<![CDATA[Chemist conquers molecules and miles]]> 34434 As an organic chemist who designs molecules to exhibit traits needed by other researchers, James Wilson relies on team science to shape his work. Outside of the classroom and lab, Wilson is a solo warrior who pushes his body to the limits as a competitive cyclist. He recently completed the infamous GAPCO (Great Allegheny Passage and Chesapeake and Ohio Canal), a 335-mile gravel ride from Pittsburgh to Washington, D.C., in 19 hours and 39 minutes — one of the fastest times ever recorded. He did it by himself, without sleeping and without support. A track athlete in high school, Wilson began cycling as an undergraduate at the University of South Carolina. He competed in local and national events, then tapered his riding while completing his Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 2004 from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

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As an organic chemist who designs molecules to exhibit traits needed by other researchers, James Wilson relies on team science to shape his work. Outside of the classroom and lab, Wilson is a solo warrior who pushes his body to the limits as a competitive cyclist. He recently completed the infamous GAPCO (Great Allegheny Passage and Chesapeake and Ohio Canal), a 335-mile gravel ride from Pittsburgh to Washington, D.C., in 19 hours and 39 minutes — one of the fastest times ever recorded. He did it by himself, without sleeping and without support. A track athlete in high school, Wilson began cycling as an undergraduate at the University of South Carolina. He competed in local and national events, then tapered his riding while completing his Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 2004 from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695653759 2023-09-25 14:55:59 1695653759 2023-09-25 14:55:59 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-18T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Unveiling metabolic pathways involved in the extreme desiccation tolerance of an Atacama cyanobacterium]]> 34434 Gloeocapsopsis dulcis strain AAB1 is an extremely xerotolerant cyanobacterium isolated from the Atacama Desert (the driest and oldest desert on Earth) that holds astrobiological significance due to its ability to biosynthesize compatible solutes at ultra-low water activities. A team including Postdoctoral Scholar Rachel A. Moore (the study's lead author) and Assistant Professor Christopher Carr, both with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, developed a genome-scale model (GEM; iGd895) to explore the metabolic capacity of G. dulcis undergoing desiccation. Understanding specific metabolic adaptations employed by extremely desiccation-tolerant cyanobacteria like G. dulcis could be critical in identifying strategies for the survival of life in arid planetary environments such as Mars, especially given that the Atacama Desert is an established Martian analog.

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Gloeocapsopsis dulcis strain AAB1 is an extremely xerotolerant cyanobacterium isolated from the Atacama Desert (the driest and oldest desert on Earth) that holds astrobiological significance due to its ability to biosynthesize compatible solutes at ultra-low water activities. A team including Postdoctoral Scholar Rachel A. Moore (the study's lead author) and Assistant Professor Christopher Carr, both with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, developed a genome-scale model to explore the metabolic capacity of G. dulcis undergoing desiccation. Understanding specific metabolic adaptations employed by extremely desiccation-tolerant cyanobacteria like G. dulcis could be critical in identifying strategies for the survival of life in arid planetary environments such as Mars, especially given that the Atacama Desert is an established Martian analog.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695651078 2023-09-25 14:11:18 1695651078 2023-09-25 14:11:18 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-22T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-22T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-22T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[NSF invests $72.5M to design revolutionary materials]]> 34434 A $72.5 million investment from the National Science Foundation will drive the design, discovery and development of advanced materials needed to address major societal challenges. The Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program will fund 37 new four-year projects. One of those projects, Organic Materials Architectured for Researching Vibronic Excitations with Light in the Infrared (MARVEL-IR), will be led by principal investigator Jason Azoulay, Associate Professor and Georgia Research Aliance Vasser Woolley Distinguished Investigator in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. (This research is also covered at Manufacturing.net.)

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A $72.5 million investment from the National Science Foundation will drive the design, discovery and development of advanced materials needed to address major societal challenges. The Designing Materials to Revolutionize and Engineer our Future (DMREF) program will fund 37 new four-year projects. One of those projects, Organic Materials Architectured for Researching Vibronic Excitations with Light in the Infrared (MARVEL-IR), will be led by principal investigator Jason Azoulay, Associate Professor and Georgia Research Aliance Vasser Woolley Distinguished Investigator in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. (This research is also covered at Manufacturing.net.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695051769 2023-09-18 15:42:49 1695649334 2023-09-25 13:42:14 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-18T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Anheuser-Busch says it will no longer amputate the tails of Budweiser's Clydesdales]]> 34434 Anheuser-Busch says it will end the practice of amputating the tails of its signature Budweiser Clydesdale horses, following a pressure campaign from the animal rights group PETA. The beer company said the practice of equine tail docking was discontinued earlier this year, according to a statement from an Anheuser-Busch spokesperson. The practice of docking has its roots in a tradition meant to keep a horse's tail from becoming tangled in the harness or equipment, but today it is mainly done for cosmetic purposes. A tail is important for a horse's welfare, as it is its instrument for swatting away biting insects, wrote David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, in a 2018 Scientific American article.

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Anheuser-Busch says it will end the practice of amputating the tails of its signature Budweiser Clydesdale horses, following a pressure campaign from the animal rights group PETA. The beer company said the practice of equine tail docking was discontinued earlier this year, according to a statement from an Anheuser-Busch spokesperson. The practice of docking has its roots in a tradition meant to keep a horse's tail from becoming tangled in the harness or equipment, but today it is mainly done for cosmetic purposes. A tail is important for a horse's welfare, as it is its instrument for swatting away biting insects, wrote David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, in a 2018 Scientific American article.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695413337 2023-09-22 20:08:57 1695414206 2023-09-22 20:23:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-21T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Saddle Up: 7 Trends Coming in 2018]]> 34434 What major challenges will higher education face in 2018? In addition to funding, free speech, and student safety issues, the authors of this story wonder about university presidents "using their bully pulpits, and their voices, to advance their principles and institutions." They include College of Sciences alumnus Angel Cabrera, president of Georgia Mason University, among a new breed of thought leaders. The authors cite this November 2016 Cabrera message to the George Mason community as an example. Cabrera received his M.S. from the School of Psychology in 1993, and a Ph.D. in psychology from Tech in 1995.

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What major challenges will higher education face in 2018? In addition to funding, free speech, and student safety issues, the authors of this story wonder about university presidents "using their bully pulpits, and their voices, to advance their principles and institutions." They include College of Sciences alumnus Angel Cabrera, president of Georgia Mason University, among a new breed of thought leaders. The authors cite this November 2016 Cabrera message to the George Mason community as an example. Cabrera received his M.S. from the School of Psychology in 1993, and a Ph.D. in psychology from Tech in 1995.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1515171620 2018-01-05 17:00:20 1695406766 2023-09-22 18:19:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2018-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2018-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 582901 image <![CDATA[Ángel Cabrera]]> image/jpeg 1477016302 2016-10-21 02:18:22 1477016302 2016-10-21 02:18:22
<![CDATA[Enzymes: Still cool after all these years]]> 34434 The first enzyme was discovered in 1833, almost 200 years ago and long before the nature of proteins was appreciated. The field of enzymology came into its own in the 20th century. Technological advances in the hands of creative enzymologists led to an ever-growing understanding of how enzymes achieve enormous rate accelerations as well as the structural basis for substrate specificity and allosteric regulation. A session scheduled for the Discover BMB convention in San Antonio March 23-26 will feature Raquel Lieberman, Professor and Sepcic-Pfiel Chair in Chemistry in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, speaking on the topic, Enzymes for a Sustainable Future.

