg 1613065179 2021-02-11 17:39:39 1613065631 2021-02-11 17:47:11 644137 image <![CDATA[This past spring, Davis spoke to protestors in California in the wake of the death of George Floyd (photo courtesy of Angela Davis)]]> image/jpeg 1613065401 2021-02-11 17:43:21 1613068220 2021-02-11 18:30:20 644136 image <![CDATA[Davis spent 15 years at the University of California Santa Cruz, where she is now a distinguished professor emerita of history of consciousness and of feminist studies (photo courtesy of Angela Davis)]]> image/jpeg 1613065233 2021-02-11 17:40:33 1613068190 2021-02-11 18:29:50
<![CDATA[Augustine Esogbue: First in Class]]> 28766 Augustine Esogbue has been a trailblazer throughout his academic career. At the top of his grade at the private high school he attended in Nigeria, Esogbue was an early recipient of a highly competitive study grant from the African Scholarship Program of American Universities. This award enabled him to attend UCLA, where he received a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering (1964), and then go on to earn a master’s degree in industrial engineering (IE) and operations research (OR) from Columbia University (1965).

Esogbue’s research at this time focused on dynamic programming; he also spent a summer at UCLA delving into the nascent field of biotechnology by researching how prosthetic devices could be externally powered. This work attracted the attention of world-famous mathematician Richard Bellman, who offered Esogbue both a research appointment and mentorship at the University of Southern California. In 1968, Esogbue received his doctorate in IE/OR, making him not only Bellman’s first Ph.D. graduate at USC but also the world’s first Black Ph.D. in the field.

The firsts didn’t stop there. As a young professor, Esogbue spent a few years teaching and researching at Case Western Reserve University, where he made breakthroughs in dynamic programming, fuzzy sets, and novel OR applications to such areas as healthcare, water resources and pollution, and transportation and education. This work led to his 1972 election as a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. 

That same year, Esogbue joined Georgia Tech’s H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) as an associate professor, with a joint appointment in the Health Systems Research Center. Promoted in 1977 to full professor, he became the Institute’s first Black faculty member at that level.

“When I arrived at Georgia Tech, I was unaware of its racial composition. I had always been a racial minority, both as a student and as a faculty member, and what mattered to me was the opportunity Tech offered to advance my academic career and to contribute to the development of knowledge,” Esogbue explained. “Most of my colleagues were welcoming and supportive, while others myopically saw me as the solution to Black problems both on and off campus. In Atlanta I was known as ‘the Black professor at Tech.’”

Esogbue’s presence at the Institute quickly caught the attention of the youthful Maynard Jackson, who had been elected the first Black mayor of Atlanta. Through Jackson, Esogbue met civil rights leaders like John Lewis, Julian Bond, and David Franklin, and these experiences opened his eyes to the deep racial disparities in the U.S. As national chairman of the Visiting Lecturers Program of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA, a precursor to INFORMS), he directed the attention of HBCU students to professional opportunities in the growing field of OR. This effort laid the foundation for a more inclusive ORSA – and later – INFORMS. 

He vowed also to use his position at Tech to promote minority representation in STEM fields.

Increasing Diversity at Georgia Tech

At this time, Georgia Tech was on its way to becoming a nationally recognized research institution. Esogbue saw that underrepresented minorities were in danger of being left behind, with the few Black students who were admitted to Tech often dropping out before they could complete their degrees. The National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) had been recently organized in 1975 at Purdue University to recruit and support Black engineering students, and Esogbue co-founded the Georgia Tech chapter (GTSBE) a few months later.

GTSBE has grown to become the third-largest student group on campus and has won multiple regional and national awards for its excellence. This includes the national 2019-20 Large Chapter of the Year Award, which GTSBE received under then-ISyE student Ndeyanta Jallow’s (BSIE 2020) presidency. Esogbue served as faculty advisor to GTSBE until he retired from ISyE in 2010; he was also NSBE’s longest-serving national advisor (1989-2014). He was elevated to National Advisor Emeritus status (2014) and became the first recipient of the organization’s Golden Torch Award for Lifetime Achievement in Education (1999).

Esogbue’s diversity efforts did not stop with GTSBE. Tech was the first Southern higher-learning institution to integrate peacefully, but its students and faculty were still mostly white and male. As Esogbue recalled in a 2014 NSBE magazine profile, “Georgia Tech was really about to lose its accreditation for federal funds because of the paucity of Blacks in various segments of its community.” 

With the backing of then-President Joseph M. Pettit, Esogbue initiated and chaired the Institute’s Affirmative Action (Faculty) Task Force, which developed a systems-based blueprint for increasing the number of minority faculty at Tech. Under his supervision, ISyE student Brenda Gullatt (EES 1976) – who herself was one of Tech’s first Black female graduates – produced quantitative data justifying the 1979 establishment of OMED, the Office of Minority Educational Development. To this day, OMED supports the academic pathways of traditionally underrepresented minorities at the Institute, and the College of Engineering (COE) is the largest producer of Black engineers in the U.S. 

The Importance of Mentoring Black Students

Esogbue emphasized Institute-wide programs that developed Black students so they are equipped with the skills to pursue advanced academic degrees or high-level industry positions. He mentored many students who have gone on to highly successful careers.

“Through their intellectual and professional pursuits and their social activism, my students have extended my contributions beyond my wildest imagination,” Esogbue said. “And not only in engineering – societal transformation systems like government, politics, religion, and education. I succeed when my mentees succeed; conversely, I die a slow death when the best of them fails. That’s negentropy, an antithesis of living systems, and is never to be tolerated.”

Esogbue’s mentees include Black academic and industry luminaries such as Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice (Chem 1983), who is currently serving as the first female president of Morehouse School of Medicine (2014), and Gary May (EE 1985).

May – like his mentor – has achieved a groundbreaking academic career. In 2005, May became the first Black school chair at Tech, helming the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; in 2011, he was chosen as the first Black dean of COE during the 50th anniversary year of Tech’s integration; and he now serves as the first Black chancellor of the University of California, Davis.

In a 2019 lecture given at Washington State University, May said that his “world opened up through [Professor Esogbue’s] influence. I could see living proof of a Black man finding great success and respect in the engineering field.” And, when President Barack Obama bestowed on May the 2015 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring, May attributed his accomplishments directly to Esogbue’s impact on his life.

Similarly, Errika Moore (IE 1996) regards Esogbue as a father figure and maintains a close personal relationship with him. She has followed in his footsteps of working to expand racial and gender diversity in STEM fields by promoting Black participation in K-12 STEM-based activities, as well as boosting Black representation in the senior leadership of U.S. technology companies. 

Moore has said, “In life we stand on the shoulders of giants, and for me Professor Esogbue was definitely one of those giants. In a space where I, as a Black woman, am still statistically an anomaly, I had the opportunity to see a trailblazer in action and to see the embodiment of Angela Davis’ words: ‘I’m no longer accepting the things I cannot change. I’m changing the things I can no longer accept.’”

Esogbue’s influence was not exclusive to the Black students he taught and advised. When ISyE alumnus Warren Hearnes (Ph.D. IE 1999) – who is white – arrived at ISyE for his doctoral studies, he had just left an Army career that touched on fuzzy logic and neural networks – which would become today's field of machine learning. He discovered Esogbue was researching this field at Georgia Tech, working with the National Science Foundation and NASA, and asked to meet with him. 

“In that first meeting, Augustine exhibited the same type of leadership qualities that had been demonstrated to me in the military,” Hearnes recalled. “This was another reason I asked him to be my advisor; he was the type of role model I wanted. He knows how to look at a problem – to break a system into its components, create a decision-making model of it, and turn all this into research. He was also a man of integrity. If Augustine said he would do something, he did it. 

“He also set very high goals for me and pushed me to be excellent,” Hearnes added. “What seemed hard at the time turned out to be very beneficial for me. I would not be where I am today without his mentorship.” Hearnes is currently the senior vice president of analytics and data science at Atlanta-based Cardlytics, an advertising platform for financial companies.

An Impactful Life

In retirement, Esogbue – who was designated a professor emeritus by the University System of Georgia Board of Regents in 2012 – has remained involved with initiatives to increase Black achievement and leadership, such as 100 Black Men of America. As Patron of the Association of Nigerian Engineers & Scientists in the Americas, he is guiding a group of mostly immigrant and first-generation STEM professionals by emphasizing excellence, integrity, service delivery, and mentorship.

Esogbue’s awards and professional recognitions are nearly too numerous to name. In 2004, he was elected as the second Black Fellow of INFORMS. Two years later, he received the NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal for contributions to the U.S. space mission, as well as the Nigerian National Order of Merit, which is the country’s highest academic honor.

Esogbue has also been named a Fellow of both the Nigerian Academy of Science and the Nigerian Academy of Engineering (NAE). He chairs the NAE’s worldwide Diaspora Group, which provides the needed linkage between NAE and other world engineering academies and promotes quality assurance, parity, and currency. 

The NAE summarizes Esogbue’s accomplishments in shaping generations of Black engineering students in this way: “Professor Emeritus Esogbue’s contributions to engineering education are legendary. He has produced and mentored generations of high-quality scholars and leaders for industry, government, and academia. He has changed the landscape of the engineering population in America with his highly successful programs to cultivate and nurture minority interests in STEM fields.”

When asked to reflect on all he has accomplished and on the impact he has made on so many, Esogbue said, “An integral part of my life has been an uncompromising dedication to excellence in everything. I converted the enormous challenges I faced along the way into opportunities, and my commitment never to accept mediocrity or failure as an option helped me thrive. I was determined to see that Georgia Tech did not miss the opportunity – surrounded as it has been by world-famous civil rights leaders – to enshrine diversity as a fundamental value of the Institute’s culture. 

“All of my achievements are dedicated to my family, to my teachers and mentors, and to all my mentees, whose success and thunderbolt-like impacts on society have far exceeded my dreams and expectations,” Esogbue continued. “Georgia Tech is certainly much better today because we believed in the possibility – the necessity – of a diverse community – each person excellent, contributing their God-given talent, and nurtured through mentorship – to raise the profile of the Institute in diverse fields of learning around the world. I am grateful for the opportunity and determination to contribute to this colossal transformational change. To God be the glory.”

More About Professor Emeritus Augustine Esogbue

 

]]> Shelley Wunder-Smith 1 1612384183 2021-02-03 20:29:43 1616170202 2021-03-19 16:10:02 0 0 news As the first Black IE/OR Ph.D. in the world, and Georgia Tech's first Black tenured professor, Esogbue has been a trailblazer throughout his academic career.

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2021-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-03 00:00:00 Shelley Wunder-Smith

H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering

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644019 643832 643848 643833 643839 643838 644019 image <![CDATA[Augustine Esogbue]]> image/jpeg 1612884422 2021-02-09 15:27:02 1612884422 2021-02-09 15:27:02 643832 image <![CDATA[John Lewis and Augustine Esogbue (2018)]]> image/jpeg 1612379828 2021-02-03 19:17:08 1612379828 2021-02-03 19:17:08 643848 image <![CDATA[Gary May and Augustine Esogbue]]> image/jpeg 1612384365 2021-02-03 20:32:45 1612384365 2021-02-03 20:32:45 643833 image <![CDATA[Investiture of Dr. Valerie Montgomery Rice as President of Morehouse School of Medicine (2014)]]> image/jpeg 1612380093 2021-02-03 19:21:33 1612380093 2021-02-03 19:21:33 643839 image <![CDATA[Errika Moore and Augustine Esogbue (Photo courtesy of Women in Technology [WIT Georgia]) ]]> image/jpeg 1612381348 2021-02-03 19:42:28 1612381348 2021-02-03 19:42:28 643838 image <![CDATA[Warren Hearnes and Augustine Esogbue]]> image/jpeg 1612381274 2021-02-03 19:41:14 1612381274 2021-02-03 19:41:14 <![CDATA[Interview with Professor Emeritus Augustine Esogbue]]>
<![CDATA[Angela Davis to Give Keynote at 2021 Georgia Tech Black History Month Lecture]]> 34932 Angela Davis, political activist, philosopher, educator, and author, will be the keynote speaker at Georgia Tech’s 2021 Black History Month Lecture on Wednesday, Feb. 10. Registration is open at: https://bit.ly/2021BHMLecture.

“Through her activism spanning over 50 years, Davis has been deeply involved in movements for social justice and social reform around the world,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. “As a leader of the Black Power Movement in the 1960s, she contributed to the advancement of the term 'antiracist,' which was later etched in the American lexicon by Ibram X. Kendi’s best-seller, “How to Be an Antiracist.""

She has written 10 books and has lectured throughout the United States, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia and South America. Her recent work has focused on the range of social problems associated with incarceration and the generalized criminalization of communities that are most affected by poverty and racial discrimination. She draws upon her own experiences in the early 1970s as a person who spent 18 months in jail and on trial after being placed on the FBI’s “Ten Most Wanted List.”

Davis has conducted extensive research on issues related to race, gender and imprisonment. Her recent books include “Abolition Democracy” and “Are Prisons Obsolete?” about the abolition of the prison industrial complex, a new edition of “Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass,” and a collection of essays, “The Meaning of Freedom.” Her most recent book of essays, “Freedom Is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement,” was published in February 2016.

After her keynote, Davis will answer questions from viewers. Questions may also be submitted in advance to institutediversity@gatech.edu.

The lecture is sponsored by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and the Georgia Tech African American Student Union.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1612286350 2021-02-02 17:19:10 1612805043 2021-02-08 17:24:03 0 0 news Angela Davis, political activist, philosopher, educator, and author, will be the keynote speaker at Georgia Tech’s 2021 Black History Month Lecture on Feb. 10.

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2021-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2021-02-02 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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<![CDATA[Al Vivian Leads Race at Georgia Tech Conversation]]> 34932 Al Vivian, a national diversity and inclusion facilitator and son of civil rights leader C.T. Vivian, was the keynote speaker for the Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action conversation on Thursday, Jan. 21. The virtual discussion was the second in a series of campus discussions on race.

"Talking about issues of race and racism is hard," said Vice President for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Archie Ervin during the conversation. "Over the past year, in the wake of last summer’s national racial turmoil, marked by the sensless killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery and others, and more recently, the events in our nation's Capitol earlier this month, have made these converrsations even more difficult as concerns about racism and its impact have intensified and continues to bubble to the surface of our national discourse.”

Vivian heads Basic Diversity Inc., a national full-service cultural diversity training and consulting firm best known for its Race Awareness Workshop. His father, a confidant of Martin Luther King Jr., founded the organization more than 45 years ago. The firm has worked with a diverse range of clients and organizations including corporations, nonprofits and, government agencies.

“I’ll start off with a statement that is just outright true: racism in America is nothing new; it’s our original sin. It’s been with us from the beginning,” Vivian said, beginning his presentation. “If you don’t understand race, your future success will be limited.”

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1611776475 2021-01-27 19:41:15 1612812377 2021-02-08 19:26:17 0 0 news Al Vivian, son of civil rights leader C.T. Vivian, was the keynote speaker for the Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action conversation on Thursday, Jan. 21.

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2021-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 2021-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 2021-01-22 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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643499 643499 image <![CDATA[Al Vivian heads Basic Diversity Inc., a full-service cultural diversity training and consulting firm.]]> image/jpeg 1611776536 2021-01-27 19:42:16 1611776536 2021-01-27 19:42:16
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Focus Program Hosted Virtually For First Time In 29-Year History]]> 34932 For almost three decades, the Georgia Tech Focus Program has attracted top, diverse students from across the nation to its campus. The annual graduate-recruitment weekend program provides participants an overview of Georgia Tech’s graduate degree programs, including information on financial resources and assistance with the application and decision-making processes involved in selecting a graduate school. Held the preceding weekend before the federal Martin Luther King Jr. holiday, the 2021 program was hosted virtually for the first time in its 29-year history.

This year’s program brought together over 300 registered participants in a multidimensional interactive virtual platform, where 60% of participants were current and former Focus Scholars.

The typically three-day program was shortened to two days. However, the program still offered participants the same host of opportunities to learn about graduate school at the Institute as its in-person weekend programs have provided.

“Despite the challenges presented by the Covid-19 pandemic, we made the decision to continue the great Focus tradition by utilizing a virtual format which allows us to continue our commitment to making Georgia Tech the most diverse and inclusive technology-focused university in our nation,” said Vice President for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Archie Ervin to participants on the opening evening of the program.

“Even with our virtual format this year, our commitments and programmatic opportunities provided for this year’s Focus Program remain the same as in past years. Georgia Tech’s president, members of our executive leadership team, our academic deans, faculty, and staff are fully engaged to ensure that your 2021 Focus experience will allow you to do what previous Focus participants have done the past 28 years: that is to learn more about the Georgia Tech graduate experience, to explore academic opportunities that align with your educational goals and aspirations, and to meet with faculty and staff who are eager to help you gain the insights and information you need to determine if the Tech graduate experience meets the expectations you have for your career goals.”

President Ángel Cabrera, who earned two graduate degrees from Georgia Tech before becoming the Institute’s 12th president 24 years later, spoke to participants about the program.

“As one of the nation’s premiere diversity recruitment programs, Focus has brought more than 3,000 students from across the U.S. to Georgia Tech, and we're proud to have six former Focus Scholars among our very own faculty, including the new dean of the College of Engineering, Dr. Raheem Beyah," he said. "It’s quite fitting that Focus hosts its annual program preceding the King holiday because its mission stems directly from Dr. King’s message of diversity, justice, and excellence."

Sybrina Atwaters, Tech alumnus, director of OMED: Educational Services and program director of Focus, announced seven Focus award recipients: Brooke Bosley, Kenneth De Jesus, Julia Harrer, Rachel Harvey, Daniel Okegbu, Kantwon Rogers, and Preety Shakya. Two additional Focus Scholars received 2021 Women of Color Initiative (WOCI) Impact Focus awards: De' Aira Bryant and Nettie Brown. 

“The 2021 cohort was unique in a few ways: the first virtual cohort and the first cohort fully empowered to navigate their own Focus experience,” Atwaters said. “At their fingertips, the participants had the ability to capture breakout sessions, issue one-on-one networking requests, instantly share contact details with faculty and alumni, manage direct access to all speakers and panelists, and have on-demand virtual visits to Atlanta attractions.”

The program concluded with a Gold Table discussion moderated by Tech alumnus and Atlanta City Councilmember Andre Dickens, titled “Women of Color in Tech: Shaping the City of Atlanta and Its Future,” featuring Nisha Botchwey, associate dean of Academic Programs with Georgia Tech Professional Education and an associate professor with the School of City and Regional Planning, and Sheila Isbell, chief of Georgia Tech Research Institute’s Software Engineering & Analytics Division. The group discussed a range of topics including how they chose their graduate school career path, the importance of diversity in graduate programs, and self-advocacy.

“It’s good to have your own advisory board, but they can’t all look like you,” Botchwey said. “You have to have people in spaces that you’re not in yet. You have to be willing to stretch yourself” she continued.

Isbell added, in response to a question regarding women of color in tech, “There is a lot of work to do there. As far as being supported or having our work recognized, we are not seeing that. We have to be willing to advocate for each other. We cannot be afraid to self-advocate. We even have to self-nominate sometimes.”

“I am deeply grateful to the more than 80 members of the Georgia Tech community -– deans, chairs, faculty, staff, alumni, and graduate students who came together to make the many components of Focus 2021 possible. Their efforts exhibit Georgia Tech’s commitment to be a leader in diversity, excellence, equity, and inclusion. It is my honor to continue the Focus legacy and lead these efforts,” Atwaters concluded.

This year’s program was dedicated to Shayla Chavis, a North Carolina Central University student and 2020 Focus participant who died last August.

The 2021 program was supported by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, the Office of Minority Educational Development, and the Hopper-Dean Foundation.

To learn more about the Focus Program, visit focus.gatech.edu.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1611876973 2021-01-28 23:36:13 1612311504 2021-02-03 00:18:24 0 0 news The 2021 Focus Program was hosted virtually for the first time in its 29-year history. This year’s program brought together over 300 registered participants in a multidimensional interactive virtual platform.

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2021-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2021-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2021-01-20 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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643620 643598 643597 643620 image <![CDATA[Sybrina Atwaters, Tech alumnus, director of OMED: Educational Services, and program director of Focus, announced seven Focus award recipients during the 2021 program.]]> image/jpeg 1611931282 2021-01-29 14:41:22 1611931282 2021-01-29 14:41:22 643598 image <![CDATA[Participants met virtually with Georgia Tech alumni and faculty during the program.]]> image/png 1611877662 2021-01-28 23:47:42 1612018955 2021-01-30 15:02:35 643597 image <![CDATA[Focus Gold Table discussion featuring Nisha Botchwey and Sheila Isbell, moderated by Andre Dickens]]> image/jpeg 1611877501 2021-01-28 23:45:01 1611936243 2021-01-29 16:04:03
<![CDATA[Award-winning Journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones Leads 2021 Georgia Tech Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture Discussion]]> 34932 Nikole Hannah-Jones, award-winning investigative journalist and creator of The New York Times Magazine’s  “The 1619 Project,” led a discussion of her landmark multimedia initiative at the Institute’s 10th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture on Jan. 14.

“The 1619 Project” delves into the brutal history and lasting legacy of American slavery, for which Hannah-Jones’ powerful introductory essay, “America Wasn’t a Democracy Until Black Americans Made It One,” was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary.

The lecture was just one event in Tech’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. commemorative event series sponsored by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) and the Division of Student Life. Many of the events are held in collaboration with Atlanta’s Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change, a resource center and community institution established in 1968 by King’s widow, Coretta Scott King.

Hannah-Jones covers racial injustice for The New York Times and has spent years chronicling the way official policy has created — and maintains — racial segregation in housing and schools. She has written extensively on the history of racism, school resegregation, and the disarray of hundreds of desegregation orders. She is a 2017 MacArthur fellow and has also won a Peabody Award, two George Polk Awards, and is a three-time National Magazine Award winner.

“It's hard for me to ever really say what the true genesis of ‘The 1619 Project’ was,” Hannah-Jones said during the discussion with IDEI’s Vice President Archie Ervin and Executive Director of Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement Pearl Alexander. “I feel like my work, and my career, and my academic trajectory had been working towards the moment where I pitched the project. I talk about being a high school student and my Black studies teacher giving me a book about the Mayflower. All those years of my education no one mentioned the White Lion,” the English ship that brought the first African slaves to Virginia in 1619. “I really spent a lot of my career trying to show that the legacy of slavery and anti-Blackness has shaped so many of the institutions we see in this country and we render it invisible. I wanted to show that nothing about American life has been untouched by the legacy of slavery.”

“The 1619 Project” is an ongoing initiative that began in August 2019, the 400th anniversary of American slavery. The first edition included 10 essays from Black writers and activists, a photo essay, and a collection of poems and fiction by an additional 16 writers. The project later grew to include live events and a podcast. Essays include “How False Beliefs in Physical Racial Difference Still Live in Medicine Today,” by Linda Villarosa and “What Does a Traffic Jam in Atlanta Have to do With Segregation? Quite A Lot,” by Kevin M. Kruse.

“We didn't go and do our own original historical research. We didn't unearth truths that were not known before,” Hannah-Jones said. “We intentionally said we are going to tell the story of America through the lens of slavery. We are going to shift from the exceptionalism. The role of history in this country has been in service of exceptionality — in service of the idea that we were the most liberatory country ever created. We were a country of those ideals, but we were also a country of the practice of slavery.”

Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera offered closing remarks after Hannah-Jones’ discussion, saying, “As a new American myself, as an American by choice, I am fascinated by the founding narrative of the American republic.

“The leading role that Black Americans have played in this country’s journey has been essential for all of us,” he continued. “I invite every member of our community to go to ‘The 1619 Project’ website. Dig in, read, and challenge your thinking. Come together as a community, and think about how we can make our community at Georgia Tech better — and how we can contribute to making true on the American promise.”

To learn more about the 2021 Georgia Tech Martin Luther King Jr. commemorative event series, visit: https://diversity.gatech.edu/mlk-celebration.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1611079021 2021-01-19 17:57:01 1611083831 2021-01-19 19:17:11 0 0 news Nikole Hannah-Jones, award-winning investigative journalist and creator of The New York Times Magazine’s  “The 1619 Project,” led a discussion of her landmark multimedia initiative at the Institute’s 10th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture on Jan. 14.

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2021-01-19T00:00:00-05:00 2021-01-19T00:00:00-05:00 2021-01-19 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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643080 643080 image <![CDATA[Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of "The 1619 Project."]]> image/jpeg 1611081346 2021-01-19 18:35:46 1611081346 2021-01-19 18:35:46
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Martin Luther King Jr. Recognition Event Series Set for 2021]]> 34932 The stage is set for the 2021 Georgia Tech Martin Luther King Jr. celebration and commemorative event series. From Jan. 11 – 26, the campus community and public are invited to a dozen mostly virtual events, including the Institute’s 10th annual MLK lecture featuring Nikole Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and creator of the New York Times Magazine’s landmark “The 1619 Project.”

The annual series is sponsored by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) and the Division of Student Life. Many of the events are in collaboration with Atlanta’s Martin Luther King Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (“The King Center”), a resource center and community institution established in 1968 by King’s widow, Coretta Scott King, shortly after his assassination.

I am thrilled with our longstanding partnership with Georgia Tech,” said Barbara Harrison, director of The King Center’s External Affairs, Strategic Partnerships, and Programs. “Together, we have established a learning environment at Georgia Tech that is designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's nonviolence philosophy and methodology for a younger generation of critical thinkers. I look forward to these students making profound advancements as they address social justice concerns and become influential global leaders. This is a testament to our efforts over the years.” 

“As a result of our collaborations with The King Center, we have given the students at Georgia Tech the rare opportunity to witness and experience, in person, the historic Ebenezer Baptist Church’s Annual Commemorative Service honoring Dr. King,” added Archie Ervin, vice president for IDEI and MLK event series planning committee chair. “We are thankful that our students are able to witness this and other events that are part of the series each year.”

Other events include Tech’s annual MLK Day of Service on Jan. 18, the MLK Student Celebration on Jan. 21, and a weekslong exploration of His Truth is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope, a biography of the late Georgia congressman, civil rights titan, and King advisor and confidant.

“I am honored to serve as co-chair for the MLK celebration planning committee and am pleased that we have organized a stellar lineup of programs and activities for the Institute and beyond, despite Covid-19 restrictions,” said Stephanie Ray, associate dean of students and director of Student Diversity Programs. “Since many of the events are virtual, I encourage members of the Tech community to participate in as many of the opportunities as possible. The 2021 theme, ‘The Fierce Urgency of Building the Beloved Community,’ is a timely topic.”

In addition to Ervin, Harrison, and Ray, 2021 MLK celebration and commemorative planning committee members include: Tamara Ballou, Etienne Batiste, Sirocus Barnes, Jorge Breton, Jeremy Brown, Donald Bullock (The King Center), Christopher Burke, Courtney Hill, Peyton Kliewer, Keona Lewis, Travis Liggins, Tabitha Lowe, Marina Martin, Stephanie Merrick, S. Gordon Moore Jr., Sherry Murray, Sarah Strohmenger, Sara Warner, and Bill Winders.

To learn more about the event series, visit: diversity.gatech.edu/mlk-celebration.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1607458058 2020-12-08 20:07:38 1607532338 2020-12-09 16:45:38 0 0 news The stage is set for the campus' 2021 Martin Luther King Jr. celebration and commemorative event series, featuring several mostly virtual events.

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2020-12-08T00:00:00-05:00 2020-12-08T00:00:00-05:00 2020-12-08 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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641970 641971 641932 641970 image <![CDATA[Martin Luther King Jr. was born January 15, 1929, in Atlanta. MLK Day, an American federal holiday, is observed the third Monday in January each year.]]> image/jpeg 1607520320 2020-12-09 13:25:20 1607520422 2020-12-09 13:27:02 641971 image <![CDATA[Nikole Hannah-Jones, creator of “The 1619 Project," will be the featured speaker at the 2021 MLK lecture.]]> image/jpeg 1607521473 2020-12-09 13:44:33 1607521473 2020-12-09 13:44:33 641932 image <![CDATA[The 2021 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration and Commemoration Event Series at Georgia Tech]]> image/png 1607436513 2020-12-08 14:08:33 1607436513 2020-12-08 14:08:33 <![CDATA[2021 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration and Commemorative Event Series]]> <![CDATA[2021 MLK Celebration and Commemorative Event Series Line-Up]]> <![CDATA[Registration Site for the 2021 Martin Luther King Jr. Lecture Featuring Nikole Hannah-Jones]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council Formed to Further Address Campus Disparity, Bias, and Inequity]]> 34932 More than 50 representatives from across the campus have been appointed by President Ángel Cabrera to the newly formed Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council (GTDEIC). The Council will identify issues of campus racial and gender disparity, bias, and inequity to be addressed in order to deliver upon the Institute’s vision of diversity and inclusion. The members represent diverse voices and perspectives from staff, faculty, and students. Their initial meeting will be Nov. 30.

The GTDEIC will continuously monitor and assess the Institute’s progress on achieving its goals for becoming a model campus community for diversity, equity, and inclusion and develop evidenced, informed recommendations, which they will submit periodically to Cabrera and the Institute’s Executive Leadership Team for consideration in developing strategic actions.

“Our Diversity and Inclusion Council is one of several action steps announced this past summer to deliver on our promise of inclusion,” said President Cabrera. “As outlined in our new strategic plan, we are striving to remove barriers to access and success, and to build an inclusive community where people of all backgrounds have the opportunity to learn and contribute to our mission. I am grateful to the individuals who volunteered to serve as inaugural council members, and look forward to working closely with them as they identify issues and propose new courses of action.”

Campus research has revealed discrepancies in the satisfaction levels of various groups. The 2017 Faculty and Staff Climate Assessment Surveys and 2018 Student Climate Assessment Survey revealed high levels of faculty, staff, and student satisfaction on a wide array of campus experiences on a number of dimensions measured across multiple social identities, such as faculty rank, job function, gender, and race.

“The surveys also revealed there are some important differences in levels of satisfaction reported regarding some campus experiences,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI). “Disaggregation of the data by social identity reveal lower levels of satisfaction with campus experiences on a number of dimensions measured by the survey that deserve attention and deeper exploration to understand why the differences exist and what action steps, if any, could be taken to address root causes of problematic or potentially adverse differences of experiences for campus members.”

“In sum, the climate assessment reports help us to understand our strengths and suggest areas where we should focus our attention to improve experiences of some members of the Tech community,” Ervin added. “Given the baseline data obtained by the Climate Assessment Surveys, and the recent development of college-level diversity councils, the establishment of an Institute-wide council on diversity, equity, and inclusion is both timely and necessary for the next iteration of an improved overarching strategy to achieve Tech’s goals for diversity and inclusion.”

The GTDEIC will be charged with the following objectives:

The group will be chaired by Ervin, and Pearl Alexander, executive director of IDEI’s Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement, will serve as vice chair. The GTDEIC is composed of representatives from across the campus academic and administrative units, faculty, staff and student governance (undergraduate and graduate) and other faculty and staff who enhance the diversity of perspective of the Council.

In addition to Ervin and Alexander, council members include the following:

Chaouki Abdallah, Maryam Alavi, Sonia Alverez-Robinson, Nelson Baker, Raheem Beyah, Terry Blum, Barrett Carson, Kim Cobb, Carol Colatrella, Karie Davis-Nozemack, Melanie DeMaeyer, Stephen Eick, Samuel Ellis, Kaye Husbands Fealing, Bonnie Ferri, Byron Fitch, Kelly Fox, Mary Frank Fox, Steven Girardot, Rebecca “Beki” Grinter, Martha Grover, Kim Harrington, Diley Hernández, LouLou Hong, Darren Hubbard, James Hudgens, Javier Irizarry, Charles Isbell, Denise Johnson-Marshall, Paul Kohn, Renee Kopkowski, Keona Lewis, Susan Lozier, Joe Ludlum, Steve McLaughlin, Joseph Montoya, Tegra Myanna, Frank Neville, Loraine Phillips, Stephanie Ray, Elora Raymond, Michelle Rinehart, David Ross, Leslie Sharp, Todd Stansbury, John Stein, Yuanzhi Tang, Frank Trammer, Richard Utz, and Mitchell Walker.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1606093671 2020-11-23 01:07:51 1632247877 2021-09-21 18:11:17 0 0 news More than 50 representatives from across the campus have been appointed by President Ángel Cabrera to the newly formed Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council which will identify issues of campus racial and gender disparity, bias, and inequity to be addressed in order to deliver upon the Institute’s vision of diversity and inclusion.

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2020-11-23T00:00:00-05:00 2020-11-23T00:00:00-05:00 2020-11-23 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
641530 641531 641530 image <![CDATA[Archie Ervin (left) will serve as chair of the newly formed Georgia Tech Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Council. Pearl Alexander (right) will serve as vice chair.]]> image/jpeg 1606094203 2020-11-23 01:16:43 1606094203 2020-11-23 01:16:43 641531 image <![CDATA[“Our Diversity and Inclusion Council is one of several action steps announced this past summer to deliver on our promise of inclusion,” said Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera.]]> image/jpeg 1606094759 2020-11-23 01:25:59 1606094759 2020-11-23 01:25:59
<![CDATA[African American Male Initiative Hosts Fall Leadership Summit]]> 34932 The African American Male Initiative (AAMI) at Georgia Tech hosted its Fall Leadership Summit on Oct. 22, featuring a host of discussions led by campus and community leaders and engaging sessions for students.

“AAMI is very excited to host the Fall Leadership Summit,” said Jelani Liddell, assistant director of Outreach Initiatives for OMED: Educational Services and AAMI program director. “Like most other events this year, we’ve had to transition to a virtual format. However, we will maintain many of the physical components of the summit such as a main keynote, concurrent sessions, a campus partner expo, and attendee networking opportunities.

“We have gathered a very impressive group of strong African American male leaders,” Liddell added shortly before the event, “all who are doing great things in their respective fields. This year we will have several sessions at the summit to explore ways our students can engage strategically to improve their communities. It is our hope that our students exchange perspectives and leave fulfilled, renewed, and better equipped.”

Months before the event, the initiative was renewed for the Institute for the tenth consecutive fiscal year by the University System of Georgia.

“We continue to be honored and humbled by the confidence the University System of Georgia places in our institution to assist in its efforts to increase the educational opportunity, performance, and graduation rates of its Black male students,” said S. Gordon Moore Jr., executive director for the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion. “This initiative continues to prove successful and beneficial to Georgia Tech, and the entire university system as a whole.”

The summit featured a full day of informative sessions and discussions designed around five themes: voting and activism; leadership and activism; PWIs (Predominately White Institutions) and activism; athletes and activism; and innovation and activism. In addition to Moore, speakers included Georgia Tech’s Raheem Beyah, vice president for Interdisciplinary Research and professor with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Samuel Graham, school chair and professor with the School of Mechanical Engineering; and alumni William “Bill” Stanley and Atlanta City Council member and Georgia Tech Alumni Board of Directors member Andre Dickens.

Guest speakers included Damon Williams, chief catalyst for the National Inclusion Excellence Leadership Academy; Ray Dempsey Jr., vice president and chief diversity officer with BP America and president of the BP Foundation; and author and social activist Shaun King.

Learn more about the African American Male Initiative at Georgia Tech by visiting https://omed.gatech.edu/programs/aami.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1606185450 2020-11-24 02:37:30 1606226846 2020-11-24 14:07:26 0 0 news The African American Male Initiative at Georgia Tech hosted its Fall Leadership Summit on Oct. 22, featuring a host of discussions led by campus and community leaders and engaging sessions for students.

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2020-10-26T00:00:00-04:00 2020-10-26T00:00:00-04:00 2020-10-26 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
641614 641615 641614 image <![CDATA[Georgia Tech professors Raheem Beyah and Samuel Graham were presenters at the AAMI Fall Summit on Oct. 22.]]> image/jpeg 1606185951 2020-11-24 02:45:51 1606185951 2020-11-24 02:45:51 641615 image <![CDATA[Ray Dempsey Jr., vice president and chief diversity officer, BP America; president, BP Foundation]]> image/png 1606186171 2020-11-24 02:49:31 1606186222 2020-11-24 02:50:22 <![CDATA[OMED, AAMI Host Third Annual Academic Empowerment Fair at Georgia Tech]]>
<![CDATA[Author Sonia Nazario Guest Speaker at Third Annual Georgia Tech Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture]]> 34932 Author Sonia Nazario gave the keynote address at Georgia Tech’s third annual Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture.

The virtual lecture was part of Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion’s Intercultural Lecture Series and one in a series of 2020 Hispanic Heritage Month events sponsored by the Office of Hispanic Initiatives (OHI).

Nazario, an award-winning journalist whose stories have tackled some of this country’s most intractable problems, such as poverty, drug addiction, and immigration, has won two Pulitzer Prizes. She is best known for “Enrique’s Journey,” her story of a Honduran boy’s struggle to find his mother in the U.S. Published as a series in the Los Angeles Times, “Enrique’s Journey” won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 2003. It was turned into a book and became a national bestseller.

“Latinx are nearly 1 in 5 Americans now in the United States, so I think putting a focus on Latinos is really important,” said Nazario.

“I have written about many social justice issues as a reporter, but it was really my past that has guided me to fight for perhaps the most vulnerable, I think – children who arrive alone at our borders and are often running from harm,” she said before launching into harrowing stories of journeying with children to cross Central American countries to reach relatives (often parents) in the U.S. and discussion about the need for better allowances for migrants to enter the country.

“When a child is knocking at our door and is in danger, I believe a country like ours should open the door," she added.

“Sonia Nazario is truly committed to social justice," said Jorge Breton, director of OHI. "Her lecture was powerful. Learning about the struggles and experiences of many immigrants gave me and others a different perspective about the conditions they face in their native countries, made us reflect on what we as individuals and as a nation could do to help them, and provided us with a better appreciation of what it means to live in this country."

To learn more about 2020 Hispanic Heritage Month at Georgia Tech, visit: https://hispanicoffice.gatech.edu/events/hispanic-heritage-month.

NOTE: This story has been edited to remove the video recording of the lecture.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1600916236 2020-09-24 02:57:16 1601318238 2020-09-28 18:37:18 0 0 news Author Sonia Nazario gave the keynote address at Georgia Tech’s third annual Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture.

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2020-09-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-23 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
639507 639507 image <![CDATA[Author and journalist Sonia Nazario gave the keynote at the Sept. 22, 2020 Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture]]> image/png 1600916977 2020-09-24 03:09:37 1600916977 2020-09-24 03:09:37
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech’s Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Nu Beta Chapter Unveils Paintings Commemorating 40th Anniversary and Celebrating Black Women in STEM]]> 35141 Join Georgia Tech’s Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®, Nu Beta Chapter and Alumnae Members for a live art dedication and celebration on Friday, October 16, 2020 at 5:30 p.m. on Georgia Tech Arts’ Facebook page. The chapter is celebrating 40 years on campus with highlights from the past four decades, the launch of a new scholarship fundraising campaign, and the unveiling of two commissioned paintings by Atlanta, Georgia-based artist Tracy Murrell. Murrell will also join the festivities for a live Q&A with viewers. You can register below for reminders and to submit your questions in advance. The event is free and open to all.

Register for #NB40 Art Unveiling

Support Nu Beta Endowment*
*
Please include "Nu Beta Endowment" under "Other Designations."

Georgia Tech Arts is excited to support Georgia Tech’s Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®, Nu Beta Chapter as a marketing and event streaming partner.


About #NB40 Art Commission
In 1979, the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated®, Nu Beta Chapter was chartered at Georgia Tech and became the first black sorority recognized by the Georgia Tech Pan Hellenic Council. In honor of the organization's 40th anniversary, alumna Maria Bailey Benson, IE 1992 and MSIE 1994, led the commission of two artworks to recognize all of the contributions of Nu Beta Chapter and Alumnae to the Tech community over the past four decades and as a tribute to all Black women in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). The two pieces, Sister and Her Mind is Open, will be displayed prominently in Crosland Tower, Georgia Tech's library, for all to enjoy for years to come. Tracy Murrell is the artist selected for the project and is a prominent Atlanta-based artist and curator who describes her work as "a celebration of the beauty and grace that I see in all women of color."