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The first enzyme was discovered in 1833, almost 200 years ago and long before the nature of proteins was appreciated. The field of enzymology came into its own in the 20th century. Technological advances in the hands of creative enzymologists led to an ever-growing understanding of how enzymes achieve enormous rate accelerations as well as the structural basis for substrate specificity and allosteric regulation. A session scheduled for the Discover BMB convention in San Antonio March 23-26 will feature Raquel Lieberman, Professor and Sepcic-Pfiel Chair in Chemistry in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, speaking on the topic, Enzymes for a Sustainable Future.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695050215 2023-09-18 15:16:55 1695050297 2023-09-18 15:18:17 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-12T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Winners of this year's WLA Prize announced]]> 34434 The winners of the 2023 World Laureates Association Prize were recently announced, and the Prize in Computer Science or Mathematics was awarded to Arkadi Nemirovski, adjunct professor in the School of Mathematics, and Professor Yurii Nesterov at Université Catholique de Louvain "for their seminal work in convex optimization theory, including self-concordant function and interior-point methods, a complexity theory of optimization, accelerated gradient methods, and robust optimization methodological advances." Nemirovski is also Professor and John P. Hunter Chair in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering

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The winners of the 2023 World Laureates Association Prize were recently announced, and the Prize in Computer Science or Mathematics was awarded to Arkadi Nemirovski, adjunct professor in the School of Mathematics, and Professor Yurii Nesterov at Université Catholique de Louvain "for their seminal work in convex optimization theory, including self-concordant function and interior-point methods, a complexity theory of optimization, accelerated gradient methods, and robust optimization methodological advances." Nemirovski is also Professor and John P. Hunter Chair in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695048167 2023-09-18 14:42:47 1695048167 2023-09-18 14:42:47 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-14T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-14T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-14T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Southern California Earthquake Was Unlikely Triggered by Hurricane Hilary]]> 34434 Southern California is no stranger to earthquakes, but tropical storms like Hilary are rare. It’s even rarer for a magnitude-5.1 earthquake near Ojai, Calif. to strike on the same Sunday afternoon (Aug. 20, 2023) that a tropical storm swept through Southern California. This uncommon confluence of events has sparked a heightened curiosity in the general public, including popular memes and the portmanteau “hurriquake.” But is there a physical connection between these events beyond mere coincidence in space and time? Zhigang Peng, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, was part of a research team that studied available meteorological and seismic data to reveal that the quake near Ojai, Calif. was almost certainly not triggered by Hilary, which had been downgraded to a tropical storm at the time the earthquake struck.

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Southern California is no stranger to earthquakes, but tropical storms like Hilary are rare. It’s even rarer for a magnitude-5.1 earthquake near Ojai, Calif. to strike on the same Sunday afternoon (Aug. 20, 2023) that a tropical storm swept through Southern California. This uncommon confluence of events has sparked a heightened curiosity in the general public, including popular memes and the portmanteau “hurriquake.” But is there a physical connection between these events beyond mere coincidence in space and time? Zhigang Peng, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, was part of a research team that studied available meteorological and seismic data to reveal that the quake near Ojai, Calif. was almost certainly not triggered by Hilary, which had been downgraded to a tropical storm at the time the earthquake struck.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695047077 2023-09-18 14:24:37 1695047077 2023-09-18 14:24:37 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-15T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-15T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-15T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Mystery shell on Ocracoke beach]]> 34434 Lynn Ingram writes that she thought she'd found the state seashell of North Carolina, a Scotch bonnet, on one of the state's beaches. But she soon discovered that the shell was a species of sea snail that is only found in the Pacific Ocean. How did it end up in the Atlantic? Joseph Montoya, professor in the School of Biological Sciences who is also director of Georgia Tech's Ocean Science and Engineering program, says one possibility involves ballast tanks of oceangoing ships; sometimes these shells start as larvae living in plankton that may have been caught up in a ship's ballast water. 

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Lynn Ingram writes that she thought she'd found the state seashell of North Carolina, a Scotch bonnet, on one of the state's beaches. But she soon discovered that the shell was a species of sea snail that is only found in the Pacific Ocean. How did it end up in the Atlantic? Joseph Montoya, professor in the School of Biological Sciences who is also director of Georgia Tech's Ocean Science and Engineering program, says one possibility involves ballast tanks of oceangoing ships; sometimes these shells start as larvae living in plankton that may have been caught up in a ship's ballast water. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1695045555 2023-09-18 13:59:15 1695045555 2023-09-18 13:59:15 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-17T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Science at the Summit – the research centre high on Greenland’s ice sheet]]> 34434 At the apex of the Greenland ice sheet, a community of 41 scientists and support staff carry out cutting-edge research into everything from climate change to particle physics. This story details recent research underway at Summit Station, located close to the apex of the Greenland ice sheet and one of the most remote scientific stations on Earth. One of two ice-coring projects at Summit Station involved Rachel Moore, a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Moore will use the core samples to study bacteria and other latent biological entities once afloat in the atmosphere and now buried in the ice sheet. Her research will provide a window into the Earth’s environmental history and changing atmospheric patterns that goes back about six centuries.

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At the apex of the Greenland ice sheet, a community of 41 scientists and support staff carry out cutting-edge research into everything from climate change to particle physics. This story details recent research underway at Summit Station, located close to the apex of the Greenland ice sheet and one of the most remote scientific stations on Earth. One of two ice-coring projects at Summit Station involved Rachel Moore, a postdoctoral scholar in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Moore will use the core samples to study bacteria and other latent biological entities once afloat in the atmosphere and now buried in the ice sheet. Her research will provide a window into the Earth’s environmental history and changing atmospheric patterns that goes back about six centuries.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1694446421 2023-09-11 15:33:41 1694446421 2023-09-11 15:33:41 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-07T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Powering the future: clean energy anywhere, anytime through energy harvesting materials]]> 34434 Zhong Lin Wang, Hightower Chair and Regents' Professor in the School of Materials Science & Engineering, with an adjunct appointment in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, will take part in a webinar sponsored by the IOP Publishing journal, JPhys Materials, to explore the immense potential of ambient energy harvesting materials. Wang pioneered the nanogenerators field for distributed energy, self-powered sensors, and large-scale blue energy. The webinar is scheduled for 11 a.m.-1 p.m. EDT Tuesday, September 26; click here for registration.

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Zhong Lin Wang, Hightower Chair and Regents' Professor in the School of Materials Science & Engineering, with an adjunct appointment in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, will take part in a webinar sponsored by the IOP Publishing journal, JPhys Materials, to explore the immense potential of ambient energy harvesting materials. Wang pioneered the nanogenerators field for distributed energy, self-powered sensors, and large-scale blue energy. The webinar is scheduled for 11 a.m.-1 p.m. EDT Tuesday, September 26; click here for registration.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1694445097 2023-09-11 15:11:37 1694445097 2023-09-11 15:11:37 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-05T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Physicists solve mysteries of microtubule movers]]> 34434 Researchers are exploring how active matter can be harnessed for tasks like designing new materials with tailored properties, understanding the behavior of biological organisms, and even developing new approaches to robotics and autonomous systems. But that’s only possible if scientists learn how the microscopic units making up active matter interact, and whether they can affect these interactions and thereby the collective properties of active matter on the macroscopic scale. School of Physics Professor Roman Grigoriev and his research colleagues have found a potential first step by developing a new model of active matter that generated new insight into the physics of the problem. They detail their methods and results in a new study published in Science Advances, “Physically informed data-driven modeling of active nematics.” Lead author of the study is graduate researcher Matthew Golden. Co-authors are graduate researcher Jyothishraj Nambisan and Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, professor in the Department of Condensed Matter Physics at the University of Barcelona and a former associate professor of Physics at Georgia Tech. (This research was also covered in WorldTimeTodays and CityLife.)

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Researchers are exploring how active matter can be harnessed for tasks like designing new materials with tailored properties, understanding the behavior of biological organisms, and even developing new approaches to robotics and autonomous systems. But that’s only possible if scientists learn how the microscopic units making up active matter interact, and whether they can affect these interactions and thereby the collective properties of active matter on the macroscopic scale. School of Physics Professor Roman Grigoriev and his research colleagues have found a potential first step by developing a new model of active matter that generated new insight into the physics of the problem. They detail their methods and results in a new study published in Science Advances, “Physically informed data-driven modeling of active nematics.” Lead author of the study is graduate researcher Matthew Golden. Co-authors are graduate researcher Jyothishraj Nambisan and Alberto Fernandez-Nieves, professor in the Department of Condensed Matter Physics at the University of Barcelona and a former associate professor of Physics at Georgia Tech. (This research was also covered in WorldTimeTodays andCityLife.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1693925214 2023-09-05 14:46:54 1694443613 2023-09-11 14:46:53 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-04T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-04T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-04T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[The Earth Unlocked: Wetlands ]]> 34434 Wetlands serve as a natural protection from storms, fires, and floods. But those protections can be deadly at times. Joel Kostka, professor and Associate Chair of Research in the School of Biological Sciences (with an adjunct appointment in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences), talks about the nation's wetlands in the latest episode of The Earth Unlocked, The Weather Channel's weekly series on the planet's natural wonders and the roles extreme weather, constant geologic change, and biological evolution play. The series airs at 8 p.m. ET Sundays, and can also be viewed on demand on The Weather Channel app (subscription required.) 

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Wetlands serve as a natural protection from storms, fires, and floods. But those protections can be deadly at times. Joel Kostka, professor and Associate Chair of Research in the School of Biological Sciences (with an adjunct appointment in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences), talks about the nation's wetlands in the latest episode of The Earth Unlocked, The Weather Channel's weekly series on the planet's natural wonders and the roles extreme weather, constant geologic change, and biological evolution play. The series airs at 8 p.m. ET Sundays, and can also be viewed on demand on The Weather Channel app (subscription required.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1693933976 2023-09-05 17:12:56 1693933976 2023-09-05 17:12:56 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-26T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Ocean heat is off the charts – here’s what that means for humans and ecosystems around the world]]> 34434 Ocean temperatures have been off the charts since mid-March 2023, with the highest average levels in 40 years of satellite monitoring, and the impact is breaking through in disruptive ways around the world. The sea of Japan is more than 7 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius) warmer than average. The Indian monsoon, closely tied to conditions in the warm Indian Ocean, has been well below its expected strength. Spain, France, England and the whole Scandinavian Peninsula are also seeing rainfall far below normal, likely connected to an extraordinary marine heat wave in the eastern North Atlantic. Annalisa Bracco, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, partially blames El Niño, but underlying everything is global warming — the continuing rising trend of sea surface and land temperatures for the past several decades as human activities have increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. (This story was also covered by The ConversationAustralian Broadcasting CorporationBloombergReutersFast CompanyU.S. News & World Report,  Idaho PressYahoo! News, Yahoo! FinanceNasdaqDaily MailToday (Singapore)The Straits TimesTimes of San Diego, Lake County News, and Pressenza.) 

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Ocean temperatures have been off the charts since mid-March 2023, with the highest average levels in 40 years of satellite monitoring, and the impact is breaking through in disruptive ways around the world. The sea of Japan is more than 7 degrees Fahrenheit (4 degrees Celsius) warmer than average. The Indian monsoon, closely tied to conditions in the warm Indian Ocean, has been well below its expected strength. Spain, France, England and the whole Scandinavian Peninsula are also seeing rainfall far below normal, likely connected to an extraordinary marine heat wave in the eastern North Atlantic. Annalisa Bracco, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, partially blames El Niño, but underlying everything is global warming — the continuing rising trend of sea surface and land temperatures for the past several decades as human activities have increased greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. (This story was also covered by The ConversationAustralian Broadcasting CorporationBloombergReutersFast Company, U.S. News & World ReportIdaho PressYahoo! NewsYahoo! FinanceNasdaqDaily MailToday (Singapore)The Straits TimesTimes of San Diego, Lake County News, and Pressenza.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1687353683 2023-06-21 13:21:23 1693929624 2023-09-05 16:00:24 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-21T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Medical Honor for Valerie Montgomery Rice]]> 34434 Valerie Montgomery Rice, president and CEO of Morehouse School of Medicine and a Georgia Tech alumna, has received a major honor from the National Medical Association. The organization is giving its 2023 Scroll of Merit Award, its highest honor, to Montgomery Rice. The award recognizes someone who has made significant contributions to medicine, health advocacy or service to the association. Montgomery Rice, who received her bachelor's degree from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is the first woman to lead the private historically Black medical school in Atlanta. (This award was also covered in the Atlanta Tribune.) 

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Valerie Montgomery Rice, president and CEO of Morehouse School of Medicine and a Georgia Tech alumna, has received a major honor from the National Medical Association. The organization is giving its 2023 Scroll of Merit Award, its highest honor, to Montgomery Rice. The award recognizes someone who has made significant contributions to medicine, health advocacy or service to the association. Montgomery Rice, who received her bachelor's degree from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, is the first woman to lead the private historically Black medical school in Atlanta. (This award was also covered in the Atlanta Tribune.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1693921334 2023-09-05 13:42:14 1693921334 2023-09-05 13:42:14 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-09-02T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-02T00:00:00-04:00 2023-09-02T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Santosh Vempala Named Simons Investigator]]> 34434 Santosh Vempala, the Frederick Storey II Chair of Computing and Distinguished Professor in the School of Computer Science, with courtesy appointments in the School of Mathematics and H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineeringhas been named a 2023 Simons Investigator in theoretical computer science by the Simons Foundation. Simons Investigators are outstanding theoretical scientists who receive a stable base of research support from the foundation, enabling them to undertake the long-term study of fundamental questions in mathematics, physics, astrophysics and computer science. Vempala is the second Georgia Tech scientist to be named a Simons Investigator; in 2022, Joshua Weitz, former professor and Tom and Marie Patton Chair in the School of Biological Sciences, was supported by the Foundation for research in theoretical physics in life sciences. 

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Santosh Vempala, the Frederick Storey II Chair of Computing and Distinguished Professor in the School of Computer Science, with courtesy appointments in the School of Mathematics and H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineeringhas been named a 2023 Simons Investigator in theoretical computer science by the Simons Foundation. Simons Investigators are outstanding theoretical scientists who receive a stable base of research support from the foundation, enabling them to undertake the long-term study of fundamental questions in mathematics, physics, astrophysics and computer science. Vempala is the second Georgia Tech scientist to be named a Simons Investigator; in 2022, Joshua Weitz, former professor in the School of Biological Sciences, was supported by the Foundation for research in theoretical physics in life sciences. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1693597267 2023-09-01 19:41:07 1693597267 2023-09-01 19:41:07 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-30T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-30T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-30T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Robotics Expert Brings Moss Clock to Life]]> 34434 There’s no artist more vibrant, spiritual, or creative than Mother Earth. Then, we have mortals like Georgia Tech School of Physics alumni Dylan Diamond, who execute Mother Earth’s designs into functional tools or, in this case, a timepiece: “Moss Clock.” The clock has its own gear train and servo, or motors. The bottom line: this technology is a clock composed of living moss. Diamond had the idea to make a “digitally inspired” clock where moving panels of different colored moss resemble a classic digital clock display. "My physics degree helped, but I firmly believe that in the age of information, with public access to so many free tutorials and teachers online, anyone can do something like this," Diamond said. 

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There’s no artist more vibrant, spiritual, or creative than Mother Earth. Then, we have mortals like Georgia Tech School of Physics alumni Dylan Diamond, who execute Mother Earth’s designs into functional tools or, in this case, a timepiece: “Moss Clock.” The clock has its own gear train and servo, or motors. The bottom line: this technology is a clock composed of living moss. Diamond had the idea to make a “digitally inspired” clock where moving panels of different colored moss resemble a classic digital clock display. "My physics degree helped, but I firmly believe that in the age of information, with public access to so many free tutorials and teachers online, anyone can do something like this," Diamond said. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1693576267 2023-09-01 13:51:07 1693593482 2023-09-01 18:38:02 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-30T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-30T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-30T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Thinning ice sheets may drive sharp rise in subglacial waters]]> 34434 Up to twice the amount of subglacial water that was originally predicted might be draining into the ocean — potentially increasing glacial melt, sea level rise, and biological disturbances. Two School of Earth and Atmospheric Scientist researchers — Alex Robel, assistant professor, and Shi Joyce Sim, research scientist — have collaborated on a new model for how water moves under glaciers. The new theory shows that up to twice the amount of  water that was originally predicted might be draining into the ocean. (The research is also covered at Earth.com.)