“The members of Nu Beta have always been campus leaders. As a continuation of that leadership, alumnae of Nu Beta commissioned a prominent black female artist, Tracy Murrell, to create two pieces of artwork to celebrate Black women in STEM. These artworks are the first commissioned artworks located in the new Georgia Tech library, as well as the first artworks commissioned by a Georgia Tech Black Greek organization,” said Benson.


Support the Nu Beta Endowment Scholarship
The #NB40 Art Commission also coincides with the launch of a new campaign supporting the Nu Beta Endowment Scholarship previously established by AKA alumnae.

According to Benson, “Nu Beta alumnae’s philanthropic leadership at Georgia Tech will now include a named endowed scholarship, annual donations to Roll Call to support the undergrads, and permanent commissioned artwork in the library where we ALL spent countless hours persevering. Nu Beta has had less than 250 members over the past 40-some years but has an indelible legacy of being ‘small, but mighty!’”  

To support the Nu Beta Endowment Scholarship, please click below and include "Nu Beta Endowment" under "Other Designations."

Donate Today

]]> Kelly Pierce 1 1600873480 2020-09-23 15:04:40 1600894175 2020-09-23 20:49:35 0 0 news 2020-09-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-23 00:00:00 639492 639494 639492 image <![CDATA[Tracy Murrell Artist Photo]]> image/jpeg 1600893736 2020-09-23 20:42:16 1600894056 2020-09-23 20:47:36 639494 image <![CDATA[Georgia Tech’s Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated Nu Beta Chapter]]> image/jpeg 1600894021 2020-09-23 20:47:01 1600894021 2020-09-23 20:47:01 <![CDATA[Register]]>
<![CDATA[2020 Georgia Tech Diversity Symposium Focuses on Disability Awareness and Inclusion]]> 34932 The 2020 Georgia Tech Diversity Symposium, Understanding Accessibility as Inclusion: Georgia Tech's Pathway to Accessibility, was presented virtually for the first time in the program’s 12-year history on Sept. 9.

Hosted by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI), the event featured campus presenters discussing disability awareness and its importance to diversity, inclusion, and the campus community, and more than 600 viewers tuned in. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act, signed into law on July 26, 1990, by President George H.W. Bush.

“Unfortunately, many members of the Tech community have a limited understanding of the term ‘access’ when it comes to understanding the myriad challenges faced by some members of our community,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for IDEI, ahead of the event. “Many of us understand issues of physical access to facilities and technologies. However, fewer realize that many members of our community face additional barriers — both visible and invisible to most of us.”

Featured speaker Haben Girma, the first deaf-blind person to graduate from Harvard Law School and author of Haben: The Deafblind Woman Who Conquered Harvard Law School, opened the event and relayed the importance of disability inclusion and disability technologies.

“If we can harness more awareness between disability and technology and innovation, everyone will benefit,” Girma said, speaking with the assistance of a hearing translator and braille computer.

“I have a braille computer; along the bottom are dots. I run my fingers over the dots and feel the patterns,” Girma demonstrated. “The patterns of the dots make braille. During this presentation, this is what I’m using for communication. I have an assistant who will be typing what people are saying.”

Girma urged viewers to let go of the idea that disabilities are a burden. “We have to resist those stories and instead reframe what disability means.” She described winning battles while at Harvard Law (such as successfully arguing for braille menus in campus cafeterias) and learning to salsa dance and surf. Today, she travels the world teaching the benefits of choosing inclusion.

The event also featured three panel presentations and discussions, including a group who discussed their experiences with their disabilities on campus and in everyday life.

“Awareness is only one part of it,” said Danny Housley, assistive technology manager with Tools for Life, part of the College of Design’s Center for Inclusive Design and Innovation (CIDI). “I use a white cane and I’m blind. You’re now aware that I have a disability — what does that change? We want to move toward acceptance of disability and for people to look at it like a trait, like anything else. I may be blind, but that doesn’t mean that I’m incapable of working.”

“I think this is a great step toward things that we need to be doing more of,” added Liz Persaud, also a CIDI staffer and panelist. “Recognizing that we have a diversity symposium and being able to focus specifically on disability issues is unbelievably important.”

Other panels focused on Tech-centered disability technology research and development, design, and Georgia Tech’s IT accessibility policies.

“The 2020 Diversity Symposium raised critical awareness of accessibility issues and exclusion that many in our Georgia Tech community and around the world face due to poor design of the built and digital environment,” said Chantal Kerssens, panelist and CIDI’s executive director and director of research. “Disabilities, permanent and temporary, are much more common than we think. Removing barriers and designing for inclusion opens up society and unlocks joy and productivity from which we all stand to benefit.”

The symposium also featured live captioning from CIDI.

“The Center for Inclusive Design and Innovation was a proud partner in planning the event and we were proud to share our lived experiences, our scholarship, and our service to communities around the country,” Kerssens added.

The event ended with the annual awards presented to this year’s Faces of Inclusive Excellence honorees and the Diversity Champion Awards honorees, who were recognized for their achievements in accessibility and inclusion on campus. They included Cassie S. Mitchell, assistant professor, Biomedical Engineering (faculty winner); Johan “John” Rempel, UX/ICT quality assurance manager, CIDI (staff winner); Nandita Gupta, graduate student, Human-Computer Interaction (student winner); and the Writing and Communication Program in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts School of Literature, Media, and Communication (unit winner).

“This year’s Diversity Symposium told the story that every person in the Tech community is valued and entitled to full access to all that we have to offer to fulfill each person’s aspirations, Ervin added. “Seeing access as an issue of inclusion demonstrates that everyone is welcomed and that we should all be dedicated to eliminating barriers of any kind for our community members.”

To learn more and to view the event’s panel recordings, visit: diversity.gatech.edu/12th-annual-georgia-tech-diversity-symposium.

A full transcript of the event is also available here

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1600370576 2020-09-17 19:22:56 1600715357 2020-09-21 19:09:17 0 0 news The 2020 Georgia Tech Diversity Symposium featured campus presenters discussing disability awareness and its importance to diversity, inclusion, and the campus community. The event was hosted virtually for the first time in the program's history.

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2020-09-16T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-16T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-16 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
639242 639274 639240 639238 639244 639237 639242 image <![CDATA[Girma authored "Haben: The Deafblind Woman Who Conquered Harvard Law School"]]> image/jpeg 1600371399 2020-09-17 19:36:39 1600382243 2020-09-17 22:37:23 639274 image <![CDATA[Girma with her braille computer]]> image/jpeg 1600394087 2020-09-18 01:54:47 1600470314 2020-09-18 23:05:14 639240 image <![CDATA[Girma became the first deafblind person to graduate from Harvard Law School]]> image/png 1600371185 2020-09-17 19:33:05 1600371281 2020-09-17 19:34:41 639238 image <![CDATA[Panelist and Center for Inclusive Design and Innovation staff member Danny Housely]]> image/png 1600371023 2020-09-17 19:30:23 1600371023 2020-09-17 19:30:23 639244 image <![CDATA[Event panelist Liz Persaud]]> image/png 1600371887 2020-09-17 19:44:47 1600371887 2020-09-17 19:44:47 639237 image <![CDATA[The 2020 Diversity Symposium also recognized Faces of Inclusive Excellence and Diversity Champion Award honorees]]> image/jpeg 1600370761 2020-09-17 19:26:01 1600370761 2020-09-17 19:26:01 <![CDATA[Ivan Allen College Faculty, Staff,and Students Honored for Diversity and Inclusion]]> <![CDATA[Diversity Symposium Celebrates Trailblazers]]>
<![CDATA[Steven McLaughlin Named Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at Georgia Tech]]> 27299 Steven McLaughlin will assume the role of Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs effective October 1, 2020.

“After an extensive national search, the candidate who rose to the top was our own Steve McLaughlin, the current Dean of our top-ranking College of Engineering,” said Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera. “Steve has served in leadership roles at Georgia Tech for nearly 25 years and is co-chairing the Steering Committee for the Institute’s new strategic plan, which will be launched later this fall. He is an inclusive leader who puts words into action as evidenced by the flagship CREATE-X program for student entrepreneurship that he helped develop and launch six years ago, as well as the work he’s done across campus in the areas of diversity, equity, and inclusion, and student mental health and well-being, which he is so passionate about.”

Aside from his proven record in championing innovation, McLaughlin’s strengths also align with the Institute’s new strategic themes of amplifying impact, expanding access, cultivating well-being, leading by example, and connecting globally.

He served as deputy director of Georgia Tech-Lorraine for two years and subsequently became the Institute’s first Vice Provost for International Initiatives and the Steven A. Denning Chair in Global Engagement. In addition, he served as the Steve W. Chaddick School Chair in the School of Electrical Engineering before serving as Dean and Southern Company Chair in the College of Engineering. He has also focused efforts to grow diversity, equity, and inclusion in the College of Engineering.

“The College of Engineering has been consistently ranked by Diverse Issues in Higher Education as number one in engineering doctoral degrees awarded to African Americans and is the largest producer of engineering degrees awarded to women and underrepresented minority students,” Cabrera said. “I very much appreciate Steve’s contributions to these outcomes and his commitment to expanding access to students of all backgrounds.”

During his three-year tenure as Dean and Southern Company Chair of the College of Engineering at Georgia Tech, the College has continued to rank among the country’s top five engineering institutions. The U.S. News & World Report 2021 “Best Colleges” undergraduate rankings announced yesterday reinforced the success of the College under McLaughlin’s leadership. The Institute remains ranked No. 4 for best undergraduate engineering programs overall, and six of the 10 programs are ranked No. 1 among public universities. The College also received more than $270 million in research awards in 2019.

“It is a dream come true to step into the role of Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at Georgia Tech, a top 10 public university, and a place I truly love,” said McLaughlin. “I am filling big shoes as Dr. Rafael Bras steps down, and I am grateful for his guidance over the years. I intend to build on his work while driving forward the strategy we’ve built to develop leaders who advance the human condition.”

An 18-person advisory committee, co-chaired by Dr. Charles Isbell, Dean of the College of Computing and John P. Imlay Jr. Chair, and Dr. Susan Lozier, Dean of the College of Sciences and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair, conducted a thorough national search with the support of Heidrick & Struggles.

“I extend my deepest gratitude to Charles, Susan, and the entire search committee for the work they did to evaluate an extraordinary pool of candidates and present a talented and diverse set of choices,” said Cabrera. “Even in the midst of the challenges we’ve faced with Covid-19, this group continued to move forward to identify an impressive slate of candidates. Their work helped me select the candidate who will help lead Georgia Tech into the next decade of innovation, research, and academic excellence.”

McLaughlin fills the role after a decade of leadership with Dr. Rafael Bras in the position. During that time, Georgia Tech established itself among the leading public universities in the nation. Among his many accomplishments at Georgia Tech, Bras launched the Commission on Creating the Next in Education, an Institute-wide effort to shape the future of higher education. Under his leadership, Georgia Tech launched the pioneering Online Master of Science in Computer Science (OMSCS) program, as well as subsequent online degree programs in analytics and cybersecurity that, together, enroll more than 12,000 students globally. This semester the work Bras did on Library Next, a multimillion-dollar, technology-focused reimagining of the intellectual center of the campus was completed as the final library building opened in the center of East Campus.

“I am grateful for the lasting impact that Rafael’s leadership has had,” said Cabrera. “I very much look forward to working with Steve to build on that very solid foundation as we find new ways to deliver on our mission of Progress and Service.”

Details about an interim Dean for the College of Engineering and plans to begin a search for a permanent replacement will be announced in the coming weeks.

 

About Dr. Steven McLaughlin 

Dr. Steven W. McLaughlin is currently the Dean and Southern Company Chair of the College of Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He currently serves as the chief academic officer of the College and provides leadership to more than 500 faculty members and more than 17,000 students at the largest engineering college in the country.

McLaughlin received the B.S.E.E. degree from Northwestern University, the M.S.E. degree from Princeton University, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. He joined the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Tech in September 1996. From 2012 to 2017 he was the Steve W. Chaddick School Chair in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and from 2007 to 2012, he was Vice Provost for International Initiatives and Steven A. Denning Chair in Global Engagement.

In 2014, he co-founded CREATE-X, a campuswide effort to instill entrepreneurial confidence in students and help them launch companies. The program has successfully launched 159 student-led companies and engaged 4,000 students in the principles and practice of evidence-based entrepreneurship.

In 2011, he was awarded the honor Chevalier de l`Ordre Nationale du Merite, (Knight of the French National Order of Merit), the second highest civilian award given by the Republic of France. He was the first Georgia Tech recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) where he was cited by President Bill Clinton "for leadership in the development of high-capacity, nonbinary optical recording formats." He is a past President of the IEEE Information Theory Society and a Fellow of the IEEE.

His research interests are in the general area of communications and information theory. His research group has published in the areas of forward error correction and equalization in wireless communications, magnetic/optical data storage, and data security and privacy. His group has published and presented more than 250 papers in journals and conferences and holds 36 U.S. patents. 

]]> Michael Hagearty 1 1600179774 2020-09-15 14:22:54 1600774533 2020-09-22 11:35:33 0 0 news McLaughlin will assume the lead academic role effective October 1, 2020. 

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2020-09-15T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-15T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-15 00:00:00 Blair Meeks
Institute Communications

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631934 631934 image <![CDATA[McLaughlin]]> image/jpeg 1580455237 2020-01-31 07:20:37 1580455237 2020-01-31 07:20:37 <![CDATA[Office of the Provost]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Receives INSIGHT Into Diversity HEED Award for Seventh Consecutive Year]]> 34932 Georgia Institute of Technology has received the 2020 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, one of the oldest and largest diversity-focused publications in higher education. As a recipient of the annual HEED Award — a national honor recognizing colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion — Georgia Tech will be featured along with 89 other recipients in the magazine's November 2020 issue.

This is the seventh consecutive year the Institute has been named a HEED Award recipient.

“Our diversity and inclusion core values support our vision for building and sustaining an inclusive and welcoming community,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI). “In the years ahead, these values will also undergird our commitment to ensuring success for all our students, staff, and faculty so they can thrive and succeed unimpeded by social barriers.”

Open to all colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada, the award measures an institution’s level of achievement and intensity of commitment in regard to broadening diversity and inclusion on campus through initiatives, programs, and outreach; student recruitment, retention, and completion; and hiring practices for faculty and staff.

The HEED Award announcement comes on the heels of Tech’s enrollment of a record number of first-year, transfer, and dual-enrollment students this fall and IDEI’s creation of Diversity and Inclusion Education and Training earlier this year to lead a broad range of education and training focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion for the campus community.

"The HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees — and best practices for both — continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion," said Lenore Pearlstein, co-publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. "As we continue to see a record number of HEED Award applicants each year, nearly every school tells us they use the application itself as a tool to create new programs and to benchmark their accomplishments across campus. The process allows them to reflect on their successes and also determine where more work needs to be done. We also continue to raise the standards in selecting HEED institutions."

To learn more and for a full listing of 2020 HEED Award recipients, visit https://www.insightintodiversity.com/about-the-heed-award/2020-recipients/.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1598984379 2020-09-01 18:19:39 1598991183 2020-09-01 20:13:03 0 0 news For the seventh consecutive year, Georgia Tech has been named a HEED Award recipient — a national honor recognizing colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion.

]]>
2020-09-01T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-01T00:00:00-04:00 2020-09-01 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
638678 638678 image <![CDATA[For the seventh consecutive year, Georgia Tech has been named a HEED Award recipient.]]> image/jpeg 1598984892 2020-09-01 18:28:12 1598984892 2020-09-01 18:28:12
<![CDATA[40th Challenge Program Hosts 75 Incoming Students]]> 34932 The 2020 OMED: Educational Services (OMED) Challenge program operated a little differently this year.

The typically five-week summer intensive academic program was shortened to three.

The incoming first-year student participants engaged in the program’s various community, athletic, and corporate activities while wearing protective masks.

Academic courses were hybrid – and smaller – to accommodate for physical distancing.

Students resided in single-occupancy dorm rooms in the campus’ Gray House (formerly known as Fourth Street Apartments).

A smaller cohort of 75 were welcomed this year.

Still, the 40th iteration of the program successfully upheld its pledge to prepare incoming first-year underrepresented minority students for college life at Georgia Tech by addressing the 7Cs: computer science, chemistry, calculus, communication, career development, cultural competency, and community service.

“The 2020 Challenge program will be remembered as historic for at least two reasons,” said Archie Ervin, vice president of Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion on a recorded video message during the program’s closing ceremonies on August 13.

“First, you as members of Challenge 2020 helped defy the odds and overcome obstacles the Covid-19 pandemic presented to us which threatened our chances for even conducting Challenge for its 40th straight year. Second, history will acknowledge all of you for doing all the right things and staying focused on your academic goals that helped make Challenge 2020 successful in spite of the odds against us,” he continued. “Even though Challenge 2020 was shortened by a couple of weeks, I’m confident we accomplished all of our important goals and objects for the program.”

“Challenge has been one of the best experiences of my life,” said Cameron Heard, an incoming biomedical engineering major. “The academic courses here were very rigorous and I feel like they’ve prepared me for the courses I’ll see at Tech. Most importantly, I feel Challenge has helped me grow overall as a person.”

In addition to the academic rigor, participants took part in virtual dinners with corporate partners; performed community service activities; participated for a scavenger hunt; made new friends during the opening weekend cookout; and battled the rapids of the Ocoee River during the annual white water rafting excursion – all while practicing safe measures in the wake of the pandemic.

“We implemented additional measures for Challenge outside of what many of our participants were used to practicing on their own, so naturally there was a period of adjustment,” said Jelani Liddell, OMED’s assistant director of Outreach Initiatives and director of the program. “Our Challenge counselors did a great job monitoring and reminding students of safety protocols. And our participants understood the precautions and adjusted very well to our modified program.”

Some of the added precautions were: requesting participants to self-isolate prior to arrival on campus; single-occupancy housing on campus; restricted travel off campus; required isolation upon non-essential off-campus travel; required face coverings in all public spaces; body temperature monitoring; designated isolation rooms; and physical distancing guidelines.

“Our hybrid-program model allowed us to maintain safe distancing while still maintaining the engagement dynamic which consisted of participant social interaction and peer relationship development,” added Liddell. “We wanted to ensure that physical distancing did not assume social distancing. We believe we were able to accomplish that this year.”

The closing program was conducted across two ceremonies to account for physical distancing. Awards for most improved and exemplary academic performance were presented to six students in the program's computer science, mathematics, and chemistry courses.

Corporate sponsor BP joined with OMED to support the recognition of 35 students for outstanding academic performance, including 18 who earned a 4.0 GPA during the program.

“Coming into college, I wasn’t sure what to expect,” said Nathnael Aberra, a computer science major, ahead of the closing. “But Challenge has put my worries to rest. I feel great that I got the opportunity to give myself this head start at Tech.”

This year’s closing ceremonies also included the presentation of a new award on behalf of Tech's Center of Engineering Education and Diversity (CEED): the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering (NACME) offered awards to five Challenge students eligible to receive an annual scholarship. “You are an impressive, proven, and resilient group," said Sybrina Atwaters, director of OMED and academic coordinator of Challenge. “During unprecedented times, this cohort has confronted every challenge placed before them, collectively earned over $30,000 in incentives for the upcoming Fall semester, and established a new Challenge academic record."

The 2020 program hosted participants from seven states with an ethnicity breakdown of 59% Black/African American, 32% Latinx, 4% Asian, and 4% two or more ethnicities. Student participants majored in more than a dozen areas of study.

This year's program was supported by corporate sponsors BP, Eaton, and Procter & Gamble.

To learn more about the Challenge program, visit omed.gatech.edu/programs/challenge.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1598377886 2020-08-25 17:51:26 1599058525 2020-09-02 14:55:25 0 0 news The 2020 OMED Challenge program successfully hosted 75 incoming first-year student participants in the wake of Covid-19.

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2020-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2020-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2020-08-25 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
638397 638398 638399 638400 638401 638411 638412 638402 638397 image <![CDATA[Student participants of the 2020 Challenge program]]> image/jpeg 1598379720 2020-08-25 18:22:00 1598380995 2020-08-25 18:43:15 638398 image <![CDATA[Participants were required to exercise physical distancing and to wear masks during the program]]> image/jpeg 1598379870 2020-08-25 18:24:30 1598379870 2020-08-25 18:24:30 638399 image <![CDATA[Student participants check in on opening day]]> image/jpeg 1598379937 2020-08-25 18:25:37 1598380885 2020-08-25 18:41:25 638400 image <![CDATA[This year marked the 40th anniversary of the program]]> image/jpeg 1598379995 2020-08-25 18:26:35 1598379995 2020-08-25 18:26:35 638401 image <![CDATA[Participants addressed the "7Cs" of the summer academic program]]> image/jpeg 1598380059 2020-08-25 18:27:39 1598380059 2020-08-25 18:27:39 638411 image <![CDATA[Students look on in a Challenge computer science class]]> image/jpeg 1598394002 2020-08-25 22:20:02 1598394002 2020-08-25 22:20:02 638412 image <![CDATA[Students also took part in extracurricular activities during the program]]> image/jpeg 1598394097 2020-08-25 22:21:37 1598394097 2020-08-25 22:21:37 638402 image <![CDATA[Program director Jelani Liddell address participants at one of two closing ceremonies]]> image/jpeg 1598380113 2020-08-25 18:28:33 1598380113 2020-08-25 18:28:33 <![CDATA[OMED: Educational Services Welcomes Largest Challenge Program Cohort in 39 Years to Campus]]>
<![CDATA[USG Updates Sexual Misconduct Policies to Adhere to New Federal Regulations]]> 27469 The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia (USG) approved changes to its sexual misconduct policies and procedures at its meeting Tuesday, Aug. 11, in accordance with new federal Title IX regulations that went into effect Aug. 14. The regulations were issued by the U.S. Department of Education in May and build on the existing federal Title IX law.

The regulations mandate how colleges and universities receiving federal funding must investigate and adjudicate sexual misconduct cases under Title IX, the federal law that prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in education programs or activities, including employment.

At USG institutions, sexual misconduct is addressed under Policy 6.7 in the Board of Regents Policy Manual. Much of the policy remains the same and Georgia Tech will continue to address incidents of sexual misconduct brought to its attention. One notable change will be in the hearing process for Title IX cases — institutions will now be required to provide an advisor to either party who does not have one. The advisor will have the right to cross-examine, in contrast to the previous Title IX process, where all questions during a hearing were submitted to and asked by a hearing panel. 

Georgia Tech’s Title IX office will host information sessions in the coming academic year to provide opportunities for the campus community to learn more.

Student support and services at Georgia Tech remain the same. Confidential victim-survivor support, prevention and education resources, and other services are available through VOICE, Georgia Tech’s sexual violence prevention program. Support is also available through the Counseling Center; Center for Assessment, Referral, and Education; and the Title IX office. Employees also have access to confidential resources through the Employee Assistance Program and health care providers.

Panelists and advisors are a vital part of the hearing process, and faculty and staff volunteers are needed to serve in these roles. Annual training is provided, and panelists and advisors serve on a rotating basis, usually one to two times per academic year.

To learn more, contact Marcia Bull Stadeker, Title IX Coordinator, at marcia.stadeker@gatech.edu or 404.385.5583.

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1597667096 2020-08-17 12:24:56 1601384545 2020-09-29 13:02:25 0 0 news The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia (USG) approved changes to its sexual misconduct policies and procedures at its meeting Tuesday, Aug. 11, in accordance with new federal Title IX regulations that go into effect August 14.

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2020-08-17T00:00:00-04:00 2020-08-17T00:00:00-04:00 2020-08-17 00:00:00 Marcia Bull Stadeker

Title IX Coordinator

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621932 621932 image <![CDATA[USG Board of Regents]]> image/jpeg 1558624650 2019-05-23 15:17:30 1558624650 2019-05-23 15:17:30 <![CDATA[Title IX at Georgia Tech]]> <![CDATA[Sexual Misconduct Questions and Answers]]> <![CDATA[VOICE (Victim-Survivor Support)]]> <![CDATA[Resources for Respondents/Accused (includes Student Rights Advocate)]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Sexual Misconduct Policy (includes resources)]]> <![CDATA[Board of Regents Sexual Misconduct Policy (Policy 6.7)]]> <![CDATA[Board of Regents Student Misconduct Proceedings (Policy 4.6.5)]]> <![CDATA[USG Human Resources Administrative Practice Manual ("Prohibit Discrimination and Harassment")]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Student Code of Conduct (Non-Academic Misconduct)]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Good Samaritan/Medical Amnesty Provision]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Equal Opportunity, Nondiscrimination, and Anti-Harassment Policy]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Faculty and Staff Assistance Program Policy]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Employee Assistance Program]]>
<![CDATA[Remembering John Lewis]]> 28817 As part of its ongoing commitment to embrace diversity in all its forms while supporting the research and learning functions of the Institute, the Georgia Tech Library invites students, faculty and staff to explore a curated collection of materials celebrating the life of Civil Rights icon John Lewis.

The “Remembering John Lewis” section of the Black Lives Matter reading room includes e-books, films, journal articles and primary source material from the NAACP database. Among the specific resources are a New York Times opinion piece he wrote in 1975, correspondence between Lewis and labor and activist groups, and original photography from the National Archive.

To view the resources, please visit the Black Lives Matter reading room, located on the Library’s website.

]]> Jason Wright 1 1595266278 2020-07-20 17:31:18 1595268495 2020-07-20 18:08:15 0 0 news As part of its ongoing commitment to embrace diversity in all its forms while supporting the research and learning functions of the Institute, the Georgia Tech Library invites students, faculty and staff to explore a curated collection of materials celebrating the life of Civil Rights icon John Lewis.

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2020-07-20T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-20T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-20 00:00:00 637114 637114 image <![CDATA[Remembering John Lewis]]> image/png 1595264676 2020-07-20 17:04:36 1595264676 2020-07-20 17:04:36
<![CDATA[From Talk to Action]]> 27469 “Ten years after my arrival at Tech, we’re having the first substantial, and substantive, conversation around issues of race,” Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI), said.

That conversation took place on July 16, online, hosted by IDEI. Tia Jackson-Truitt, director of Diversity and Inclusion Education and Training within IDEI, moderated “Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action.” The event drew more than 1,000 unique viewers during 90 minutes of candid reflections on Black experiences at Tech — and talking about about what comes next, as the Institute and the nation come to terms with the reality of systemic racism at a moment in which change feels both possible and palpable.

It was the first in a series of events that seeks to shine the light on painful racial truths and inspire the action required to bring about change. It featured students, faculty, and staff who, each in their own way, have worked to make Georgia Tech more inclusive. They were tasked with being open, honest, and vulnerable about their lived experiences, and they did that and more.

Mechanical engineering undergraduate Mykala Sinclair began by observing that Black students, and especially Black student organizations, are usually asked to participate in wider campus events when they involve a “Black” issue. “It’s almost a silo,” she said. “The Institute, by not showing care and interest in communicating consistently with the Black community at Georgia Tech, has created that narrative.”

Nettie Brown, third-year Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering, first visited the Tech campus as part of the Focus program, which encourages the brightest underrepresented minority students from around the country to pursue graduate studies at Georgia Tech. When she returned as a doctoral student, one of the first things she noticed was that “people stare a lot. And there’s a difference between an admiration stare and a ‘What are they doing here?’ stare.” She described wearing her BuzzCard everywhere she goes on campus, “not just for the quick access, but so people will know, that’s a student, faculty, staff, she’s a something — she belongs here.”

Associate Professor Manu Platt in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering recalled his first day in a Tech classroom. For the Morehouse College graduate, it was his first experience teaching white students. He was 29. “The challenges I got as a young faculty member from 18- to 20-year-olds in class were about my intelligence, where I got my degrees, did I deserve to be here, why did I get hired — it shocked me in my early days.”

Since then, he has taken an active role in making sure that Black students in biomedical engineering feel like they belong there. “If I hear of something being said to or about one of our students, my job is to go in and correct it. I don’t want to drive our students away from science and engineering” because of a hostile environment.

Where to start, then? Change the environment. Participants agreed on the necessity of creating and nurturing a pipeline and networks for Black students at Tech, and for white faculty — and students — to be intentional, persistent allies who will take the lead in solving problems that are the result of deeply entrenched racism.

Sonia Alvarez-Robinson, executive director of Georgia Tech Strategic Consulting, concluded the session, noting that the work being done to improve equity and inclusion represents a “great beginning. But we’ve got to accelerate the momentum. We have to take courageous action to address the things that we know are real. Racism is a societal cancer. I don’t know that we have gone as far to be as fierce as we need to to really address it at the root.”

Other panelists included Seth Marder, Regents Professor and Georgia Power Chair in Energy Efficiency in Chemistry; Kaye Husbands Fealing, dean and Ivan Allen Jr. Chair in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts; and President Ángel Cabrera.

Cabrera wrapped up the event by identifying steps that Tech is taking to move beyond words to action. First, Tech’s executive leadership team will engage in anti-racist training this summer. Next, the Institute will set up a community police council made up of a cross-section of students, faculty, and staff to meet regularly with the Georgia Tech Police Department, ask questions, and share concerns. There are also plans to launch an Institute-wide diversity and inclusion council, to develop new implicit bias training with greater attention to racial biases, and to highlight diversity and inclusion in the new strategic plan currently under development.

“We have to act today,” Cabrera urged. Before signing off, he turned to the camera and said, “At Georgia Tech, Black lives matter.”

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1594990359 2020-07-17 12:52:39 1595277853 2020-07-20 20:44:13 0 0 news “Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action” drew more than 1,000 unique viewers during 90 minutes of candid, passionate reflections on Black experiences at Tech.

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2020-07-17T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-17T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-17 00:00:00 Stacy Braukman

Institute Communications

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606701 637059 585070 636389 606701 image <![CDATA[Kaye Husbands Fealing]]> image/jpeg 1527885325 2018-06-01 20:35:25 1538403075 2018-10-01 14:11:15 637059 image <![CDATA[Race in Action Panel]]> image/jpeg 1594991055 2020-07-17 13:04:15 1594999050 2020-07-17 15:17:30 585070 image <![CDATA[Seth Marder]]> image/jpeg 1481746858 2016-12-14 20:20:58 1481898150 2016-12-16 14:22:30 636389 image <![CDATA[Ángel Cabrera]]> image/png 1592846812 2020-06-22 17:26:52 1592847029 2020-06-22 17:30:29 <![CDATA[Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion]]> <![CDATA[Watch an Archived Video of the Event]]>
<![CDATA[New Process Allows Georgia Students to Receive Earlier Admission Decision]]> 35059 Georgia high school seniors can now apply to Georgia Tech for admission in Early Action and receive their admission decision in December.

Starting with the 2021 admission cycle, first-year applicants can select one of three admission plans: Early Action 1, Early Action 2, and Regular Decision.

Early Action 1 is reserved specifically for Georgia students, including Georgia residents attending high school out of state. These students who apply during Early Action 1 will be given priority consideration and receive their admission decision in December. The deadline to apply for Early Action 1 will be October 15.

Giving Georgia students the ability to apply earlier allows the admission team to prioritize their review of in-state applications.

“We are confident this change will benefit all of our applicants and future students,” said Rick Clark, director of Undergraduate Admission. “As a public institution, our primary responsibility is to our state. Providing an application plan specifically for Georgians reflects that commitment.”

“We know our in-state applicants are phenomenally talented and have a lot of great options for college,” continued Clark. “This change allows us to admit Georgia students a month earlier than in years past and begin conversations with them about why they should choose Tech.”

Students who are not Georgia residents and attend a high school out of state are eligible to apply for Early Action 2, with a deadline of November 2. This new deadline for out-of-state students is more in line with school start dates in other parts of the country and provides those students additional time to complete their applications. Early Action 2 decisions will be released in mid-January.

“Many high schools around the country and the world do not begin until after Labor Day,” Clark said. “We’ve heard from counselors and school leaders that November 2 is a more helpful deadline for their students. Listening, refining, and creating policies that are beneficial to students and families is always our goal. Establishing an Early Action 2 deadline accomplishes that.”

The Regular Decision deadline remains the same for all students. This year it will be January 4, 2021, with decisions released in mid-March.

The application for first-year admission is available starting August 1, 2020.

More information: https://admission.gatech.edu/first-year/deadlines-fees

 

]]> Denise Ward 1 1594738211 2020-07-14 14:50:11 1594739008 2020-07-14 15:03:28 0 0 news 2020-07-14T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-14T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-14 00:00:00 Denise Ward

denise.ward@comm.gatech.edu

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636933 636933 image <![CDATA[Early Admission Decision photo]]> image/jpeg 1594738358 2020-07-14 14:52:38 1594738358 2020-07-14 14:52:38
<![CDATA[President Cabrera, Other Campus Leaders to Discuss Race]]> 27469 Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) will host a virtual panel discussion entitled “Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action,” on Thursday, July 16. The discussion will feature President Ángel Cabrera and the lived experiences of Black and non-Black faculty, staff, and students.

“In the aftermath of the national upheaval over the killing of unarmed Black Americans, the campus community has openly called out racism in our society,” Archie Ervin, vice president for IDEI and chief diversity officer at Tech, said last month. “We have heard their voices and understand that the campus body is not simply satisfied with platitudes – they want change and they are asking for our direction.”

Tia Jackson-Truitt, director of IDEI’s Diversity and Inclusion Education and Training, added, “Now that there has been a collective raising of consciousness on issues of race and racism, the campus community has been very vocal in telling us that they are ready to have these critical conversations.”

In addition to Cabrera, the July 16 event will feature Ervin; Jackson-Truitt; Sonia Alvarez-Robinson, executive director for Strategic Consulting; Nettie Brown, biomedical engineering doctoral student and vice president of Academic and Research Affairs, graduate Student Government Association (SGA); Kaye Husbands Fealing, dean, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts; Seth Marder, Regents Professor and Georgia Power Chair in Energy Efficiency, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Manu Platt, associate professor, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering; and Mykala Sinclair, mechanical engineering undergraduate student and vice president of Student Life, undergraduate SGA.

Each panelist will discuss their personal experiences with race and ways in Georgia Tech can expand on its commitment to eradicate overt and implicit racism, and build a more diverse and inclusive campus.

The event will be the first of a continuing series on race.

Following the July 16 discussion, its recording will be posted online for viewing. Questions may be submitted for panelists in advance to institutediversity@gatech.edu. They may also be submitted during the live event.

 

Date and time:

July 16, 11 a.m.to 12:30 p.m.— https://c.gatech.edu/race-at-GT

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1594648411 2020-07-13 13:53:31 1594649321 2020-07-13 14:08:41 0 0 news Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) will host a virtual panel discussion entitled “Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action,” on Thursday, July 16.

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2020-07-13T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-13T00:00:00-04:00 2020-07-13 00:00:00 Courtney Hill

Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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<![CDATA[Statement on George Floyd]]>
<![CDATA[Can We Talk About Race — and Racism? Yes. ]]> 27713 Generations of Black and African American parents have had “the race talk” with their children. It’s an uncomfortable but necessary conversation about how to behave in public, how to act around white people, and especially how to interact with the police. Outside of minority households, the subject of race has largely been considered taboo — or not considered at all. But, since the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on May 25, conversations about race are emerging from the shadows and taking many different forms.

“A lot of people would like to talk about race, racial inequality, and the impact of racism, but don’t know where to start,” said Tiffiny Hughes-Troutman, licensed psychologist and director of the Center for Assessment, Referral, and Education (CARE) at Georgia Tech. “Some worry that others won’t understand their points of view or fear that what they say might be offensive to others. Also, individuals may be confused about how to be an ally and supporter and how to make an impact in a positive, meaningful way.”

That’s the position Steve McLaughlin found himself in until a few years ago. McLaughlin, dean and Southern Company Chair of the College of Engineering, said that he is like many white people when it comes to talking about race: cautious because he doesn’t want to say the wrong thing.

“There are your intentions, and then there’s how it’s received,” he said. “The fear of saying the wrong thing is so strong. It’s such a block to making a difference and to being able to work on the things you feel strongly about.”

McLaughlin said that throughout his adult life he has considered himself an ally of groups that sometimes feel marginalized or misunderstood. He thought it was enough to see himself as nonracist. His thinking changed when the son he and his wife adopted from Guatemala as a baby entered his teen years.

“I started to see how the world treated him and processed him and, quite honestly, didn’t process him because they didn’t see him. Or didn’t want to see him,” McLaughlin said. “He was raised as we would have raised any other child. Then all of a sudden the world starts to just process him differently. I became more attuned to some of the things that African Americans and Latinos experience — everyday microaggressions and racism. I became more passionate. And, I decided I need to speak up.” 

McLaughlin said he is still trying to find his voice in terms of race. He posts on social media about his journey, and he shared his experiences with Transformative Narratives, a digital story library curated by the Office of Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI).

“I did it rather quietly at first,” he said. “I was the chair of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, then came into this role as dean and realized I have a platform. I can pick the things I think are important to talk about, and this is one of them.”

Where to Begin?

When trying to start a conversation about race, Hughes-Troutman suggests starting small.

“There is great potential in intergroup dialogue that leverages diversity and creates opportunity for connection among large groups,” she said, “but I would suggest starting on an individual level and creating a safe space with friends, colleagues, or co-workers you genuinely care about and whose lives and experiences you are sincerely interested in learning about.”

Stephanie Ray agrees.

“I want you to call me because you really care about me. Don’t call just because you think you should join the conversation about race,” said Ray, associate dean of students and director of Student Diversity Programs in the Division of Student Life.

Ray added that people should not expect their Black colleagues to be the only ones talking about or even leading the conversation. “Everyone has a responsibility to do some heavy lifting,” she said.

McLaughlin is determined to do his part.

“I have African American colleagues with whom I have close enough relationships to initiate the race talk and feel uninhibited in both directions,” he said. “I haven’t had many, but a few, that I could really have a direct conversation about race and not feel worried. I want to get more and more comfortable talking about it.”

Current Climate and What’s Next

Ongoing political protests against police brutality and systemic racism, combined with the anxiety of dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic, are having a significant impact on students, according to Hughes-Troutman.

“Students share feelings of anger, frustration, sadness, and grief as they process these complex emotions and focus on other milestones, experiences, and events,” she said. “The Covid-19 pandemic is incredibly stressful, and many students are grieving many losses — losses of lives through death, and the loss of their former lifestyle.”

Even when looking at the intersection of racism and Covid-19, Hughes-Troutman is optimistic because of the nature of the conversations taking place.

“I certainly hope it’s a turning point,” she said. “This is a time for racial healing, and these conversations are more important than ever. Dialogue, affirmation and connectedness, and a sense of purpose and agency are ways to move us forward.”

McLaughlin wants to keep the conversation going, and make the most of it. He said the College of Engineering has been talking with student groups and will be collaborating with IDEI to prioritize what can be done within the College to improve the climate in a short time.

“These moments seem to come and go, and people move on to something else,” McLaughlin said. “I’m determined to not let this moment pass.” 

Ray suggests that applying Georgia Tech’s spirit of “We can do that” is the approach to take when addressing race-related issues.

“Look at all of the research Georgia Tech does. If we are willing to put in the hard work for STEM, we should be willing to work hard to improve the human condition — which is part of our new mission statement,” Ray said. “Let’s put these great minds together to do the work needed, not only for Georgia Tech, but for the world.”

]]> Victor Rogers 1 1593535396 2020-06-30 16:43:16 1595606004 2020-07-24 15:53:24 0 0 news Conversations about race emerge from the shadows.

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2020-06-30T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-30T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-30 00:00:00 Suggestions for Beginning the Race Talk, from Tiffiny Hughes-Troutman, licensed psychologist and director of the Center for Assessment, Referral, and Education (CARE):

Start small. Create a safe space with friends, colleagues, or co-workers whom you genuinely care about and whose lives and experiences you are sincerely interested in learning about.

Acknowledge the difficulty of the conversation and validate the other person’s feelings, whether it’s shock, sadness, anger, confusion or shared discomfort.

Own your motivation for the conversation, and identify the goals acknowledging that people are in different places when it comes to their understanding of racial justice issues. A basic goal may be to gain some sense of understanding.

Engage in your own work to understand the privilege that shapes one’s worldview and educate yourself on the things you need to personally learn and unlearn in order to be a better advocate.

Understand one’s racial and cultural identity by making the invisible visible. Become aware of your own values, biases, assumptions, and worldviews.

Acknowledge and be open to admitting racial biases. Addressing one’s own personal biases is more than an intellectual exercise of attending workshops and reading books. It comes from lived reality and experiences that require frequent interaction with people who differ from you with respect to race, culture, and ethnicity.

Don’t allow a difficult dialogue to brew in silence. Sometimes you reach an impasse or a deadlock. Although teachable moments sometimes take time, there’s power in calling out an impasse and sitting in that discomfort.

Understand differences in communication styles.

Validate and express appreciation to those who speak when it’s unsafe to do so. “As a psychologist, I often espouse the value of creating a safe space for race-based conversations but recognize that what constitutes a safe space for one group is different from what another group defines as safe,” said Hughes-Troutman.

 

Talking About Race:

Do:

  • Listen more than you speak.
  • Have empathy.
  • Acknowledge other people’s truths, even when you feel uncomfortable.

Don’t:

  • Make the conversation about you.
  • Assume that because you’ve never experienced something, it doesn’t exist.
  • Suggest the person you are talking to is exaggerating.
  • Sympathize by saying you feel the same way. For example, do not remark, “A similar thing happened to me, and I’m afraid of the police, too.” Comparing an isolated incident to systematic racism is trivializing even when it comes from a good place.
  • Change the subject.

 

RESOURCES:

Institute Diversity, Equity and Inclusion events:

July 1-2: Community Healing Through Storytelling: Breaking Through the Armor of Our Hearts (Brave & Heartfelt Stories About Race by African Heritage and White Campus Colleagues)

July 16, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: “Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action”– Open to the campus community, this is a panel discussion on the lived experiences of Black and non-Black faculty, students, and staff. (First of a continued series.)

July 29, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Race, Bias, and Privilege - Pilot training for professional staff in conjunction with Georgia Tech Professional Education

July 29: Inclusive Leaders Academy Community Dialogue

July 31: White Fragility: When a Spoon Full of Sugar Isn’t Quite Enough (campus community)

August 7: Stories We Live Workshop- Learn to Excavate Your Diversity Stories (for faculty and staff)

LINKS:

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Victor Rogers

Institute Communications

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636644 636643 636646 636648 636644 image <![CDATA[Tiffiny Hughes-Troutman]]> image/jpeg 1593554462 2020-06-30 22:01:02 1593554544 2020-06-30 22:02:24 636643 image <![CDATA[Woman talking with co-worker.]]> image/jpeg 1593554264 2020-06-30 21:57:44 1593554310 2020-06-30 21:58:30 636646 image <![CDATA[Steve McLaughlin]]> image/jpeg 1593555623 2020-06-30 22:20:23 1593555676 2020-06-30 22:21:16 636648 image <![CDATA[Stephanie Ray]]> image/jpeg 1593555881 2020-06-30 22:24:41 1593555924 2020-06-30 22:25:24
<![CDATA[An Update from Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion]]> 27469 The death of George Floyd sparked worldwide protests and a national call for an end to systemic racism. Many around the country took heed, including at Georgia Tech, where administrators denounced the recent killing of Black people, and pledged to look inward to ensure they are doing what they can to treat people of all walks of life equally and fairly.

Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) is leading Tech’s effort here in collaboration with units across the campus. Following weeks of social unrest, IDEI has placed heightened focus on its already strong suite of programming designed to address perceived and real racial inequities.

IDEI plans an assortment of training, workshops, and facilitated conversations for students, faculty and staff. Over the past two weeks, the unit has held three community dialogue sessions for faculty and staff with more planned. Additionally, IDEI will offer bi-monthly workshops and community conversations for the Tech community to address issues of disparity brought about by racism and bias. The workshops will emphasize the link between implicit bias, micro aggressions, and privilege.

Next month, IDEI will also host a panel discussion with President Àngel Cabrera that will feature the lived experiences of Black and non-Black faculty, staff, and students. Details are forthcoming. This summer, IDEI is piloting several implicit bias training programs with a focus on race. The training will eventually be open to the campus community. In the spring, IDEI will launch a train-the-trainer program and add new anti-racism resources to the IDEI website.

“In the aftermath of the national upheaval over the killing of unarmed Black Americans, the campus community has openly called out racism in our society,” said Archie W. Ervin, vice president for IDEI, and chief diversity officer at Georgia Tech. “We have heard their voices and understand that the campus body is not simply satisfied with platitudes – they want change and they are asking for our direction.”

At the heart of IDEI’s mission is its effort to embed equal opportunity and non-discrimination practices throughout Tech’s programs. That mission, he said, is even greater now, as the Institute prepares to release its new strategic plan, which has as one of its themes, the importance of diversity as part of Tech’s culture and community.

Tia Jackson-Truitt, inaugural director of Diversity and Inclusion Education and Training, recently joined IDEI to build a more comprehensive training and education program. Her arrival into the role coincides with the unit’s expanded efforts to ensure inclusivity in every corner of campus.

“The events over the past few weeks have emboldened us to go even deeper with these opportunities,” said Jackson-Truitt. “Now that there has been a collective raising of consciousness on issues of race and racism, the campus community has been very vocal in telling us that they are ready to have these critical conversations.”

Ervin said his unit is collaborating with the Division of Student Life, the Student Government Association, and IDEI’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion to support students. This includes a call with Black student leaders to express their concerns and frustrations in a safe space.

“I understand that it is not the task of IDEI alone to undertake these actions for the campus,” Ervin said. “I’m proud to say that numerous units have eagerly volunteered to partner with us on these upcoming offerings.”

Still, Ervin acknowledges there is more work to be done. “My hope is that through these offerings, the campus can collectively figure out novel and practical ways to understand and solve seemingly intractable problems of racial inequity and injustice,” he said.

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1593005105 2020-06-24 13:25:05 1595605920 2020-07-24 15:52:00 0 0 news Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) is leading Tech’s effort in collaboration with units across the campus.

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2020-06-24T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-24T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-24 00:00:00 Upcoming Diversity and Inclusion events

Information about how to attend the events as well as dates and times for activities where those details are not provided, will be added as we receive it.

  • June 10, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    Community Conversation for GRIOT Employee Resource Group (ERG) faculty and staff members.
  • June 12, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
    Community Conversation Race Dialogue with all six ERGs
  • June 19, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
    Community Conversation: Leading Women Meditation and Dialogue on Women & Race
  • June 24, 4 to 5 p.m.
    Race, Bias and Privilege - Pilot training for undergraduate student researchers in ME
  • July 1
    "Stories Over Lunch: Personal Stories on Race" (Part 1 - Stories by People of Color) for faculty and staff
  • July 2
    "Stories Over Lunch: Personal Stories on Race" - (Part 2 - Stories by White People) for faculty and staff
  • July 16, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
    Race at Georgia Tech: A Call to Action” - Open to the campus community, this is a panel discussion on the lived experiences of Black and non-Black faculty, students, and staff. (First of a continued series.)
  • July 17
    Community Group Coaching Session: How to Talk about Race (for faculty and staff)
  • July 22, 1 to 2:30 p.m.
    Race, Bias and Privilege – Pilot training for graduate students and post-docs in conjunction with Graduate Education and Faculty Development offices
  • July 23, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
    Implicit Bias training for GTRI research faculty
  • July 29, 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
    Race, Bias and Privilege - Pilot training for professional staff in conjunction with Georgia Tech Professional Education
  • July 29
    Inclusive Leaders Academy Community Dialogue
  • July 31
    "White Fragility: When a Spoon Full of Sugar Isn't Quite Enough"
  • August 7
    Stories We Live Workshop - Learn to excavate your diversity stories (faculty and staff)
  • August 18, 11 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
    Implicit Bias training for GTRI research faculty
  • Selected opportunities for one-on-one culture and leadership coaching July 17- September 18 for faculty and staff. (Calendar opens July 6.)
]]>
Courtney Hill

Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

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<![CDATA[‘Statement on George Floyd’]]> <![CDATA[‘Statement of Solidarity with the Black Community: We Stand for Equity and Justice’]]> <![CDATA[‘James and George’ ]]> <![CDATA[‘From the Dean's Desk - June 1, 2020’]]> <![CDATA[‘#TGW: It’s a Humanity Issue’]]> <![CDATA[‘Video: CEE Panel Discussion on Race’ ]]> <![CDATA[‘Your Voice Matters’ ]]>
<![CDATA[Commitment to Drive Change]]> 34932 Vice president for Institute Diversity Equity and Inclusion and chief diversity officer Archie Ervin shares his thoughts on the recent deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbury and racial injustice in ‘Commitment to Drive Change.’

“Last weekend, President Cabrera and I discussed at length the horrific events that have occurred in the black community in the U.S. in recent weeks,” he began. “The statement the president released Sunday about the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and the deaths of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky, and Ahmaud Arbury in Brunswick, Georgia, inspired me.”

Read his full statement on the Chief Diversity Officer’s Corner blog.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1591669998 2020-06-09 02:33:18 1591670143 2020-06-09 02:35:43 0 0 news Archie Ervin shares his thoughts on the recent deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, and Ahmaud Arbury and racial injustice in ‘Commitment to Drive Change.'

]]>
2020-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2020-06-04 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
636064 636064 image <![CDATA[Archie W. Ervin, Ph.D.]]> image/png 1591670096 2020-06-09 02:34:56 1621972772 2021-05-25 19:59:32
<![CDATA[Board of Regents Approves Georgia Tech’s New Mission Statement]]> 27165 The University System of Georgia Board of Regents (BOR) has approved Georgia Tech’s updated mission statement generated from the work done as part of the new strategic planning process launched in Fall 2019 under President Ángel Cabrera. The approval was granted at the BOR’s regular monthly meeting, which took place May 12.

The approved mission statement reads: The Georgia Institute of Technology is a public research university established by the state of Georgia in Atlanta in 1885 and committed to developing leaders who advance technology and improve the human condition.

Feedback from internal and external campus stakeholders was used to guide the development of the mission statement.

Along with this new mission statement, the strategic planning process has also produced a vision and foundational narrative, values definition, and strategic themes, which are currently being further refined by active working groups. 

The strategic planning process is currently in phase two: goal setting. Working groups are focusing on six strategic themes that will drive the Institute’s actionable goals — Amplify Impact, Champion Innovation, Connect Globally, Expand Access, Cultivate Well-Being, Lead by Example. These themes resulted from the first phase of the strategic planning process: the visioning phase. During visioning, more than 5,700 students, faculty, staff, alumni, campus partners, and community leaders shared varied perspectives, aspirations, and dreams to help shape the future of the Institute. From there, the steering committee worked to extrapolate and organize the most relevant and salient themes from the data collected. The committee then divided into four sub-committees to draft the mission statement, vision narrative, values definitions, and strategic themes that are now being further developed.

“Our mission to develop leaders who advance technology and improve the human condition has never been more relevant and necessary,” said Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera. “Georgia Tech is a leading research university devoted to inclusive and impactful innovation, relentlessly committed to serving the public good and breaking new ground in addressing the biggest local, national, and global challenges of our time. Our many contributions in combating the covid-19 pandemic offer a clear illustration of what our mission means in practice.”

Learn more about the work of these groups and each strategic impact theme by visiting the strategic plan website.

]]> Susie Ivy 1 1589390565 2020-05-13 17:22:45 1589553293 2020-05-15 14:34:53 0 0 news The University System of Georgia Board of Regents (BOR) has approved Georgia Tech’s updated mission statement.

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2020-05-15T00:00:00-04:00 2020-05-15T00:00:00-04:00 2020-05-15 00:00:00 strategicplan@gatech.edu

]]>
632765 632765 image <![CDATA[Building Blocks of the Strategic Plan]]> image/jpeg 1582226516 2020-02-20 19:21:56 1582226516 2020-02-20 19:21:56 <![CDATA[Georgia Tech's Strategic Planning Process]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech's National Society of Black Engineers Chapter Wins Chapter of the Year Award]]> 34932 Georgia Tech’s chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) has won the 2019-20 Large Chapter of the Year Award.

This is the third consecutive year the Tech chapter has been the recipient of the award on the regional level and the first time in over a decade it has received the honor on the national level.

Nominated by NSBE’s regional executive boards, and selected by its scholarship and awards committee, high-achieving collegiate and NSBE junior groups were chosen as the Society’s “best exemplars and promoters of academic excellence, professional success, community service and cultural responsibility” during the 2019–20 programmatic year.

“It’s been an honor and a privilege to be part of the Georgia Tech Society of Black Engineers (GTSBE) for the past four years,” said chapter president Ndeyanta Jallow, a fourth-year Industrial Engineering major, Georgia Tech Provost Scholar, and spring 2020 graduate. “This organization has a been monumental part of some of the best and brightest engineers who go on to graduate from Georgia Tech. This year specifically, the awards and recognitions we received truly showcase the drive, ambition, and passion that our general body members and executive board members have for this organization.”

Chapter vice president Pampam Akinyemi, a fourth-year Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering major added, “For the past four years, I have had the privilege to be a part of this wonderful organization. Personally, I have been able to grow as a leader and more importantly as a person. Even though my journey with GTSBE has come to an end, I am very excited to see what the future of GTSBE leadership has to be bring.”

Founded in 1976, one year after the national organization was formed, GTSBE is the third-largest organization on campus with around 250 members. The chapter would go on to win NSBE’s first-ever National Distinguished Chapter of the Year Award.

Specific criteria for selection of chapter awards included creativity, diversity and consistency in programming, as well as intensity of engagement with other chapters, NSBE’s regional and national executive boards, and with NSBE’s 2019–20 National Directives.

Other collegiate winners include Northeastern University (National Medium-Sized Chapter) and Hampton University (National Small-Sized Chapter).

In-person celebration of these honors is scheduled to take place in August, as chapter members take the stage at the Henry B. González Convention Center in San Antonio, Texas, to receive their awards during NSBE’s 46th annual convention.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1588257789 2020-04-30 14:43:09 1588273187 2020-04-30 18:59:47 0 0 news This is the third consecutive year the Tech chapter has been the recipient of the award on the regional level and the first time in over a decade it has received the honor on the national level.

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2020-04-30T00:00:00-04:00 2020-04-30T00:00:00-04:00 2020-04-30 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
634887 634888 634887 image <![CDATA[GTSBE members pose with Georgia Tech President Àngel Cabrera]]> image/jpeg 1588257861 2020-04-30 14:44:21 1588257861 2020-04-30 14:44:21 634888 image <![CDATA[Ndeyanta Jallow]]> image/jpeg 1588257940 2020-04-30 14:45:40 1588257940 2020-04-30 14:45:40
<![CDATA[Jackson-Truitt Named Inaugural Director of Diversity and Inclusion Education Training]]> 34932 Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (IDEI) has named Tia Jackson-Truitt as its inaugural director of Diversity and Inclusion Education and Training. In this position, Jackson-Truitt will be responsible for developing and leading diversity and inclusion curriculum-based training across Georgia Tech for faculty, staff, and students. 

Jackson-Truitt, who has worked in higher education since 2010, previously worked in the mental health field with at-risk youth and adults. She has also worked as a forensic social worker for incarcerated populations. 

“In this new role, I hope to use my experiences in counseling and higher education to create diversity and inclusion programming that enhances the culture and climate of the Institute,” Jackson-Truitt said. “In the ten years that I’ve been at Tech, I have seen so much growth in how people with different backgrounds and areas of expertise are regarded and respected.”

Archie Ervin, vice president of IDEI added, "The addition of Dr. Jackson-Truitt to Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion’s professional staff represents an important milestone in the Institute’s commitment to creating an inclusive and welcoming campus community. She was selected for this position from a very competitive pool of talented candidates."

"She will develop and lead a broad range of education and training focused on diversity, equity, and inclusion issues that will be available to all members of the Tech community," Ervin continued. "Education and awareness about diversity, equity, and inclusion is a prerequisite to building the capacity to understand, embrace, and leverage differences that diversity brings. We fully expect Dr. Jackson-Triutt’s role as a diversity education and training specialist will be a difference-maker on Georgia Tech’s journey toward remaining a best-in-class model of diversity and inclusion among universities nationwide."

Jackson-Truitt received her bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Delaware; her master’s degree in social work from the University of Pennsylvania; and her doctorate in counseling and student support services from the University of Georgia.

In her most previous role at Georgia Tech as associate director of the Center for Engineering Education and Diversity (CEED), Jackson-Truitt provided recruitment and retention programming for undergraduate and graduate students through the SURE, LSAMP, Grad REACH, and Grad RISE initiatives. Using best practices in STEM recruitment and retention, she has guided dozens of students from under represented backgrounds through master’s and doctoral degree programs at Georgia Tech and peer institutions. Combining her counseling background with her passion for students, she has also served as an advisor, advocate, and mentor.

Jackson-Truitt also serves as the Region B chairperson for the National Association of Multicultural Educational Program Administrators (NAMEPA) and is the principal empowerment officer for GRIOT -- the Georgia Tech African-heritage Employee Resource Group.

“I am ecstatic to be able to bring not only my professional and educational training into this role, but also my lived experiences,” Jackson-Truitt added. “I am optimistic for the opportunity to work across the campus’ various constituent groups and excited about this role’s many contributions to the Georgia Tech community to come.”

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1586362561 2020-04-08 16:16:01 1593388025 2020-06-28 23:47:05 0 0 news Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion has named Tia Jackson-Truitt as its inaugural director of Diversity and Inclusion Education and Training.

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2020-04-08T00:00:00-04:00 2020-04-08T00:00:00-04:00 2020-04-08 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
634168 634168 image <![CDATA[Tia Jackson-Truitt, Ph.D., LCSW]]> image/jpeg 1586362633 2020-04-08 16:17:13 1586362633 2020-04-08 16:17:13
<![CDATA[Building Resilience During Challenging Times]]> 34932 Since December 2015, Georgia Tech’s Resilience Employee Resource Group (ERG) has led the charge of helping students, faculty, and staff build skills to effectively manage the impact of adversity.

Working with partners across the Institute, Resilience – one of six ERG’s offered to campus staffers by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion’s Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement unit – has provided experiences to help participants increase resilience and strength, and proactively mitigate the impact of routine stress, crisis, and change. Program activities have included workshops, leadership panels, educational experiences, facilitated dialogues, mentoring, and peer support.

“Today, this work is more important than ever,” said Sonia Alvarez-Robinson, executive director of Georgia Tech Strategic Consulting and principal empowerment officer of the Resilience ERG. And that is why Resilience, together with the University System of Georgia Employee Assistance Program (EAP) partner KEPRO, is hosting a webinar called Building Resiliency and Coping with Change.

This online workshop will be offered to Georgia Tech students, faculty, and staff on three dates: April 20, 28, and May 1, from 1 to 2 p.m. Interested participants can register for one of the sessions here.

In other efforts to increase resilience awareness across the Tech community, the first Building Personal and Organizational Resilience “mini-mester” course – 1 credit hour, five-week class introducing students to nontraditional classroom material – was delivered to Georgia Tech students earlier this spring. The course will be offered again in early and late Summer semester and during all three Fall mini-mester terms. 

The class is designed to help students build skills to survive and thrive through chronic stresses and acute crises, and offers a variety of techniques for students to build resilience. Registration is now open and available on OSCAR.

To learn more about the Resilience ERG, workshop presentations, videos, resources, and information, visit sdie.gatech.edu/resilience-employee-resource-group

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1585684834 2020-03-31 20:00:34 1585751441 2020-04-01 14:30:41 0 0 news Georgia Tech ERG offers virtual workshops and courses for the campus community.

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2020-03-31T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-31T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-31 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
633977 633977 image <![CDATA[Resilience ERG Leadership Panel ‘Realities of Resilience: An Authentic Leadership Dialogue,’ featuring Sonia Alvarez-Robinson, Dean Maryam Alavi, Dean Steve McLaughlin, and Kim Harrington]]> image/jpeg 1585751405 2020-04-01 14:30:05 1585929434 2020-04-03 15:57:14
<![CDATA[Student Emergency Funding Now Available]]> 27244 The Division of Student Life, the Alumni Association, and the Office of Development are partnering to collect and distribute emergency funding through the Georgia Tech Parents Fund and Roll Call to support students in need.

This fund has been established to support Tech students who have a demonstrated financial need related to the COVID-19 crisis and campus closures. Funding is available to all enrolled Georgia Tech students and can be used to alleviate financial challenges resulting from the current public health crisis, including travel assistance, housing assistance, medical expenses, moving costs, financial support, food insecurity, and much more. 

Students in need of financial assistance should complete the application form, and the Office of the Vice President and Dean of Students will contact them to coordinate the assistance through the Office of Financial Aid. The maximum amount of each grant is $1,000.

Funds are limited but are currently being raised. Parents looking to support this fund can make a gift through the Georgia Tech Parents Fund. Alumni can make a gift through Roll Call. And faculty and staff can make a gift by visiting the Office of Development website, clicking on Give Now, and entering Student Relief Fund in the space for "other designation."

]]> Sara Warner 1 1584972521 2020-03-23 14:08:41 1586904508 2020-04-14 22:48:28 0 0 news The Division of Student Life, the Alumni Association, and the Office of Development are partnering to collect and distribute emergency funding through the Georgia Tech Parents Fund and Roll Call to support students in need.

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2020-03-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-23 00:00:00 Sara Warner
Student Life Communications Director
sara.warner@studentlife.gatech.edu

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634374 634374 image <![CDATA[emergency fund]]> image/jpeg 1586904455 2020-04-14 22:47:35 1586904455 2020-04-14 22:47:35 <![CDATA[Emergency Fund Application]]> <![CDATA[GT Parents Fund]]> <![CDATA[Roll Call]]> <![CDATA[Office of Development]]>
<![CDATA[Updates on Spring 2020 Grading and GPA Policies]]> 33693 A number of changes have been made to assist students and faculty due to the semester disruption caused by the COVID-19 outbreak. These updates include:

The full list of updates can be found here.

]]> Kayleigh Haskin 1 1584975742 2020-03-23 15:02:22 1584976475 2020-03-23 15:14:35 0 0 news 2020-03-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-23T00:00:00-04:00 2020-03-23 00:00:00 625904 625904 image <![CDATA[Tech Tower]]> image/jpeg 1568119621 2019-09-10 12:47:01 1568119621 2019-09-10 12:47:01
<![CDATA[Celebrating Black History Month: The Importance of Representation with Crystal Bell]]> 35185 Throughout her life, Crystal Bell has been encouraged and motivated by the mentorship of those around her.

“They have inspired me to never stop striving for greatness,” says Bell.

This inspiration has led her to Georgia Tech, where she is a Ph.D. candidate in the School of Biochemistry and Chemistry. With her advisor Dr. Faisal Alamgir, she experiments with materials to help design better fuel cells for the next generation of clean energy devices. Outside of the lab, she is president of the Georgia Tech chapter of the National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers (NOBCChE).

“NOBCChE feels like a family — it is a community allowing me to see people who look like me in places where African Americans are not represented in large numbers,” says Bell.

Through the organization, Bell connects African American youth with STEM experiences. And through a middle school outreach event called “Hands on Future Tech,” Bell helps facilitate engaging experiments and scientific learning. It’s all with an aim to continue contributing to a community that once mentored her.

“Engaging students in STEM at younger ages promotes long-term curiosity that can lead them to pursuing degrees in STEM down the road,” says Bell.

Bell is particularly aware of how monumental a small bit of inspiration can be, given that that mentorship and guidance from others was critical to Bell’s decision to become a scientist.

When it comes to Black History Month, Bell is grateful for an opportunity to highlight the academic, cultural, and historical achievements of African American figures. And Bell underscores that those collective contributions to science and culture need to be further incorporated into regular curricula and conversation — and that Black History Month helps facilitate this incorporation through recognizing important African American figures and launching a conversation about their positive impact on society.

“I would not be who I am today — an African American chemist pursuing a Ph.D. — if it were not for people like Reverend Martin Luther King Jr., John Lewis, Linda Brown, Mary Jackson, and thousands of other activists, scientists, and artists paving the roads to success,” Bell says. “Black History Month reminds me not only of our successes, but also of the obstacles we have overcome, the struggles we have had to wage, as well as of the adversity we still face.”

Related Links:

Alamgir Lab Georgia Tech

More Black History Month Features:

Celebrating Black History Month: How to Promote Diversity Daily with Lewis Wheaton

Celebrating Black History Month: Letting Diversity Shine with Alonzo Whyte

Black History Month: "6Ps" Relevant to Academic and Career Success

By Grace Pietkiewicz, First-Year Student, School of Literature, Media, and Communication

]]> kpietkiewicz3 1 1582231867 2020-02-20 20:51:07 1582656174 2020-02-25 18:42:54 0 0 news When it comes to Black History Month, Crystal Bell is grateful for an opportunity to highlight the academic, cultural, and historical achievements of African American figures.

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2020-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-19 00:00:00 Grace Pietkiewicz
Communications Assistant
College of Sciences
katiegracepz@gatech.edu

]]>
632773 632773 image <![CDATA[Crystal Bell at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.]]> image/jpeg 1582231547 2020-02-20 20:45:47 1582231547 2020-02-20 20:45:47
<![CDATA[Celebrating Black History Month: Letting Diversity Shine with Alonzo Whyte]]> 35185 Alonzo Whyte is just in his first year as a faculty member of the Neuroscience program at Georgia Tech, but his positive outlook and appreciation for diversity is already shining brightly. As an academic advisor, faculty instructor, and course curriculum designer, Whyte incorporates his philosophy of positivity and inclusion into multiple levels of the neuroscience curriculum.

“Without an intentional commitment to portraying people of color and their successes, it’s almost impossible for our students, regardless of race or gender, to pick up those messages unless they go looking for them,” Whyte says. “As instructional faculty, we are the primary source of information about science to the students. We should deliberately take moments to send positive messages about the contributions to science from black people.”

Many of Whyte’s own initiatives to increase diversity come from his experience as a student that noticed few people that looked like him. In fact, Whyte was not taught by a black instructor until graduate school when he took a summer course instructed by Kevin Jones, who at the time was a faculty member at Howard University and is currently a faculty member at the University of Michigan.

“That was the first time that I saw someone that looked like me and that felt I could be in the future,” Whyte says.

And it wasn’t just with his faculty that Whyte noticed a lack of representation for people of color. The first time he heard about Ernest Everett Just, a black science credited for great contributions to marine biology, was four years into his PhD.

Whyte hopes that his students are exposed to more diversity than he was. In the classroom, this means that includes images and works of scientists from underrepresented backgrounds throughout his courses. In academic advising, he strives to ensure that all of his students are guided to the career and educational opportunities available to them. In curriculum development, he is working to form partnerships with other metro Atlanta institutions so that people from underrepresented backgrounds can earn chances to experience neuroscience research at Georgia Tech.

“Partnerships with local Atlanta students could really be beneficial to making science more global and reducing the barriers to getting research experience,” says Whyte.

Whyte also believes that Black History Month is particularly important for highlighting the underrepresented stories of black communities and black scientists, leaders, and mentors.

“It’s easy for that voice to get swept aside, if there’s not a concerted effort to keep making sure that it’s heard,” says Whyte.

Related Links:

College of Sciences Welcomes Seven Faculty Members

More Black History Month Features:

Celebrating Black History Month: How to Promote Diversity Daily with Lewis Wheaton

Celebrating Black History Month: The Importance of Representation with Crystal Bell

Black History Month: "6Ps" Relevant to Academic and Career Success

By Grace Pietkiewicz, First-Year Student, School of Literature, Media, and Communication

]]> kpietkiewicz3 1 1582568192 2020-02-24 18:16:32 1582656452 2020-02-25 18:47:32 0 0 news Alonzo Whyte is just in his first year as a faculty member of the Neuroscience program at Georgia Tech, but his positive outlook and appreciation for diversity is already shining brightly.

]]>
2020-02-24T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-24T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-24 00:00:00 Grace Pietkiewicz
Communications Assistant
College of Sciences
katiegracepz@gatech.edu

]]>
632873 632873 image <![CDATA[Alonzo Whyte]]> image/jpeg 1582567434 2020-02-24 18:03:54 1680031663 2023-03-28 19:27:43
<![CDATA[Strategic Plan Draft Available for Review, Application Period Open for Phase Two Working Groups]]> 27165 Thousands of people focused on the future of Georgia Tech by helping us complete phase one — visioning and drafting — of Georgia Tech’s strategic planning process. Now, the process moves into the goal setting phase that will include an opportunity for review and input from the Georgia Tech community.

Since October 2019, more than 5,700 students, faculty, staff, alumni, campus partners, and community leaders provided input via surveys, in-person meetings, workshops, informal sessions, and webinars. They shared varied perspectives, aspirations, and dreams to help shape the future of the Institute.

The steering committee worked in tandem with the visioning and collection process to analyze volumes of raw data and provide the building blocks for the Institute’s new mission, vision, and values, and strategic impact theme areas.

Members of the Georgia Tech community are encouraged to visit strategicplan.gatech.edu to review the draft of the foundational narrative, vision, theme and values and beliefs that will ultimately shape the strategic plan. There, you can submit feedback through March 20, and learn more about the process, the data collection and analysis methodology, and next steps.

Applying to a Working Group

Starting now in Phase two — goal setting— working groups will cluster around six strategic themes. Applications are currently being accepted for any who are interested in serving on one of six themed working groups.

The strategic themes are as follows:

  1. Amplify Impact: Embrace our power as agents of change for the public good and concentrate our research and learning efforts on identifying and solving the most critical and complex problems of our time, locally and globally.
  2. Champion Innovation: Champion our leadership position as an engine of innovation and entrepreneurship and collaborate with other public and private actors to create economic opportunity and position Atlanta and Georgia as examples of inclusive innovation.
  3. Connect Globally: Strengthen our role as a hub of worldwide collaboration and build a global learning platform to expand our reach and amplify our impact.
  4. Expand Access: Empower people of all backgrounds and stages of life to learn and contribute to technological and human progress.
  5. Cultivate Well-Being: Strengthen our culture of wellbeing and create an environment of holistic learning where all members of our community can grow and learn to lead healthy, purposeful, impactful lives.
  6. Lead by Example: Lead and inspire by example by creating a culture of deliberate innovation in our own practices and by being an example of agility, effectiveness, efficiency, and sustainability.

The working groups will meet between March and May, and work to identify goals, objectives and measures of success necessary to bring those themes to life. The groups are expected to meet on a regular basis, with time commitments expected to be between four to six hours each week.

Interested working group applicants must complete the Institute Strategic Planning Working Group Application Form by Wednesday Feb. 26, 2020.

Questions can be sent to strategicplan@gatech.edu.

]]> Susie Ivy 1 1582209860 2020-02-20 14:44:20 1679521865 2023-03-22 21:51:05 0 0 news Thousands of people focused on the future of Georgia Tech by helping us complete phase one — visioning and drafting — of Georgia Tech’s strategic planning process. Now, the process moves into the goal-setting phase that will include an opportunity for review and input from the Georgia Tech community.

]]>
2020-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-20T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-20 00:00:00 strategicplan@gatech.edu

]]>
632765 632765 image <![CDATA[Building Blocks of the Strategic Plan]]> image/jpeg 1582226516 2020-02-20 19:21:56 1582226516 2020-02-20 19:21:56 <![CDATA[Georgia Tech's Strategic Planning Process]]>
<![CDATA[OMED, AAMI Host Third Annual Academic Empowerment Fair at Georgia Tech]]> 34932 OMED: Educational Services, a unit within the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion (CSDI), hosted its 2020 Academic Empowerment Fair on February 13.

Since 2018, OMED has collaborated with the African-American Male Initiative (AAMI) – an Institute-and-state-supported program to provide academic resources, mentoring, and leadership training to support the enrollment, retention, graduation, and career placement of black males at Georgia Tech – to host the student-focused event.

The 2020 event provided a centralized space where students were given access to targeted undergraduate and graduate one-on-one advisement, direct professional coaching, alumni and corporate interaction, interactive innovation and entrepreneurial coaching, professional and academic incentives, and out-of-classroom faculty interaction. 

“I see this day and all its efforts as making sure students are aware of the vast set of resources they can tap into here at Georgia Tech, while continuing the critical efforts of assisting students, faculty, and staff in building a community in which they can engage every day,” said S. Gordon Moore Jr., executive director of CSDI, a unit of Georgia Tech’s Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion office.

This year’s event was supported by almost a dozen Institutional departments – which provided coaching services to attendees – while nearly 20 campus organizations and departments (including the the Center for Career Discovery and Development, the Center for Engineering Education and Diversity (CEED), and the Office of International Education) provided tabling information and giveaways.

The event was also supported by 30 advisor and alumni volunteers, including the 2019-2021 president of the Georgia Tech Black Alumni Organization, Jeanne Kerney (CE ’84).

The fair also received support from corporate partners BP, Cardlytics, Eaton, and Siemens.

"On behalf of OMED and AAMI, I would like to thank all of the campus organizations and departments that participated with us this year,” said Jelani Liddell, assistant director of OMED’s Outreach Initiatives and project director of AAMI. “It is through events such as these that gaps are bridged, access is transparent, and knowledge is transferred to our students."

“The third iteration of the Academic Empowerment Fair at Georgia Tech reached new heights,” added Sybrina Y. Atwaters, Georgia Tech alumnus and director of OMED. “The initial vision of the fair was driven by an observed need for intimate, candid engagement around black excellence during Black History Month. It is one of the few initiatives where the quantity of participants is not the metric for success. Instead, the Academic Empowerment Fair is measured by qualitative impact in providing students customized services on all levels of their academic endeavors, thus empowering students to become more excellent in their pursuits.”

The event also provided participants with a chance to receive free registration and travel to the 2020 National Society of Black Engineers National Convention and an innovation prototype entrepreneurship session and competition.

Overall, more than 60 development-coaching sessions were conducted in four hours.

The event concluded with an evening faculty seminar and dinner, welcoming faculty, staff, and students.

For more information on the Academic Empowerment Fair, visit https://omed.gatech.edu/academic-empowerment-fair.

 

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1582158831 2020-02-20 00:33:51 1582161861 2020-02-20 01:24:21 0 0 news OMED: Educational Services and the African-American Male Initiative (AAMI) at Georgia Tech hosted its 2020 Academic Empowerment Fair on February 13, with support by almost a dozen Institutional departments, 20 campus organizations, 30 advisor and alumni volunteers, and corporate sponsors.

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2020-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-19 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
632702 632703 632701 632700 632693 632698 632697 632696 632694 632695 632702 image <![CDATA[The 2020 Academic Empowerment Fair was held Feb. 13]]> image/jpeg 1582160050 2020-02-20 00:54:10 1582161461 2020-02-20 01:17:41 632703 image <![CDATA[OMED's Jelani Liddell]]> image/jpeg 1582160077 2020-02-20 00:54:37 1582162263 2020-02-20 01:31:03 632701 image <![CDATA[Faculty seminar and dinner]]> image/jpeg 1582159985 2020-02-20 00:53:05 1582160810 2020-02-20 01:06:50 632700 image <![CDATA[Participants engage at the faculty seminar and dinner]]> image/jpeg 1582159956 2020-02-20 00:52:36 1582168519 2020-02-20 03:15:19 632693 image <![CDATA[Academic Empowerment Fair participants ]]> image/jpeg 1582159404 2020-02-20 00:43:24 1582161048 2020-02-20 01:10:48 632698 image <![CDATA[Sybrina Y. Atwaters and S. Gordon Moore Jr.]]> image/jpeg 1582159902 2020-02-20 00:51:42 1582160864 2020-02-20 01:07:44 632697 image <![CDATA[Fair corporate sponsor Cardalytics]]> image/jpeg 1582159554 2020-02-20 00:45:54 1582160934 2020-02-20 01:08:54 632696 image <![CDATA[Fair corporate sponsor BP]]> image/jpeg 1582159518 2020-02-20 00:45:18 1582160958 2020-02-20 01:09:18 632694 image <![CDATA[Several campus units tabled at the fair on Feb. 13]]> image/jpeg 1582159451 2020-02-20 00:44:11 1582160992 2020-02-20 01:09:52 632695 image <![CDATA[Academic Empowerment Fair attendees]]> image/jpeg 1582159483 2020-02-20 00:44:43 1582168496 2020-02-20 03:14:56
<![CDATA[Andrew Gillum Champions Voting Rights at 2020 Black History Month Lecture]]> 34932 Former Tallahassee mayor and 2018 Democratic Florida gubernatorial nominee Andrew Gillum told an enthusiastic Georgia Tech audience that the strongest tribute to black American history may be the ballot itself.

“I always get a little bit drawn up with speeches about black history, in that oftentimes we reflect on names and personalities over the arc of history but fail to bring their experiences forward to what our lived experiences are today,” Gillum said. He was the featured speaker at Tech’s 2020 Black History Month Lecture, sponsored by Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and the African American Student Union.

“Coming here to Georgia Tech during Black History Month is already a very rich burden and privilege, because we are standing in the city that is often credited as the home, if you will, of activism and the civil rights movement,” he continued. “This is the capital of modern black history here in the United States.”

Gillum invoked the names of Ford Greene, Ralph Long Jr., and Lawrence Williams – who broke the Georgia Tech color barrier in 1961, becoming the Institute’s first African American students – and Ronald Yancey, Tech’s first black graduate. The four were honored at the Institute’s annual Diversity Symposium in September and with permanent bronze sculpture installations recognizing their historical significance to the campus, the city, and the region.

Gillum, also previously a Tallahassee city commissioner first elected at the age of 23, became the first African American nominee for governor in Florida’s history in 2018.

He lost the race to Ron DeSantis by less than half a point.

“I often reflect on Martin Luther King Jr.’s memorial statue in Washington, D.C., which is not far from where he delivered the speech ‘Give Us the Ballot’ in 1957. Dr. King thought that in the years past Reconstruction, we would finally reach the pinnacle, ‘one citizen, one vote.’ Dr. King called that a great beacon of hope to millions of disenfranchised Americans who’d dared to only dream of freedom, of having the vote.”

Noting research that finds the best predictor of voting is encouragement from family and friends, Gillum called on the audience of 500 to dedicate themselves to registering more voters ahead of the upcoming presidential election.

Gillum also provided a road map for political change and for expanding voting rights, including for ex-felons.

In the same 2018 election in which he narrowly lost to DeSantis – one in which a record-shattering two million new midterm voters turned out – Florida voters also decided to re-enfranchise 1.3 million former felons whose voices, Gillum said, “will be heard in November of this year.”

In March 2019, Gillum launched the voter outreach organization Bring It Home Florida and has vowed to register one million new voters in Florida before November.

He also shared stories of growing up as the fifth of seven children. His mother, Frances Jackson Gillum, was a school bus driver and his father, Charles, worked in construction. He said his grandmother, who often helped him get ready for school, would tell him “to bring the education home” for the benefit of his parents, his siblings, and his community.

“I think of men like my father who built doorways that they themselves could not enter,” Gillum said. “I was told that I would need to open doors, not only for myself, but for others after me.”

He would go on to be the first in his family to graduate from high school and college.

“The only way we can commemorate this month of reflection is to take action. There’s no more room for those of us who choose not to engage our relatives, our dinner tables, our conversations around voter registration, to make sure that everyone around us gets out to vote. The time is too urgent.”

To view the 2020 Black History Month Lecture in its entirety, visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P_RX4h0cCbo.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1582207185 2020-02-20 13:59:45 1582750909 2020-02-26 21:01:49 0 0 news Former Tallahassee mayor and 2018 Democratic Florida gubernatorial nominee Andrew Gillum said that the strongest tribute to black American history may be the ballot itself.

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2020-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2020-02-17 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
632708 632720 632718 632709 632708 image <![CDATA[Former Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum]]> image/jpeg 1582208055 2020-02-20 14:14:15 1582208055 2020-02-20 14:14:15 632720 image <![CDATA[Audience members asked questions after Gillum's lecture on voting and voting rights]]> image/jpeg 1582215059 2020-02-20 16:10:59 1582215059 2020-02-20 16:10:59 632718 image <![CDATA[2020 Black History Month Lecture program]]> image/jpeg 1582214959 2020-02-20 16:09:19 1582214959 2020-02-20 16:09:19 632709 image <![CDATA[Andrew Gillum posses with attendee at reception following his keynote address]]> image/jpeg 1582208119 2020-02-20 14:15:19 1582215155 2020-02-20 16:12:35
<![CDATA[Mary Frank Fox Elected AAAS Section Chair]]> 35266 Mary Frank Fox, ADVANCE Professor in the School of Public Policy, has been elected Chair of the Social, Economic and Political Sciences Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The AAAS is the largest multidisciplinary science society in the world and publishes the Science family of journals.