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Up to twice the amount of subglacial water that was originally predicted might be draining into the ocean — potentially increasing glacial melt, sea level rise, and biological disturbances. Two School of Earth and Atmospheric Scientist researchers — Alex Robel, assistant professor, and Shi Joyce Sim, research scientist — have collaborated on a new model for how water moves under glaciers. The new theory shows that up to twice the amount of  water that was originally predicted might be draining into the ocean. (The research is also covered at Earth.com.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692634011 2023-08-21 16:06:51 1693229295 2023-08-28 13:28:15 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-21T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[New Proof Finds the ‘Ultimate Instability’ in a Solar System Model]]> 34434 For centuries, ever since Isaac Newton formulated his laws of motion and gravity, mathematicians and astronomers have grappled with the long-term stability of planetary orbits in the solar system. In the simplest model, which considers only the gravitational forces exerted by the sun, the planets follow their elliptical orbits like clockwork for eternity. But once you account for gravitational attraction between the planets themselves, everything gets more complicated. You can no longer explicitly calculate the planets’ positions and velocities over long periods of time, and must instead ask qualitative questions about how they might behave. Might the effects of the planets’ mutual attraction accumulate and break the clockwork? Now, in three papers that together exceed 150 pages, a trio of mathematicians have proved for the first time that instability inevitably arises in a model of planets orbiting a sun. Rafael de la Llave, a professor in the School of Mathematics, didn't work on the research but is quoted in the article.


 

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For centuries, ever since Isaac Newton formulated his laws of motion and gravity, mathematicians and astronomers have grappled with the long-term stability of planetary orbits in the solar system. In the simplest model, which considers only the gravitational forces exerted by the sun, the planets follow their elliptical orbits like clockwork for eternity. But once you account for gravitational attraction between the planets themselves, everything gets more complicated. You can no longer explicitly calculate the planets’ positions and velocities over long periods of time, and must instead ask qualitative questions about how they might behave. Might the effects of the planets’ mutual attraction accumulate and break the clockwork? Now, in three papers that together exceed 150 pages, a trio of mathematicians have proved for the first time that instability inevitably arises in a model of planets orbiting a sun. Rafael de la Llave, a professor in the School of Mathematics, didn't work on the research but is quoted in the article.


 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692983657 2023-08-25 17:14:17 1692983657 2023-08-25 17:14:17 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-16T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Maybe There's No Magic to the Mindset]]> 34434 One of the most popular pop psychology concepts to take hold in recent years is that of the “growth mindset.” The belief that you can improve your mental powers (grow your brain) can be a powerful tool in helping you actually achieve the success you desire. The converse mindset, or “fixed,” keeps you tied so heavily to the idea that you need to perform well that you fear doing anything that could jeopardize a favorable outcome. But what if your mindset doesn’t really matter? What if the idea is just an oversimplification, as so many pop psychology concepts are? Alexander Burgoyne, postdoctoral researcher in the School of Psychology, co-authored research on 63 studies of growth mindsets showing that there was "no support for meaningful changes in motivation and behavior." Also, many of the studies showed inadequate study design, reporting flaws, and bias. 

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One of the most popular pop psychology concepts to take hold in recent years is that of the “growth mindset.” The belief that you can improve your mental powers (grow your brain) can be a powerful tool in helping you actually achieve the success you desire. The converse mindset, or “fixed,” keeps you tied so heavily to the idea that you need to perform well that you fear doing anything that could jeopardize a favorable outcome. But what if your mindset doesn’t really matter? What if the idea is just an oversimplification, as so many pop psychology concepts are? Alexander Burgoyne, postdoctoral researcher in the School of Psychology, co-authored research on 63 studies of growth mindsets showing that there was "no support for meaningful changes in motivation and behavior." Also, many of the studies showed inadequate study design, reporting flaws, and bias. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692640146 2023-08-21 17:49:06 1692640146 2023-08-21 17:49:06 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-01T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[To build a better crawly robot, add legs—lots of legs]]> 34434 When traveling on rough and unpredictable roads, the more legs the better — at least for robots. Balancing on two legs is somewhat hard; on four legs, it’s slightly easier. But what if you had many many legs, like a centipede? Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have found that by giving a robot multiple, connected legs, it allows the machine to easily clamber over landscapes with cracks, hills, and uneven surfaces without the need for extensive sensor systems. Their results are published in a study this week in the journal Science. The researchers from the School of Physics include Daniel Goldman, Dunn Family Professor, and Baxi Chong, postdoctoral scholar and a Ph.D. graduate student in the Quantitative Biosciences program. Two scientists from the School of Mathematics involved in the study are Grigoriy Blekherman, professor, and Daniel Irvine, postdoctoral scholar. And three members of Goldman's Complex Rheology and Biomechanics (CRAB) Lab are study co-authors: Ph.D. graduate students Juntao He and Tianyu Wang, and Daniel Soto, postgraduate research assistant. (This story is covered in QHubo NewsCBC RadioTech Briefs, New Atlas, the BBC, and ScienceDaily. Popular Science also mentions the Georgia Tech research in its story on a separate multi-legged robot developed by researchers in Japan. And Baxi Chong wrote about the research in The Conversation which was reprinted in RoboHub.) 

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When traveling on rough and unpredictable roads, the more legs the better — at least for robots. Balancing on two legs is somewhat hard; on four legs, it’s slightly easier. But what if you had many many legs, like a centipede? Researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology have found that by giving a robot multiple, connected legs, it allows the machine to easily clamber over landscapes with cracks, hills, and uneven surfaces without the need for extensive sensor systems. Their results are published in a study this week in the journal Science. The researchers from the School of Physics include Daniel Goldman, Dunn Family Professor, and Baxi Chong, postdoctoral scholar and a Ph.D. graduate student in the Quantitative Biosciences program. Two scientists from the School of Mathematics involved in the study are Grigoriy Blekherman, professor, and Daniel Irvine, postdoctoral scholar. And three members of Goldman's Complex Rheology and Biomechanics (CRAB) Lab are study co-authors: Ph.D. graduate students Juntao He and Tianyu Wang, and Daniel Soto, postgraduate research assistant. (This story is also covered in QHubo NewsCBC RadioTech Briefs, New Atlas, the BBC, and ScienceDaily. Popular Science also mentions the Georgia Tech research in its story on a separate multi-legged robot developed by researchers in Japan. And Baxi Chong wrote about the research in The Conversation which was reprinted in RoboHub.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1683554486 2023-05-08 14:01:26 1692638928 2023-08-21 17:28:48 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-08T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-08T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-08T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Researchers discover algorithm to create shapes that roll down pre-determined paths]]> 34434 Researchers have developed a method to construct solid objects that roll down pre-determined paths, which they reckon could have applications in quantum mechanics and medicine. To get a ball of malleable clay to roll down a simple path, you can force it down a specific path once, squashing it as you go. Take it to the top again, restart it from the initial starting point on the ball's surface, and it will roll down the same path. The researchers took this principle to develop an algorithm that could produce a shape capable of following almost any pre-determined path, even making the weird-shaped solids out of 3D-printed plastic and solid ball-bearings (for weight) to prove the point. Elisabetta Matsumoto, assistant professor in the School of Physics, co-wrote an accompanying article to the study saying "future work developing for more precise mathematical understanding of the issue would help to connect this work to applications, as well as to open up more purely mathematical veins of research."

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Researchers have developed a method to construct solid objects that roll down pre-determined paths, which they reckon could have applications in quantum mechanics and medicine. To get a ball of malleable clay to roll down a simple path, you can force it down a specific path once, squashing it as you go. Take it to the top again, restart it from the initial starting point on the ball's surface, and it will roll down the same path. The researchers took this principle to develop an algorithm that could produce a shape capable of following almost any pre-determined path, even making the weird-shaped solids out of 3D-printed plastic and solid ball-bearings (for weight) to prove the point. Elisabetta Matsumoto, assistant professor in the School of Physics, co-wrote an accompanying article to the study saying "future work developing for more precise mathematical understanding of the issue would help to connect this work to applications, as well as to open up more purely mathematical veins of research."

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692636792 2023-08-21 16:53:12 1692636792 2023-08-21 16:53:12 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-09T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-09T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-09T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Fossils Are Tackling One of Conservation’s Toughest Questions]]> 34434 Fossils aren’t only useful for learning about the past. They can also suggest how plants and animals might respond to future events — most pressingly, climate change. For example, Jenny McGuire, assistant professor and conservation paleobiologist in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and her colleagues studied fossilized pollen grains to see how 16 important plant taxa from North America responded to climate change over the past 18,000 years. Did the plants shift their ranges to follow their preferred climate, the researchers wondered, or did they stay put and make the best of things as the climate changed around them? Twelve of the 16 taxa changed their geographic distribution to maintain similar climate niches, the researchers found — even in periods when the climate was changing rapidly. (This story was first published in Knowable Magazine.) 

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Fossils aren’t only useful for learning about the past. They can also suggest how plants and animals might respond to future events — most pressingly, climate change. For example, Jenny McGuire, assistant professor and conservation paleobiologist in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and her colleagues studied fossilized pollen grains to see how 16 important plant taxa from North America responded to climate change over the past 18,000 years. Did the plants shift their ranges to follow their preferred climate, the researchers wondered, or did they stay put and make the best of things as the climate changed around them? Twelve of the 16 taxa changed their geographic distribution to maintain similar climate niches, the researchers found — even in periods when the climate was changing rapidly. (This story was first published in Knowable Magazine.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692634616 2023-08-21 16:16:56 1692635440 2023-08-21 16:30:40 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-12T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[‘Folks in Alaska should take this seriously.’ Anchorage not safe from tsunamis, study finds]]> 34434 On a cold March evening in 1964, a colossal earthquake struck off the coast of Alaska. At magnitude 9.2, it was the largest earthquake ever recorded in North America, and it triggered massive tsunamis that killed more than 120 people and leveled communities. But no wave reached Anchorage, the state’s biggest city. Many concluded that nearby geography makes the city immune to tsunamis. A new study published this week by the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), however, finds Anchorage simply got lucky in 1964—and might not the next time an earthquake strikes the seismically active region. Hermann Fritz, professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ocean Science and Engineering, and the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, did not work on the study but is quoted in this article. 

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On a cold March evening in 1964, a colossal earthquake struck off the coast of Alaska. At magnitude 9.2, it was the largest earthquake ever recorded in North America, and it triggered massive tsunamis that killed more than 120 people and leveled communities. But no wave reached Anchorage, the state’s biggest city. Many concluded that nearby geography makes the city immune to tsunamis. A new study published this week by the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS), however, finds Anchorage simply got lucky in 1964—and might not the next time an earthquake strikes the seismically active region. Hermann Fritz, professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Ocean Science and Engineering, and the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, did not work on the study but is quoted in this article. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692635298 2023-08-21 16:28:18 1692635298 2023-08-21 16:28:18 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-16T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[A new approach to drug design: Restoring the effectiveness of antibiotics]]> 34434 A team led by members of the Department of Chemistry at King’s College London, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Oklahoma and the Georgia Institute of Technology, have reportedly discovered a new molecular method that could enable more effective and cheaper prevention of bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics. The School of Chemistry and Biochemistry researchers involved in the study are James Gumbert, professor, and Katie Kuo, Ph.D. scholar. 

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A team led by members of the Department of Chemistry at King’s College London, in collaboration with scientists from the University of Oklahoma and the Georgia Institute of Technology, have reportedly discovered a new molecular method that could enable more effective and cheaper prevention of bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics. The School of Chemistry and Biochemistry researchers involved in the study are James Gumbert, professor, and Katie Kuo, Ph.D. scholar. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692633240 2023-08-21 15:54:00 1692633240 2023-08-21 15:54:00 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-16T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[New Neuroimaging Approach Could Improve Diagnosis of Schizophrenia ]]> 34434 New research led by scientists working with Georgia State University’s TReNDS Center has identified age-related changes in brain patterns associated with the risk for developing schizophrenia. The discovery could help clinicians identify the risk for developing mental illness earlier and improve treatment options. The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The research is part of a collaboration by experts from the University of Bari Aldo Moro, the Lieber Institute of Brain Development and the Tri-institutional Center for Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Data Science (TReNDS) based at Georgia State University. The TReNDS Center is a collaboration among Georgia State University, Georgia Tech, and Emory University.

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New research led by scientists working with Georgia State University’s TReNDS Center has identified age-related changes in brain patterns associated with the risk for developing schizophrenia. The discovery could help clinicians identify the risk for developing mental illness earlier and improve treatment options. The study is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The research is part of a collaboration by experts from the University of Bari Aldo Moro, the Lieber Institute of Brain Development and the Tri-institutional Center for Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Data Science (TReNDS) based at Georgia State University. The TReNDS Center is a collaboration among Georgia State University, Georgia Tech, and Emory University.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692631779 2023-08-21 15:29:39 1692631779 2023-08-21 15:29:39 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-02T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-02T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-02T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[W. Jason Morgan, Who Developed Theory of Plate Tectonics, Dies at 87]]> 34434 The science world is remembering W. Jason Morgan, who in 1967 developed the theory of plate tectonics — a framework that revolutionized the study of earthquakes, volcanoes and the slow, steady shift of the continents across the earth’s mantle. Morgan, who died July 31 at his home in Natick, Mass., attended Georgia Tech and received his B.S. from the School of Physics in 1955. 

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The science world is remembering W. Jason Morgan, who in 1967 developed the theory of plate tectonics — a framework that revolutionized the study of earthquakes, volcanoes and the slow, steady shift of the continents across the earth’s mantle. Morgan, who died July 31 at his home in Natick, Mass., attended Georgia Tech and received his B.S. from the School of Physics in 1955. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692630503 2023-08-21 15:08:23 1692630503 2023-08-21 15:08:23 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-11T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[What’s new on Georgia’s college campuses for fall 2023?]]> 34434 This summary of new courses, programs, and buildings available for the 2023-2024 school year at Georgia's college campuses includes mention of the three new majors in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciencesenvironmental scienceatmospheric and ocean sciences, and solid earth and planetary sciences.

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This summary of new courses, programs, and buildings available for the 2023-2024 school year at Georgia's college campuses includes mention of three new majors in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciencesenvironmental scienceatmospheric and ocean sciences, and solid earth and planetary sciences.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1692628821 2023-08-21 14:40:21 1692628821 2023-08-21 14:40:21 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-08-09T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-09T00:00:00-04:00 2023-08-09T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Warming Could Push the Atlantic Past a ‘Tipping Point’ This Century]]> 34434 Could the system of ocean currents that regulates the climate for a swath of the planet — currents known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) — collapse sooner than expected? New research, published in the journal Nature Communications, show that a sharp weakening of the currents, or even a shutdown, could be upon us by century’s end. In interviews, several researchers who study the overturning applauded the new analysis for using a novel approach to predict when we might cross a tipping point. But they voiced reservations about some of its methods, and said more work was still needed to nail down the timing with greater certainty. Susan Lozier, Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair of the College of Sciences, and a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, has researched the AMOC in the past and is involved in new efforts to directly measure its currents. But the projects began collecting data in 2004 at the earliest, which isn’t enough time to draw firm long-term conclusions. “It is extremely difficult to look at a short record for the ocean overturning and say what it is going to do over 30, 40 or 50 years,” Lozier said.