Fox researches the role and influence of gender in scientific occupations and organizations, and she is considered one of the leaders in the field. She has received numerous honors in her career, including:

As part of the ADVANCE Program, which has a professor in each of Georgia Tech's six colleges and is supported by the Institute Diversity, Equity and Inclusion office, Fox works to support and build a community of women in science and academia.

Fox's term begins on Feb. 17, at the conclusion of the AAAS's Annual Meeting.

]]> ifrazer3 1 1580235878 2020-01-28 18:24:38 1580240133 2020-01-28 19:35:33 0 0 news Mary Frank Fox, ADVANCE Professor in the School of Public Policy, has been elected Chair of the Social, Economic and Political Sciences Section of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

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2020-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-28 00:00:00 Rebecca Keane
Director of Communications
rebecca.keane@iac.gatech.edu
404.894.1720

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606727 606727 image <![CDATA[Mary Frank Fox, ADVANCE professor]]> image/jpeg 1528122220 2018-06-04 14:23:40 1538405109 2018-10-01 14:45:09
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Focus Program Hosts Students and Postdocs From Over 90 Colleges and Universities]]> 34932 For almost three decades, the Georgia Tech Focus Program has attracted top, diverse students from across the nation to its campus.

The annual graduate-recruitment weekend program provides participants an overview of Georgia Tech’s graduate degree programs, including information on financial resources, and assistance with the application and decision-making processes involved in selecting a graduate school.

Focus Scholars – undergraduate college and university students – learned of the benefits of receiving an advanced degree, while Focus Fellows – doctoral students who are one or two years away from graduation, and postdocs – learned the advantages of pursuing a career in academia.

“I know Georgia Tech has a great track record of not only having some of the best engineering programs in the country, but it is also known for bringing in some of the best, most diverse students from all over the world."

The 2020 program brought together 184 Scholar participants and 19 Focus Fellows (the largest Fellow cohort to date), from over 90 colleges and universities across the U.S.

“For me, it was important to visit the campus to learn first-hand about graduate opportunities here are Tech,” said Alexandria Hicks, a University of Chicago third-year undergraduate student. “I’m interested in graduate programs that really look to help minority students find avenues to succeed.”

Florida International University undergraduate Heriberto Nieves shared Hicks’ sentiment.

“I’m especially interested in Georgia Tech’s biomedical engineering program,” Nieves said. “I was drawn to the Focus Program after taking on an internship here last summer. I want to know even more about what Tech has to offer, especially to someone like me.”

“In the current era of high technological innovation, globalization, and interdisciplinary scholarship, any agenda towards progress and excellence must be inclusive, diverse, intentional, and dare I say, ‘focused,’” said Sybrina Atwaters, director of the Focus Program and OMED: Educational Services, a unit of Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion. “Focus 2020 represented an Institute-wide commitment of over 40 faculty, staff, graduate students, and alumni dedicated to meeting this aim.”

The three-day program included opening and closing dinners; the annual President’s Dinner – which included a fireside chat featuring Charles Isbell, dean of the Georgia Tech College of Computing – department and lab visits; workshops; and panel discussions on mentoring and graduate admissions led by Georgia Tech alumni and faculty members.

“For 28 years now, Georgia Tech has offered the Focus graduate-recruitment program on the same weekend our nation celebrates the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr.,” opened Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, at the Friday President’s Dinner. “The Focus Program encourages the nation’s best and brightest diverse students to pursue graduate studies and careers in academia.”

Five-year sponsor Intel Corporation also presented two Intel Fellowships worth $10,000 each to recipients at the conclusion of the President’s Dinner.

Since its 1991 conception and opening weekend in January 1992, more than 3,200 students have participated in the program. Hundreds of former Focus Scholars are among Georgia Tech alumni who have earned master’s and doctoral degrees, while several Focus Fellows – a program initiated in 2000 – are current Georgia Tech faculty members.

The Institute currently ranks third in the country in doctoral degrees in engineering awarded to all racial/ethnic minority students and number one in doctoral degrees in engineering awarded to African Americans and Asian Americans.

“I know Georgia Tech has a great track record of not only having some of the best engineering programs in the country, but it is also known for bringing in some of the best, most diverse students from all over the world,” Nieves added. “That’s impressive to me.”

To learn more about the Focus Program, visit focus.gatech.edu.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1580335067 2020-01-29 21:57:47 1580401320 2020-01-30 16:22:00 0 0 news The 2020 Focus Program welcomed over 200 participants from more than 90 institutions across the country.

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2020-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-29 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institue Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
631864 631871 631866 631865 631867 631870 631868 631864 image <![CDATA[2020 Focus Program Cohort]]> image/jpeg 1580336571 2020-01-29 22:22:51 1580336571 2020-01-29 22:22:51 631871 image <![CDATA[2020 Focus Fellows]]> image/jpeg 1580338048 2020-01-29 22:47:28 1580338048 2020-01-29 22:47:28 631866 image <![CDATA[Focus Program participants]]> image/jpeg 1580336781 2020-01-29 22:26:21 1580337835 2020-01-29 22:43:55 631865 image <![CDATA[Fireside chat featuring College of Computing Dean Charles Isbell at the 2020 Focus President's Dinner]]> image/jpeg 1580336725 2020-01-29 22:25:25 1580336725 2020-01-29 22:25:25 631867 image <![CDATA[Focus participants took part in classroom visits across the campus]]> image/jpeg 1580336891 2020-01-29 22:28:11 1580336891 2020-01-29 22:28:11 631870 image <![CDATA[Sponsor Intel Corp. presented two Focus Fellowships during the President's Dinner]]> image/jpeg 1580337432 2020-01-29 22:37:12 1580337432 2020-01-29 22:37:12 631868 image <![CDATA[2020 Focus Program]]> image/jpeg 1580336983 2020-01-29 22:29:43 1580337813 2020-01-29 22:43:33
<![CDATA[Remembering Georgia Tech Trailblazer Ford C. Greene]]> 27446 The Georgia Tech community is mourning history-making alumnus Ford C. Greene this week. Greene, who was one of the first black students to enroll at Georgia Tech, died Saturday at age 76.

“We have lost a true Georgia Tech hero. Because of Ford Greene and the other trailblazers who integrated Georgia Tech in the ‘60s, thousands of people of all backgrounds have been able to learn, grow, and contribute to our mission of Progress and Service,” said Georgia Tech President Ángel Cabrera. “Ford has left an indelible mark on this place. His courage and determination will continue to be an inspiration for generations to come. I send his wife, Frankie, and his entire family my love and respect on behalf of the entire Georgia Tech community.”

Along with Ralph A. Long Jr. and Lawrence Williams, Greene started classes at Tech in 1961. In the fall, all three returned to campus, where they were honored for their courage and memorialized with a new sculpture near the campus’ iconic Tech Tower. A second sculpture honored the first African American graduate, Ronald Yancey.

“It’s important to look back and see your history,” Greene said that day, “measure yourself and see what progress has been made, and also look at what progress needs to continue to be made and move forward.”

Rafael L. Bras, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs and the K. Harrison Brown Family Chair, said, “The fortitude of Ford Greene and his classmates so many years ago changed Georgia Tech forever. Those first steps onto this campus took a bravery like most of us will never have to know. We honor his memory and mourn his loss. He is a part of our history, and we pledge that his story of courage will never be forgotten.”

Greene studied chemical engineering at Georgia Tech after graduating from Henry McNeal Turner High School in Atlanta. He completed a bachelor’s degree in mathematics and computer science at Morgan State University, working for years at IBM and eventually co-founding several telecommunications companies. He was a well-respected leader in the wireless communication industry, testifying before Congress and the Federal Communications Commission and contributing to the federal Telecommunications Act of 1996.

By virtue of an alphabetical seating chart, Francis S. “Bo” Godbold, IE 1965, sat in front of Greene in some classes in 1961. Decades later, he and his wife Betsy provided the gift to Georgia Tech that made the sculptures of Greene, Long, Williams, and Yancey possible.

"This is a great loss for Georgia Tech and for Betsy and me personally,” Godbold said. “Unfortunately, it took me nearly 50 years to understand better the adversity Ford Greene faced at Tech — to have those deep conversations about breaking down racial barriers and his finding the strength to persevere through difficult times. We will never forget his place in Georgia Tech's history. I am so grateful that I got to sit in front of him in several classes in September 1961, had the chance to get to know him personally, and feel blessed to have been with him and his family at the ceremony commemorating his courage with the Three Pioneers sculpture."

“We were deeply saddened to learn of the death of Ford C. Greene,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. “As our office made preparations to honor Mr. Greene and the other trailblazers this past September, we learned of his courage and strength in the face of adversity. We are thankful for his efforts and determination, which forever transformed the Georgia Tech community. Our sincerest sympathies are with his wife, Frankie Hall, and the family at this time.”

At a discussion before the sculpture dedication in September, Greene recalled his first class on campus: Army ROTC, then mandatory for all students.

“I was placed in the front rank,” Greene said. “There were numerous ugly remarks coming from the rear of the rank.”

When the platoon commander heard the other students’ comments, he shut them down. It didn’t hurt that the commander was Chick Graning, the football team’s star running back.

“I can’t repeat what Chick told them, but it had something to do with severe bodily harm,” Greene said. “His final threat was, 'I will put you out of ROTC.' ROTC was a requirement for graduation. So, never again did I hear that.”

]]> Joshua Stewart 1 1580174470 2020-01-28 01:21:10 1580306565 2020-01-29 14:02:45 0 0 news Pioneer who was one of the first black students at Georgia Tech died Jan. 25.

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2020-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-28 00:00:00 Joshua Stewart

404.894.6016

]]>
631736 631736 image <![CDATA[Ford Greene and Trailblazers Statues]]> image/jpeg 1580173999 2020-01-28 01:13:19 1580173999 2020-01-28 01:13:19 <![CDATA[WATCH: Trailblazers: Unveiling a Legacy]]> <![CDATA[Trailblazers: The Struggle and the Promise]]> <![CDATA[Diversity Symposium Celebrates Trailblazers]]>
<![CDATA[Journalist Yamiche Alcindor Delivers 2020 MLK Lecture Keynote Address]]> 34932 For the past decade, Georgia Tech has commemorated the life and work of Martin Luther King Jr. through its annual MLK Celebration.

The 2020 series of events themed, “The Beloved Community 2020: Activism and the Fierce Urgency of Now,” will feature more than a dozen campus and community events -- some in partnership with the King Center in Atlanta.

Journalist Yamiche Alcindor gave the keynote address at the campus' Ninth Annual MLK Lecture January 15, on what would have been King’s 91st birthday.

“Martin Luther’s King Jr.’s message is one that was born right here in Georgia,” Alcindor opened, in acknowlegment of King's birthplace in Atlanta. “With that in mind, I feel like I’m greeting you on sacred ground.”

Alcindor, the White House correspondent for PBS NewsHour and a political contributor to NBC News and MSNBC, spoke about life purpose and identity to a crowd of more than 400 faculty, staff, students, and campus guests.

She also spoke earlier in the day to an HTS class on campus.

“Now, of course the theme of today’s address is 'The Beloved Community 2020: Activism and the Fierce Urgency of Now.' But, those last words – ‘the fierce urgency of now’ – Dr. King’s own words, speak very clearly to me.”

Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, said during the event, “The term ‘beloved community’ was first coined in the 20th century by philosopher and theologian Josiah Royce. Dr. King popularized the term, where he envisioned a community where people of all races, creeds, colors, and nationalities could live and work together in peace and harmony.”

Alcindor’s remarks also challenged attendees to continue the legacy of King through activism and awareness.

“Dr. King said ‘The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.’ This quote reminds me that journalism must be a medium where we continue to dig into issues such as race and justice and ask tough questions.”

To learn more about the 2020 MLK Celebration series, visit https://diversity.gatech.edu/mlk-celebration-events.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1580872241 2020-02-05 03:10:41 1581006962 2020-02-06 16:36:02 0 0 news Journalist Yamiche Alcindor gave the keynote address at the campus' 2020 MLK Lecture on January 15.

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2020-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-20 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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632121 632122 632123 632121 image <![CDATA[Yamiche Alcindor]]> image/jpeg 1580873190 2020-02-05 03:26:30 1580873190 2020-02-05 03:26:30 632122 image <![CDATA[Archie Ervin, Yamiche Alcindor, and Georgia Tech President Àngel Cabrera]]> image/jpeg 1580873248 2020-02-05 03:27:28 1580873266 2020-02-05 03:27:46 632123 image <![CDATA[Alcindor gave the keynote address at the 2020 MLK campus lecture]]> image/jpeg 1580873326 2020-02-05 03:28:46 1580873343 2020-02-05 03:29:03
<![CDATA[OMED Welcomes New Assistant Director of Outreach Initiatives]]> 34932 OMED: Educational Services, a unit within Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion, welcomes Jelani T. Liddell as its new assistant director of Outreach Initiatives.

Liddell will be in charge of OMED’s signature summer program, Challenge, as well as OMED’s AAMI (African American Male Initiative), awarded by the University System of Georgia (USG).

Liddell brings a strong repertoire of experience to the role. He has several years of academic outreach experience establishing K-12 partnerships, most recently from Clayton State University where he managed the USG’s third largest dual-enrollment program of nearly 1,000 students. 

In addition, he was a part of the inaugural AAMI committee and has developed multiple AAMI-funded programs during his career. He is also familiar with initiatives and efforts necessary to support students transitioning from high school into collegiate matriculation which are essential to continuing Challenge’s success in academic preparation for incoming first-year students at Georgia Tech.

Liddell has nearly 20 years of service as an educator in both the K-12 and post-secondary settings in multiple capacities as a teacher and academic support professional, as well as developing and leading student programs. His goal to inspire students to excel in school and life led him to launch The Remarkable Youth Project Inc., a not-for-profit organization that provides youth with exploration opportunities in career paths in digital media arts.  

Liddell obtained his bachelor’s degree from Morehouse College and a master’s degree in Higher Education Administrative Leadership.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1578509662 2020-01-08 18:54:22 1579038730 2020-01-14 21:52:10 0 0 news OMED: Educational Services welcomes Jelani T. Liddell as its assistant director of Outreach Initiatives.

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2020-01-08T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-08T00:00:00-05:00 2020-01-08 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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630788 630788 image <![CDATA[Jelani T. Liddell]]> image/png 1578509725 2020-01-08 18:55:25 1578509725 2020-01-08 18:55:25
<![CDATA[Women's and LGBTQIA Resource Centers Host Events Throughout Fall]]> 34946 Throughout the fall, the Women’s Resource Center (WRC) and LGBTQIA Resource Center will be hosting free events for students, most of which are designed to serve as forums for open discussion.

The Women’s Resource Center is hosting several events for groups of women at Georgia Tech, including Community Circles, a biweekly dialogue for African American, Asian, and Latinx women; and Women of Color and Study Abroad, which will be held Thursday, Oct. 10, in the Student Center, Room 321.

Graduate student women may be interested in the Graduate Women’s Writing Circle, which is hosted in the Smithgall (Flag) Building, Suite 131, every Friday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Two trained graduate peer facilitators also host a monthly Women’s GradChat, the last two sessions of which will be held on Thursday, Oct. 24, and Thursday, Nov. 21.

Both the Community Circles and GradChats are new programs this semester. The Community Circles are part of the WRC’s new Women of Color Initiative, which they launched with OMED: Educational Services. The GradChats came from a partnership between the WRC and Graduate Student Government Association.

“After completing multiple focus groups and reviewing campus climate data, the Women's Resource Center has chosen to deepen our level of commitment to women of color and graduate women through intentional programming that strives to meet their specific needs and experiences,” said Melanie DeMaeyer, director of the WRC. “We're excited to launch these programs — and expand our resources for these groups over the next year.”

Both undergraduate and graduate women can attend the WRC’s Craft Circles on Oct. 30 and Nov. 15. The Oct. 30 Craft Circle will be Harry Potter-themed and cohosted with the LGBTQIA Resource Center’s Gay Christmas. Visit the WRC Programs page for more information on upcoming events and RSVP links.

The LGBTQIA Resource Center also hosts events for specific groups within the LGBTQIA community. New events this year include Closed Circuit Q Chats and a meeting group for the existing Ace Space. Q Chats are student discussion groups that meet every other week and are open to queer people of color; trans, gender nonconforming, and gender questioning students; and closeted and questioning students. Most Q Chats will be held in the LGBTQIA Resource Center, though some will only disclose the meeting location upon request to protect attendees’ identities. Queer Coffeehouse events take place on a monthly basis and serve coffee and treats while offering a casual discussion forum. The next Queer Coffeehouse will be held Monday, Nov. 11.

The Center’s highlighted events for the fall are this week, which is OUT Week. These events include a Reading Rainbows workshop, Fostering Families: LGBTQIA Youth in Foster Care, tabling at the second annual Pride Fest, and walking in the Oct. 13 Atlanta Pride Parade with Pride Alliance and the Tech Trolley. The Center will also host an educational event for Trans Day of Remembrance on Nov. 20.

“We hope that our programs provide a well-balanced mixture of education, support, community-building, advocacy, and fun,” said Camilla Brewer, coordinator for the LGBTQIA Resource Center.

For more information on LGBTQIA programs, including Safe Space training for all students, visit the Center’s Student Programs page. Some Safe Space training will also be available during OUT Week. Be sure to check which events require advance registration.

]]> gwyner3 1 1570197094 2019-10-04 13:51:34 1570454313 2019-10-07 13:18:33 0 0 news There will be frequent dialogues open to members of both communities throughout the semester.

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2019-10-04T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-04T00:00:00-04:00 2019-10-04 00:00:00 Grace Wyner

Institute Communications

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544301 544301 image <![CDATA[LGBTQIA Pride]]> image/jpeg 1465851600 2016-06-13 21:00:00 1475895336 2016-10-08 02:55:36
<![CDATA[Former US Treasurer Rosario Marin Gives Inspiring Keynote Speech at Second Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture]]> 34932 Rosario Marin, author, advocate, and 41st treasurer of the United States, delivered the keynote address at Institute Diversity's Office of Hispanic Initiatives second annual Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture. She has served for more than two decades at the local, state, and national government levels and as an advocate for families of children with disabilities. Marin, who immigrated to the United States from Mexico at the age of 14, is the only foreign-born citizen to ever hold the office of U.S. Treasurer.

“During the 2019 Hispanic Heritage Month at Georgia Tech, we will recognize the contributions made and the important presence of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the United states,” said Toyya Pujol, a doctoral candidate in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, in her opening remarks referencing this year’s theme, Hispanic Americans: A History of Serving Our Nation. “Hispanic Heritage Month pays tributes to the generations of Hispanic Americans who have positively influenced and enriched our society.”

“I hope each one of you can see yourself reflected in me,” Marin said at the top of her remarks. “My life is no different than yours; I just get the tremendous honor of sharing it with you,” she continued. “My life is your life.”

The daughter of a janitor father and seamstress mother, Marin described her experiences moving to California from her family’s two-room home in Mexico City.

“I didn’t want to come here,” she said. “I was fourteen-and-a-half; what about my quinceañera?” she quipped to audience laughs.

Though she initially struggled in high school because she couldn’t speak English, her persistence and reliance on an “English diet” led her to graduate at the top of her senior class. She then enrolled in East Los Angeles Community College, completing an associate’s degree, followed by the completion of a bachelor’s degree at California State University, Los Angeles -- all over the course of seven years.

While in college, she also began working fulltime at City National Bank in Beverly Hills, initially as an assistant to the receptionist. Six years later, she was appointed as the bank’s assistant vice president.

Her career and enrollment in an MBA program came to a halt, however, after her first child, Eric, was born with Down syndrome in 1985. His condition launched Marin to become an advocate for Latino families with children with disabilities. She also founded Padres de Personas con Sindrome Down (Parents of Persons with Down Syndrome), which was later renamed FUERZA, meaning "strength."

In addition to her public advocacy work, Marin became politically involved.

She won a city council seat in Huntington Park, California, in 1994. She then served for a term as mayor, becoming the first Hispanic to hold the position in the city’s history. And, in April 2001, President George W. Bush nominated Marin for the post of U.S. Treasurer. She was unanimously confirmed by the United States Senate four months later.

“If someone would have said that those things were going to happen, I wouldn’t have believed them," Marin said." But that’s how my life happened.”

During her two-year tenure, she championed the Treasury's financial literacy outreach program focusing on the more than 10 million Americans who did not have their own bank account. 

After a failed run in 2004 for the U.S. Senate – becoming the first Latina in California to run for a Senate seat – and serving in roles under the administration of then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, she published her memoir, Leading Between Two Worlds: Lessons from the First Mexican-Born Treasurer of the United States, in 2007.

At the conclusion of her lecture address, she shared three of her ‘Successful Seven’ values from the book which she says helped her gain successes both personally and professionally. “These are the three things I raised my kids with. They’ve very simple, but not always easy to do:”

Always do the right thing; always try your best; and always treat people the way you’d like to be treated.

“Look at me. I made it and so can you,” Marin concluded. “Know that whatever is for you, no matter how big your challenges are, no matter how difficult your obstacles are, you can overcome them. It is within you, but you have to believe.”

To view the 2019 Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture in its entirety, visit https://youtu.be/NPP0SUMNOXw

The Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture is a part of Georgia Tech’s Intercultural Lecture Series. To learn more, visit https://hispanicoffice.gatech.edu/HispanicHeritageMonthLecture.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1569538008 2019-09-26 22:46:48 1569591111 2019-09-27 13:31:51 0 0 news Rosario Marin, author, advocate, and 41st treasurer of the United States, delivered the keynote address at the Office of Hispanic Initiative’s second annual Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture.

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2019-09-24T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-24T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-24 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
626810 626806 626808 626809 626811 626810 image <![CDATA[Rosario Marin delivers the keynote speech at the 2019 Hispanic Heritage Month Lecture]]> image/jpeg 1569541123 2019-09-26 23:38:43 1569541256 2019-09-26 23:40:56 626806 image <![CDATA[Marin served as the 41st treasurer of the United States]]> image/jpeg 1569540684 2019-09-26 23:31:24 1569541410 2019-09-26 23:43:30 626808 image <![CDATA[Doctoral student Toyya Pujol gives opening remarks]]> image/jpeg 1569540903 2019-09-26 23:35:03 1569541353 2019-09-26 23:42:33 626809 image <![CDATA[Provost Rafael Bras, Rosario Marin, and Vice President for Institute Diversity Archie Ervin]]> image/jpeg 1569540993 2019-09-26 23:36:33 1569541317 2019-09-26 23:41:57 626811 image <![CDATA[Marin signed copies of her 2007 memoir immediately after the lecture]]> image/jpeg 1569541176 2019-09-26 23:39:36 1569544228 2019-09-27 00:30:28
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Receives INSIGHT Into Diversity HEED Award for Sixth Consecutive Year]]> 34932

Georgia Tech has received the 2019 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, one of the oldest and largest diversity-focused publications in higher education. As a recipient of the annual HEED Award — a national honor recognizing U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate an outstanding commitment to diversity and inclusion — Georgia Tech will be featured along with 93 other recipients in the magazine's November 2019 issue.

This is the sixth consecutive year the Institute has been named a HEED Award recipient.

“Georgia Tech continues to be an influential thought leader in the areas of diversity and inclusion,” said Archie. W. Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. “Receiving the HEED Award for a sixth year in a row signifies the Institute’s commitment to creating an inclusive and welcoming campus community for all as we continue on our path forward, together, as ‘One Georgia Tech.’”

Open to all colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada, the award measures an institution’s level of achievement and intensity of commitment in regard to broadening diversity and inclusion on campus through initiatives, programs, and outreach; student recruitment, retention, and completion; and hiring practices for faculty and staff.

The award announcement comes on the heels of Georgia Tech welcoming one of its most diverse class of incoming students last month and amid the expansion of campus diversity and inclusion programs and initiatives such as the Challenge program for incoming students; one-on-one leadership coaching for staff members; and added implicit bias workshops and trainings for faculty.

“The HEED Award process consists of a comprehensive and rigorous application that includes questions relating to the recruitment and retention of students and employees — and best practices for both — continued leadership support for diversity, and other aspects of campus diversity and inclusion,” said Lenore Pearlstein, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity. “We take a detailed approach to reviewing each application in deciding who will be named a HEED Award recipient. Our standards are high, and we look for institutions where diversity and inclusion are woven into the work being done every day across their campus.”

For a full listing of 2019 HEED Award recipients and to learn more, visit insightintodiversity.com/about-the-heed-award/.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1569337658 2019-09-24 15:07:38 1569610472 2019-09-27 18:54:32 0 0 news Georgia Tech has received the 2019 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. This is the sixth consecutive year the Institute has been a recipient of the award.

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2019-09-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-20T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-20 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
626675 626675 image <![CDATA[Georgia Tech is a 2019 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award recipient]]> image/jpeg 1569348365 2019-09-24 18:06:05 1569426424 2019-09-25 15:47:04
<![CDATA[Diversity Symposium Celebrates Trailblazers ]]> 27713 A capacity crowd of students, faculty, staff, and alumni gathered at the Global Learning Center Wednesday morning to explore Georgia Tech’s racial diversity journey. Others tuned in to watch a live stream of the 11th Annual Diversity Symposium.

Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, welcomed guests to “Georgia Tech’s Racial Diversity Journey: Recognizing Our Past, Acknowledging Our Present, and Charting our Future.”  

“This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to look back at where Georgia Tech was and to think about where we can be,” said Ervin.

“It's often said that the current generation is the beneficiary of the sacrifices of previous generations,” he said. “This is especially appropriate today, for we are indeed standing on the shoulders of giants — strong men and women whose courage to act nearly six decades ago has altered the course of Georgia Tech forever.”

Tech’s new president, Ángel Cabrera, then addressed the gathering.

“What is clear to me is that things don’t just change. They don’t just happen. They may seem inevitable after they happen. But it actually takes courageous acts of people who call out injustice and who take personal risks,” Cabrera said. “What is inspiring to me is that when those courageous leaders take action and they show us the way, they help us see the world differently.”

One panel, facilitated by Jacqueline Royster, professor and former dean in the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, featured Georgia Tech’s first three African American students: Ford C. Greene, Ralph A. Long Jr., and Lawrence Williams, and Georgia Tech’s first African American graduate: Ronald L. Yancey, EE 1965. Royster began by asking the panelists, “Why did you choose to come to Tech, and what did you bring with you?”

“All of us had outstanding academic achievements as well as sports and the arts," said Long, who graduated from what was then Henry McNeal Turner High School. "My objective was to dispel several myths — number one, that black kids could not withstand the academic rigors of Georgia Tech.”

After applying several times, the three young men were accepted and began classes in 1961. Yancey enrolled a year later. They didn't socialize or study together, but they knew each other’s schedules — just in case.

The men shared stories of feeling isolated and unwelcome at Tech. But there were some bright moments along the way.

Greene spoke about an incident in Army ROTC during which Tech football player Charles "Chick" Graning came to his aid.

“My very first class on my very first day was Army ROTC," Greene said. "It was mandatory. I was placed in the front rank. There were numerous ugly remarks coming from the rear of the rank. Fortunately, a big man on campus, Chick Graning, the star running back, was the platoon commander. I can't repeat what Chick told them, but it had something to do with severe bodily harm. His final threat was, 'I will put you out of ROTC.' ROTC was a requirement for graduation. So, never again did I hear that."

When the panelists were asked how their parents felt about sending their sons off to an all-white university, Yancey recalled, “My mother was terrified, but she never said it. My father asked what I was thinking, but they were both happy to see me get away from demonstrating in downtown Atlanta, so they felt I might be a little safer at Georgia Tech.”

Sculptures Dedication

The afternoon brought the unveiling of sculptures honoring Greene, Long, Williams, and Yancey.

“We are honored that all of these sculptures are dedicated today in Harrison Square, as they will be constant reminders of the trailblazers' courage in the face of adversity,” said Ervin.

President Cabrera thanked his predecessors G.P. “Bud” Peterson and G. Wayne Clough, for their support of the Trailblazers sculptures and the arts in general. He then thanked the honorees for sharing their stories

“Those four stories are of unassuming but incredibly effective leadership. Stories of courage. Stories of people who really knew the moment,” Cabrera said. “It is thanks to their work and their courage that this place is a global example of inclusion, and the place where more African American engineers graduate. You own that story, and we thank you for it.”

Rafael L. Bras, provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs, the K. Harrison Brown Family Chair, and a champion of Arts@Tech, said, “These pieces have much to teach us. The journey of these four men, the trailblazers, is a part of our history that must not be forgotten.”

Francis S. “Bo” Godbold, IE 1965, a classmate of the trailblazers, was inspired by their courage. He and his wife Betsy provided the philanthropic support to make the sculptures possible.

“I wasn’t prepared for how emotional the last 24 hours were,” Godbold said. “When I was talking to Ron Yancey’s son Jason early this morning I felt myself tearing up. I couldn’t even talk.”

When they were students, Godbold sat in front of Ford Greene because students were seated alphabetically.

“These four guys are why I’m here and why I did this,” Godbold said. “I want to salute their bravery. I have thought long and hard about this. Would I have been brave enough to do this? And my answer is no. I just don’t think I would have had the courage to do what they did. I really appreciate you.”

Explaining his hopes for the impact of the scuptures, he told the crowd, “I would like today’s students, next year’s students, Ralph’s grandson, my grandson, their children, and their grandchildren to look at them someday and say, ‘What? Schools were segregated? Why? That’s really stupid. And wrong.'"

Godbold added, "I hope they will accomplish that, and we’ll continue to move forward, not backward."

 

]]> Victor Rogers 1 1567687311 2019-09-05 12:41:51 1580307128 2020-01-29 14:12:08 0 0 news A standing-room only crowd gathered at the Global Learning Centr for the 11th Annual Diversity Symposium.

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2019-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2019-09-05 00:00:00 Victor Rogers

Institute Communications

]]>
625654 625656 625725 625727 625726 625654 image <![CDATA[Trailblazers]]> image/jpeg 1567691552 2019-09-05 13:52:32 1567691564 2019-09-05 13:52:44 625656 image <![CDATA[Trailblazers unveil sculptures ]]> image/jpeg 1567691694 2019-09-05 13:54:54 1567691725 2019-09-05 13:55:25 625725 image <![CDATA[Trailblazers sculptures]]> image/jpeg 1567734343 2019-09-06 01:45:43 1567734481 2019-09-06 01:48:01 625727 image <![CDATA[President Ángel Cabrera at the Trailblazers sculpture dedication.]]> image/jpeg 1567735242 2019-09-06 02:00:42 1567735316 2019-09-06 02:01:56 625726 image <![CDATA[Bo Godbold, classmate of the Trailblazers]]> image/jpeg 1567734849 2019-09-06 01:54:09 1567734870 2019-09-06 01:54:30 <![CDATA[Trailblazers: The Struggle and The Promise]]> <![CDATA[Institute Diversity]]>
<![CDATA[Trailblazers: The Struggle and the Promise]]> 34932 In summer 2018, Rafael L. Bras, Georgia Tech provost and executive vice president for Academic Affairs and the K. Harrison Brown Family Chair, turned to Atlanta sculptor Martin Dawe.

Months earlier on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., the Institute dedicated Dawe’s Continuing the Conversation interactive art piece in Harrison Square, depicting Rosa Parks at age 42 in 1955 — the year her courageous act of refusing to give up her seat for a white passenger on a Montgomery bus helped launch the yearlong Montgomery bus boycott — and at the age she died, 92. The pieces sit across from each other, an empty seat in between, inviting passersby to sit in reflection.

Bras shared an idea for a second campus sculpture collaboration.

The provost had received a call from Francis S. “Bo” Godbold (IE 1965) with an idea to have a statue dedicated to Ford C. Greene, one of three African American students who integrated Georgia Tech in 1961. Godbold, who led a successful career in the financial services industry after graduating from Tech in 1965 and Harvard Business School in 1969, had shared a class with Greene.

His idea eventually developed into a having a sculpture of all three of Tech’s first African American matriculants – Greene, Ralph A. Long Jr., and Lawrence M. Williams – dedicated and installed on campus grounds. The men made their arrival on campus in September 1961, less than five years after the bus boycott in Montgomery ended.

“When the three of us were shepherded in, the [Georgia] State Patrol had to escort us everywhere we went,” reflected Long on the 50th anniversary of the integration.

In 1961, Georgia Tech became the first major university in the Deep South to open its doors to African American students without a court order.

The Three Pioneers

“This project was different than Continuing the Conversation,” said Dawe, founder and owner of Cherrylion Studios in midtown Atlanta. A graduate of Georgia State University, Dawe apprenticed for eight years with Georgia Tech alumnus, architecture professor, and sculptor Julian Harris before his death in 1987.

“With Rosa, I was the conductor,” Dawe continued. He came up with the idea for Continuing the Conversation years ago and shared it with Bras and then-director of Tech’s Office of the Arts Madison Cario who both felt the piece would be a perfect fit for the campus. “With this project of these three pioneers, however, the score was written for me by Bras and Godbold.”

The first step was to talk with the men.

“After talking with them and getting their approval on the project, we decided that the iconic photo of the three on their first day on campus would be my starting point,” Dawe said. “I then studied various photos of each of them from that time.”

He continued, “I really liked the idea of a walking sculpture which would add sense of comradery to its feel. With this sculpture, they’re all looking off [to their left] and you get this sense that they’re looking at something, but you don’t know if it’s [something] good or bad. For me, that tells a little bit of what they went through on campus – that they had this awareness, a very strong awareness about what was going on around them.”

According to Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity, “These were three individuals who, though not members who were readily accepted into the community, were very proud to be at Georgia Tech. Even then [their first day on campus] they were wearing their Georgia Tech insignia.”

It was quickly decided that the statue would be placed in Harrison Square, named after Edwin D. Harrison, Georgia Tech’s sixth president (1957-1969). The campus’ integration came under Harrison’s watch just one day after he called a meeting of students and ordered that the integration be done peacefully.

On the day of the pioneers’ arrival, Harrison flew overhead the campus on a plane to observe its climate. He also evacuated his family from their home due to a barrage of threats.

The First Graduate

Months later, in February 2019, the idea to also dedicate a bronze sculpture of Tech’s first African American graduate Ronald L. Yancey (EE 1965) was developed.

“Yancey started after the three pioneers, but he was the first to graduate, so it didn’t seem fair to not include him as a part of this story,” said Dawe.

Yancey, who entered Georgia Tech in September 1962, one year after the campus’ integration, completed the first two years of his undergraduate degree at Morehouse College. During those years, he applied repeatedly to Tech, with no answers provided with each denial despite excellent grades and test scores.  

Once accepted, Yancey faced isolation and intimidation on campus.

“It was a lonely and difficult time,” said Yancey. “‘Glares and stares’ is the best way I can put it, but I try not to reflect on the negative.” 

Though Tech exempted seniors from final exams at the time, Yancey was required to take 18 exams in his five classes during his last three weeks of school. He would prove successful and graduated with a degree in electrical engineering in 1965, becoming the Institute’s first black graduate.

With the target of dedicating both statues on campus later that September, Dawe and his team immediately went to work on the Yancey statue.

But where would the Yancey piece go?

There were almost a dozen locations around campus discussed before the decision was made that it would be installed in the Wayne G. Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons, seated at the bottom of the atrium’s wooden staircase providing the building's one million yearly visitors with an interactive seating experience much like Parks’ Continuing the Conversation.

“The bronze pieces take at least four months to complete: a month to complete the molds and then they spend about three months at the Baer Bronze Fine Art Foundry in Springville, Utah,” said Dawe.

At the foundry, the sculptures were then bronzed, welded, and sandblasted.

The final stage of the process is patina -- the coloration of the bronze brought about by the oxidation of the metal surface. This is achieved by applying various chemicals and finishes to the surface of the bronze until the desired color effect is reached. For both the Three Pioneers and the First Graduate, Dawe decided on an ombré effect from top to bottom.

The Trailblazers

“These pieces are reminders that it wasn’t that long ago when intolerance ruled the day,” said Bras.

“The other part of the lesson that I hope doesn’t escape people is the reality is that these young men must have lived through very difficult times,” Bras added. “Despite the fact that our intention was to integrate peacefully, nobody is naïve enough to think that this was an easy time for them.”

He added, “What I hope is that as the community interacts with these pieces – either walking or sitting next to them – that their interaction will become natural. They’re reminders of how far we have come. They’re also reminders that we still have a way to go."

Life After Integration

Greene studied chemical engineering at Georgia Tech. He completed his bachelor’s degree in mathematics and computer science at Morgan State University and led a successful career in telecommunications and information technology systems.

After attending Georgia Tech, Long completed his bachelor’s degree at Clark College (now Clark Atlanta University) in mathematics and physics and would go on to become the first African American systems engineer for the Large Systems Group in the southeastern U.S. at IBM Atlanta.

Williams was drafted and served honorably in the Vietnam War, earning several distinctions and honors.

One week after graduating from Tech, Yancey moved to the Washington, D.C. area. He went on to have a successful career with the Department of Defense and served on the Georgia Tech Alumni Association Board of Trustees.

The four men will participate on a panel at the Institute’s 11th Annual Diversity Symposium, Georgia Tech’s Racial Diversity Journey: Recognizing Our Past, Acknowledging Our Present, and Charting Our Future, on September 4.

Later that afternoon, both sculptures will be unveiled and dedicated in their honor at Trailblazers: The Struggle and the Promise in Harrison Square.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1567305702 2019-09-01 02:41:42 1567466913 2019-09-02 23:28:33 0 0 news The story behind the making of bronze sculptures of Georgia Tech's first African American students and first African American graduate.

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2019-08-30T00:00:00-04:00 2019-08-30T00:00:00-04:00 2019-08-30 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
625422 625421 625420 625419 625418 625415 625435 625416 625423 625426 625422 image <![CDATA[Clay molds of the sculptures at Cherrylion Studios.]]> image/jpeg 1567306312 2019-09-01 02:51:52 1567375531 2019-09-01 22:05:31 625421 image <![CDATA[Atlanta sculptor Martin Dawe examines the molds.]]> image/jpeg 1567306275 2019-09-01 02:51:15 1567350141 2019-09-01 15:02:21 625420 image <![CDATA[Left to right: Ralph A. Long Jr., Lawrence M. Williams, and Ford C. Greene, September 1961]]> image/jpeg 1567306240 2019-09-01 02:50:40 1567381045 2019-09-01 23:37:25 625419 image <![CDATA[In 1965, Ronald L. Yancey became the Institute's first African American graduate.]]> image/jpeg 1567306219 2019-09-01 02:50:19 1567381029 2019-09-01 23:37:09 625418 image <![CDATA[Ronald Yancey's graduation was covered in a number of media publications.]]> image/jpeg 1567306196 2019-09-01 02:49:56 1567347872 2019-09-01 14:24:32 625415 image <![CDATA[The idea for the sculptures was developed in summer 2018.]]> image/jpeg 1567305816 2019-09-01 02:43:36 1567347978 2019-09-01 14:26:18 625435 image <![CDATA[The finishing process, Baer Bronze Fine Art Foundry]]> image/jpeg 1567437564 2019-09-02 15:19:24 1567437680 2019-09-02 15:21:20 625416 image <![CDATA[The patina process, Baer Bronze Fine Art Foundry]]> image/jpeg 1567306001 2019-09-01 02:46:41 1567354291 2019-09-01 16:11:31 625423 image <![CDATA[The Trailblazers today (top, l-r: Greene, Long; bottom, l-r: Williams, Yancey)]]> image/jpeg 1567348658 2019-09-01 14:37:38 1567350278 2019-09-01 15:04:38 625426 image <![CDATA[Francis S. “Bo” and Betsy Godbold's philanthropic support made the 'Trailblazers' sculptures possible.]]> image/png 1567375222 2019-09-01 22:00:22 1567379496 2019-09-01 23:11:36 <![CDATA[50 Years Ago, First African-American Student Graduated from Tech]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Celebrates 50th Anniversary of the Matriculation of Black Students]]>
<![CDATA[Sybrina Atwaters Named Director of OMED: Educational Services]]> 34932 Sybrina Atwaters (BS, EE 1994; MS, HTS 2009; Ph.D. 2014) has been named director of OMED: Educational Services.

As part of Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion (CSDI), OMED is charged with the retention and development of historically underrepresented minority students at Georgia Tech. In the role of director, Atwaters will provide oversight and leadership of various OMED programs and initiatives such as Challenge, Edge, Focus, and Transitions.