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Could the system of ocean currents that regulates the climate for a swath of the planet — currents known as the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) — collapse sooner than expected? New research, published in the journal Nature Communications, show that a sharp weakening of the currents, or even a shutdown, could be upon us by century’s end. In interviews, several researchers who study the overturning applauded the new analysis for using a novel approach to predict when we might cross a tipping point. But they voiced reservations about some of its methods, and said more work was still needed to nail down the timing with greater certainty. Susan Lozier, Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair of the College of Sciences, and a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, has researched the AMOC in the past and is involved in new efforts to directly measure its currents. But the projects began collecting data in 2004 at the earliest, which isn’t enough time to draw firm long-term conclusions. “It is extremely difficult to look at a short record for the ocean overturning and say what it is going to do over 30, 40 or 50 years,” Lozier said.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690378402 2023-07-26 13:33:22 1690384819 2023-07-26 15:20:19 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-25T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-25T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-25T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Red Symons: Divided We Conquer]]> 34434 The work of School of Biological Sciences researchers William Ratcliff and Ozan Bozdag makes its way into this Cosmos Magazine column from Redmond Symons, who waxes eloquent how his body developed from a single cell. In May 2023, Ratcliff, an associate professor and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences, along with Bozdag, a research scientist, released a study on how they developed multicellular colonies from single cells of snowflake yeast. The team showed how the cells evolved to be physically stronger and more than 20,000 times larger than their ancestor. This type of biophysical evolution is a pre-requisite for the kind of large multicellular life that can be seen with the naked eye. Their study is the first major report on the ongoing Multicellularity Long-Term Evolution Experiment (MuLTEE), which the team hopes to run for decades.

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The work of School of Biological Sciences researchers William Ratcliff and Ozan Bozdag makes its way into this Cosmos Magazine column from Redmond Symons, who waxes eloquent how his body developed from a single cell. In May 2023, Ratcliff, an associate professor and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences, along with Bozdag, a research scientist, released a study on how they developed multicellular colonies from single cells of snowflake yeast. The team showed how the cells evolved to be physically stronger and more than 20,000 times larger than their ancestor. This type of biophysical evolution is a pre-requisite for the kind of large multicellular life that can be seen with the naked eye. Their study is the first major report on the ongoing Multicellularity Long-Term Evolution Experiment (MuLTEE), which the team hopes to run for decades.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690380929 2023-07-26 14:15:29 1690380929 2023-07-26 14:15:29 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-20T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-20T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-20T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Oppenheimer Almost Discovered Black Holes Before He Became ‘Destroyer of Worlds’]]> 34434 J. Robert Oppenheimer, now the protagonist of a much-anticipated film, is today most known for his scientific leadership of the U.S. Manhattan Project, the World War II–era crash program to build the first-ever atomic bombs. But just a few years earlier, Oppenheimer had found himself pondering very different “weapons” of mass destruction: black holes — although it would be decades before that name arose. “It was influential; it was visionary,” says Feryal Özel, professor and chair of the School of Physics, of Oppenheimer’s work on black holes and neutron stars, the superdense corpses of expired massive stars. “He has a lasting impact.” Özel is a founding member of the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, which released the first-ever image of a black hole in 2019 — 80 years after Oppenheimer co-authored a paper theorizing that such objects could exist.

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J. Robert Oppenheimer, now the protagonist of a much-anticipated film, is today most known for his scientific leadership of the U.S. Manhattan Project, the World War II–era crash program to build the first-ever atomic bombs. But just a few years earlier, Oppenheimer had found himself pondering very different “weapons” of mass destruction: black holes — although it would be decades before that name arose. “It was influential; it was visionary,” says Feryal Özel, professor and chair of the School of Physics, of Oppenheimer’s work on black holes and neutron stars, the superdense corpses of expired massive stars. “He has a lasting impact.” Özel is a founding member of the Event Horizon Telescope Collaboration, which released the first-ever image of a black hole in 2019 — 80 years after Oppenheimer co-authored a paper theorizing that such objects could exist.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690379264 2023-07-26 13:47:44 1690379264 2023-07-26 13:47:44 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-21T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[The Earth Unlocked: Season 2, Episode 1: Space Weather featuring Annalisa Bracco]]> 34434 Extreme weather isn't exclusive to the planet; storms twice the size of Earth, winds faster than the strongest hurricanes, and towering tornadoes thousands of miles high all rage in the distant corners of the universe. Episode 1 of the second season of The Weather Channel's show The Earth Unlocked features commentary from Annalisa Bracco, professor and associate chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Bracco's research includes a study of the atmospheric "oceans" of Jupiter and its polar cyclones. (DirecTV subscription required to view episodes.) 

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Extreme weather isn't exclusive to the planet; storms twice the size of Earth, winds faster than the strongest hurricanes, and towering tornadoes thousands of miles high all rage in the distant corners of the universe. Episode 1 of the second season of The Weather Channel's show The Earth Unlocked features commentary from Annalisa Bracco, professor and associate chair of the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Bracco's research includes a study of the atmospheric "oceans" of Jupiter and its polar cyclones. (DirecTV subscription required to view episodes.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690316753 2023-07-25 20:25:53 1690316753 2023-07-25 20:25:53 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-25T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-25T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-25T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[11 signs you’re a deep thinker according to psychologists]]> 34434 One of those signs involves being a bit absent-minded, but don't worry. If you’re a deep thinker, you’ll always be lost in your thoughts. Your brain is always busy imagining scenarios and solving problems big and small. This story points to a 2017 Georgia Tech-led study showing that daydreaming may be a sign of a creative, intelligent person. Eric Schumacher, professor in the School of Psychology, and then-Ph.D. scholar Christine Godwin were co-authors of that study.

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One of those signs involves being a bit absent-minded, but don't worry. If you’re a deep thinker, you’ll always be lost in your thoughts. Your brain is always busy imagining scenarios and solving problems big and small. This story points to a 2017 Georgia Tech-led study showing that daydreaming may be a sign of a creative, intelligent person. Eric Schumacher, professor in the School of Psychology, and then-Ph.D. scholar Christine Godwin were co-authors of that study.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690213913 2023-07-24 15:51:53 1690213913 2023-07-24 15:51:53 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Conformational restriction shapes the inhibition of a multidrug efflux adaptor protein]]> 34434 Membrane efflux pumps play a major role in bacterial multidrug resistance. The tripartite multi-drug efflux pump system from Escherichia coli, AcrAB-TolC, is a target for inhibition to lessen resistance development and restore antibiotic efficacy, with homologs in other ESKAPE pathogens. Our results support a model where an inhibitor forms a molecular wedge within a cleft between the lipoyl and αβ barrel domains of AcrA, diminishing its conformational transmission of drug-evoked signals from AcrB to TolC. This work provides molecular insights into multi-drug adaptor protein function which could be valuable for developing antimicrobial therapeutics. Co-authors of the study include two School of Chemistry and Biochemistry researchers: Associate Professor James Gumbart and Ph.D. candidate Katie M. Kuo. (Gumbart is also an associate professor in the School of Physics.) 

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Membrane efflux pumps play a major role in bacterial multidrug resistance. The tripartite multi-drug efflux pump system from Escherichia coli, AcrAB-TolC, is a target for inhibition to lessen resistance development and restore antibiotic efficacy, with homologs in other ESKAPE pathogens. Our results support a model where an inhibitor forms a molecular wedge within a cleft between the lipoyl and αβ barrel domains of AcrA, diminishing its conformational transmission of drug-evoked signals from AcrB to TolC. This work provides molecular insights into multi-drug adaptor protein function which could be valuable for developing antimicrobial therapeutics. Co-authors of the study include two School of Chemistry and Biochemistry researchers: Associate Professor James Gumbart and Ph.D. candidate Katie M. Kuo. (Gumbart is also an associate professor in the School of Physics.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690212729 2023-07-24 15:32:09 1690212729 2023-07-24 15:32:09 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Delta Junction air quality monitoring site comes online in new national network]]> 34434 Four science instruments at Delta Junction, Alaska, have begun gathering air quality data as part of a multi-state project to determine the chemical content and physical properties of airborne particulate matter. The Delta Junction site, one of 12 in 10 states, is managed by associate professor Jingqiu Mao of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute and College of Natural Science and Mathematics. Nga Lee “Sally” Ng, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is the lead investigator. The instruments began operating June 26. The $12 million project, funded by the National Science Foundation, has created the nation’s first long-term network of monitoring stations on aerosol chemical content and properties.

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Four science instruments at Delta Junction, Alaska, have begun gathering air quality data as part of a multi-state project to determine the chemical content and physical properties of airborne particulate matter. The Delta Junction site, one of 12 in 10 states, is managed by associate professor Jingqiu Mao of the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute and College of Natural Science and Mathematics. Nga Lee “Sally” Ng, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is the lead investigator. The instruments began operating June 26. The $12 million project, funded by the National Science Foundation, has created the nation’s first long-term network of monitoring stations on aerosol chemical content and properties.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690211486 2023-07-24 15:11:26 1690211486 2023-07-24 15:11:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-17T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Why Studying the Microbiome Is Like Playing Ultimate Frisbee]]> 34434 As an organic chemist at Harvard Medical School, Liz Jones loves to study how bonds are made and broken in the molecules in our bodies. She manipulates those bonds when building molecular probes to study the gut microbiome and developing potential new drugs to treat microbiome-related illnesses. She also forges bonds among people, both as a scientist and as an Ultimate Frisbee coach.“I’m super drawn to team environments,” said Jones, research fellow in biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology in the Blavatnik Institute at HMS. Jones received her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

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As an organic chemist at Harvard Medical School, Liz Jones loves to study how bonds are made and broken in the molecules in our bodies. She manipulates those bonds when building molecular probes to study the gut microbiome and developing potential new drugs to treat microbiome-related illnesses. She also forges bonds among people, both as a scientist and as an Ultimate Frisbee coach.“I’m super drawn to team environments,” said Jones, research fellow in biological chemistry and molecular pharmacology in the Blavatnik Institute at HMS. Jones received her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1690207227 2023-07-24 14:00:27 1690207227 2023-07-24 14:00:27 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-18T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[With neutrinos, scientists observe our galaxy in a whole new way]]> 34434 Human beings for millennia have gazed with awe at the vast torrent of stars -— bright and dim — shining in Earth's night sky that comprise the Milky Way. Our home galaxy, however, is now being observed for the first time in a brand new way. Scientists said on Thursday they have produced an image of the Milky Way not based on electromagnetic radiation - light - but on ghostly subatomic particles called neutrinos. They detected high-energy neutrinos in pristine ice deep below Antarctica's surface, then traced their source back to locations in the Milky Way - the first time these particles have been observed arising from our galaxy. "This observation is ground-breaking. It established the galaxy as a neutrino source. Every future work will refer to this observation," said Ignacio Taboada, professor in the School of Physics and spokesperson for the IceCube research collaboration in Antarctica that produced the image. (The story was also covered in NPR, Popular Mechanics, Smithsonian MagazineYahoo! News UKYahoo! News CanadaThe Jerusalem PostKPBSInteractions.org, APS (American Physical Society), Vice, El Pais, VOA Learning Englishbdnews24, SciTechDaily, PetaPixel, and Sinc.)

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Human beings for millennia have gazed with awe at the vast torrent of stars — bright and dim — shining in Earth's night sky that comprise the Milky Way. Our home galaxy, however, is now being observed for the first time in a brand new way. Scientists said on Thursday they have produced an image of the Milky Way not based on electromagnetic radiation - light - but on ghostly subatomic particles called neutrinos. They detected high-energy neutrinos in pristine ice deep below Antarctica's surface, then traced their source back to locations in the Milky Way - the first time these particles have been observed arising from our galaxy. "This observation is ground-breaking. It established the galaxy as a neutrino source. Every future work will refer to this observation," said Ignacio Taboada, professor in the School of Physics and spokesperson for the IceCube research collaboration in Antarctica that produced the image. (The story was also covered in NPR, Popular MechanicsSmithsonian Magazine, Yahoo! News UKYahoo! News CanadaThe Jerusalem PostKPBSInteractions.org, APS (American Physical Society), Vice, El Pais, VOA Learning Englishbdnews24, SciTechDaily, PetaPixel, and Sinc.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1688132937 2023-06-30 13:48:57 1689794379 2023-07-19 19:19:39 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-29T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-29T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-29T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[This Hurricane Season Depends on a Showdown in the Atlantic]]> 34434 Like a massive, watery battery, the Atlantic Ocean powers hurricanes. As the ocean warms throughout the summer, it sends moisture into the atmosphere—heat energy that combines with wind to spin up storms. And the surface of the North Atlantic has never been hotter at this time of year — the early stages of hurricane season — at least since routine satellite measurements began in the early 1980s. Because of this change, a showdown over this year’s hurricane season is literally heating up in the Atlantic. Hurricanes could feed on that warm ocean water. But at the same time, an El Niño has also formed in the Pacific and could provide conditions that prevent hurricanes. Annalisa Bracco, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, mentions other factors that may influence the 2023 hurricane season. 

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Like a massive, watery battery, the Atlantic Ocean powers hurricanes. As the ocean warms throughout the summer, it sends moisture into the atmosphere—heat energy that combines with wind to spin up storms. And the surface of the North Atlantic has never been hotter at this time of year — the early stages of hurricane season — at least since routine satellite measurements began in the early 1980s. Because of this change, a showdown over this year’s hurricane season is literally heating up in the Atlantic. Hurricanes could feed on that warm ocean water. But at the same time, an El Niño has also formed in the Pacific and could provide conditions that prevent hurricanes. Annalisa Bracco, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, mentions other factors that may influence the 2023 hurricane season. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1689792741 2023-07-19 18:52:21 1689792741 2023-07-19 18:52:21 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-29T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-29T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-29T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Scientists Unearth 20 Million Years of ‘Hot Spot’ Magmatism Under Cocos Plate]]> 34434 Ten years ago, Samer Naif made an unexpected discovery in Earth’s mantle: a narrow pocket, proposed to be filled with magma, hidden some 60 kilometers beneath the seafloor of the Cocos Plate. The observation provided an explanation for how tectonic plates can gradually slide, lubricated by partial melting. The study also “raised several questions about why magma is stored in a thin channel — and where the magma originated from,” says Naif, an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology. Fellow researchers went on to share competing interpretations for the cause of the channel. Naif went looking for clues of mantle magmas that he first observed in his 2013 Nature study. The results of that search are detailed in a new Science Advances article, “Episodic intraplate magmatism fed by a long-lived melt channel of distal plume origin”, co-authored by Naif. (Coverage of this study also appeared at Phys.org and Interesting Engineering.)

]]>
Ten years ago, Samer Naif made an unexpected discovery in Earth’s mantle: a narrow pocket, proposed to be filled with magma, hidden some 60 kilometers beneath the seafloor of the Cocos Plate. The observation provided an explanation for how tectonic plates can gradually slide, lubricated by partial melting. The study also “raised several questions about why magma is stored in a thin channel — and where the magma originated from,” says Naif, an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at Georgia Institute of Technology. Fellow researchers went on to share competing interpretations for the cause of the channel. Naif went looking for clues of mantle magmas that he first observed in his 2013 Nature study. The results of that search are detailed in a new Science Advances article, “Episodic intraplate magmatism fed by a long-lived melt channel of distal plume origin”, co-authored by Naif.  (Coverage of this study also appeared at Phys.org and Interesting Engineering.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1687276194 2023-06-20 15:49:54 1689791191 2023-07-19 18:26:31 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-20T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-20T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-20T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[How sounds can turn us on to the wonders of the universe]]> 34434 Sonification — turning data into sound — and data accessibility were recurring themes at the January 2023 meeting of the American Astronomical Society.  Sonic representations of light echoing off hot gas around a black hole, sonifications designed to make solar eclipses accessible to the blind and visually impaired (BVI) community, and a proposal to incorporate sonification into astronomical data collected by the $600 million Rubin Observatory in Chile, were just three examples. The meeting was a microcosm of a bigger trend in science accessibility. “Astronomy is a leading field in sonification, but there’s no reason that work couldn’t be generalized,” says one astronomer. Bruce Walker, professor in the School of Psychology who runs the Georgia Tech Sonification Lab, is quoted in the article. 