“We’re looking forward to the impact Dr. Atwaters will have on student success and development at Georgia Tech," said S. Gordon Moore Jr., executive director of CSDI. "Her previous experiences in STEM research, sociology, and student programming will serve OMED and the larger Tech community extremely well.”

Atwaters previously held roles as OMED’s assistant director of Outreach Initiatives and as outreach support for OMED’s African-American Male Initiative (AAMI), an Institute and state-supported program to provide academic resources, mentoring, and leadership training to support the enrollment, retention, graduation, and career placement of African-American males at Tech. Simultaneously, she managed the Challenge program, OMED’s signature five-week, academic intensive summer residential program for incoming first-year students and Focus, the Institute’s graduate recruitment initiative hosted by Institute Diversity.

She is a three-time graduate of Georgia Tech, holding a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering and master’s and doctorate degrees in sociology of technology and science. She also holds master’s degrees from Emory University and Georgia State University.

Atwaters brings to the role ten years of experience as a senior wireless design engineer and more than a decade of STEM diversity research and programming. Her research interests have included the intersection of sociology and technology as well as social inequality in higher education.

Atwaters has also taught Intro to Sociology and Women in Science & Engineering courses at Georgia Tech. She has also served on the board of the Georgia Tech Black Alumni Organization (GTBAO) and currently serves on the Georgia Million Women Mentor and Complete College Georgia (CCG)-GT steering committees.

During her undergraduate and graduate studies, she was an active member with the Institute’s Xi Alpha chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc.; a member of the executive board of the Georgia Tech chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers; a member of the Black Graduate Students Association; and a President’s Fellowship recipient.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1565144173 2019-08-07 02:16:13 1565206466 2019-08-07 19:34:26 0 0 news The three-time Georgia Tech graduate brings more than a decade of STEM diversity research experience to her new role.

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2019-08-07T00:00:00-04:00 2019-08-07T00:00:00-04:00 2019-08-07 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager,
Institute Diversity
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

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624057 624057 image <![CDATA[Sybrina Atwaters, Ph.D.]]> image/jpeg 1565144308 2019-08-07 02:18:28 1565144308 2019-08-07 02:18:28 <![CDATA[OMED: Educational Services Welcomes Largest Challenge Program Cohort in 39 Years to Campus]]>
<![CDATA[OMED: Educational Services Welcomes Largest Challenge Program Cohort in 39 Years to Campus]]> 34932 OMED: Educational Services’ 2019 Challenge program hosted 140 incoming first-year Georgia Tech students this summer, representing the largest cohort in the program’s 39-year history.

During the five-week summer intensive academic program, participants resided in the campus’ Field and Hanson dormitories while preparing for college life by addressing the “7Cs:” computer science, chemistry, calculus, communication, career development, cultural competency, and community service.

The 2019 class was also the growing program’s most diverse: 52% female and 33% Latinx – the largest percentages of both groups to take part in the program – and 42% of all black students committed to attend Georgia Tech in the fall participated in this year’s program. Participants hailed from across the United States (including Puerto Rico), Brazil, Panama, and Nigeria. The students represented interests in 27 unique majors, with 44% intending to pursue non-engineering degrees while at Tech.

“The diversity of this year’s participants reflects the diversity that continues to flourish at Georgia Tech and highlights the continuing need for programs aimed at attracting and retaining talented minority students,” said Archie Ervin, vice president of Institute Diversity. “I am confident that OMED will continue to grow the program’s capacity resulting in the higher performance and graduation rates of our underrepresented minority students.”

“I have been a part of so many Challenge programs here at Tech that I am no longer concerned about whether our Challenge students will be successful,” added S. Gordon Moore Jr., executive director of Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion. “Instead, I eagerly await to see just how far they exceed.”

The 2019 cohort was the first to experience the newly added resource and information component with six rotating sessions before the opening-day orientation. During the resource and information component participants obtained academic coaching tips from Georgia Tech’s Center for Academic Success, important insights from Tech’s Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life and Study Abroad, and more.

Sybrina Atwaters, 2019 Challenge program director said, “Over the past three years, strategic decisions were made to enhance the program’s quality, content, and participation in order to broaden the impact of the program to meet the needs of the evolving Georgia Tech student population. That’s no small feat for an already successful program.” She added, “The 2019 cohort is a reflection of these efforts, resulting in over $16,000 in monetary rewards for outstanding performance, over 7,500 minutes of course and development training per student, and the formation of life-long networks.”

“My first year at Georgia Tech went really well – definitely thanks to the Challenge program,” said Zion Martell, a rising second-year environmental engineering undergraduate student who completed the program in 2018 and returned this year to serve as one of 19 counselors to the participants. “I was headed to Georgia Tech not knowing anyone here, but the program provided a network of friends and mentors I could count on,” Martell continued. “I got a 4.0 my spring (second) semester.”

Dwanda Brew, mother to 2019 Challenge participant and academic performance award recipient Kelsey Brew, reflected on the effect the program had on her son, Julian, eight years ago. “My son took part in the Challenge program in 2011 and it really set the foundation for him here,” she said during the program’s kickoff in June. “He went on to complete his master’s degree here in 2017 and will complete his doctorate in aerospace engineering – also at Georgia Tech – in December of this year. He’s been a really big advocate for Kelsey to attend the Challenge program and I hope it does the same for her as it did for him.”

During the closing banquet on July 25, OMED recognized each participant with certificates and some were also presented with monetary awards for completing the five-week program with exceptional academic performance. Banquet sponsor BP presented more than a dozen grant awards.

Faculty, staff members, counselors, and student participants all offered words of reflection.

“The past five weeks have been some of the best -- and busiest -- of my life,” said Aniya Alston to the banquet audience. “I know that no matter how hard things may get while I’m here, my Challenge family will help me get through it. I’m incredibly thankful for each and every one of you.”

The 2019 Challenge program was supported by the following corporate sponsors: Bechtel, BP, Eaton, ExxonMobil, John Deere, Marathon Petroleum, Procter & Gamble, Southwire, and SunTrust.

To learn more about the program, visit omed.gatech.edu/programs/challenge.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1564681351 2019-08-01 17:42:31 1564684702 2019-08-01 18:38:22 0 0 news The 2019 Challenge program hosted 140 incoming first-year Georgia Tech students this summer, representing the largest -- and most diverse -- cohort in the program’s 39-year history.

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2019-08-01T00:00:00-04:00 2019-08-01T00:00:00-04:00 2019-08-01 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager,
Institute Diversity
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
623921 623925 623923 623916 623920 623919 623918 623921 image <![CDATA[2019 Challenge program students pose on Corporate Day. The 140-member cohort was the largest in the program's 39-year history.]]> image/jpeg 1564683031 2019-08-01 18:10:31 1564684222 2019-08-01 18:30:22 623925 image <![CDATA[Challenge students addressed the “7Cs” during the course of the summer program: computer science, chemistry, calculus, communication, career development, cultural competency, and community service.]]> image/jpeg 1564683799 2019-08-01 18:23:19 1564702976 2019-08-01 23:42:56 623923 image <![CDATA[The 2019 cohort volunteered at Books For Africa, the YMCA of East Atlanta, the Truly Living Well Center for Natural Urban Agriculture and other local organizations during the five-week program.]]> image/jpeg 1564683354 2019-08-01 18:15:54 1564684278 2019-08-01 18:31:18 623916 image <![CDATA[Sybrina Atwaters and 2019 Challenge participant Jade Wurapa at the program's closing banquet ]]> image/jpeg 1564681710 2019-08-01 17:48:30 1564684450 2019-08-01 18:34:10 623920 image <![CDATA[S. Gordon Moore Jr. and 2019 Challenge participant Lawrence Williams at the program's closing banquet]]> image/jpeg 1564682503 2019-08-01 18:01:43 1564688546 2019-08-01 19:42:26 623919 image <![CDATA[Archie Ervin, BP corporate representative, Ahmed Farag, and 2019 Challenge participant Courtney Curtis]]> image/jpeg 1564682334 2019-08-01 17:58:54 1564682334 2019-08-01 17:58:54 623918 image <![CDATA[2019 Challenge program closing banquet attendees]]> image/jpeg 1564682216 2019-08-01 17:56:56 1564684489 2019-08-01 18:34:49
<![CDATA[Registration Now Open for 11th Annual Diversity Symposium]]> 34932 In September 1961, Ford Greene, Ralph Long Jr., and Lawrence Williams became Georgia Tech’s first African American matriculants. In June 1965, Ronald Yancey became the Institute’s first African American graduate.

Join us for a morning panel conversation with these four men as we explore the racial history and progress of our campus community at the 11th Annual Diversity Symposium, ‘Georgia Tech's Racial Diversity Journey: Recognizing Our Past, Acknowledging Our Present, and Charting Our Future,’ on September 4 at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center.

These trailblazers will also be honored with the dedication of bronze statues to be permanently affixed in Harrison Square and the G. Wayne Clough Undergraduate Learning Commons to mark their significance in the history of Georgia Tech.

For more information on the Diversity Symposium, and to register, visit https://diversity.gatech.edu/diversitysymposium.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1563291467 2019-07-16 15:37:47 1563644961 2019-07-20 17:49:21 0 0 news The first African American students and graduate will be recognized at the Diversity Symposium on September 4, 2019.

]]>
2019-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2019-07-16 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager,
Institute Diversity
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
623429 623431 623429 image <![CDATA[Georgia Tech's Annual Diversity Symposium ]]> image/jpeg 1563291554 2019-07-16 15:39:14 1563458083 2019-07-18 13:54:43 623431 image <![CDATA[The first African American matriculants and graduate will be recognized at the September 4 Diversity Symposium]]> image/jpeg 1563291656 2019-07-16 15:40:56 1563644861 2019-07-20 17:47:41 <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Celebrates 50th Anniversary of the Matriculation of Black Students]]> <![CDATA[50 Years Ago, First African-American Student Graduated from Tech]]>
<![CDATA[ Institute Diversity and Office of Academic Effectiveness Release 2018 Student Climate Assessment Survey Report]]> 34932 In 2018, all undergraduate and graduate students at Georgia Tech were invited to participate in a Climate Assessment Survey to gauge the Institute’s progress on building an inclusive, supportive, and welcoming campus community.

The report from the 2018 Student Climate Assessment Survey is now available from Institute Diversity and the Office of Academic Effectiveness. The report also offers a comparison of results from the 2013 Climate Assessment Surveys providing a longitudinal perspective.

The Climate Assessment Task Force (CATF), established in Spring 2012 by Provost Rafael Bras to measure Georgia Tech’s progress towards the goals articulated in its Strategic Plan, was chaired by Vice President of Institute Diversity Archie Ervin.

“The survey results indicate that large majorities of both undergraduate and graduate respondents feel Georgia Tech provides a comfortable and inclusive environment with over 80% agreeing that Tech provides a comfortable and inclusive environment and over 85% feel that the Institute supports their academic aspirations,” Ervin said. “The surveys also reveal that student experiences vary by gender, race and ethnicity, in both positive and negative ways, which merits attention and actions to ensure an inclusive culture for all Tech students.”

In the survey, students were asked to describe the overall climate at Georgia Tech and the degree to which they feel supported by the campus community. Respondents were also asked their opinions on the value of diversity and the degree to which the Institute is committed to policies that support the principles of diversity and inclusion.

Ervin added “As the methodologist for the survey data analysis, Joe Ludlum, and the Office of Academic Effectiveness, make the presentation of data a clear and understandable analysis for everyone interested in our campus culture and climate. I think policymakers will find the data analysis crisp, concise, and useful."

To learn more and to read the complete survey reports, visit the Institute Diversity survey report website.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1559609733 2019-06-04 00:55:33 1560344963 2019-06-12 13:09:23 0 0 news In 2018, all undergraduate and graduate students at Georgia Tech were invited to participate in the Climate Assessment Survey to gauge the Institute’s progress on building an inclusive campus community.

]]>
2019-06-03T00:00:00-04:00 2019-06-03T00:00:00-04:00 2019-06-03 00:00:00 Courtney Hill
Communications Manager,
Institute Diversity
courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
622200 622200 image <![CDATA[Over 2,700 students participated in the 2018 Student Climate Assessment Survey to gauge Georgia Tech’s progress on building an inclusive, supportive, and welcoming campus community.]]> image/jpeg 1559610024 2019-06-04 01:00:24 1559610024 2019-06-04 01:00:24 <![CDATA[Four Years Later: Measuring Progress on Campus Inclusivity]]>
<![CDATA[Annual Tower Awards Celebrates 25th Year]]> 34932 The 2019 Tower Awards were presented Thursday, April 4, to a crowd of almost 600.

Hosted by OMED: Educational Services, the event marked the 25th year the ceremony has celebrated the academic achievements of traditionally underrepresented students at Georgia Tech. Undergraduate and graduate students – including doctoral candidates – were honored. Out of 1,500 academically eligible students, 335 were present to receive their awards.

“This night is about you,” said S. Gordon Moore, Jr., executive director of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion as he opened the evening ceremony at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta. “Tonight, we honor your achievements of scholastic excellence,” he continued.

Award categories included Ph.D. Awards, Master’s Awards (graduating GPA of 3.5 or higher), Graduating Senior Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher), Sustained Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher), Yearly Awards (GPA of 3.15 or higher over the past three semesters), Transfer/Dual-Degree Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher), and First-Year Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher). Within each award category (except the Ph.D. and Master’s Awards), sub-categories included Bronze (GPA of 3.15-3.49), Silver (GPA of 3.50-3.94), and Gold (GPA of 3.95 or higher).

Also presented were the Georgia Tech Black Alumni Organization (GTBAO) Valerie Dial Thomas Unsung Hero Award, the OMED Mentor Award, and the 2019 Lift As You Climb Scholarship by the Jeremy T. Feaster Foundation.

"I grew up looking at my parents’ Tower Awards, aspiring to have one, one day,” said Milan Johnson, an undergraduate biomedical engineering student, Tower Award honoree, and recipient of the GTBAO Unsung Hero Award. “I will always appreciate the Tower Awards for celebrating underrepresented minorities’ hard work in an environment where our accomplishments can often be overlooked."

Part of Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion (CSDI), OMED is supported by more than 25 corporate partners and sponsors who attended and provided raffle giveaways at the ceremony. OMED corporate partners include 3M, BP, Eaton, General Motors, and Southwire.

To learn more about the Tower Awards, visit the OMED: Educational Services website.

]]> Courtney Hill 1 1555526974 2019-04-17 18:49:34 1556203542 2019-04-25 14:45:42 0 0 news The 2019 Tower Awards were presented Thursday, April 4. Hosted by OMED: Educational Services, the event marked the 25th year the ceremony has celebrated the academic achievements of traditionally underrepresented students at Georgia Tech.

]]>
2019-04-04T00:00:00-04:00 2019-04-04T00:00:00-04:00 2019-04-04 00:00:00 Courtney Hill

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

courtney.hill@gatech.edu

]]>
620579 620580 620587 620590 620589 620588 620593 620585 620594 620584 620583 620579 image <![CDATA[25th Annual Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527066 2019-04-17 18:51:06 1555550610 2019-04-18 01:23:30 620580 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527139 2019-04-17 18:52:19 1555550717 2019-04-18 01:25:17 620587 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527851 2019-04-17 19:04:11 1555598230 2019-04-18 14:37:10 620590 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527981 2019-04-17 19:06:21 1555550847 2019-04-18 01:27:27 620589 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527951 2019-04-17 19:05:51 1555598286 2019-04-18 14:38:06 620588 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527920 2019-04-17 19:05:20 1555550912 2019-04-18 01:28:32 620593 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555528132 2019-04-17 19:08:52 1555598211 2019-04-18 14:36:51 620585 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527778 2019-04-17 19:02:58 1555598328 2019-04-18 14:38:48 620594 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555528168 2019-04-17 19:09:28 1555598260 2019-04-18 14:37:40 620584 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527750 2019-04-17 19:02:30 1555598243 2019-04-18 14:37:23 620583 image <![CDATA[2019 Tower Awards]]> image/jpeg 1555527714 2019-04-17 19:01:54 1555598340 2019-04-18 14:39:00
<![CDATA[Institute Diversity and Academic Effectiveness Release Report from the Faculty and Staff Climate Assessment Surveys]]> 27465 Last fall, more than 2,600 faculty and staff members participated in Climate Assessment Surveys to gauge Georgia Tech’s progress on building an inclusive, supportive, and welcoming environment for the campus community.

The report from the 2017 Faculty and Staff Climate Assessment Surveys is now available from Institute Diversity and Academic Effectiveness at diversity.gatech.edu/ClimateAssessmentSurveys. In the report, longitudinal data from last year’s surveys were compared to the results from the 2013 Climate Assessment Surveys.

As Academic Effectiveness Assistant Director Joe Ludlum explained, “The content of the questions in the 2017 surveys remained unchanged from the 2013 surveys, which therefore allowed comparative analysis to track changes over time since the first surveys’ administration.”

The Climate Assessment Surveys assessed the lived experiences, perceptions, and satisfaction of faculty and staff with respect to the Strategic Plan’s aspiration to build “a culture of collegiality, close collaboration, global perspective, intercultural sensitivity and respect, and thoughtful interaction among a diverse community of scholars that includes all students, faculty, and staff.”

“The results of the surveys indicate significant progress on some important measures,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “For instance, there were positive gains over the past four years on faculty satisfaction with support from their chairs, and nearly 90 percent of staff respondents hold the opinions that they freely interact with colleagues across Georgia Tech and that the Institute is generally a comfortable and inclusive environment for them.”

“Despite the generally positive direction over four years, we have work to do. As another example, the level of agreement from staff respondents that adequate processes are in place to address grievances dropped by seven percent in 2017 in comparison to 2013,” added Ervin.

Following the evaluation of the faculty and staff surveys over the past year, all undergraduate and graduate students were invited to participate in the 2018 Student Climate Assessment Survey earlier this month. Results from this survey will be compared to the findings of the 2013 Student Climate Assessment Survey and released in 2019.

“Thank you to those who participated in the surveys as this feedback will help us better understand the lived experiences of faculty, staff, and students and inform Tech’s leadership about strategies to improve support for the campus community,” said Keona Lewis, program review and research manager for Institute Diversity. “Programs like the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program, Inclusive Leaders Academy, and Leading Women@Tech were launched, in part, after reviewing the findings from the 2013 survey.”

To learn more and read the reports from the 2013 and 2017 Climate Assessment Surveys, visit diversity.gatech.edu/ClimateAssessmentSurveys

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1539289460 2018-10-11 20:24:20 1540817917 2018-10-29 12:58:37 0 0 news 2018-10-11T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-11T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-11 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
612655 612655 image <![CDATA[2017 Faculty and Staff Climate Assessment Surveys]]> image/jpeg 1539289638 2018-10-11 20:27:18 1540817946 2018-10-29 12:59:06
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Receives the INSIGHT Into Diversity HEED Award for Fifth Consecutive Year]]> 27465 For the fifth consecutive year, INSIGHT Into Diversity has given the 2018 Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award to Georgia Tech in recognition of its commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion.  

“We are honored,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity and president of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education. “On the heels of a challenging year for our campus community, we remain steadfast in our commitment to an inclusive, safe, and healthy community on our path forward together as ‘One Georgia Tech.’”

Open to all colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada, the award measures an institution’s level of achievement and intensity of commitment in regard to broadening diversity and inclusion on campus through initiatives, programs, and outreach; student recruitment, retention, and completion; and hiring practices for faculty and staff.

Award applications are reviewed and evaluated by representatives of Potomac Publishing Inc., publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity, and the magazine’s editorial board members may have also been asked to assist with evaluating applications.

“Georgia Tech’s HEED Award application received our highest score to date,” said Keona Lewis, program review and research manager for Institute Diversity. “While we are grateful for the recognition, there is still work to do as evidenced by our recently released report from the 2017 Faculty and Staff Climate Assessment Surveys.”

Ninety-six higher education institutions, including Georgia Tech, received the HEED Award this year. They will be featured in the November 2018 and December 2018 issues of INSIGHT Into Diversity.

To learn more about the HEED Award, visit www.insightintodiversity.com/about-the-heed-award/

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1539201321 2018-10-10 19:55:21 1539213001 2018-10-10 23:10:01 0 0 news 2018-10-10T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
612604 612604 image <![CDATA[HEED Award 2018]]> image/jpeg 1539212916 2018-10-10 23:08:36 1539212916 2018-10-10 23:08:36
<![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program Application Period Opens to Select Third Cohort ]]> 27465 If you are interested in working with a group of faculty, staff, and students to foster a community of diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech, consider applying for the 2019 Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

With support from Institute Diversity and the ADVANCE Program, this program brings together campus community members who individually and collectively advance their action, research, or teaching objectives while improving inclusivity on campus. The Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program is a bottom-up initiative tapping into the creativity and diversity of thought among our campus community to crowdsource ideas that create long-term culture change.

“The goals of the program are to cultivate a network of ambassadors who will advance a culture of inclusive excellence and to create an environment where people feel safe, comfortable, and empowered to discuss diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech,” said Beril Toktay, ADVANCE Professor in the Ernest Scheller Jr. College of Business, Brady Family Chair and faculty director of the Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business, and co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

Each applicant should submit an issue area or project idea to focus on as a potential Diversity and Inclusion Fellow. The program is seeking fellows who have been immersed in the topics of diversity and inclusion, as well as those interested in connecting these topics to different fields and perspectives.

All Georgia Tech faculty, post-doctoral fellows, staff, and graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to apply. The Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program will run from January 15 to December 1, 2019. During this time, fellows are expected to:

“Our intention is that Diversity and Inclusion Fellows will benefit from this program by building lasting connections among participants and accelerating culture change at Georgia Tech,” said Catherine Ross, Harry West Professor and ADVANCE Professor in the School of City and Regional Planning and incoming co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program. 

The application deadline is October 19, 2018 at 5 p.m. To read the application instructions, visit diversity.gatech.edu/DIFellowsProgramApplicationInstructions, and to apply, visit https://goo.gl/forms/WM3OOdBB5ndTi3dB3.

To learn more about the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program, visit diversity.gatech.edu/DIFellowsProgram. The program is one of three diversity and inclusion initiatives funded through a Strategic Planning Advisory Group proposal; the other two are the Diversity and Inclusion Councils and Transformative Narratives

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1538430361 2018-10-01 21:46:01 1538431865 2018-10-01 22:11:05 0 0 news 2018-10-01T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-01T00:00:00-04:00 2018-10-01 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager 

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu 

]]>
612192 612192 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program]]> image/jpeg 1538430459 2018-10-01 21:47:39 1538430459 2018-10-01 21:47:39
<![CDATA[OMED’s Challenge Program Welcomed 110 Incoming First-Year Students to Georgia Tech This Summer ]]> 27465 OMED: Educational Services’ 38th annual Challenge program welcomed 110 incoming first-year students to Georgia Tech this summer. During the five-week intensive academic preparation program, incoming students prepared for a successful college career by addressing the “7C’s” (computer science, chemistry, calculus, communication, career development, cultural competency, and community service).

This year’s cohort consisted of 48 percent women, 66 percent African-American, and 29 percent Hispanic/Latino students. The participants also represented more than 20 different majors with 39 percent pursuing non-engineering degrees.

“The long-term goal of Challenge is to enroll a more diverse undergraduate population at Georgia Tech reflecting the demographic diversity of the United States through programming that enables these students to thrive and perform at the highest levels,” said S. Gordon Moore Jr., executive director of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion. 

Challenge participation has nearly tripled in size since its inception at Georgia Tech. “As a strategic response to the Black Student Experience Task Force recommendations, Challenge began to expand three years ago when we had an opportunity to build the program’s capacity to contribute to higher performance and graduation rates of underrepresented students,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity.

“The data shows that your first-semester performance can dictate your graduating GPA,” said Cedric Stallworth, assistant dean of outreach, enrollment, and community for the College of Computing and computer science instructor for the program. “Challenge is a program that helps prepare incoming first-year students for a successful transition.”

Last year, for example, the average fall first semester GPA of Challenge participants was 3.35 compared to the 3.22 GPA of non-Challenge participants.

As OMED Assistant Director and Challenge Director Sybrina Y. Atwaters explained, “For five weeks, Challenge students lived in a first-year dorm, took classes from professors, and participated in activities like whitewater rafting and mental health and well-being workshops. After volunteering in the Atlanta community, participants also used their enhanced knowledge about the community – along with their academic interests – to develop social impact project solutions like urban farming.” Atwaters serves as the communications, career, and cultural development instructor for Challenge.

Each Challenge student completed 4,500 in-class minutes of computer science, calculus, and chemistry; 1,560 in-class minutes of communications and interpersonal development training; and 1,560 in-class minutes of direct corporate engagement and professional development training.

“The relationships that Challenge students establish with each other and with faculty will last throughout their time at Georgia Tech, which will help them weather the inevitable hard times and set them up for success in the future,” stated Michael Evans, first-year chemistry laboratory coordinator for the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and chemistry instructor for Challenge.

“I’m glad that I participated in this program,” undergraduate Jeniveve Vaia told the audience at the Challenge closing banquet on July 26. “When I saw compassion by my fellow students asking about other students’ well-being or opening a spot in their group study sessions, it made me proud and excited to spend the next several years at Tech.”

During the closing banquet, OMED recognized participants with certificates and presented more than $18,000 in awards and incentives from corporate supporters.

“Georgia Tech is a place where you will thrive in a community and by learning from those around you. By sharing our strengths, we were all able to perform the best that we could in Challenge,” added Jaylen Williams, an undergraduate student who received the BP Scholar award.

The Challenge program is supported by the following corporate partners and sponsors: 3M, Bechtel, BP, Eaton, ExxonMobil, John Deere, Marathon Petroleum Corporation, Procter & Gamble, Southwire, and SunTrust.

To view the Challenge highlight video, visit https://youtu.be/KNH70JRlWMs, and to learn more, visit www.omed.gatech.edu/programs/challenge

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1535574619 2018-08-29 20:30:19 1535651227 2018-08-30 17:47:07 0 0 news 2018-08-29T00:00:00-04:00 2018-08-29T00:00:00-04:00 2018-08-29 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu 

]]>
610566 610567 610568 610571 610572 610566 image <![CDATA[38th Annual Challenge Program ]]> image/jpeg 1535574913 2018-08-29 20:35:13 1535574913 2018-08-29 20:35:13 610567 image <![CDATA[Challenge Volunteering ]]> image/jpeg 1535575152 2018-08-29 20:39:12 1535575759 2018-08-29 20:49:19 610568 image <![CDATA[Challenge Academics ]]> image/jpeg 1535575277 2018-08-29 20:41:17 1535575277 2018-08-29 20:41:17 610571 image <![CDATA[Challenge Social Impact Project Presentations]]> image/jpeg 1535575712 2018-08-29 20:48:32 1535575712 2018-08-29 20:48:32 610572 image <![CDATA[Challenge Closing Banquet ]]> image/jpeg 1535576306 2018-08-29 20:58:26 1535576306 2018-08-29 20:58:26 <![CDATA[Challenge]]> <![CDATA[OMED: Educational Services]]> <![CDATA[Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion]]> <![CDATA[Institute Diversity]]>
<![CDATA[Faces of Inclusive Excellence Nomination Period Starts]]> 27465 For the past five years, Institute Diversity has published Faces of Inclusive Excellence to recognize individuals who are committed to advancing a culture of inclusive excellence at Georgia Tech.

This year’s Faces of Inclusive Excellence publication and video will recognize deserving faculty, staff, and students at the 10th Annual Diversity Symposium on September 5, 2018.

“The theme of this year’s Diversity Symposium is ‘Building Inclusive Communities: The Path Forward – Together,’ which will explore both the progress made and the challenges that remain in the interrelated areas of academics, health and well-being, and student and community life," said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “We encourage you to nominate faculty, staff, and students for Faces of Inclusive Excellence to honor their accomplishments, and we look forward to celebrating their successes at the Diversity Symposium as we all work together to continue building an inclusive community at Georgia Tech.”

Faces of Inclusive Excellence recognizes campus community members who have distinguished themselves in their research, teaching, and/or service by receiving special awards or recognitions during the past academic year.

Nominations, including self-nominations, may be made by all Georgia Tech faculty, staff, or students and will be accepted until June 29, 2018.

For more information and the nomination form, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/facesofinclusiveexcellence. To view last year's Faces of Inclusive Excellence video, visit https://youtu.be/8L9OLnHIMwY.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1528315060 2018-06-06 19:57:40 1528315705 2018-06-06 20:08:25 0 0 news 2018-06-06T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-06T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-06 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
606799 606799 image <![CDATA[Faces of Inclusive Excellence 2018]]> image/jpeg 1528315185 2018-06-06 19:59:45 1528315250 2018-06-06 20:00:50
<![CDATA[Bridging Equity and Sustainability: Living Building Equity Champions ]]> 27465 Once completed next year, The Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design is expected to become the most environmentally advanced education and research facility in the Southeast. The Kendeda Building focuses on seven performance areas – one being equity.

“If we’re going to talk about equity, then it needs to extend beyond the building,” said Atira Rochester, corporate relations manager for Institute Diversity. “The Kendeda Building presents a unique opportunity to connect the campus and greater Atlanta community with equity-centered sustainability programs and initiatives. That’s why we launched the Living Building Equity Champions initiative.”

Working with Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion, the Living Building Equity Champions (LBECs) are students charged with fully engaging in the development and realization of the equity component of The Kendeda Building.

The LBECs provide input in the design and development of The Kendeda Building; engage current students in The Kendeda Building’s equity, sustainability, and diversity efforts; and enhance the greater Atlanta community’s access to The Kendeda Building, particularly K-12 students.

Eleven undergraduate and graduate students have been selected as LBECs: Angelica Acevedo, Chaselyn Baca, John Butler III, Helen Chang, Simon Clopton, Tamera Flowers, Nataly Granados, Janay Jones, Lucy Kates, Amber Roberts, and Arionna Russell.

Keona Lewis, program review and research manager for Institute Diversity, said, “As equity practitioners, we are often faced with the challenges of bringing more voices to the table as it relates to sustainability. It was exciting for us to be able to bring a diverse group of passionate students to the table to inform The Kendeda Building project.”

Lewis and Rochester represent Institute Diversity on The Kendeda Building equity working group. They proposed the LBECs initiative as a way to engage more students, particularly those from underrepresented communities, in equity and sustainability efforts.

Last fall, the LBECs focused on their own understanding of The Kendeda Building and the role of equity within this project. They also participated in workshops and other learning opportunities to increase their knowledge of equity and sustainability. In Spring 2018, the LBECs connected with other Kendeda Building projects, visited the Center for Civil and Human Rights, and participated in outreach efforts, including OMED’s African American Male Initiative Academic Empowerment Fair and Expo, Serve-Learn-Sustain’s Community Open House, and GoSTEM’s Latino College and STEM Fair.

“Being a LBEC opened my eyes to the term ‘equity’ itself,” said Kates. “Because of this experience, I am more aware of people’s very different backgrounds, and it is important to understand that even if a design shows equality, it doesn’t mean that it is equitable in reaching all users.”

Another LBEC project was a student-produced video to explain the initiative, which can be viewed at https://youtu.be/T-qIJoM9iHo.

Acevedo added, “I hope that The Kendeda Building can be a place where people of all backgrounds feel included and productive. I would like this education and research facility to serve as an example for how we can prioritize equity in an everyday, working environment.”

“The LBECs will continue to develop and refine our equity work beyond this academic year,” said Clopton. “For instance, we plan to conduct surveys and interviews to evaluate the interplay among sustainable buildings, sustainable education, and underrepresented groups. This data will be used to tailor our work to create positive change for the campus and greater Atlanta communities.”

The 2018-19 LBEC application period will open this summer. For more information, contact Lewis at keona.lewis@vpid.gatech.edu or Rochester at atira.rochester@gatech.edu.

The LBECs pilot project is supported by the Academic and Research Council and Serve-Learn-Sustain. To learn more, visit www.csdi.gatech.edu/living-building-equity-champions

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1528217696 2018-06-05 16:54:56 1528220733 2018-06-05 17:45:33 0 0 news 2018-06-05T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-05T00:00:00-04:00 2018-06-05 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
606759 606760 606759 image <![CDATA[Living Building Equity Champions]]> image/jpeg 1528220172 2018-06-05 17:36:12 1528220172 2018-06-05 17:36:12 606760 image <![CDATA[Living Building Equity Champions Participating in GoSTEM’s Latino College and STEM Fair]]> image/jpeg 1528220559 2018-06-05 17:42:39 1528220559 2018-06-05 17:42:39
<![CDATA[Finding Community]]> 27469 Growing up in Nigeria, Oladipupo (Ola) Johnson did a lot of traveling with his family, but never to the U.S. He attended boarding school and learned about Georgia Tech from his roommate’s sister, who convinced him to apply.

He didn’t think he’d get in — but he did, and he arrived in the summer of 2014 for Georgia Tech’s Challenge Program, a summer academic preparation program for incoming underrepresented minority students.

In that same Challenge cohort was Brandon Gipson, a computer science major from Virginia who started programming in seventh grade. Gipson had Georgia Tech on his radar at an early age thanks to a teacher and an older student from his high school who had gone on to attend Tech. Like Johnson, Gipson never set foot on campus before coming to Challenge that summer.

For Gipson, culture shock hit once classes started. During Challenge, Gipson and Johnson had been part of a cohort of 73 students. When the fall semester began, their worlds changed.

“I came from a majority minority high school,” Gipson said. “In some ways, it was exciting to get to meet people from all over the world. But, at times, it was alienating.”

Gipson was feeling what numbers show: Though Georgia Tech awards more engineering degrees to women and underrepresented minorities than any other university in the U.S., black men comprise less than 5 percent of the resident student population.

Read the full story

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1525366125 2018-05-03 16:48:45 1525443343 2018-05-04 14:15:43 0 0 news Two graduates talk about their time at Tech and the family they found on campus

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2018-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-03 00:00:00 Kristen Bailey

Institute Communications

]]>
605810 605810 image <![CDATA[Brandon Gipson and Ola Johnson]]> image/jpeg 1525365956 2018-05-03 16:45:56 1525366339 2018-05-03 16:52:19 <![CDATA[Read the full story]]> <![CDATA[More Commencement Stories]]>
<![CDATA[More Than 40 Community Members Honored at Sixth Annual Lavender Graduation and Fourth Annual Lavender Awards]]> 27465 On April 19, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and ally (LGBTQIA) students, faculty, and staff were honored during the at-capacity Sixth Annual Lavender Graduation and Fourth Annual Lavender Awards, hosted by the LGBTQIA Resource Center.

"During Lavender Graduation, graduates are recognized for their accomplishments at Georgia Tech by coming to the stage to receive a lavender diploma from the Center and a letter from Dean [John] Stein," said Aby Parsons, director of the Center. “The celebration also gives students the opportunity to connect with our alumni and learn how they can stay involved with LGBTQIA life at Tech after graduation."

This year’s Lavender Graduation honorees included Kirk Barrow, Caden Brooks Catoe, Phillip Cai, Sienna Creech, William Disser, Elliott Eason, Raphael Gontijo Lopes, Naiki Kaffezakis, Cailin Elizabeth Kellum, Michelle M. Lin, Raksha Muthukumar, Lela Myrick, Lauren O’Hara, Calvin Runnels, Sebastian Russell, and Eli Whisnant.

“I’m thrilled to conclude my college experience with this recognition because it feels like the culmination of all that I’ve gained from my work with the LGBTQIA Resource Center, Pride Alliance, and queer community on campus,” said Muthukumar, undergraduate student in the School of Computer Science. “The Center and queer community provided a safe place to develop my professional and social skills, a supportive network that gave me the confidence to dream big, and positive experiences that kept me motivated.”

Following Lavender Graduation, the Center presented the Fourth Annual Lavender Awards to recognize individuals who have made Georgia Tech a safer and more inclusive environment for LGBTQIA students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Award recipients included:

“This recognition is important to me because it came from Aby and the people in the Center who I admire greatly. Working with the Center, specifically in Q-Chats, allowed me to grow as a leader and as a person,” said Stauduhar, undergraduate student in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication.

Ruiz, area manager for the Department of Housing, added, “I am always trying to find ways to be more inclusive such as attending trainings, educating staff, and advocating for an adoption of gender inclusive spaces in residential halls. Recently, I attended the Center’s Level Up program, and this course helped me understand how I can continue to advocate and provide space for queer and trans voices.”

As a new recognition moment at this event, more than 20 faculty and staff graduates of the Level Up program were also honored. Designed to build on the knowledge and skills from Safe Space training, Level Up comprises advanced allyship courses over five weeks (level one) or 10 weeks (level two) that explore topics and concepts related to LGBTQIA histories, identities, and communities.

On the same day, the Center received the 2018 Gift to Tech from the Student Alumni Association to expand its space and programs. “It was an astounding day for the Center and the LGBTQIA community,” said Parsons. “After a difficult year for the community at Tech, we are excited about the year ahead thanks to our supporters.”

This summer, the Center will be bringing on a new coordinator and expanding into a multi-room space in the Smithgall Student Services Building. It will also partner with the Pride Alliance to host Welcome Week and OUT Week events in the fall.

The Sixth Annual Lavender Graduation and Fourth Annual Lavender Awards were supported by Institute Diversity, Student Life, Parent and Family Programs, Campus Services BuzzFunds, and the Georgia Tech Alumni Association.

To learn more about the Center’s Lavender Graduation, Lavender Awards, Level Up, and other programs and events, visit www.lgbtqia.gatech.edu.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1525361897 2018-05-03 15:38:17 1525362434 2018-05-03 15:47:14 0 0 news Celebration Includes New Recognition for Level Up Program Graduates, Occurs on Same Day as the LGBTQIA Resource Center’s Gift to Tech Award Ceremony

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2018-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-03 00:00:00 For the first time, faculty and staff graduates of the Level Up program were honored, including: Isabel Altamirano, Brandy Blake, Lanie Damon, Melanie DeMaeyer, Stacey Doremus, Kata Dosa, Ashlee Flinn, Dallas Flint, Melissa Foulger, Kate Fu, Ann Gerondelis, Beki Grinter, Matt Hall, Chelsea Holley, Meredith Levine, Gia Lockett-Hart, Benjamin McKean Williams, Susan Parham, Stephanie Phillips, Stephanie Ray, Colleen Riggle, Christopher Ruiz, Carol Senf, Carrie Shepler, Faith Sumpter, and Chris Thompson.

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Annette Filliat
Institute Diversity
annette.filliat@gatech.edu

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605803 605801 605804 605803 image <![CDATA[2018 Lavender Graduation]]> image/jpeg 1525362198 2018-05-03 15:43:18 1525362198 2018-05-03 15:43:18 605801 image <![CDATA[2018 Lavender Graduation]]> image/jpeg 1525362126 2018-05-03 15:42:06 1525362126 2018-05-03 15:42:06 605804 image <![CDATA[2018 Lavender Graduation]]> image/jpeg 1525362261 2018-05-03 15:44:21 1525362261 2018-05-03 15:44:21
<![CDATA[Diversity Champion Awards Nomination Period Opens]]> 27465 When you think of diversity champions at Georgia Tech, is there a particular member of the faculty, staff, or student population, or a unit (e.g., college, department, school, or lab) that comes to mind? If so, please take a moment to nominate that individual or unit for the 2018 Diversity Champion Awards. 

Each year, the Diversity Champion Awards recognize those who demonstrate a commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion within the Georgia Tech community. They will be honored at the 10th Annual Diversity Symposium Awards Luncheon on September 5, 2018.

“This year’s Diversity Symposium theme is ‘Building Inclusive Communities: The Path Forward,’ and the awards will be given to campus community members who demonstrate leadership in building an inclusive community and advancing a culture of inclusive excellence,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity.

Award recipients will have demonstrated one or more of the following within the last 10 years:

Nominations will be accepted until June 1, 2018. For more information and the online nomination form, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/diversitychampionawards

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1525196222 2018-05-01 17:37:02 1526065224 2018-05-11 19:00:24 0 0 news 2018-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-01 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

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605741 605741 image <![CDATA[2018 Diversity Champion Awards ]]> image/jpeg 1525196385 2018-05-01 17:39:45 1525196479 2018-05-01 17:41:19 <![CDATA[Diversity Champion Awards]]>
<![CDATA[More Than 1,400 Students Academically Eligible to Receive a 2018 Tower Award]]> 27465 For 24 years, OMED: Educational Services has hosted the Tower Awards to celebrate the academic achievements of underrepresented students at Georgia Tech. Among the more than 1,400 undergraduate and graduate students eligible to receive a 2018 Tower Award (an increase of 200 over the previous year), more than 350 students were recognized during the annual award ceremony on April 5.

“As we celebrated the 24th anniversary of this award, we marked a milestone in recent years as more than 1,400 underrepresented students were academically eligible to receive a Tower Award in 2018,” said Denise Ocasio, assistant director for OMED. “This is a significant testament to our students’ scholastic abilities, work ethic, and commitment to excellence.”

Award categories included Ph.D. Awards, Master’s Awards (graduating GPA of 3.5 or higher), Graduating Senior Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher), Sustained Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher), Yearly Awards (GPA of 3.15 or higher over the past three semesters), and First-Year Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher). Within each award category, except the Ph.D. and Master’s Awards, sub-categories included Bronze (GPA of 3.15-3.49), Silver (GPA of 3.50-3.94), and Gold (GPA of 3.95 or higher).

Two special honors were also presented: the Georgia Tech Black Alumni Organization (GTBAO) Unsung Hero Award and OMED Student Mentor Award. Alexander Pegues, undergraduate student in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, received the GTBAO Unsung Hero Award, and Charles Van-Hein Sackey, undergraduate student in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, was honored with the OMED Student Mentor Award. Both also received a 2018 Tower Award.

Pegues remarked, “The GTBAO Unsung Hero Award is quite special. When I accepted this award, it was not just for me but for all of the people who are working in the background to organize events and set ideas in motion to increase the social well-being at our institution.”

“This award recognition is a tribute to how much I have learned from each of my outstanding mentees within and outside of OMED,” said Van-Hein Sackey. “OMED has been a haven for academic excellence and a great support system for students like me. I will always be grateful to OMED for giving me that exposure and pushing me to excel in all facets of my life at Georgia Tech.”

Part of Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion (CSDI), OMED is supported by more than 25 corporate partners and sponsors who attended and provided raffle giveaways at the Tower Awards. Corporate partners include 3M, BP, John Deere, Procter & Gamble, and Southwire.

CSDI Executive Director S. Gordon Moore Jr. concluded, “The aspirations in the Institute’s strategic plan can only be truly realized if we foster a fluid pipeline of talented, innovative, strategic, engaged, and compassionate students. At the Tower Awards, we honor the students who meet these criteria and walk the talk, and we applaud their hard work, persistence, and determination.”

To learn more about the Tower Awards, visit www.omed.gatech.edu.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1524598337 2018-04-24 19:32:17 1524603042 2018-04-24 20:50:42 0 0 news 2018-04-24T00:00:00-04:00 2018-04-24T00:00:00-04:00 2018-04-24 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
605478 605479 605480 605485 605478 image <![CDATA[Tower Awards Ceremony ]]> image/jpeg 1524598980 2018-04-24 19:43:00 1524599004 2018-04-24 19:43:24 605479 image <![CDATA[OMED Student Mentor Award Recipient Charles Van-Hein Sackey]]> image/jpeg 1524599129 2018-04-24 19:45:29 1524599129 2018-04-24 19:45:29 605480 image <![CDATA[GTBAO Unsung Hero Award Recipient Alexander Pegues]]> image/jpeg 1524599305 2018-04-24 19:48:25 1524599305 2018-04-24 19:48:25 605485 image <![CDATA[Tower Awards Ceremony ]]> image/jpeg 1524600607 2018-04-24 20:10:07 1524600607 2018-04-24 20:10:07
<![CDATA[Black History Month Lecture Keynote Speaker Angela Rye Discusses the Impact of #MeToo and the Need for ‘Working Woke’ ]]> 27465 Activists will recognize the familiar protest chant: What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!

According to Georgia Tech’s Fifth Annual Black History Month Lecture Keynote Speaker Angela Rye, this is the wrong ask.

“In Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s ‘Where Do We Go from Here?’ speech, he discussed power, and he defined power as the ability to achieve purpose,” said Rye. “When you can’t achieve your purpose, does it matter if you are dealt with fairly?”

“If you’re released from a form of bondage, and you’re not equipped to fully engage in society in a meaningful way, your justice means nothing. Society can treat you fairly, but if you don’t have the tools to achieve your purpose, or power, you’re going to fail. Black activists have been asking for justice and equality, but what we need is equity and power.”

The theme of this year’s Black History Month Lecture was “Giving Voice to Justice for 50 Years.” “The theme was selected to mark the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Dr. King and the founding of AASU at Georgia Tech,” explained Leah Miller, president of the African American Student Union (AASU) and undergraduate student in the Ernest Scheller Jr. College of Business. “Moreover, 2018 is seeing a continuation of the #MeToo movement in the ongoing struggle for gender equity.”

Rye, a national political strategist and commentator, discussed the recent controversies surrounding pervasive sexual harassment, the unmasking of male privilege, and the impact of the #MeToo movement through the lens of Black History Month. As a central narrative, Rye repeatedly referenced “Ain’t I a Woman?,” a powerful speech delivered by Sojourner Truth at the Women’s Rights Convention in 1851.

“I wonder what Sojourner would say today given our current discord and state of the struggle. Not just for women’s rights but for black women’s rights,” reflected Rye. “When I think of the many black women throughout history who have blazed trails, opened doors, persisted, and resisted, I pull from their strength. I get to stand on their shoulders. And ain’t I a woman?”

In addition to #MeToo, Rye talked about the #StayWoke movement. “We can’t afford to talk about ‘Stay Woke’ anymore; we have to ‘Work Woke.’ We have to use our gifts to truly change our path forward. Black History Month is about honoring the legacy of people who blazed trails for us. They were working woke.”

Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin concluded the lecture by stating that he was inspired by the references to “Ain’t I a Woman.” “Today’s lecture was an uplifting experience, and at Georgia Tech, we are honored to continue the conversation on April 5 by unveiling a sculpture of Rosa Parks in one of our most cherished locations, Harrison Square.”

To view the Black History Month Lecture in its entirety, visit https://youtu.be/n_W4WzIx9dw.

Georgia Tech’s Black History Month Lecture was sponsored by Institute Diversity and AASU. To learn more, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/2018-black-history-month-lecture

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1520974107 2018-03-13 20:48:27 1520975863 2018-03-13 21:17:43 0 0 news 2018-03-13T00:00:00-04:00 2018-03-13T00:00:00-04:00 2018-03-13 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
603740 603741 603742 603740 image <![CDATA[Black History Month Lecture Keynote Speaker Angela Rye]]> image/jpeg 1520974715 2018-03-13 20:58:35 1520974715 2018-03-13 20:58:35 603741 image <![CDATA[Black History Month Lecture Keynote Speaker Angela Rye with the AASU Executive Board ]]> image/jpeg 1520974889 2018-03-13 21:01:29 1520974933 2018-03-13 21:02:13 603742 image <![CDATA[Black History Month Lecture Audience Questions]]> image/jpeg 1520975063 2018-03-13 21:04:23 1520975063 2018-03-13 21:04:23
<![CDATA[Campus Community Members Encouraged to Share Their Stories Through the Transformative Narratives Initiative]]> 27465 “No doubt about it, the best speakers are good storytellers. The best writers are good storytellers. The best leaders are good storytellers. The best teachers, trainers, and coaches are good storytellers. It might even be argued that the best parents are good storytellers,” wrote Rodger Dean Duncan in January 2014 in Forbes.

Earlier this month, Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement (SDIE) hosted the inaugural Transformative Narratives Storytelling Crawl, an immersive, six-event series featuring 51 stories, four poems, and two monologues from 26 national, local, and Georgia Tech storytellers and six musicians over two days.

Transformative Narratives was launched as a major storytelling initiative at Georgia Tech because we want to be among the best at modeling and achieving inclusive excellence,” said Cheryl D. Cofield, director of inclusion and engagement and curator of the initiative. “The reciprocal relationship between storytellers and story listeners sparks connection among people and the opportunity for ‘being with’ and understanding others.”

The storytelling crawl elicited strong reactions from attendees. “It was cathartic to hear the stories of pain, hope, and triumph from my colleagues and invited guests. While we may be in a different time, stage, or season in life, we can all persevere and help one another grow by taking the time to listen and truly care about what others have experienced,” remarked Laura Pusateri, assistant director of Institute special events and protocol for Institute Communications.

Aisha Oliver-Staley, executive director for Affiliated Organizations, found it an enriching experience. “I left inspired by stories of lived experiences that connect all of us beyond our identifiable differences.”

Through the Transformative Narratives initiative, SDIE has curated 24 artistically embellished photographic portraits as a traveling exhibit, currently hosted by the Ernest Scheller Jr. College of Business, and 17 audio recordings that capture the rich diversity of the campus community. The curated sets of photographic portraits and audio recordings are maintained in the growing digital story library.

Now, SDIE is seeking stories from faculty, staff, and students as part of Transformative Narratives, which is endorsed by the Strategic Plan Advisory Group. Submitted stories may be selected to become part of the Institute’s digital story library and showcased in a future exhibit. To participate, campus community members can submit 55-word story summaries at www.sdie.gatech.edu/share-your-story.

“The initiative aligns well with growing the capacity of our faculty, staff, and students to increase their intercultural competence and interpersonal savvy through the sharing of their identities, experiences, and perspectives,” Cofield noted.

Pearl Alexander, executive director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement and co-producer of Transformative Narratives, credits Cofield’s leadership as well as input from the steering committee with the initiative’s success to date. “We are creating the spaces and means for our campus community to excavate and express their personal stories,” she said. “I’m extremely proud of Cheryl’s vision, the work of the committee, and the sponsorship that we’ve been afforded to make this initiative happen.”

Visit www.sdie.gatech.edu/transformative-narratives to learn more, share your story, or register to attend an upcoming storytelling workshop. 

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1518472545 2018-02-12 21:55:45 1518543258 2018-02-13 17:34:18 0 0 news 2018-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2018-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2018-02-13 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu 

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602279 602280 602281 602279 image <![CDATA[Transformative Narratives Storytelling Crawl ]]> image/jpeg 1518473257 2018-02-12 22:07:37 1518543221 2018-02-13 17:33:41 602280 image <![CDATA[African Heritage Storytelling Concert and Experience]]> image/jpeg 1518473617 2018-02-12 22:13:37 1518473617 2018-02-12 22:13:37 602281 image <![CDATA[Transformative Narratives Traveling Exhibit ]]> image/jpeg 1518473793 2018-02-12 22:16:33 1518473793 2018-02-12 22:16:33
<![CDATA[MLK Lecture Keynote Speaker Joy-Ann Reid Shares Insights on the Past, Present, and Future of Nonviolent Political Protest ]]> 27465 It has been 50 years since the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. If he were alive today, how would King view his philosophy of nonviolent political protest during the current struggles for social and interpersonal change?

“During this pivotal time, it seems as if we are at the height of the struggle toward becoming an inclusive society, and our journey continues during this evolution toward becoming a truly just and beloved community,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity.

During Georgia Tech’s Seventh Annual MLK Lecture, “Actualizing the Dream: The Future of Nonviolent Political Protest,” Joy-Ann Reid, national correspondent for MSNBC, discussed King’s legacy and his vision of a beloved community, achieved through nonviolent principles.

“I sometimes object to the ‘postcardization’ of Dr. King,” said Reid. “During these anniversaries, it is easier to remember the beautiful words that he said and to forget the more complicated person that he was. If Dr. King were alive today, he wouldn’t be the man who is saying that we can get to the table of brotherhood; he would be agitating for the change that he was trying to create.”

After discussing the complexities of American history, including the Poor People’s Campaign, King’s last days, and the designation of a federal holiday honoring him, Reid shifted her focus to today’s national climate. “The wealth gap is only getting worse, and the political power gap is just as wide. The country has a long way to go to be a more perfect union.” 

As Reid stated, the median black family has $1,700 in wealth, and the median Latino family has $2,000 in wealth – total assets minus total debt – which has declined over the past three decades. Meanwhile, white median household wealth is significantly higher – $116,800 – up from $102,000 30 years ago.1

“Anyone who wants to advocate for economic justice needs to understand that you need to fight for racial justice as a unique, special, and separate thing. Then, you need to fight for economic justice as a reparative, multi-community, and interdenominational thing,” concluded Reid. “Otherwise, America is a tribal country, and all the tribes will fight for whatever limited resources there are.”

Following the lecture, Allen Hyde, assistant professor in the School of History and Sociology, remarked, “It is important to understand the complexity of Dr. King and American history, so we can understand the connections between racial justice and economic justice in both the past and today’s society.”

“Despite America’s tribal nature, we can come together by developing Dr. King’s dangerous unselfishness, particularly in today’s narcissistic era, as the need for economic justice cuts across everything,” said John Jordan, alumnus of Morehouse College and managing partner for Fight for Light Inc.

To view the MLK Lecture in its entirety, visit https://youtu.be/LF9PiJpzW2U.

Georgia Tech’s MLK Lecture is sponsored by Institute Diversity, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Office of Government and Community Relations, and Office of Student Diversity Programs. To learn more about the MLK Lecture, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/mlk-celebration.

 

1 Josh Hoxie, “Blacks and Latinos Will Be Broke in a Few Decades,” FORTUNE, (September 19, 2017). 

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1518046023 2018-02-07 23:27:03 1518046883 2018-02-07 23:41:23 0 0 news 2018-02-07T00:00:00-05:00 2018-02-07T00:00:00-05:00 2018-02-07 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
602112 602113 602114 602115 602112 image <![CDATA[MLK Lecture Keynote Speaker Joy-Ann Reid ]]> image/jpeg 1518046113 2018-02-07 23:28:33 1518046113 2018-02-07 23:28:33 602113 image <![CDATA[MLK Lecture Keynote Speaker Joy-Ann Reid with Georgia Tech First Lady Val Peterson and Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin]]> image/jpeg 1518046278 2018-02-07 23:31:18 1518046278 2018-02-07 23:31:18 602114 image <![CDATA[MLK Lecture Audience Questions]]> image/jpeg 1518046410 2018-02-07 23:33:30 1518046410 2018-02-07 23:33:30 602115 image <![CDATA[MLK Lecture Audience Questions ]]> image/jpeg 1518046529 2018-02-07 23:35:29 1518046529 2018-02-07 23:35:29
<![CDATA[Nearly 200 Students and Postdocs Attend the Focus Program]]> 27465 “By participating in the Focus Program, I learned how to be a stronger candidate for graduate school,” said Camilla Johnson, a Virginia Tech undergraduate. “I am thankful for this program because it gave me more confidence to pursue a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering.”

For 27 years, Georgia Tech’s Focus Program has brought high-achieving students from diverse backgrounds to campus. The annual graduate recruitment weekend is held during the observance and celebration of the Martin Luther King Jr. national holiday.

This month, 192 underrepresented minority students and postdocs attended, representing 81 colleges and universities from 32 states and four countries.

“Our Latinx applications to the Focus Program increased this year, and our attendance of Focus Scholars from Puerto Rico almost doubled compared to 2017,” said Sybrina Atwaters, assistant director for outreach initiatives at OMED: Educational Services, a unit of Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion.

The three-day program includes opening and closing dinners; President’s Dinner; campus tours; department and lab visits; and panel discussions on graduate admissions, fellowships, scholarships, mentoring, and student and alumni experiences.

S. Gordon Moore Jr., the Center’s executive director, told Focus Program participants during the President’s Dinner, “Georgia Tech seeks excellence. You are not here as an underrepresented minority; you are here because you are one of the best students in the country.”

Approximately 47 percent of the 2018 Focus Program participants, who will graduate this May, have applied to graduate programs at Georgia Tech, and 37 percent received application fee waivers. Compared to last year, participant applications to Georgia Tech’s graduate programs have increased 17 percent.

“You have to believe in yourself. The Focus Program helped everyone believe that we could earn graduate degrees,” remarked Gabriela Lopez, an undergraduate student at New York University.

Since its inception, more than 3,000 students from a wide array of colleges and universities have participated in the program. Some 300 former Focus Scholars are among the Georgia Tech alumni who have earned master’s and doctoral degrees. Focus Scholars is a component of the program designed to inform juniors and seniors about the benefits of earning an advanced degree. Additionally, numerous Focus Fellows are members of Georgia Tech’s engineering faculty. Focus Fellows encourages diverse doctoral students to consider an academic career.

“The program’s level of success is due to the support of the Institute’s administration, faculty, staff, and students – with generous support from corporate sponsors like Intel,” added Atwaters.

Currently, Georgia Tech awards more doctoral degrees in engineering to all racial/ethnic minority students,1 and more undergraduate degrees in engineering to women,2 than any other school. 

To learn more about the Focus Program, visit www.focus.gatech.edu.

 

1 Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

2 American Society for Engineering Education

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1517262326 2018-01-29 21:45:26 1517265960 2018-01-29 22:46:00 0 0 news 2018-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-29T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-29 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
601541 601543 601549 601541 image <![CDATA[2018 Focus Program Participants ]]> image/jpeg 1517264596 2018-01-29 22:23:16 1517264596 2018-01-29 22:23:16 601543 image <![CDATA[2018 Intel-supported Focus Fellows]]> image/jpeg 1517264918 2018-01-29 22:28:38 1517264918 2018-01-29 22:28:38 601549 image <![CDATA[2018 Focus Program Alumni Panel ]]> image/png 1517265332 2018-01-29 22:35:32 1517265332 2018-01-29 22:35:32
<![CDATA[EthicsPoint Reporting Now Includes Student Categories]]> 27469 One of the recommendations resulting from 2016’s Black Student Experience Task Force included the request for an anonymous reporting system, a tool that would enable a systematic investigation for any allegations of discrimination on campus.

Georgia Tech already had such a tool. But at the time, it wasn’t being used for student-related matters. Today, the EthicsPoint reporting system is set up to address a broader array of concerns.

Melissa Hall, an associate director in the Department of Internal Auditing, said that the act of expanding the reporting categories had an additional benefit: It initiated a thorough review of all the information contained on the site, as well as a process for keeping it up to date. 

“Going forward, it’s something we’re going to review every two years,” Hall said. 

Anyone with a concern such as unsafe working conditions, academic misconduct, or abuse are encouraged to access the EthicsPoint system. When a report is submitted, personnel within the responsible unit are notified by email to investigate the claims. Alleged financial improprieties are referred to Internal Auditing, for example, just as allegations of discrimination are directed to staff in Institute Diversity. The University System’s Board of Regents is also alerted and has oversight for all filed reports. 

“We acknowledge receipt [of a complaint] within 48 hours, so the submitter knows there is an awareness of their report,” Hall said. 

Once a user submits a report, they receive unique login credentials that enable them to monitor status updates, upload supporting documentation, or respond to any follow-up questions the investigator may have.

Hall said she’s aware the primary reluctance people have when reporting is whether or not there will be anonymity in the process. In response, she pointed out that EthicsPoint is a third-party system — which keeps the reporter’s identification secure — and that the Institute’s focus is ensuring that staff, faculty, and students are operating within the boundaries of ethical behavior. 

“Our interest is investigating the claims and taking corrective action if necessary, not trying to identify the source of the information,” she said.

]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1516644224 2018-01-22 18:03:44 1516803279 2018-01-24 14:14:39 0 0 news Anyone with a concern such as unsafe working conditions, academic misconduct, or abuse are encouraged to access the EthicsPoint system.

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2018-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-22T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-22 00:00:00 Melissa Hall

melissa.hall@business.gatech.edu

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<![CDATA[Ethicspoint]]>
<![CDATA[First Cohort of Faculty, Staff, and Students Complete Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program]]> 27465 Twenty faculty, staff, and students were recently honored for completing the inaugural Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program at the program’s poster expo and celebration event.

The first cohort of fellows included Jennifer Beveridge, Brienné Coates, Santanu Dey, Lana Ferreira, Michelle Gaines, Stephanie Gillespie, Tia Jackson-Truitt, Ronald Johnson, Timothy Lieuwen, Susannah McFaul, Jerrold Mobley, Lauren Neefe, Dionne Nickerson, Irina Nikivincze, Yelena Rivera-Vale, Sebastian Ruf, Calvin Runnels, Hussein Sayani, Jacquelyn Strickland, and William Todd.

“Through this program, we wanted to create a grassroots movement that would accelerate cultural change at Georgia Tech,” said Magnus Egerstedt, professor and Julian T. Hightower Chair in Systems and Controls in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, executive director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines, and co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

According to the Harvard Business Review, a number of organizations experienced consistently positive results with diversity and inclusion programs that apply three basic principles: engage ambassadors in solving the problem, expose them to people from different groups, and encourage social accountability for change.1

With support from Institute Diversity, the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program was launched last year to bring together faculty, staff, and students who individually and collectively advance their action, research, or teaching objectives while improving inclusivity on campus.

The goals of the program are to cultivate a network of ambassadors who will advance a culture of inclusive excellence and create an environment where people feel safe, comfortable, and empowered to discuss diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech.

“After selecting the first cohort from their submitted proposals, the fellows were grouped into teams, and each team had a leader or co-leaders,” remarked Beril Toktay, ADVANCE Professor in the Ernest Scheller Jr. College of Business, Brady Family Chair and faculty director of the Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business, and co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program. “This cohort represented an excellent cross-section of the Institute. We are proud of the authenticity of this program thanks to the unique perspecties of the fellows.”

Projects from the first cohort included podcast stories, blogs, icebreakers, online training modules, panel discussions, and circus arts performances focusing on the dimensions and intersectionalities of diversity, including race, ethnicity, gender, gender expression, sexual orientation, and disability. To learn more about the fellows’ projects, visit
www.diversity.gatech.edu/DIFellowsProgram/2017ProjectSpotlights.

Yelena Rivera-Vale, one of the fellows and TV and web operations coordinator for the Georgia Tech Cable Network, described her team’s project: “Accent Stories is a series of podcasts where campus community members share their personal recollections and perspectives related to the way they speak. The way one speaks tells a story, and accents can be related to bias. After hearing these stories, it is our hope that listeners will think about accents in a different way.”

The second cohort of 21 faculty, staff, and students was recently selected for the 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program. Following an application period last fall, this year’s fellows will be expected to:

“Institute Diversity is pleased to support the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program, which was launched after a Strategic Plan Advisory Group proposal was submitted. We applaud the first and second cohorts who are making a difference and transforming the culture through modeling inclusive excellence,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity.

To learn more about the program, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/DIFellowsProgram.

 

1 Frank Dobbin and Alexandra Kalev, “Why Diversity Programs Fail,” Harvard Business Review (July-August 2016).

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1515180276 2018-01-05 19:24:36 1515188296 2018-01-05 21:38:16 0 0 news 2018-01-05T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-05T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-05 00:00:00 The 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program includes Troy Batugal, Natashia Boland, Rachel Chen, Sheila Cranman, Rishabh Datta, Claudio Di Leo, Heather Dicks, Jennifer Glass, Lacy Hodges, Avanti Joshi, Angela Keys, Preksha Kukreja, Minda Monteagudo, Rhea Perkins, Raneem Rizvi, Rockie Rodriguez, Sahana Srivatsan, Maloreigh Todd, Skyler Tordoya Henckell, Emily Weigel, and Conan Zhao.

]]>
Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
600487 600488 600489 600490 600487 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows ]]> image/jpeg 1515183101 2018-01-05 20:11:41 1515183101 2018-01-05 20:11:41 600488 image <![CDATA[Diversity Inclusion and Fellows Program Project: Accent Stories]]> image/jpeg 1515183285 2018-01-05 20:14:45 1515183360 2018-01-05 20:16:00 600489 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows with Archie Ervin ]]> image/jpeg 1515183516 2018-01-05 20:18:36 1515183516 2018-01-05 20:18:36 600490 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program Co-Directors Magnus Egerstedt and Beril Toktay ]]> image/jpeg 1515183737 2018-01-05 20:22:17 1515183737 2018-01-05 20:22:17
<![CDATA[Implementation Committee Provides Quarterly Updates on the 11 Recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force]]> 27465 Chaired by Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin, the implementation committee of students and leaders from Institute Diversity, Student Life, and Undergraduate Education provided updates on its progress to address the 11 recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force that will help ensure a welcoming, inclusive campus. Quarterly updates will continue to be released until the end of the 2018-19 academic year. 

As part of a three-year implementation process, the recommendations are grouped into four impact areas: programs, trainings, physical spaces, and planning and assessments.

“The implementation committee has made significant strides to transform the culture as we collectively work toward modeling inclusive excellence, but there is still work to do as culture change takes time,” said Ervin. “This year’s Climate Assessment Surveys are pivotal to gauge the Institute’s progress on building an inclusive and supportive environment as we analyze the longitudinal data from the surveys four years ago.”

These implementation updates (not ranked by priority) encompass:

Programs

1. Academics – Expanded the recommendation to include issues such as academic performance, retention, and graduation.

2. Orientation – Expanded the recommendation to include orientation processes beyond the FASET program.

3. Intercultural Student Programs – Conducted the first meeting of the Student Advisory Committee on Black Student Experiences and Campus Environment, co-led by Institute Diversity and Student Life. The committee is exploring how student issues are handled by the administration.

4. Reporting System – Updated and finalized the “Discriminatory Behavior/Harassment” report type language under the “Student-Related Matters” and “Employee Matters” categories within EthicsPoint, and Institute Communications and Institute Diversity will announce the EthicsPoint portal updates to the campus community next month.

Trainings

5. Community Orientation and Training – Continuing to offer the following trainings:

6. Cultural Inclusivity Leadership Training – Relaunching Greeks United for Inclusivity, Diversity, and Equity (GUIDE) with a new cohort of student leaders. Conducted the Student Leader Retreat earlier this year for participants to engage with the “I Feel Safe When…” campaign. Student Life is planning the next Student Leader Retreat this spring.

7. Greek Education – Relaunching GUIDE with a new cohort of student leaders as noted above.

Physical Spaces

8. Multicultural Center – Selected the architecture firm for the Student Center expansion, and the Student Center is meeting with select staff and students to discuss visioning for the Multicultural Center. Also meeting with Capital Planning and Space Management to identify plots on campus for National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. organizations.

Planning and Assessments

9. Strategic Plan – Continuing to offer three diversity and inclusion initiatives through a proposal to the Institute’s Strategic Plan Advisory Group, two of which — the Diversity and Inclusion Councils and the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program — are noted above. The third initiative is:

10. Climate Assessment Surveys – Administered the 2017 Climate Assessment Surveys to faculty and staff last month from Institute Diversity and Academic Effectiveness, and students will receive a climate assessment survey email during spring semester 2018 as noted above.

11. Institutional Climate Change and Growth – Conducted the first meeting of the Student Advisory Committee on Black Student Experiences and Campus Environment, co-led by Institute Diversity and Student Life, as noted above.  

“Thanks to the implementation team whose efforts have helped us fulfill some of the recommendations set forth by the Black Student Experience Task Force,” said John M. Stein, vice president for Student Life and dean of students. “We will continue to work together over the next 18 months to satisfy all of the recommendations.”

To inquire about the Black Student Experience Task Force and/or its recommendations, email institutediversity@gatech.edu. For more information, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/blackstudentexperiencetaskforce.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1512755913 2017-12-08 17:58:33 1512766364 2017-12-08 20:52:44 0 0 news 2017-12-08T00:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08T00:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
599714 599713 599734 599714 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program]]> image/jpeg 1512757208 2017-12-08 18:20:08 1512757220 2017-12-08 18:20:20 599713 image <![CDATA[Climate Assessment Surveys]]> image/jpeg 1512757023 2017-12-08 18:17:03 1512757054 2017-12-08 18:17:34 599734 image <![CDATA[Black Student Experience Task Force Recommendations Progress Report, Fall 2017]]> image/jpeg 1512766306 2017-12-08 20:51:46 1512766306 2017-12-08 20:51:46
<![CDATA[Implementation Committee Provides Quarterly Updates on the 11 Gender Equity Initiatives]]> 27465 Chaired by Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin, the implementation committee of faculty and staff from the Office of the President, Institute Diversity, Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development (VPGEFD), and Human Resources provided updates on its progress to implement the 11 Gender Equity Initiatives. Quarterly updates will continue to be released until the end of the 2017-18 academic year.

As part of a two-year implementation process, the initiatives are grouped into four impact areas: hiring, promotion, and tenure; professional and leadership development; leadership appointments; and recognition and increased visibility of the Institute’s commitment to gender equity.

“As we enter the last six months of implementation, it is imperative that we continue to support gender equity programs and initiatives moving forward,” commented Ervin. “We are committed to transforming the culture as we collectively work toward modeling inclusive excellence at Georgia Tech.”

These implementation updates (not ranked by priority) encompass:

Impact Area 1: Hiring, Promotion, and Tenure

1. Implicit Bias Workshops – Offered more than 25 workshops to more than 400 faculty members since fall 2015 and secured four additional trainers to facilitate upcoming workshops. Institute Diversity and the ADVANCE Program, in collaboration with VPGEFD, are providing additional workshops this spring.

2. Search Guidelines – Developing an application tracking system for faculty through VPGEFD and Human Resources and refining interim search guidelines to create one applicant funnel at Tech pending the rollout of the OneUSG system.  

3. Processes and Pathways to Advancement and Promotion – Continuing to promulgate the approved changes to the Faculty Handbook by the Faculty Senate that outlined and clarified new promotion guidelines for academic professionals and lecturers, and led to the promotion of more than 15 faculty members this year; and continuing to offer the following programs:

4. Salary Equity Studies – Launching a staff salary equity study from the Office of Institutional Research and Planning and Human Resources and evaluating the equity study findings.

Impact Area 2: Professional and Leadership Development

5. Professional and Leadership Development Programs – Continuing to offer the following competency-based leadership development programs as noted above: Emerging Leaders Program, Inclusive Leaders Academy, and Leading Women@Tech.

6. Family-Friendly Programming and Policies – Human Resources and Institute Diversity are continuing to revisit recommendations from the Task Force on Family-Friendly Policies. Additionally, VPGEFD re-released the updated Active Service Modified Duties policy and proposed probationary period extension changes to the Faculty Handbook this year.

Impact Area 3: Leadership Appointments

7. Inclusive and Open Processes for Appointments – Institute Diversity and VPGEFD adjusted the stipends for ADVANCE Professors and revised the Regents’ Professors selection process at Georgia Tech.

Impact Area 4: Recognition and Increased Visibility

8. Reporting System Awareness – Updated and finalized the “Discriminatory Behavior/Harassment” report type language under the “Student-Related Matters” and “Employee Matters” categories within EthicsPoint, and Institute Communications and Institute Diversity will announce the EthicsPoint portal updates to the campus community next month.

9. Success Story Promotion – Continuing to publish news stories and success stories to promote women’s successes and achievements, including the Diversity Champion Awards, Faces of Inclusive Excellence, and Inclusive Leaders Academy from Institute Diversity and faculty recognition success stories from the Office of the Provost.

10. Event Promotion – Continuing to promote events on campus that feature and celebrate women, such as Inclusive Leaders Academy Closing Ceremony Keynote Speaker Brené Brown and Leading Women@Tech Closing Ceremony Keynote Speaker Gail Evans.

11. Gender Equity Data – Continuing to update diversity and equity dashboard content from the Office of Institutional Research and Planning and Institute Diversity. Additionally, Institute Diversity and Academic Effectiveness administered the 2017 Climate Assessment Surveys to faculty and staff last month, and students will receive a climate assessment survey email during spring semester 2018.

“The Inclusive Leaders Academy taught me what it takes to be a brave leader, how to embrace vulnerability, and that we all have unconscious biases,” said Melissa Arceneaux, financial manager II for Procurement and Business Services. “Anyone who wants to foster an inclusive environment should participate in this program.”

To inquire about the Gender Equity Initiatives, email institutediversity@gatech.edu. For more information, visit diversity.gatech.edu/genderequityinitiatives.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1512760679 2017-12-08 19:17:59 1512766181 2017-12-08 20:49:41 0 0 news 2017-12-08T00:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08T00:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
599721 599722 599723 599733 599721 image <![CDATA[Implicit Bias Workshops]]> image/jpeg 1512761499 2017-12-08 19:31:39 1512761499 2017-12-08 19:31:39 599722 image <![CDATA[Inclusive Leaders Academy]]> image/jpeg 1512761655 2017-12-08 19:34:15 1512762054 2017-12-08 19:40:54 599723 image <![CDATA[Leading Women@Tech ]]> image/jpeg 1512761790 2017-12-08 19:36:30 1512761790 2017-12-08 19:36:30 599733 image <![CDATA[Gender Equity Initiatives Progress Report, Fall 2017]]> image/jpeg 1512766147 2017-12-08 20:49:07 1512766147 2017-12-08 20:49:07
<![CDATA[Four Years Later: Measuring Progress on Campus Inclusivity ]]> 27465 Next month, Institute Diversity and Academic Effectiveness will start conducting climate surveys to gauge the Institute’s progress on building an inclusive, supportive, and welcoming environment for the campus community. 

The findings from the 2017 Climate Assessment Surveys will provide longitudinal data that will be analyzed and compared to the results from the Institute’s 2013 Climate Assessment Surveys.

“The climate assessment survey comparisons will help us measure progress toward achieving the goals in our strategic plan and inform the Institute’s leadership about our strengths and opportunities to improve efforts with supporting a culture of collegiality, close collaboration, and professional development,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity.

Beginning the week of November 13, 2017, faculty and staff will receive an email that includes a link to their respective online survey. The survey should take approximately 10 to 15 minutes to complete, and participation is completely voluntary.

Students will receive a climate assessment survey email during spring semester 2018.

“On behalf of Institute Diversity and Academic Effectiveness, thank you for your time to complete this survey, as your feedback is greatly valued,” added Ervin.

Contact Academic Effectiveness at 404.385.1292 or survey@oars.gatech.edu with any questions. To read the 2013 Climate Assessment Survey findings, visit http://b.gatech.edu/17c2DzK.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1509388230 2017-10-30 18:30:30 1509389309 2017-10-30 18:48:29 0 0 news 2017-10-30T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-30T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-30 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
598094 598094 image <![CDATA[Climate Assessment Survey ]]> image/jpeg 1509389225 2017-10-30 18:47:05 1509389225 2017-10-30 18:47:05
<![CDATA[The Goizueta Foundation Scholarships and Fellowships Support Record Number of Students This Academic Year ]]> 27465 In 2002, scholarships and fellowships were created to increase and retain the number of Hispanic and Latino undergraduate and doctoral students at Georgia Tech.

“Fifteen years later, Hispanics and Latinos have become one of the fastest growing student groups at the Institute. This year, for instance, applications from Hispanic and Latino incoming freshmen increased by 7.8 percent,” said Jorge Breton, director of Institute Diversity’s Office of Hispanic Initiatives (OHI), which is part of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion. “The Goizueta Foundation Scholarships and Fellowships are one of several programs and initiatives at Georgia Tech that provide pathways to success for our community.”

Since its inception, more than 270 Hispanic and Latino students have been supported by The Goizueta Foundation Scholarships and Fellowships. For this academic year, 18 scholars and eight fellows were selected, the highest number of new awardees to date.  

The Goizueta Foundation Scholarships provide four-year or eight-term renewable, merit- and need-based scholarships for full-time undergraduate students. The Goizueta Foundation Fellowships provide renewable, merit-based fellowships with a stipend of $4,000 for 12 months of full-time enrollment for doctoral students.

Charlene Rincón, a Ph.D. graduate of the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, recalled, “I had the great opportunity of being a Goizueta Fellow for four years, and during those years, the fellowship not only provided me with economic assistance, but it also allowed me to meet and interact with people from different disciplines and backgrounds, which had a long-lasting impact in my life.” 

Scholars and fellows participate in various projects and activities to assist in the recruitment, retention, and outreach of Hispanic and Latino students at Georgia Tech. These include assisting with the Focus graduate recruitment program, interacting with distinguished faculty, participating in events such as GoSTEM’s Latino STEM Education Day and Latino College and STEM Fair, and hosting campus visits by middle and high school students to Georgia Tech, among others.

“I am fortunate to participate in events that help young Hispanics see their potential and engage in STEM fields,” said Natalia Wauldron, recipient of The Goizueta Foundation Scholarship and undergraduate student in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. “These events are crucial to the betterment of our society.”

The Goizueta Foundation Fellow Kevin Lanza, a doctoral student in the School of City and Regional Planning, remarked, “After attending Goizueta luncheons and planning meetings for Hispanic Heritage Month, I now walk around Georgia Tech knowing that I have a strong, campus-wide support system.”

Along with Breton, several distinguished faculty members serve as role models and mentors to The Goizueta Foundation Scholars and Fellows and assist OHI in its efforts to recruit, retain, and promote the success of students and faculty of Hispanic and Latino origin. Currently, Rosario Gerhardt, professor in the School of Materials Science and Engineering, serves as The Goizueta Foundation Faculty Chair, and William J. Koros, professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, serves as the Roberto C. Goizueta Chair for Excellence in Chemical Engineering. Georgia Tech’s next The Goizueta Foundation Junior Faculty Rotating Chair will be selected and announced during this academic year.

Georgia Tech is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s top schools for awarding bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in STEM fields to Hispanics and Latinos (Diverse: Issues in Higher Education). 

To learn more about OHI and The Goizueta Foundation Scholarships and Fellowships at Georgia Tech, visit www.hispanicoffice.gatech.edu

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1508441047 2017-10-19 19:24:07 1508442305 2017-10-19 19:45:05 0 0 news 2017-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-19 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu 

]]>
597639 597636 597640 597639 image <![CDATA[Former Goizueta Fellows at GoSTEM’s Latino STEM Education Day]]> image/png 1508441600 2017-10-19 19:33:20 1508441600 2017-10-19 19:33:20 597636 image <![CDATA[The Goizueta Foundation Scholarships and Fellowships Annual Reception]]> image/png 1508441396 2017-10-19 19:29:56 1508441871 2017-10-19 19:37:51 597640 image <![CDATA[The Goizueta Foundation Scholarships and Fellowships 10th Anniversary Celebration]]> image/png 1508441841 2017-10-19 19:37:21 1508441841 2017-10-19 19:37:21
<![CDATA[Diversity Is Only the Beginning]]> 27513 Why has the valuation of Microsoft increased a quarter-trillion dollars since 2013? The latest issue of Fast Company magazine offers an intriguing answer: It’s because people within the company are listening to and understanding each other better — and that’s helping them perform better.

 

The magazine’s cover profile of CEO Satya Nadella centers on the culture of empathy and inclusion he has cultivated since taking the reins of Microsoft three years ago. In the old days, the article says, employees were know-it-alls. Nadella is working to make them learn-it-alls, and that requires strengthening interpersonal competencies.

 

“You have to be able to say, ‘Where is this person coming from?’ Nadella says. ‘What makes them tick? Why are they excited or frustrated by something that’s happening?’”

 

It’s exactly that kind of thinking that’s at the heart of a remarkable new initiative taking shape within Georgia Tech’s Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory. Partnering with the Vice President for Institute Diversity’s Office at Georgia Tech, the initiative hopes to change the ways student’s think before they go on to their careers.

 

The department announced this summer it had been awarded a $2 million grant from the National Science Foundation to do something unheard of in engineering education: prepare students to shape and lead teams of people who have different backgrounds and perspectives.

 

The logic behind the initiative is simple. The big problems facing the world are so complex, they can only be solved by teams. A number of studies show the highest-performing teams not only have people of varied cultures and influences — these different members are able to connect with each other. Diversity is a start; harnessing diversity is the key.

 

By infusing such awareness among student teams in classrooms and labs, the thinking goes, the department will produce graduates so well equipped to collaborate, they’ll ultimately transform the engineering workplace.

 

“I like to think of it as creating situations in teams where people feel both respected and connected,” says Joe LeDoux, the department’s associate chair for undergraduate learning. “We all need to feel like we’re valued as individuals, for who we are. But just as important is feeling like we belong.”

 

The initiative is part cultural transformation and part scientific research. The grant comes from NSF’s “REvolutionizing engineering and computer science Departments” program, which supports “groundbreaking, scalable and sustainable changes in undergraduate education.”

 

An obvious question is, why the Coulter Department? The department itself is already a model of fusion: Since its founding 20 years ago, it’s been the nation’s only academic engineering enterprise comprised of both a public and private university (Georgia Tech and Emory). In 2013, the state Board of Regents recognized the department for its teaching innovation. And a “climate study” conducted last year revealed favorable perceptions from students on matters of diversity and acceptance.

 

“Yet, I hear anecdotally all the time that faculty at Georgia Tech witness interpersonal issues on teams of students,” says Wendy Newstetter, the College of Engineering’s assistant dean for educational innovation. “There are conflicts that go on in undergraduate teams. For example, female members are sometimes given writing tasks, rather than technical work. I don’t think it always means that boys on teams consciously say, ‘We’re going to give these jobs to the girls.’ But it happens.”

 

Julie Ancis, associate vice president for Institute Diversity, who has studied such attitudes and behaviors over a 30-year career, agrees. “Some biases affect our judgments, actions and decisions unconsciously,” says Ancis, Tech’s associate vice president for diversity. “These implicit biases differ from the more conscious biases that people may choose to conceal. They’re automatic reactions to people and events.

 

Ancis – who, along with Paul Benkeser, senior associate chair of the Coulter Department, holds faculty workshops on the issue – points to a number of examples in academe. Letters of recommendation written for female students and faculty tend to hedge on achievements, compared to the descriptors in letters written for men. Students of color often report feeling marginalized in classroom and lab work. “They may be perceived as less capable by others, which impacts how they are treated, or they may be picked last,” Ancis says. “Their input is not sought out, or they say they don’t feel included in a group or team.”

 

How the new Coulter Department and Institute Diversity initiative will peel back bias, interpersonal conflicts and other issues affecting team performance stems from a well-considered plan. The 15-page grant application to NSF presents organizational change theories and frameworks – the kind of social science exploration not typically seen around engineering departments.

 

The thrust of the approach is independence and collaboration. Faculty, staff and industry representatives, guided by learning specialists, will work in “incubator” teams to engineer strategies and tactics for student groups in classrooms and labs. Their approach is not prescriptive – each team develops its own interventions, which are tried, then refined. Outside of this effort are a host of other activities, such as the creation of a “Faculty Learning Community,” in which faculty collectively explore approaches that work.

 

By addressing student pairings, or dyads, as well as larger groups, the plan creates an architecture that ultimately will influence the culture of the department. Five years of this kind of activity is expected to produce knowledge that will then be shared across Georgia Tech and exported to other universities around the country.

 

“It’s essential that we create engineers in the workforce who understand what inclusion is and can help promote it,” Newstetter says. “We need to be graduating those people.”

 

“There is such a thing as an ‘inclusion dividend,’ and that’s really at the heart of what we’re doing,” says Le Doux. “The inclusion dividend is the positive impact that high-functioning teams make, not just because they’re diverse, but because they’re inclusive.”

 

To appreciate the distinction, he points to a 2015 talk from consultant Verna Myers. “She said, it’s the difference between being invited to a dance — and being asked to dance,” Le Doux says. “Who among us doesn’t want to be asked to dance?”

 

 

AT-A-GLANCE

The Wallace H. Coulter Department ’s RED Grant

$2 million from the National Science Foundation

Five-year program to prepare students to shape and lead teams of people who have different backgrounds and perspectives

Three-part effort:

  1. Create “incubator” squads of faculty, students, industry reps and learning specialists to invent classroom and lab practices that equip students to shape and optimize diverse teams
  2. Hold ongoing dialogues to exchange ideas and share experiences on strengthening interpersonal competencies
  3. Take actions to apply what’s learned to transform department culture

 

For More Information:

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory

www.bme.gatech.edu

Office of Institute Diversity

diversity.gatech.edu

Implicit Bias Workshops

advance.gatech.edu/implicit-bias-workshops

]]> Walter Rich 1 1507820436 2017-10-12 15:00:36 1507898811 2017-10-13 12:46:51 0 0 news 2017-10-12T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-12T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-12 00:00:00 Walter Rich

]]>
597297 597300 597297 image <![CDATA[Diversity Is Only the Beginning]]> image/jpeg 1507820058 2017-10-12 14:54:18 1507820058 2017-10-12 14:54:18 597300 image <![CDATA[Julie Ancis, Joe Le Doux, Paul Benkeser, and Wendy Newstetter attended a recent NSF RED conference. They are among the many faculty that will participate.]]> image/jpeg 1507820263 2017-10-12 14:57:43 1507820586 2017-10-12 15:03:06
<![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program Application Period Opens ]]> 27465 If you are interested in working with a group of faculty, staff, and students to foster a community of diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech, consider applying for the 2018 Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

With support from Institute Diversity, this program brings together campus community members who individually and collectively advance their action, research, or teaching objectives while improving inclusivity on campus. The Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program is a bottom-up initiative tapping into the creativity and diversity of thought among our campus community to crowdsource ideas that create long-term culture change.

“The goals of the program are to cultivate a network of ambassadors who will advance a culture of inclusive excellence and to create an environment where people feel safe, comfortable, and empowered to discuss diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech,” said Beril Toktay, ADVANCE Professor in the Ernest Scheller Jr. College of Business, Brady Family Chair and faculty director of the Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business, and co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

Each applicant should submit an issue area or project idea to focus on as a potential Diversity and Inclusion Fellow. The program is seeking fellows who have been immersed in the topics of diversity and inclusion as well as those who are interested in connecting these topics to different fields and perspectives.

All Georgia Tech faculty, post-doctoral fellows, staff, and graduate and undergraduate students are welcome to apply. The Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program will run from January 15 to December 1, 2018, and during this time, fellows are expected to:

“The bottom-up nature of this program recognizes the importance of ensuring that the Institute leverages the thoughts and actions of each individual in promoting diversity and inclusion,” remarked Magnus Egerstedt, professor and Julian T. Hightower Chair in Systems and Controls in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, executive director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines, and co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

The application deadline is October 20, 2017 at 5 p.m. To read the application instructions, click here, and to apply, visit https://goo.gl/forms/NSsxCjy8FSwB0Yyd2.

To learn more about the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/DIFellowsProgram. The program is one of three diversity and inclusion initiatives funded through a SPAG proposal; the other two are the Diversity and Inclusion Councils and Transformative Narratives

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1507141261 2017-10-04 18:21:01 1512668384 2017-12-07 17:39:44 0 0 news 2017-10-04T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-04T00:00:00-04:00 2017-10-04 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu 

]]>
590359 590359 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program ]]> image/jpeg 1492107755 2017-04-13 18:22:35 1492113298 2017-04-13 19:54:58
<![CDATA[Ninth Annual Diversity Symposium Focuses on Building Inclusive Communities, Explores the Impact and Implications of Race and Class ]]> 27465 On September 6, a capacity crowd filled the ballroom of the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center as Institute Diversity hosted the Ninth Annual Diversity Symposium, an all-day forum for discussions among faculty, staff, and students.

In light of this year’s theme, “Building Inclusive Communities,” the Diversity Symposium featured a variety of lectures, panels, and performances that explored the impact and implications of race and class on individual success and community engagement in higher education institutions.

The morning sessions featured an opening keynote from John Quiñones, author, broadcast journalist, and host and creator of What Would You Do?, and panel discussions on race, class, and bias.

Quiñones shared his inspiring journey from migrant farm work and poverty to more than 30 years at ABC News and the anchor desk at 20/20 and Primetime. “When journalism is done right, stories can shed light on injustice,” he said. “Peter Jennings once told me to talk to the moved and the shaken – not the movers and the shakers.”

After the morning sessions, the Diversity Symposium awards luncheon included Diversity Champion Awards and Faces of Inclusive Excellence presentations and an artistic performance that addressed issues of race in contemporary society.

Four Diversity Champion Award winners were honored for advancing equity at the Institute, particularly at the intersections of race and class. This year’s winners are Anne Pollock (faculty), Jocelyn Thomas (staff), Jennifer Salcedo (student), and the Center for Engineering Education and Diversity (CEED) (unit). To view the 2017 Diversity Champion Awards video, visit https://youtu.be/NrK61wCwIzY.

“The Diversity Champion Award means so much to me, everyone within our office, and the students we serve. The recognition shows that not only do you see us, but you accept us, and value what we do,” remarked Felicia Benton-Johnson, assistant dean and director for CEED.

Sixty-five honorees were featured in this year’s Faces of Inclusive Excellence publication, which was distributed at the Diversity Symposium. The publication recognized a diverse group of faculty, staff, and students who are committed to advancing a culture of inclusive excellence at Georgia Tech and who have distinguished themselves in their research, teaching, and/or service. To view the 2017 Faces of Inclusive Excellence video, visit https://youtu.be/8L9OLnHIMwY.

Following the awards and recognition presentations, Dahlak Brathwaite, writer and performer of Spiritrials, delivered a powerful performance on race and the criminal justice system. To view his performance, visit www.bit.ly/2xiQQr4.

“The last five years have been particularly challenging on college campuses as we have grappled with issues of free speech, political ideologies, race, gender identities, access, and disability,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “I want to thank the faculty, staff, and students who attended and contributed to the discussions during this year’s Diversity Symposium. These conversations are important to our journey toward becoming the kind of community that we want to be.”

To learn more about the Diversity Symposium, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/diversitysymposium.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1506615714 2017-09-28 16:21:54 1511287203 2017-11-21 18:00:03 0 0 news 2017-09-28T00:00:00-04:00 2017-09-28T00:00:00-04:00 2017-09-28 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
596624 596625 596626 596624 image <![CDATA[Ninth Annual Diversity Symposium Opening Keynote Speaker John Quiñones ]]> image/jpeg 1506615833 2017-09-28 16:23:53 1506615833 2017-09-28 16:23:53 596625 image <![CDATA[Ninth Annual Diversity Symposium Audience ]]> image/jpeg 1506615961 2017-09-28 16:26:01 1506615961 2017-09-28 16:26:01 596626 image <![CDATA[Ninth Annual Diversity Symposium Awards Luncheon Performer Dahlak Brathwaite]]> image/jpeg 1506616097 2017-09-28 16:28:17 1506616097 2017-09-28 16:28:17
<![CDATA[INSIGHT Into Diversity Honors Georgia Tech with the HEED Award for Four Consecutive Years]]> 27465 Institute Diversity is proud to announce that INSIGHT Into Diversity honored Georgia Tech with the 2017 INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award for the fourth consecutive year. Georgia Tech is being recognized for its outstanding commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion.  

“The HEED Award, open to all colleges and universities across the country, measures an institution’s level of achievement and intensity of commitment in regard to broadening diversity and inclusion on campus through initiatives, programs, and outreach; student recruitment, retention, and completion; and hiring practices for faculty and staff,” said Holly Mendelson, co-publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine.

Eighty higher education institutions, including Georgia Tech, received the HEED Award this year, and these institutions will be featured in the November 2017 issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine.

“We are honored to receive the HEED Award for four consecutive years,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity and president of the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education. “Following a landmark year for the Institute, Georgia Tech’s HEED Award application received our highest score to date from INSIGHT Into Diversity. We remain steadfast in our commitment to fostering a safe, inclusive, and welcoming environment, particularly in this time of uncertainty in the U.S.”

To learn more about the HEED Award, visit www.insightintodiversity.com/about-the-heed-award/.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1506372445 2017-09-25 20:47:25 1506372774 2017-09-25 20:52:54 0 0 news 2017-09-25T00:00:00-04:00 2017-09-25T00:00:00-04:00 2017-09-25 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager 

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu 

]]>
596467 596467 image <![CDATA[2017 INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education Excellence in Diversity Award]]> image/png 1506372544 2017-09-25 20:49:04 1506372544 2017-09-25 20:49:04
<![CDATA[Implementation Committee Shares Updates on the 11 Recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force]]> 27465 Chaired by Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin, the implementation committee of students and leaders from Institute Diversity, Student Life, and Undergraduate Education shared updates on its progress to address the 11 recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force that will help ensure a welcoming, inclusive campus. Quarterly updates will continue to be released until the end of the 2018-19 academic year. 

As part of a three-year implementation process, the recommendations are grouped into four impact areas: programs, trainings, physical spaces, and planning and assessments.

“As we enter the second year of implementation, our priorities are to identify ways to substantively impact bias education within the campus community,” said Ervin. “The implementation committee is also looking more expansively at the recommendations and connecting them to broader campus issues.”

These implementation updates (not ranked by priority) encompass:

Programs

1. Academics – Expanded focus of the recommendation to identify broader academic issue areas beyond the Challenge program. Issues such as academic performance, retention, and graduation require a deeper understanding of the impact of campus experiences, both in-class and out-of-class, and other factors on academic outcomes.

2. Orientation – Expanded focus of the recommendation to identify broader orientation processes beyond the FASET program.

3. Intercultural Student Programs – Established the Student Advisory Committee on Black Student Experiences and Campus Environment, co-led by Institute Diversity and Student Life. In the coming months, the committee is offering feedback on community and climate issues and providing recommendations on changes to Institute policies that may directly impact students.  

4. Reporting System – Launching an updated EthicsPoint portal this fall for campus community members to anonymously report discrimination and harassment experienced on campus.

Trainings

5. Community Orientation and Training – Exploring additional diversity and inclusion online training for faculty, staff, and students, and continuing to offer the following trainings:

6. Cultural Inclusivity Leadership Training – Hired a coordinator in Greek Affairs to advise the Multicultural and National Pan-Hellenic Councils and Greeks United for Inclusivity, Diversity, and Equity (GUIDE), conducting an inventory of diversity and inclusion content in all current course offerings at Tech through Undergraduate Education, and offering the following course:  

7. Greek Education – Conducted focus groups with 175 individuals on the state of Greek life at Tech through Greek Affairs, and continuing to offer the following training:

Physical Spaces

8. Multicultural Center – Identifying the space and programmatic support for the Multicultural Center as part of the Student Center expansion.

Planning and Assessments

9. Strategic Plan – Continuing to offer three diversity and inclusion initiatives through a proposal to the Institute’s Strategic Plan Advisory Group, two of which — the Diversity and Inclusion Councils and the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program — are noted above. The third initiative is:

10. Campus Climate Assessment – Administering the campus climate assessment to faculty, staff, and students this fall from Institute Diversity and the Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

11. Institutional Climate Change and Growth – Established the Student Advisory Committee on Black Student Experiences and Campus Environment, co-led by Institute Diversity and Student Life. In the coming months, the committee will offer feedback on community and climate issues and provide recommendations on changes to Institute policies that may directly impact students.  

“The continued effort of the implementation committee over the last year has allowed us to spotlight the importance of diversity, equity, and inclusion as a Tech value,” remarked John M. Stein, vice president for Student Life and dean of students.

To inquire about the Black Student Experience Task Force and/or its recommendations, email institutediversity@gatech.edu. For more information, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/blackstudentexperiencetaskforce.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1503681321 2017-08-25 17:15:21 1511287181 2017-11-21 17:59:41 0 0 news 2017-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-25 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
595062 595065 595068 595069 595062 image <![CDATA[Challenge Program ]]> image/jpeg 1503681421 2017-08-25 17:17:01 1503681421 2017-08-25 17:17:01 595065 image <![CDATA[Inclusive Leaders Academy ]]> image/jpeg 1503681631 2017-08-25 17:20:31 1503681631 2017-08-25 17:20:31 595068 image <![CDATA[Transformative Narratives]]> image/jpeg 1503682365 2017-08-25 17:32:45 1503682365 2017-08-25 17:32:45 595069 image <![CDATA[Black Student Experience Task Force Recommendations Progress Report, Summer 2017]]> image/jpeg 1503682679 2017-08-25 17:37:59 1503682679 2017-08-25 17:37:59
<![CDATA[Implementation Committee Shares Updates on the 11 Gender Equity Initiatives]]> 27465 Chaired by Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin, the implementation committee of faculty and staff from the Office of the President, Institute Diversity, Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development (VPGEFD), and Human Resources shared updates on its progress to implement the 11 Gender Equity Initiatives. Quarterly updates will continue to be released until the end of the 2017-18 academic year.

As part of a two-year implementation process, the initiatives are grouped into four impact areas: hiring, promotion, and tenure; professional and leadership development; leadership appointments; and recognition and increased visibility of the Institute’s commitment to gender equity.

“As we enter the final year of implementation, we will continue to advance the gender equity agenda at the Institute as we collect data from Georgia Tech’s next campus climate assessment, which is scheduled to be administered during the 2017-18 academic year,” commented Ervin. 

These implementation updates (not ranked by priority) encompass:

Impact Area 1: Hiring, Promotion, and Tenure

1. Implicit Bias Workshops – Offered more than 20 workshops to more than 350 faculty members to date. Institute Diversity and the ADVANCE Program, in collaboration with VPGEFD, are providing additional workshops this fall.

2. Search Guidelines – Continuing to develop an applicant tracking system through VPGEFD and Human Resources and refining interim search guidelines to create one applicant funnel at Tech.

3. Processes and Pathways to Advancement and Promotion – Continuing to promulgate the approved changes to the Faculty Handbook by the Faculty Senate that outlined and clarified new promotion guidelines for academic professionals and lecturers; providing self-assessment and six-month review tools from Human Resources to employees as part of the performance management process; and continuing to offer the following programs:

4. Salary Equity Studies – Launching a staff salary equity study from the Office of Institutional Research and Planning and Human Resources this fall.

Impact Area 2: Professional and Leadership Development

5. Professional and Leadership Development Programs – Continuing to offer the following competency-based leadership development programs as noted above: Emerging Leaders Program, Inclusive Leaders Academy, and Leading Women@Tech.

6. Family-Friendly Programming and Policies – Human Resources and Institute Diversity are revisiting recommendations from the Task Force on Family-Friendly Policies, and continuing to explore the following issues: parental leave, Active Service Modified Duties policy, and child care availability options on campus.

Impact Area 3: Leadership Appointments

7. Inclusive and Open Processes for Appointments – VPGEFD and Institute Diversity are monitoring search processes and appointment outcomes for internal administrative and named positions.

Impact Area 4: Recognition and Increased Visibility

8. Reporting System Awareness – Launching an updated EthicsPoint portal this fall for campus community members to anonymously report discrimination and harassment experienced on campus.

9. Success Story Promotion – Continuing to publish news stories and success stories to promote women’s successes and achievements, including the Diversity Champion Awards, Faces of Inclusive Excellence, and Leading Women@Tech participant success stories from Institute Diversity and faculty recognition success stories from the Office of the Provost. In this year’s Faces of Inclusive Excellence publication, for example, 65 faculty, staff, and students are recognized, and more than 70 percent are women.

10. Event Promotion – Continuing to promote events on campus that feature and celebrate women, such as Inclusive Leaders Academy Closing Ceremony Keynote Speaker Brené Brown.  

11. Gender Equity Data – Identifying diversity and equity dashboard content from the Office of Institutional Research and Planning and Institute Diversity this fall.

“Leading Women@Tech has provided me with critical leadership skills and coaching to help advance my career and build a strong network of support from other women leaders on campus and in the broader community,” said Tiffiny Hughes-Troutman, director of health behavior in the Office of Health and Well-Being. “I applaud Georgia Tech for continuing to offer professional and leadership development programs that foster gender inclusiveness.”

To inquire about the Gender Equity Initiatives, email institutediversity@gatech.edu. For more information, visit diversity.gatech.edu/genderequityinitiatives.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1503687895 2017-08-25 19:04:55 1503689424 2017-08-25 19:30:24 0 0 news 2017-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-25 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
595077 595078 595079 595081 595077 image <![CDATA[Leading Women@Tech ]]> image/jpeg 1503688182 2017-08-25 19:09:42 1503688182 2017-08-25 19:09:42 595078 image <![CDATA[Leading Women@Tech ]]> image/jpeg 1503688365 2017-08-25 19:12:45 1503688365 2017-08-25 19:12:45 595079 image <![CDATA[Inclusive Leaders Academy]]> image/jpeg 1503688481 2017-08-25 19:14:41 1503688481 2017-08-25 19:14:41 595081 image <![CDATA[Gender Equity Initiatives Progress Report, Summer 2017]]> image/jpeg 1503688731 2017-08-25 19:18:51 1503688731 2017-08-25 19:18:51
<![CDATA[OMED’s Challenge Program Welcomes One of Its Largest Cohorts to Georgia Tech This Summer ]]> 27465 According to the Institute of Education Sciences, students who participate in summer “bridge” programs to ease the transition from high school to college are significantly more likely to graduate — and graduate with superior academic performance — than non-program participants.1

For nearly four decades, OMED: Educational Services has offered Challenge, a summer academic preparation program, to help prepare incoming freshmen for a successful college career — academically, professionally, and socially.

This summer, the Challenge program welcomed one of its largest cohorts representing 23 different majors to Georgia Tech. Fifty-four percent were women — the highest percentage since the program’s inception — and 68 percent were black.

“The Institute’s Black Student Experience Task Force recently recommended expanding Challenge to 175 underrepresented minority and women students per program over the next three years,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “The growth of this year’s cohort is a strategic response to those recommendations.” Among the 137 black students who were considered eligible for Challenge, 41 percent participated in the program. 

“To successfully and sustainably grow Challenge, OMED enhanced the program’s academic focus and structure to attract more high-performing students, and increased corporate and institutional funding and alumni sponsorship to provide fee waivers,” explained Sybrina Atwaters, assistant director of outreach initiatives for OMED and director of the program. “It was remarkable to see the caliber of this year’s cohort who voluntarily chose to participate in this intensive program before fall semester.”

Over five weeks, participants were immersed in the Georgia Tech environment, living in a first-year dorm, taking classes, and participating in activities like whitewater rafting and mental health and well-being workshops. Individually, each student logged 4,500 in-class minutes of computer science, calculus, and chemistry; 1,560 in-class minutes of interpersonal development training; and 1,560 minutes of corporate engagement and professional development training.

“I’m significantly more prepared for fall semester,” undergraduate Alexander Bustos told the audience at the Challenge closing banquet on July 27. “It all comes down to happiness, and I’m a happier person from this experience.”

Last year, the average fall first semester GPA of Challenge participants was 3.26 compared to the 3.17 GPA of non-Challenge participants.

“I am so proud of my students, and it recharged me to see their enthusiasm this summer,” reflected Ta Nycia Wooden, one of the Challenge Counselors and an undergraduate student in the Ernest Scheller Jr. College of Business. Twenty Challenge Counselors served as role models and peer mentors to incoming freshmen during the program.

The Challenge program is supported by the following corporate partners and sponsors: 3M, Bechtel, BP, Eaton, ExxonMobil, GE Aviation, John Deere, Procter & Gamble, and Southwire.

To learn more about Challenge, visit www.omed.gatech.edu.

1 “Summer Bridge Programs,” WWC Intervention Report by the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences (July 2016).
]]> Annette Filliat 1 1502482402 2017-08-11 20:13:22 1502484865 2017-08-11 20:54:25 0 0 news 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2017-08-11 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
594354 594356 594357 594358 594354 image <![CDATA[OMED’s 37th Annual Challenge Program ]]> image/jpeg 1502482627 2017-08-11 20:17:07 1502482627 2017-08-11 20:17:07 594356 image <![CDATA[Challenge Participants at Southwire Headquarters ]]> image/jpeg 1502482941 2017-08-11 20:22:21 1502482941 2017-08-11 20:22:21 594357 image <![CDATA[Challenge Ocoee River Whitewater Rafting Trip]]> image/jpeg 1502483208 2017-08-11 20:26:48 1502483208 2017-08-11 20:26:48 594358 image <![CDATA[Challenge Closing Banquet ]]> image/jpeg 1502483451 2017-08-11 20:30:51 1502483475 2017-08-11 20:31:15 <![CDATA[OMED: Educational Services ]]> <![CDATA[Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion]]> <![CDATA[Institute Diversity ]]>
<![CDATA[Faces of Inclusive Excellence Nomination Period Opens]]> 27465 For the past four years, Institute Diversity has published Faces of Inclusive Excellence to recognize individuals who are committed to advancing a culture of inclusive excellence at Georgia Tech.

Each year, the Faces of Inclusive Excellence publication and video are featured at the Diversity Symposium Awards Luncheon. In addition to the Diversity Champion Awards, this year’s Faces of Inclusive Excellence publication and video will recognize deserving faculty, staff, and students at the Diversity Symposium Awards Luncheon on September 6, 2017.

Faces of Inclusive Excellence recognizes campus community members who have distinguished themselves in their research, teaching, and/or service by receiving special awards or recognitions during the past academic year.

“We encourage you to nominate faculty, staff, and students for the Faces of Inclusive Excellence to honor our diverse community of students, faculty, and staff whose accomplishments consistently exemplify inclusive excellence,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity.

Nominations, including self-nominations, may be made by all Georgia Tech faculty, staff, or students. Nominations will be accepted until June 30, 2017.

For more information and the nomination form, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/facesofinclusiveexcellence.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1496766986 2017-06-06 16:36:26 1496767272 2017-06-06 16:41:12 0 0 news 2017-06-06T00:00:00-04:00 2017-06-06T00:00:00-04:00 2017-06-06 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
592461 592461 image <![CDATA[Faces of Inclusive Excellence 2017]]> image/jpeg 1496767092 2017-06-06 16:38:12 1496767092 2017-06-06 16:38:12
<![CDATA[LGBTQIA Resource Center Presents Fifth Annual Lavender Graduation and Third Annual Lavender Awards]]> 27465 On April 13, more than 150 members of the Georgia Tech community gathered to honor its lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, asexual, and ally (LGBTQIA) graduates at the annual Lavender Graduation celebration. Twenty graduating students were recognized at the Fifth Annual Lavender Graduation, which was hosted by the LGBTQIA Resource Center.

“Lavender Graduation rewards graduates for their accomplishments at Tech and serves as a formal farewell to the community,” said Aby Parsons, director of the Center. “The celebration also gives students the opportunity to connect with our alumni and learn how they can stay involved with LGBTQIA life at Tech after graduation.” 

During the celebration, Student Life Vice President and Dean of Students John Stein welcomed attendees, and Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin invited each graduate to the stage to receive a lavender diploma from the LGBTQIA Resource Center and a letter from Stein.

“Lavender Graduation means to me that there is progress at Georgia Tech,” said Jefferson Dixon, a mechanical engineering student and Greek Allies facilitator with the Center. “In the last few years, Tech has made astounding progress in creating an inclusive, welcoming community.”

Following the event, the Center presented the Third Annual Lavender Awards to recognize individuals who have made the Institute a safer and more inclusive environment for LGBTQIA students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Award recipients included:

“It is such an honor to receive this award, as I know Billiee personally,” remarked Fazenbaker. “We strive to be a good partner to the LGBTQIA community. It is our belief that you can explore your sexuality in light of your spirituality, and explore your spirituality in light of your sexuality.”

The Fifth Annual Lavender Graduation and Third Annual Lavender Awards were supported by Institute Diversity, Parent and Family Programs, Georgia Tech Alumni Association, ADVANCE Program, and the Campus Recreation Center.

To learn more about Lavender Graduation and Lavender Awards, visit www.lgbtqia.gatech.edu.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1495207024 2017-05-19 15:17:04 1495208369 2017-05-19 15:39:29 0 0 news 2017-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2017-05-19 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
591931 591932 591931 image <![CDATA[Fifth Annual Lavender Graduation]]> image/jpeg 1495207440 2017-05-19 15:24:00 1495207440 2017-05-19 15:24:00 591932 image <![CDATA[Third Annual Lavender Awards ]]> image/jpeg 1495207567 2017-05-19 15:26:07 1495207567 2017-05-19 15:26:07
<![CDATA[Diversity Champion Awards Nomination Period Opens]]> 27465 When you think of diversity champions at Georgia Tech, is there a particular member of the faculty, staff, or student population, or a unit (e.g., college, department, school, or lab) that comes to mind? If so, please take a moment to nominate that individual or unit for the 2017 Diversity Champion Awards.

The Diversity Champion Awards recognize faculty, staff, students, and units who significantly demonstrate a commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion within the Georgia Tech community. They will be selected and recognized at the Ninth Annual Diversity Symposium Awards Luncheon on September 6, 2017.

“This year’s Diversity Symposium theme is ‘Building Inclusive Campus Communities,’ and the Diversity Champion Awards will be given to campus community members who are advancing equity at the Institute, particularly at the intersections of race and class,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity.

Award recipients will have demonstrated one or more of the following within the last three years:

Nominations will be accepted until May 26, 2017. For more information and the online nomination form, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/diversitychampionawards.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1493324461 2017-04-27 20:21:01 1493324672 2017-04-27 20:24:32 0 0 news 2017-04-27T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-27T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-27 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
591053 591053 image <![CDATA[2017 Diversity Champion Awards ]]> image/jpeg 1493324556 2017-04-27 20:22:36 1493324556 2017-04-27 20:22:36
<![CDATA[Nearly 300 Students Honored at the 23rd Annual Tower Awards ]]> 27465 Myron R. Anderson, a leader in higher education at the Metropolitan State University of Denver, once wrote, “You can have diversity without excellence, but you can’t have excellence without diversity.”

For 23 years, the Tower Awards have celebrated the academic achievements of underrepresented students at Georgia Tech. Of the more than 1,200 students eligible to receive a 2017 Tower Award, nearly 300 gathered for the annual recognition ceremony, hosted by OMED: Educational Services, on April 6.

“Our students set the standard for what the next generation can accomplish with a high-quality education and community support,” said OMED Director Cynthia Moore. “For instance, one of our Tower Award recipients, Cray Noah, was recently accepted into Harvard Medical School, and we are very proud of him! Cray served as a physics tutor and mentored several pre-med students in OMED for years.”

Award categories included Ph.D. Awards, Master’s Awards (graduating GPA of 3.5 or higher), Graduating Senior Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher), Sustained Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher), Yearly Awards (GPA of 3.15 or higher over the past three semesters), and First-Year Awards (cumulative GPA of 3.15 or higher). Within each award category, except the Ph.D. and Master’s Awards, sub-categories included Bronze (GPA of 3.15-3.49), Silver (GPA of 3.50-3.94), and Gold (GPA of 3.95 or higher).

Two special honors were also conferred: the Georgia Tech Black Alumni Organization (GTBAO) Unsung Hero Award and OMED Student Mentor Award. Renee Copeland, a biomedical engineering undergraduate student, received the Unsung Hero Award, and Nyemkuna Fortingo, a biochemistry undergraduate student, was recognized with the Student Mentor Award. Both also received a 2017 Tower Award for their outstanding academic performance at Tech.

“I am thankful to GTBAO for this award, and I credit support from OMED for this achievement,” said Copeland, who plans to pursue a graduate degree in public health. Fortingo, who plans to attend medical school, echoed the sentiment: “OMED has had a huge impact on my life – both academically and socially. As an incoming freshman, I participated in the Challenge program, and my Challenge counselors inspired me to become a Challenge counselor and Edge mentor.” Challenge is an immersive bridge program for incoming freshmen, and the Edge program pairs first-year students with upperclassmen who help them acclimate to Georgia Tech.

As the ceremony concluded, Henderson Johnson II, an aerospace engineering doctoral student and a co-founder of The Black Burdell, reminded attendees of the meaning and significance of their success.

“As Georgia Tech students, you are called to change the world,” he said. “Every day we are here, we make history. Your story should be one worth noting.”

Part of Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion, OMED is supported by more than 25 corporate partners and sponsors who attended and provided raffle giveaways at the Tower Awards. Corporate partners include 3M, BP, Eaton, John Deere, Northrop Grumman, Procter & Gamble, and Southwire.

To learn more about the Tower Awards, visit www.omed.gatech.edu.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1492192297 2017-04-14 17:51:37 1492193737 2017-04-14 18:15:37 0 0 news 2017-04-14T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
590451 590454 590457 590460 590451 image <![CDATA[23rd Annual Tower Awards ]]> image/jpeg 1492192605 2017-04-14 17:56:45 1492192605 2017-04-14 17:56:45 590454 image <![CDATA[GTBAO Unsung Hero Award and Tower Award Recipient Renee Copeland ]]> image/jpeg 1492192820 2017-04-14 18:00:20 1492192924 2017-04-14 18:02:04 590457 image <![CDATA[OMED Student Mentor Award and Tower Award Recipient Nyemkuna Fortingo]]> image/jpeg 1492193125 2017-04-14 18:05:25 1492193125 2017-04-14 18:05:25 590460 image <![CDATA[Doctoral Award Recipients at the 23rd Annual Tower Awards ]]> image/jpeg 1492193481 2017-04-14 18:11:21 1492193481 2017-04-14 18:11:21
<![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program Launches to Crowdsource Ideas That Improve Campus Inclusivity ]]> 27465 According to the 2012 Georgia Tech Climate Assessment Survey, some faculty, staff, and students expressed feelings of marginalization based on gender, race, and ethnicity. In response to these findings, a Strategic Plan Advisory Group (SPAG) proposal was submitted in 2016 to launch the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program in an effort to accelerate cultural transformation.

With support from Institute Diversity, the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program brings together faculty, staff, and students who individually and collectively advance their action, research, or teaching objectives while improving inclusivity on campus.

“This program is a bottom-up initiative, tapping into the creativity and diversity of thought among our campus community to crowdsource ideas that create long-term culture change,” said Beril Toktay, ADVANCE Professor in the Scheller College of Business, Brady Family Chair and faculty director of the Ray C. Anderson Center for Sustainable Business, and co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

The goals of the program are to cultivate a network of ambassadors who will advance a culture of inclusive excellence and to create an environment where people feel safe, comfortable, and empowered to discuss diversity and inclusion at Georgia Tech.

Following an application period last fall, 21 faculty, staff, and students were selected as fellows based on their submitted proposals, which were scored on their inventiveness and likelihood to change the campus culture. The fellows were then grouped into three teams. Each team has a leader or co-leaders, and teams are expected to meet at least six times per year.

“Diverse collaboration often sparks great innovation,” remarked Magnus Egerstedt, professor and Julian T. Hightower Chair in Systems and Controls in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, executive director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines, and co-director of the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program. “Some of the teams’ ideas may be institutionalized and scaled to the broader campus community over time.”

Initial ideas from the fellows include symposia, workshops, improv performances, surveys, mentorship programs, and journaling exercises focusing on the dimensions and intersectionalities of diversity, including race, ethnicity, gender, gender expression, sexual orientation, and disability.

On March 7, some of the fellows hosted the Talking Race@Tech: Student Voices panel discussion with student leaders, which was sponsored by the Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts; School of Literature, Media, and Communication; Writing and Communication Program; and Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program.

“Through the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program, I was able to draw broader support and diverse audiences to this panel discussion,” said Lauren Neefe, Marion L. Brittain Postdoctoral Fellow in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, and Diversity and Inclusion Fellow. “The more we make spaces for these conversations, the more likely they are to occur again.”

SPAG solicits new ideas from the campus community each year that will continue the implementation of the strategic plan and address gaps in advancing the goals of the Institute. The three-year Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program is one of three diversity and inclusion initiatives funded through a SPAG proposal; the other two are the Diversity and Inclusion Councils and the Transformative Narratives project.

“This program is one example of Georgia Tech being steered in the right direction,” commented Brienné Coates, alumna of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, and Diversity and Inclusion Fellow. “We are helping to create ideal outcomes instead of waiting for these outcomes.”

For more information on the Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/DIFellowsProgram.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1492107644 2017-04-13 18:20:44 1492113542 2017-04-13 19:59:02 0 0 news 2017-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2017-04-13 00:00:00 Following an application period last fall, 21 faculty, staff, and students were selected as Diversity and Inclusion Fellows based on their submitted proposals: Jennifer Beveridge (Chemistry and Biochemistry), Akanksha Bhatia (Biomedical Engineering), Brienné Coates (Industrial & Systems Engineering), Santanu Dey (Industrial & Systems Engineering), Lara Ferreira (Scheller College of Business), Michelle Gaines (Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering), Stephanie Gillespie (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Tia Jackson-Truitt (Center for Engineering Education and Diversity), Ronald Johnson (Industrial & Systems Engineering), Timothy Lieuwen (Aerospace Engineering), Susannah McFaul (Office of International Education), Jerrold Mobley (Library), Lauren Neefe (Literature, Media, and Communication), Dionne Nickerson (Scheller College of Business), Irina Nikivincze (College of Design), Yelena Rivera Vale (Georgia Tech Cable Network), Sebastian Ruf (Electrical and Computer Engineering), Celeste Runnels (Chemistry and Biochemistry), Hussein Sayani (Earth and Atmospheric Sciences), Jacquelyn Strickland (Graduate Studies), and William Todd (Scheller College of Business).

]]>
Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
590359 590360 590364 590359 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program ]]> image/jpeg 1492107755 2017-04-13 18:22:35 1492113298 2017-04-13 19:54:58 590360 image <![CDATA[Talking Race@Tech Panel Discussion ]]> image/jpeg 1492108268 2017-04-13 18:31:08 1492113362 2017-04-13 19:56:02 590364 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellow Brienné Coates]]> image/jpeg 1492113225 2017-04-13 19:53:45 1492113225 2017-04-13 19:53:45
<![CDATA[Committee Announces Implementation Updates on the 11 Recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force]]> 27465 The implementation committee of students and leaders from Institute Diversity, Office of the Provost, Student Life, and Undergraduate Education announced updates on its progress to address the 11 recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force that will help ensure a welcoming, inclusive campus. Quarterly updates will be released until the end of the 2018-19 academic year. 

As part of a three-year process, implementation of the 11 recommendations started in August 2016. These recommendations are grouped into four categories: programs, trainings, physical spaces, and planning and assessments.

“After discussing with the committee, we expanded the implementation of two areas from the original 11 recommendations of the Black Student Experience Task Force – Challenge and FASET,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “The implementation committee identified broader and more long-term academic issue areas beyond the Challenge program and orientation processes beyond the FASET program as it relates to diversity, equity, and inclusion.”

These implementation updates (not ranked by priority) encompass:

Programs

1. Academics – Expanded focus of the recommendation to identify broader academic issue areas beyond the Challenge program. For example, issues such as academic performance, retention, and graduation require deeper understanding of the impact of campus experiences, both in-class and out-of-class, and other factors on academic outcomes, which will be examined by the implementation committee in the future.

2. Orientation – Expanded focus of the recommendation to identify broader orientation processes beyond the FASET program.

3. Intercultural Student Programs – Established the Multicultural Student Advisory Committee, a joint student advisory group to advise and recommend actions that enhance diversity and inclusion experiences among Tech students. In addition, hosted by OMED, GT-PRIME, and Student Diversity Programs, Fearless Dialogues will be held on April 12 to facilitate conversations that see gifts in others, hear value in stories, and work for positive transformation in self and others.

4. Reporting System – Completed intake language of the reporting system and provided language to EthicsPoint to build the reporting system portal for the Institute. System will allow campus community members to submit information detailing any discrimination experienced on campus, and submissions will remain anonymous.

Trainings

5. Community Orientation and Training – Launched the following in-person and online trainings for faculty, staff, and students that address issues of diversity, equity, and inclusion: Implicit Bias Workshops for faculty who serve on reappointment, promotion, and tenure and search committees from Institute Diversity and the ADVANCE Program; Inclusive Leaders Academy for staff managers from Institute Diversity’s Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement unit; Diversity and Inclusion Councils, which were formed at the college level, and Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program for faculty, staff, and students through a proposal to the Institute’s Strategic Plan Advisory Group (SPAG); and a Certificate in Multicultural Competence for staff from the Division of Student Life. 

6. Cultural Inclusivity Leadership Training – Expanded new member education programs (e.g., peer education) for students to include diversity and inclusion themes; proposed a GT 1000 or similar course on social justice for new members and/or leaders of Greek organizations focused on the development of the individual chapter and broader council and community programs; and formed Greeks United for Inclusivity, Diversity, and Equity (GUIDE) as an inter-council Greek committee that includes delegates from each of the four Greek Councils (Collegiate Panhellenic, Interfraternity, Multicultural Greek, and National Panhellenic).

7. Greek Education – Provided Greek Allies training to more than 30 students through the LGBTQIA Resource Center. GUIDE is also planning events for all students to increase the interactions and engagement opportunities among the Greek Councils, and between the Greek Councils and student body.

Physical Spaces

8. Multicultural Center – Developing and envisioning the Multicultural Center as part of the Student Center expansion this summer; and tasked Lindsay Bryant, director of the Student Center, to oversee the development of the Multicultural Center, which will support students’ overall adjustment and well-being.

Planning and Assessments

9. Strategic Plan – Launched three diversity and inclusion initiatives through a proposal to SPAG: Transformative Narratives, a collection of 24 artistically embellished photographic portraits of faculty, staff, and students; Diversity and Inclusion Councils; and Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program, which brings together faculty, staff, and students to individually and collectively push their action, research, or teaching objectives forward while improving inclusivity on campus.  

10. Campus Climate Assessment – Evaluating the campus climate assessment instrument for possible modifications; Institute Diversity submitted a proposal to the Office of Institutional Research and Planning for approval this spring. Campus climate assessment to launch to faculty, staff, and students in October. 

11. Institutional Climate Change and Growth – Established the Multicultural Student Advisory Committee, which is co-chaired by the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion Executive Director S. Gordon Moore Jr. and Associate Dean of Students and Student Diversity Programs Director Stephanie Ray. The purpose of the committee is to evaluate multicultural and climate issues on campus and report any issues to the Institute’s administration.

“Although not visible to the campus community yet, there has been a sustained amount of background, foundational work from the implementation committee to move forward on the recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force report,” said John M. Stein, dean of students and vice president for Student Life. “I appreciate and applaud the work of the committee, and we look forward to the campus community experiencing these recommendations and seeing the positive changes in an effort to further advance a culture of close collaboration, global perspective, and intercultural respect at Tech.”

To inquire about the Black Student Experience Task Force and/or its recommendations, email institutediversity@gatech.edu. For more information, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/blackstudentexperiencetaskforce.  

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1490894256 2017-03-30 17:17:36 1503687912 2017-08-25 19:05:12 0 0 news 2017-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2017-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2017-03-30 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
589550 589551 589552 589550 image <![CDATA[Black Student Experience Task Force Implementation Committee]]> image/jpeg 1490894404 2017-03-30 17:20:04 1490894446 2017-03-30 17:20:46 589551 image <![CDATA[OMED's Challenge Program ]]> image/jpeg 1490894568 2017-03-30 17:22:48 1490894568 2017-03-30 17:22:48 589552 image <![CDATA[Diversity and Inclusion Fellows Program]]> image/jpeg 1490894803 2017-03-30 17:26:43 1490894803 2017-03-30 17:26:43
<![CDATA[Committee Announces Implementation Updates on the 11 Gender Equity Initiatives]]> 27465 The implementation committee of faculty and staff from the Office of the President, Institute Diversity, Faculty Affairs, and Human Resources announced updates on its progress to implement the 11 Gender Equity Initiatives.

As part of a two-year process, implementation began in August 2016. The initiatives emerged from President Peterson’s listening sessions on inclusiveness and gender equity in 2015 following feedback from faculty and staff that some of the Institute’s collective actions, practices, and policies fell short of fully recognizing women’s contributions.

The Gender Equity Initiatives are grouped into four impact areas: hiring, promotion, and tenure; professional and leadership development; leadership appointments; and recognition and increased visibility of the Institute’s commitment to gender equity.

“I applaud the work of the implementation committee to promote gender equity policies and procedures and celebrate the contributions of women in the Georgia Tech community,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “We look forward to implementing the next phase of initiatives in the year ahead.”

These implementation updates (not ranked by priority) encompass:

Impact Area 1: Hiring, Promotion, and Tenure

1. Implicit Bias Workshops – Offered more than 20 Implicit Bias Workshops to nearly 300 faculty members, or nearly one-third of all tenured or tenure-track faculty at Georgia Tech, since fall 2015. Institute Diversity, in collaboration with the ADVANCE Program, will offer additional workshops this fall. 

2. Search Guidelines – Developing a search guidance framework from the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education and Faculty Development (VPGEFD) with best practices and related policies for faculty and senior staff searches that are transparent and fair and yield the most qualified and diverse applicant pools. Hosted workshops on critical legal issues in graduate education for the campus community from VPGEFD and Legal Affairs, and Title IX for school chairs and associate chairs from VPGEFD in October 2016.

3. Processes and Pathways to Advancement and Promotion – Approved changes to the Faculty Handbook by the Faculty Senate in October 2016 that outlined and clarified new promotion guidelines for academic professionals and lecturers under the leadership of VPGEFD, and launched the following programs: Provost Emerging Leaders Program for tenured faculty from the Office of the Provost; Inclusive Leaders Academy for staff managers from Institute Diversity’s Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement unit; and Leading Women@Tech for staff women leaders from Institute Diversity. Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Rafael L. Bras also disseminated a memo on October 11, 2016 regarding innate associations and the Implicit Bias Workshops and another memo on March 16, 2017 regarding search and appointment guidelines for internal administrative and named positions, such as deans, chairs, vice provosts, and named/endowed faculty positions, among others.

4. Salary Equity Studies – Conducted faculty and staff salary equity studies from the Office of Institutional Research and Planning and Human Resources, respectively, in the past year. Currently reviewing the studies and determining how often these studies should occur in the future.

Impact Area 2: Professional and Leadership Development

5. Professional and Leadership Development Programs – Creating a competency-driven leadership development curriculum for faculty from the Office of the Provost. Also offered the Provost Emerging Leaders Program to 16 tenured faculty from the Office of the Provost; Inclusive Leaders Academy to nearly 200 staff managers from Institute Diversity’s Staff Diversity, Inclusion, and Engagement unit; and Leading Women@Tech to 16 staff women leaders in 2016 and 27 staff women leaders in 2017 from Institute Diversity.

6. Family Friendly Programming and Policies – Compiled an information sheet on Family Friendly Benefits and Policies by the Faculty Benefits Committee in collaboration with VPGEFD and Human Resources, which was distributed to faculty through the schools and colleges from VPGEFD in fall 2016, and VPGEFD worked with Georgia Tech’s ADVANCE Program and the colleges on a revised proposal for the Active Service Modified Duties program to be finalized in spring 2017. Faculty Governance’s Family Benefits Committee is also evaluating summer camp and on-campus day care center issues. 

Impact Area 3: Leadership Appointments

7. Inclusive and Open Processes for Appointments – Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs Rafael L. Bras disseminated a memo on October 11, 2016 regarding innate associations and the Implicit Bias Workshops and another memo on March 16, 2017 regarding search and appointment guidelines for internal administrative and named positions, such as deans, chairs, vice provosts, and named/endowed faculty positions, among others.

Impact Area 4: Recognition and Increased Visibility

8. Reporting System Awareness – Completed intake language of the reporting system and provided language to EthicsPoint to build the reporting system portal for the Institute. System will allow campus community members to submit information detailing any discrimination experienced on campus, including gender bias, and submissions will remain anonymous.

9. Success Story Promotion – Published more than 10 news stories over the past six months to promote women’s successes and achievements, including the Gender Equity Champion Awards, Leadership Excellence Awards, Leading Women@Tech, and Stempower. Also published more than 20 success stories of women faculty, staff, and students over the past six months, including the Leading Women@Tech participant success stories from Institute Diversity and faculty recognition success stories from the Office of the Provost.  

10. Event Promotion – Promoted recent events on campus that celebrated women, including the Eighth Annual Diversity Symposium, which focused on gender equity and featured keynote speaker Marcia McNutt; Black History Month Lecturer Janet Mock; Leading Women@Tech Closing Ceremony Keynote Speaker Cheryl Dozier; and WST Distinguished Lecturer Alice M. Agogino.

11. Gender Equity Data – Developing diversity and equity dashboards from Institute Diversity to compile reports on employee data and trends.   

“I’ve been in many meetings where I was the only woman. We’ve come a long way in regard to gender equity, but Georgia Tech still has a way to go,” said Nazia Zakir, assistant vice president for Environmental Health and Safety and participant of the Leading Women@Tech program.

Quarterly updates will be released until the end of the 2017-18 academic year. To inquire about the Gender Equity Initiatives, email institutediversity@gatech.edu. For more information, visit diversity.gatech.edu/genderequityinitiatives.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1490892065 2017-03-30 16:41:05 1490893533 2017-03-30 17:05:33 0 0 news 2017-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2017-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2017-03-30 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
589545 589546 589545 image <![CDATA[Leading Women@Tech ]]> image/jpeg 1490892524 2017-03-30 16:48:44 1490892524 2017-03-30 16:48:44 589546 image <![CDATA[Implicit Bias Workshops]]> image/jpeg 1490892610 2017-03-30 16:50:10 1490892610 2017-03-30 16:50:10
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Students Develop Stempower to Mentor Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Girls in STEM ]]> 27465 When five Georgia Tech students — Brenna Fromayan, Natalie Leonard, Wendy Ng, Anokhi Patel, and Kaitlin Rizk — co-founded Stempower in 2014, they wanted to boost the flagging self-confidence of young women in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, despite their natural interest and ability.

“As women pursuing STEM degrees from Georgia Tech, Stempower was personally relevant to all of us from the beginning,” remarked Leonard, an undergraduate in the School of Psychology. “The majority of the co-founders had a role model who provided direct encouragement. Yet for girls growing up without a role model, where can they turn for support? We knew that we needed Stempower to fill this gap.”

Stempower is a mentoring program offered by Georgia Tech women students that encourages girls to explore STEM and learn key character values. Partnering with the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta, two Stempower mentors meet bimonthly with fourth- and fifth-grade girls in a given troop. Each meeting is comprised of a different STEM activity — building rockets, making circuits, or learning to code — paired with a character lesson like encouraging questions and valuing mistakes.

“Research shows that young women start losing interest in math and science during middle school. We created Stempower to mentor elementary school girls in STEM, thereby increasing their self-confidence and providing relatable role models,” said Rizk, an undergraduate in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering.

Three years later, after initial support from the Grand Challenges Living and Learning Community, Stempower has become one of the outreach initiatives of the Center for the Study of Women, Science, and Technology (WST), with eight Tech mentors and 100 Girl Scout mentees in the U.S. Stempower was also launched at Uganda’s Makerere University after Rizk witnessed similar women’s empowerment issues during a service project a few years ago.

“After mentoring for years, I still clearly remember my first meeting with a troop,” Leonard reflected. “The meeting opened with a broad discussion about women scientists and engineers. Upon mentioning Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman astronaut, girls raised their hands and jumped up and down for the opportunity to tell me what they already knew about her. After this first meeting, I walked away impressed by their knowledge and energy and encouraged that supporting these girls through Stempower would help each of them thrive.”

According to Carol Colatrella, professor in the School of Literature, Media, and Communication, assistant dean for graduate studies, and co-director of WST, “We are excited to support Stempower as their efforts align with WST’s mission and goals to promote the recruitment, retention, and advancement of women students and faculty in STEM fields.”

If interested in becoming a mentor, contact stempower.gt@gmail.com. To learn more about Stempower, visit www.wst.gatech.edu/stempower.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1488218663 2017-02-27 18:04:23 1488235082 2017-02-27 22:38:02 0 0 news 2017-02-27T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-27T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-27 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
587996 587997 587996 image <![CDATA[Stempower Co-Founder Kaitlin Rizk Mentors Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Girl Scouts]]> image/jpeg 1488218995 2017-02-27 18:09:55 1488218995 2017-02-27 18:09:55 587997 image <![CDATA[Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Mentees Participate in Stempower]]> image/jpeg 1488219204 2017-02-27 18:13:24 1488219204 2017-02-27 18:13:24
<![CDATA[Black History Month Lecturer Janet Mock Explores the Rewards, Challenges, and Implications of Being Black and Trans ]]> 27465 James Baldwin has said that American history is "longer, larger, more various, more beautiful" than many people realize. In the celebration of Black History Month, last week’s invited speaker focused on the overlooked contributions of queer black people.

Janet Mock, an activist, author, and media personality, discussed the rewards, challenges, and implications of being black and trans as the featured speaker for Georgia Tech’s Fourth Annual Black History Month Lecture. The visit was co-sponsored by Institute Diversity, African American Student Union (AASU), and the LGBTQIA Resource Center.

“By bringing the achievements of queer black people to the forefront, we hope to honor these exceptional individuals and uncover histories that educate, inspire, and uplift,” said Adreanna Nattiel, graduate assistant in the LGBTQIA Resource Center.

Throughout her speech, Mock emphasized the importance of storytelling. “It gave me visibility and voice and allowed me to shift conversations such as living at the intersections of gender, race, and class, how restrictive gender expectations oppress us all, and the significance of media representation.”

She began with her own story of living in conflict as a young person to “express femininity in a culture that often demeans and devalues feminine people, is binary-prone, and mandates that if you are born with certain body parts, you are not allowed to express who you truly are.”

Mock said many black transgender women are struggling with interconnected issues of homelessness, joblessness, and lack of access to health care and education. “Our history as trans and queer people of color fighting against poverty, policing, brutality, hunger, racism, misogyny, and HIV/AIDS is deep,” she said. “Yet despite the tragedies, there is great resilience in our communities.”

“We must remember that telling our stories can be met with love, understanding, transcendence, and community, which has brought all of us here.”

Mock charged the audience to use its voice, story, privilege, and access to ignite change, and offered guidance “toward becoming more conscious partners in the struggle:”

As AASU Black History Chair Raianna Brown reflected, “I was moved by the vulnerability and realness of Janet Mock. At the end of the lecture, she opened up about the difficulties in being strong for your community and how becoming a symbol can sometimes be alienating. However, you can draw strength to keep going from those who came before us.”

“This lecture was one of the most inspirational events that I have seen at Georgia Tech,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “It takes tremendous courage to share your own journey publicly, and the Georgia Tech community immediately embraced her story — rewards and challenges alike.”

To learn more about the Black History Month Lecture, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu. Members of the Georgia Tech community who are interested in learning more about transgender issues can register for Trans 101 trainings at www.lgbtqia.gatech.edu/trans-101.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1487700491 2017-02-21 18:08:11 1488237132 2017-02-27 23:12:12 0 0 news 2017-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-21 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
587712 587712 image <![CDATA[Black History Month Lecturer Janet Mock]]> image/jpeg 1487700623 2017-02-21 18:10:23 1487700650 2017-02-21 18:10:50
<![CDATA[Lavender Awards Nomination Period Open]]> 27465 First presented by the LGBTQIA Resource Center in 2015, the Lavender Awards recognize individuals who have made Georgia Tech a safer and more inclusive environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual students, faculty, staff, and alumni.

Each year, the LGBTQIA Resource Center presents four awards at the annual Lavender Graduation ceremony: The Billiee Pendleton Parker Award for Outstanding Allyship, The LGBTQIA Student Leadership Award, The LGBTQIA Faculty/Staff Leadership Award, and The LGBTQIA Alum of the Year Award.

Previous Lavender Award recipients demonstrated their commitment to the community through holding leadership roles in LGBTQIA organizations, volunteering for the Center, advocating for changes to policies and practices, or providing individual support to LGBTQIA students and employees.

"We created the Lavender Awards as a way to recognize and honor the incredible accomplishments of our LGBTQIA and ally community members," said Aby Parsons, director of the LGBTQIA Resource Center. "Numerous students, faculty, staff, and alumni volunteer their time, energy, and resources to make our campus more welcoming and inclusive, and we felt it was important to show everyone that this work really does take a village."

Lavender Award nominations will be accepted until February 17, 2017. For award criteria, eligibility, and the nomination form, visit www.lgbtqia.gatech.edu/lavender-awards.

Awards will be presented at Lavender Graduation on Thursday, April 13 at 6 p.m. in the Gordy Room of the Wardlaw Center. To register to attend Lavender Graduation, visit www.lgbtqia.gatech.edu/lavender-graduation.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1486766044 2017-02-10 22:34:04 1487020833 2017-02-13 21:20:33 0 0 news 2017-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-13 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
532481 532481 image <![CDATA[Second Annual Lavender Awards]]> image/jpeg 1462478400 2016-05-05 20:00:00 1475895314 2016-10-08 02:55:14
<![CDATA[Focus Program Increases Interest of More Than 94 Percent of Participants to Apply to Georgia Tech for Graduate Studies ]]> 27465 For 26 years, Georgia Tech has offered the Focus Program on the same weekend that the nation celebrates the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This program attracts and recruits the nation’s best and brightest diverse students to pursue graduate studies and careers in academia.

“The commemoration of Dr. King and the civil rights struggle is of great significance for the timing of this program, as we strive to broaden educational opportunities for all populations,” said S. Gordon Moore Jr., executive director of Institute Diversity’s Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion.

Last month, 176 minority students participated in the Focus Program from 92 colleges and universities and approximately 33 states. The number of participating colleges and universities has increased by 18 percent from 2016.

Lacie Pierre, undergraduate alumna of the University of California, Merced, remarked, “Applying to graduate school is such a huge process. I wanted to participate in the Focus Program to better understand how the process worked, and it was eye-opening to speak with Georgia Tech faculty, other students, and alumni during the program.”

More than 94 percent of the surveyed participants indicated that the Focus Program increased their desire to apply to Georgia Tech for graduate studies, and 30 percent of the senior applicants have applied to Georgia Tech’s graduate programs.

“These results suggest that the diverse future of graduate education will be enhanced by the efforts of our Focus Program staff, alumni volunteers, panelists, speakers, campus partners, and corporate supporters like Intel,” said Sybrina Atwaters, assistant director, outreach initiatives at OMED: Educational Services, a unit of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion.  

The three-day program includes campus tours; department and lab visits; panel discussions on graduate admissions, fellowships, scholarships, mentoring, and alumni insights; and the President’s Dinner.

“This unique program shows how Georgia Tech values diversity in higher education,” said Diego Huyke Villeneuve, undergraduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “Professors were eager to speak with us, and the department was open and welcoming.”

Since the program’s inception, more than 2,700 students from a wide array of colleges and universities across the U.S. have participated in Focus. Some 300 former Focus Scholars are among Georgia Tech alumni who have earned master’s and doctoral degrees. Focus Scholars is a component of the program designed to inform juniors and seniors about the benefits of receiving an advanced degree. Additionally, at least six former Focus Fellows are members of Georgia Tech’s engineering faculty; Focus Fellows encourages diverse doctoral students to consider an academic career.

“While fostering an inclusive, supportive environment, Georgia Tech is dedicated to creating the next – the next idea, the next technology, the next legion of diverse, agile minds who are well equipped to imagine and engineer our future,” Moore explained.

Currently, Georgia Tech is the nation’s top producer of doctoral degrees awarded to all racial/ethnic minority students (Diverse: Issues in Higher Education). The Institute also awards more engineering degrees to women than any other school, according to the American Society for Engineering Education.

To learn more about the Focus Program, visit www.focus.gatech.edu.  

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1486060919 2017-02-02 18:41:59 1486065539 2017-02-02 19:58:59 0 0 news 2017-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2017-02-02 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
586834 586835 586836 586834 image <![CDATA[FOCUS 2017]]> image/jpeg 1486065097 2017-02-02 19:51:37 1486065097 2017-02-02 19:51:37 586835 image <![CDATA[FOCUS 2017]]> image/jpeg 1486065252 2017-02-02 19:54:12 1486065252 2017-02-02 19:54:12 586836 image <![CDATA[FOCUS 2017]]> image/jpeg 1486065497 2017-02-02 19:58:17 1486065497 2017-02-02 19:58:17
<![CDATA[100 Students, Faculty, and Staff Tour Civil Rights Sites in the Nation’s Capital During MLK Weekend ]]> 27465 During the weekend commemorating the life and inspiration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., 76 students and 24 faculty and staff from Georgia Tech traveled to Washington, D.C., to tour several civil rights sites. This tour is part of the Institute’s MLK Celebration, an ambitious slate of educational programs, arts and cultural performances, and service opportunities to encourage active participation from the campus and Atlanta community.

Students, faculty, and staff departed in charter buses on the night of January 12 to visit museums and memorials over the next two days, including the National Museum of African American History and Culture, the King Memorial, National Mall, National Museum of the American Indian, and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. 

Associate Dean of Students and Director of Student Diversity Programs Stephanie Ray reflected on why Georgia Tech’s MLK Student Board organized the civil rights tour in D.C.: “We followed the life of Dr. King. After leading civil rights trips in Montgomery, Ala. in 2012 and Birmingham, Ala. in 2013, the next goal was to end our tour by visiting the King Memorial and National Museum of African American History and Culture in our nation’s capital.”

Here is what student participants said about their experiences during the civil rights tour:

Why did you want to go on this trip?

“I wanted to experience the history and culture of Africans before being brought to America. I also wanted to learn more about the Native American culture beyond what is presented in history books.”

Alexander Pegues, undergraduate student in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

What was your favorite part of this trip?

“The National Museum of African American History and Culture, hands down. From the photos to the interactive learning, it was beautifully designed and presented. The experience was more than you could imagine.”

Khadijah Boles, undergraduate student in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering

What have you learned from this experience that you could apply in your daily life?

“For us, as a people, to progress, we need to come together as one. We also need to make education available to everyone, especially our youth. I plan to start programs for youth that I didn’t have in school but was blessed to have family who taught me.”

Khadijah Boles, undergraduate student in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering

“I saw the triumph of the human spirit over oppression. I apply that triumph to my own daily small victories.”

TJ Funso, undergraduate student in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering

School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences Assistant Professor Jennifer Glass also shared her experiences on the civil rights tour at www.storify.com/jenniglass/gt-civil-rights-tour-of-dc.

This year’s tour was sponsored by the College of Engineering, College of Sciences, Department of Housing, Division of Student Life, Institute Diversity, LGBTQIA Resource Center, Office of Student Diversity Programs, and Parent’s Fund for Student Life and Leadership. To learn more about the civil rights tour and Georgia Tech’s MLK Celebration, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/mlk-celebration.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1485817863 2017-01-30 23:11:03 1485819512 2017-01-30 23:38:32 0 0 news 2017-01-30T00:00:00-05:00 2017-01-30T00:00:00-05:00 2017-01-30 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
586664 586665 586666 586667 586664 image <![CDATA[Civil Rights Tour: Alexander Pegues at the Washington Monument]]> image/jpeg 1485818673 2017-01-30 23:24:33 1485818710 2017-01-30 23:25:10 586665 image <![CDATA[Civil Rights Tour: Khadijah Boles at the King Memorial ]]> image/jpeg 1485818880 2017-01-30 23:28:00 1485818880 2017-01-30 23:28:00 586666 image <![CDATA[Civil Rights Tour: TJ Funso at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum]]> image/jpeg 1485819072 2017-01-30 23:31:12 1485819072 2017-01-30 23:31:12 586667 image <![CDATA[Civil Rights Tour: Georgia Tech Students, Faculty, and Staff at the King Memorial]]> image/png 1485819402 2017-01-30 23:36:42 1485819402 2017-01-30 23:36:42
<![CDATA[MLK Lecture Keynote Speaker Discusses the Agenda for the Next Civil Rights Movement ]]> 27465 If Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. were alive today, what would he find as the most pressing social and economic justice challenges facing the U.S. in the 21st century? Would he be satisfied with the progress the nation has made to ensure that all Americans enjoy the promise of the rights to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness?"

“It has been nearly 50 years since the assassination of Dr. King, yet many of the same issues he worked to address, including racial discrimination, poverty, and social justice, continue to be important to many in our nation today,” said Archie Ervin, vice president for Institute Diversity. “That is why the theme of this year’s MLK Celebration at Georgia Tech is ‘Setting the Agenda for the Next Civil Rights Movement.’”

During Georgia Tech’s MLK Lecture on January 11, Bakari Sellers, CNN political analyst, lawyer, and activist, honored Dr. King’s legacy while setting the agenda for the next civil rights movement with students, faculty, staff, and community members. During his remarks, Sellers asked the audience: “How far have we come, and where do we go from here?”

“When you think about the sacrifice of the civil rights leaders like Marion Barry and Julian Bond, and you ask yourself, ‘Where do we go from here?’ there are two choices — chaos or community — as Dr. King once outlined,” said Sellers. “The answer between these choices lies fundamentally in our ability to dream with our eyes open.”

According to Sellers, “When you dream with your eyes open, you seek nothing less than excellence.” He gave an example from his own life, when he made history in 2006 as the youngest member of the South Carolina state legislature and the youngest African-American elected official in the nation.

“We have to remember the names that are not taught. For example, Shirley Chisholm helped paved the way for Hillary Clinton,” remarked Sellers. “We stand on the shoulders of countless heroes who deserve from us to continue this journey on the race to excellence.”

To view the MLK Lecture in its entirety, visit https://youtu.be/I1QildvSWeA.

Georgia Tech’s MLK Celebration is sponsored by Institute Diversity, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Office of Government and Community Relations, Office of Student Diversity Programs, and Student Government Association. To learn more about the MLK Celebration, visit www.diversity.gatech.edu/mlk-celebration.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1485283859 2017-01-24 18:50:59 1485285296 2017-01-24 19:14:56 0 0 news 2017-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2017-01-24T00:00:00-05:00 2017-01-24 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
586406 586408 586406 image <![CDATA[MLK Lecture Keynote Speaker Bakari Sellers ]]> image/jpeg 1485284341 2017-01-24 18:59:01 1485284720 2017-01-24 19:05:20 586408 image <![CDATA[MLK Lecture Audience Questions ]]> image/jpeg 1485284664 2017-01-24 19:04:24 1485284704 2017-01-24 19:05:04 <![CDATA[MLK Lecture Video ]]>
<![CDATA[Celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month: Panelists Discuss the Past, Present, and Future of U.S. and Cuba Relations ]]> 27465 The U.S. and Cuba agreed to diplomatic relations in December 2014. What do you know about Cuba and Cuban contributions to the world? What does this new agreement mean for Cubans, Americans, and others? What does it mean to you? The Hispanic Heritage Month Panel on “U.S. and Cuba Relations: Past, Present, and Future” answered these questions and more on September 26.

Students, faculty, and staff from the Georgia Institute of Technology and Georgia State University participated in the program, which was co-sponsored by Tech’s Office of Hispanic Initiatives and Student Diversity Programs.

Georgia Tech School of Modern Languages Associate Professor Juan C. Rodríguez opened the discussion with a historical overview of the relationship between the U.S. and Cuba since 1898 at the end of the Spanish-American War. He briefly discussed the Cuban Revolution in 1933, the emergence of the new Cuban Revolution in the 1950s, the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962, how Cuba was affected after the Soviet Union collapsed in 1991, and the recent diplomatic relations with the U.S. 

Panelists then reflected on the impact of a lifted trade embargo with the U.S., race relations in Cuba, and the meaningful contributions of Cuba to the world.

Lifting the Trade Embargo

Earlier this year, President Barack Obama and Cuban President Raúl Castro called for the removal of the U.S. trade embargo. Castro argued that Cuba and the U.S. could make more progress on their shared agenda if the embargo was lifted, but the leaders disagreed on some issues, including human rights.1

“Lift the embargo, and see if socialism survives in Cuba,” commented Richard Laub, director of Georgia State’s Heritage Preservation Master’s Degree Program.

Rodríguez emphasized the importance of distinguishing between the Cuban people and the Cuban government. As Cassandra Gomez, undergraduate student in Georgia Tech’s School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, added, “Many Cuban people are fearful of what these opened sanctions could mean.”

Race Relations in Cuba

In the U.S., 38 percent of the population is non-White, including Blacks, Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans. They make up 17 percent of Congress.2 In Cuba, around two-thirds of the population is non-White, primarily Black and mixed race, and make up about 30 percent of civil and public leadership.3  

“Racial issues in Cuba manifest in institutional leadership,” said Rodríguez.

Georgia State Department of Political Science Associate Professor Henry Frank Carey explained, “You don’t have high crime rates in totalitarian societies. As Cuba democratizes, I think the crime rate may increase from an ‘us versus them’ phenomenon.”

Racial issues are difficult to express in Cuba, according to Georgia Tech GoSTEM Director Diley Hernández. “In Cuba, the official narrative is that there is no racism or sexism because the Revolution ‘fixed’ inequality issues,” she said. “In a totalitarian regime, you cannot acknowledge those issues because in doing so, it is seen as dissenting from the regime.”

Cuban Contributions to the World

The panel agreed on Cuba’s remarkable contributions of art and music to the world. “Cuba has done an outstanding job in keeping art and culture highly accessible to everyone in the country,” remarked Hernández.

Laub added that “Cuba has a robust art and historic preservation program to maintain their architecture,” and according to Carey, “New Orleans became the way station for Afro-Cuban music and dance.”

And of course there’s baseball. “Unlike other Hispanic countries with soccer, baseball is the national sport in Cuba,” said Gomez. “Some Americans think that Cubans are so different from them, but their national sport is our national sport.”

Georgia Tech Human-Centered Computing doctoral student Michaelanne Dye also noted the growing technological advances in Cuba. “The technology sector is fascinating. In the coming years, the latest technology will penetrate Cuba, but currently, Cubans have used ingenuity to connect 9,000 homes in Havana with homegrown internet.”

This panel discussion was part of a series of events to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at Georgia Tech. Other events included the Kickoff on September 15, Cross-Cultural Workshop on September 20, Mini World Cup on September 23, and Closing Banquet on October 5. 

 

1 Teresa Welch, “Obama, Castro: Lift the Trade Embargo,” U.S. News & World Report, (March 21, 2016).
2 Jens Manuel Krogstad, “114th Congress Is Most Diverse Ever,” Pew Research Center, (January 12, 2015).
3 Damien Cave, “Cuba Says It Has Solved Racism. Obama Isn’t So Sure,” The New York Times, (March 23, 2016).
]]> Annette Filliat 1 1476328783 2016-10-13 03:19:43 1476331304 2016-10-13 04:01:44 0 0 news 2016-10-13T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-13T00:00:00-04:00 2016-10-13 00:00:00 Moderated by Marc Canellas, Ph.D. student, Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering, Georgia Tech, panelists included Henry Frank Carey, associate professor, Department of Political Science, Georgia State; Michaelanne Dye, Ph.D. student, Human-Centered Computing, Georgia Tech; Cassandra Gomez, undergraduate student, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech; Diley Hernández, academic professional and director, GoSTEM, Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing, Georgia Tech; Richard Laub, director, Heritage Preservation Master’s Degree Program, Department of History, Georgia State; and Juan C. Rodríguez, associate professor, School of Modern Languages, Georgia Tech.

]]>
Annette Filliat
Communications Manager
Institute Diversity
annette.filliat@gatech.edu
]]>
582484 582484 image <![CDATA[Hispanic Heritage Month Panel ]]> image/jpeg 1476329331 2016-10-13 03:28:51 1476413277 2016-10-14 02:47:57
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Moves Forward with 11 Recommendations from the Black Student Experience Task Force to Ensure a Welcoming, Inclusive Campus]]> 27465 Co-chaired by Institute Diversity Vice President Archie Ervin and Student Life Vice President and Dean of Students John Stein, the Black Student Experience Task Force presented its 11 recommendations to President G.P. “Bud” Peterson late last spring. All recommendations were approved and will be implemented over the next three academic years.

“While the task force was formed at the start of fall semester 2015 following allegations that several black female students were racially harassed on two separate occasions on campus, the group’s charge was to examine the broader issues of climate and culture at Georgia Tech,” said Stein.

Recommendations were based on the research findings and report from an independent consultant, who conducted more than 130 interviews—both focus groups and one-on-one discussions—with undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty and staff. Student members of the task force also gathered feedback directly from the student body to form a list of issues for the Institute to consider.

“After reviewing the collective research findings and the consultant’s report, the task force outlined 11 recommendations that fall into four broad categories: programs; trainings; physical spaces; and planning and assessment,” said Ervin.

The 11 recommendations can be summarized as follows (not ranked by priority):

Programs

1. Challenge – Expand OMED’s Challenge enrollment from 75 to 175 underrepresented minority and women students per program over the next three years. Challenge helps prepare incoming freshmen for a successful college career, both academically and socially, during a five-week intensive summer program.

2. FASET – Orient all new students and their parents, families, and guests to issues of diversity and inclusion and share campus resources that support Georgia Tech’s commitment to diversity. At least one new session at FASET will highlight the successes of underrepresented students, faculty, and staff at the Institute.

3. Intercultural Student Programs – Create and support collaborative intercultural student programs that foster interactions and learning among diverse student communities at Georgia Tech. 

4. Reporting System – Create a data infrastructure or submission tool that allows students to submit information detailing any experienced discrimination on campus. Submissions would remain anonymous.

Trainings

5. Community Orientation and Training – Launch online and in-service training for faculty and staff that addresses issues of gender and ethnic diversity, equity, and inclusion within the student experience. Following this training, faculty and staff will serve as ambassadors for an equitable and inclusive Georgia Tech.

6. Cultural Inclusivity Leadership Training – Expand and modify leadership training for leaders of student organizations to include modules on cultural inclusivity and managing student diversity. Incorporate these modules into GT 1000 classes and other opportunities. 

7. Greek Education – Create a subcommittee of fraternity and sorority members who will plan programming on issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, and sexual assault for members of Greek Life. This subcommittee will also be tasked with evaluating the current state of Greek Life at Georgia Tech.

Physical Spaces

8. Multicultural Center — Create spaces where all students feel welcome on campus, in support of students’ overall adjustment and well-being.

Planning and Assessment

9. Strategic Plan – Examine how student diversity is operationalized through Georgia Tech’s Strategic Plan. Prioritize and fund proposals that enhance diversity, equity, and inclusion experiences for students.

10. Campus Climate Assessment – Conduct a broad-based campus climate assessment by an independent entity to obtain a deeper understanding of the concerns and experiences of all students at Georgia Tech.

11. Institutional Climate Change and Growth – Establish a joint student advisory group to advise and recommend actions that enhance diversity and inclusion experiences among Tech students.

“I applaud the work of the Black Student Experience Task Force members who volunteered their time and experience to create a more inclusive academic environment,” Peterson said. “Diversity is a community value at Georgia Tech, and embracing different perspectives is critical to the success and vitality of our campus community. These recommendations will help us enhance a culture of close collaboration, global perspective, and intercultural respect.”

The Black Student Experience Task Force comprised 13 student, faculty, and staff members. Student Government Association President Nagela Nukuna was one of those members: "Working with such a dedicated group of student leaders and administrators on the task force helped push forward the recommendations. Finding actionable solutions to a problem that also is a societal issue was not easy, but I think we're taking great steps toward progress."

Moving forward, an implementation team from Institute Diversity, Student Life, and Undergraduate Education will meet regularly to monitor progress on these recommendations. Additionally, the Student Intercultural Advisory Committee was recently established to offer guidance on diversity and inclusion and to participate in these implementation meetings in the future.

For any questions about the Black Student Experience Task Force and/or its recommendations, email institutediversity@gatech.edu. For more information, visit diversity.gatech.edu/blackstudentexperiencetaskforce.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1472129874 2016-08-25 12:57:54 1475896946 2016-10-08 03:22:26 0 0 news 2016-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2016-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2016-08-25 00:00:00 Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
567841 568011 567841 image <![CDATA[Black Student Experience Task Force]]> image/jpeg 1472145042 2016-08-25 17:10:42 1475895374 2016-10-08 02:56:14 568011 image <![CDATA[Challenge Program]]> image/jpeg 1472146816 2016-08-25 17:40:16 1475895374 2016-10-08 02:56:14
<![CDATA[Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion Launches to Serve More Underrepresented Students]]> 27465 In an effort to strengthen the services that support the success of underrepresented minority and women students at Georgia Tech, a new center will both centralize current programs and expand its reach with new ones.

This month, the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion launches to provide more programs and pathways to success for underrepresented students on campus. As part of Institute Diversity, the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion encourages students to excel academically, interact across cultures and perspectives, and value inclusion.

The purpose of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion is to serve students from all backgrounds and encourage them to be inventive leaders who think globally. The Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion will be a positive, enriching environment, connecting students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community stakeholders through effective programs, projects, networks, and research.

S. Gordon Moore Jr., executive director, student diversity and inclusion, serves as the director of the new Center.

“One of the findings from Georgia Tech’s Climate Assessment Survey expressed feelings of marginalization by gender, race, and ethnicity among undergraduate and graduate students,” said Moore. “By launching the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion, we will better serve the more than 4,000 students who benefit from our programs now—and increase capacity to serve even more current and future students.”

Focusing on the recruitment, retention, and advancement of underrepresented minority and women students, the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion houses the following units:

In the year ahead, the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion will offer an Outreach Initiative to assist Georgia Tech in discovering and developing its future pool of talented and diverse students.

“I am excited to see how the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion can create synergy among units in sharing resources, insights, and connections to help increase the diversity of our student population,” said Auston Kennedy, undergraduate student, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering.

Two open houses will be held at the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion: August 22-24 for the campus community and October 29 for alumni. Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community stakeholders are encouraged to visit the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion (681 Cherry Street NW) to take a tour of the renovated Chapin Building, learn more about its units and initiatives, and meet its talented staff.

To serve more current and future students, the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion also welcomes partnerships with foundations and donors. Learn more at www.csdi.gatech.edu.

]]> Annette Filliat 1 1471442507 2016-08-17 14:01:47 1475896943 2016-10-08 03:22:23 0 0 news This month, the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion launches to provide more programs and pathways to success for underrepresented students on campus. 

]]>
2016-08-17T00:00:00-04:00 2016-08-17T00:00:00-04:00 2016-08-17 00:00:00 Georgia Tech is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s top schools for awarding bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees in STEM fields to African-Americans, Hispanics, and Native Americans.

- Diverse: Issues in Higher Education

Georgia Tech awards more undergraduate engineering degrees to women than any other school.

- American Society for Engineering Education

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Annette Filliat

Communications Manager

Institute Diversity

annette.filliat@gatech.edu

]]>
564471 564481 564621 564541 564611 564471 image <![CDATA[The Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion Launches in the Renovated Chapin Building]]> image/jpeg 1471457338 2016-08-17 18:08:58 1475895369 2016-10-08 02:56:09 564481 image <![CDATA[A Look Inside the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion]]> image/jpeg 1471457493 2016-08-17 18:11:33 1475895369 2016-10-08 02:56:09 564621 image <![CDATA[One of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion Units: OHI]]> image/jpeg 1471458538 2016-08-17 18:28:58 1475895369 2016-10-08 02:56:09 564541 image <![CDATA[One of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion Units: OMED]]> image/jpeg 1471458073 2016-08-17 18:21:13 1475895369 2016-10-08 02:56:09 564611 image <![CDATA[One of the Center for Student Diversity and Inclusion Units: WST]]> image/jpeg 1471458387 2016-08-17 18:26:27 1475895369 2016-10-08 02:56:09
<![CDATA[New Class Continues Trend of Prestige, Diversity]]> 27469 On Aug. 22, another impressive group of students will begin their careers as Yellow Jackets.

A record number of students applied for acceptance to Georgia Tech this year, with applications exceeding 30,500 for the first time. Of those who were accepted, around 2,860 will make up the new class. 

As has been the trend in recent years, their credentials set new highs for an incoming class. These students have taken an average of 10 college-level courses, and 95 percent have take college-level calculus or an equivalent. The students represent 69 countries, 43 states, 89 Georgia counties, and 1,429 high schools (307 in Georgia). The class is 42 percent female — an Institute record for the second year — and 58 percent male.  

“We need more women in STEM and at the table when it comes to policy and product creation in the workforce, and we look at ourselves as part of the solution,” said Rick Clark, director of Undergraduate Admission. 

Still, it’s not just the stats that make Clark proud. 

“The fact that we continue to become more academically talented with each class, and more diverse on almost every metric of what you would call diversity, is really an anomaly,” he said. “Colleges often have to give up one or the other. It kind of blows my mind, but it’s just indicative of Georgia Tech’s excellence and national prominence that we are coupling those two things.”

This year, Tech saw an especially high increase in applications to the College of Computing and growth in matriculation in the College of Sciences, which will make up 13 percent of the new class. 

In 2014, Georgia Tech started the Atlanta Public Schools (APS) Scholars program to recruit, enroll, support and graduate the most academically talented students in the city school system. This year's freshman class includes APS Scholars from 11 of the 13 high schools in the district. Under the program, which started with the incoming class of 2015, Georgia Tech offers automatic admission to all APS valedictorians and salutatorians who apply and covers four years of in-state tuition and mandatory fees.

As this class arrives on campus, the next admission cycle has already begun. This week, Georgia Tech joins the University of Georgia, Georgia State University, and several others for the start of the Peach State tour, where colleges collaborate to visit communities around the state and meet with prospective students. 

One of Georgia Tech’s challenges is continuing to attract the best and brightest in all of Tech’s disciplines as the cost of higher education continues to increas