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Sonification — turning data into sound — and data accessibility were recurring themes at the January 2023 meeting of the American Astronomical Society.  Sonic representations of light echoing off hot gas around a black hole, sonifications designed to make solar eclipses accessible to the blind and visually impaired (BVI) community, and a proposal to incorporate sonification into astronomical data collected by the $600 million Rubin Observatory in Chile, were just three examples. The meeting was a microcosm of a bigger trend in science accessibility. “Astronomy is a leading field in sonification, but there’s no reason that work couldn’t be generalized,” says one astronomer. Bruce Walker, professor in the School of Psychology who runs the Georgia Tech Sonification Lab, is quoted in the article. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1687274933 2023-06-20 15:28:53 1689790394 2023-07-19 18:13:14 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-19T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Scientists discover small RNA that regulates bacterial infection]]> 34434 People with weakened immune systems are at constant risk of infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common environmental bacterium, can colonize different body parts, such as the lungs, leading to persistent, chronic infections that can last a lifetime — a common occurrence in people with cystic fibrosis. But the bacteria can sometimes change their behavior and enter the bloodstream, causing chronic localized infections to become acute and potentially fatal. How and why the switch happens in humans has remained unknown. However, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have identified the major mechanism behind the transition between chronic and acute P. aeruginosa infections. Marvin Whiteley -- professor in the School of Biological Sciences and Bennie H. and Nelson D. Abell Chair in Molecular and Cellular Biology -- and Pengbo Cao, a postdoctoral researcher in Whiteley's lab, discovered a gene that drives the switch. By measuring bacterial gene expression in human tissue samples, the researchers identified a biomarker for the transition. (This story was also covered in Technology Networks and News Medical Life Sciences.) 

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People with weakened immune systems are at constant risk of infection. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a common environmental bacterium, can colonize different body parts, such as the lungs, leading to persistent, chronic infections that can last a lifetime — a common occurrence in people with cystic fibrosis. But the bacteria can sometimes change their behavior and enter the bloodstream, causing chronic localized infections to become acute and potentially fatal. How and why the switch happens in humans has remained unknown. However, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have identified the major mechanism behind the transition between chronic and acute P. aeruginosa infections. Marvin Whiteley -- professor in the School of Biological Sciences and Bennie H. and Nelson D. Abell Chair in Molecular and Cellular Biology -- and Pengbo Cao, a postdoctoral researcher in Whiteley's lab, discovered a gene that drives the switch. By measuring bacterial gene expression in human tissue samples, the researchers identified a biomarker for the transition. (This story was also covered in Technology Networks and News Medical Life Sciences.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1687280114 2023-06-20 16:55:14 1689790046 2023-07-19 18:07:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-14T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-14T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-14T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Cooperation and Cheating]]> 34434 Cooperation is everywhere. Cells cooperate in multicellular organisms, individuals cooperate in societies, and different species cooperate. Why would it not be the case that microbes cooperate with each other? Researchers have known for more than 20 years that bacteria participate in collective behaviors such as forming biofilms and acquiring nutrients from the environment. But being part of a cooperative group does not necessarily mean that every individual bacterium plays by the rules. Occasionally, cheaters arise. Steve Diggle, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and director of Georgia Tech's Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection, weighs in on what keeps microbial cheaters from ruining biofilm structures. 

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Cooperation is everywhere. Cells cooperate in multicellular organisms, individuals cooperate in societies, and different species cooperate. Why would it not be the case that microbes cooperate with each other? Researchers have known for more than 20 years that bacteria participate in collective behaviors such as forming biofilms and acquiring nutrients from the environment. But being part of a cooperative group does not necessarily mean that every individual bacterium plays by the rules. Occasionally, cheaters arise. Steve Diggle, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and director of Georgia Tech's Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection, weighs in on what keeps microbial cheaters from ruining biofilm structures. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1689789308 2023-07-19 17:55:08 1689789308 2023-07-19 17:55:08 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-01T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[DOE Welcomes New Biden-Harris Appointees and Announces Promotions]]> 34434 Ariel Marshall, who received a Ph.D. from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 2014, is the new Chief of Staff, Office of the Under Secretary for Science and Innovation in the U.S. Department of Energy. Marshall, who joins the DOE after serving as legislative director for Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), will work alongside Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm to implement President Biden’s climate and energy agenda and the Administration’s investments in energy infrastructure across the nation.

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Ariel Marshall, who received a Ph.D. from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry in 2014, is the new Chief of Staff, Office of the Under Secretary for Science and Innovation in the U.S. Department of Energy. Marshall, who joins the DOE after serving as legislative director for Senator Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), will work alongside Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm to implement President Biden’s climate and energy agenda and the Administration’s investments in energy infrastructure across the nation.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1689607958 2023-07-17 15:32:38 1689607958 2023-07-17 15:32:38 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-07T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Is there a strategy to winning Powerball and Mega Millions? Tips for picking numbers]]> 34434 With the Powerball lottery once again in the news, people dream about becoming the lucky ones who put the mega in millions. Massive jackpots — that have only gotten more massive in recent years — feed those fantasies of mind-blowing winnings. But lottery games are mostly only lucrative for the private companies that states hire to run them, says Lew Lefton, who retired from the School of Mathematics faculty this year but is still affiliated with the Institute. Lefton is also a former Assistant Dean for Information Technology in the College of Sciences. 

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With the Powerball lottery once again in the news, people dream about becoming the lucky ones who put the mega in millions. Massive jackpots — that have only gotten more massive in recent years — feed those fantasies of mind-blowing winnings. But lottery games are mostly only lucrative for the private companies that states hire to run them, says Lew Lefton, who retired from the School of Mathematics faculty this year but is still affiliated with the Institute. Lefton is also a former Assistant Dean for Information Technology in the College of Sciences. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1689605039 2023-07-17 14:43:59 1689605039 2023-07-17 14:43:59 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-07T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Can Math and Physics Save an Arrhythmic Heart?]]> 34434 The heart’s electrical system keeps all its muscle cells beating in sync. A hard whack to the chest at the wrong moment, however, can set up unruly waves of abnormal electrical excitation that are potentially deadly. The resulting kind of arrhythmia may be what caused the football player Damar Hamlin of the Buffalo Bills to collapse on the field after he took a powerful hit during a 2023 National Football League game. In this Quanta podcast, Flavio Fenton, a professor in the School of Physics who studies the electrical dynamics of the heart, tells host Steve Strogatz about a new method under development for treating arrhythmias by stimulating the heart with mild, precisely timed shocks — or possibly even with light.

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The heart’s electrical system keeps all its muscle cells beating in sync. A hard whack to the chest at the wrong moment, however, can set up unruly waves of abnormal electrical excitation that are potentially deadly. The resulting kind of arrhythmia may be what caused the football player Damar Hamlin of the Buffalo Bills to collapse on the field after he took a powerful hit during a 2023 National Football League game. In this Quanta podcast, Flavio Fenton, a professor in the School of Physics who studies the electrical dynamics of the heart, tells host Steve Strogatz about a new method under development for treating arrhythmias by stimulating the heart with mild, precisely timed shocks — or possibly even with light.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1689604197 2023-07-17 14:29:57 1689604197 2023-07-17 14:29:57 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-12T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[How hot is too hot for survival? Researchers cranked up the temperature on volunteers to find out]]> 34434 As a deadly heat wave continues to ravage the U.S., new evidence suggests the human body may stop functioning optimally when outside temperatures climb to 104 to 122 degrees Fahrenheit. Research presented at the recent annual Society for Experimental Biology conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, suggests that temperatures in that range raise a person's resting metabolic rate — the amount of energy needed to function at rest. Michael Sawka, adjunct professor and professor of the practice in the School of Biological Sciences, is quoted in the article. 

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As a deadly heat wave continues to ravage the U.S., new evidence suggests the human body may stop functioning optimally when outside temperatures climb to 104 to 122 degrees Fahrenheit. Research presented at the recent annual Society for Experimental Biology conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, suggests that temperatures in that range raise a person's resting metabolic rate — the amount of energy needed to function at rest. Michael Sawka, adjunct professor and professor of the practice in the School of Biological Sciences, is quoted in the article. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1689603045 2023-07-17 14:10:45 1689603045 2023-07-17 14:10:45 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-07-06T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-06T00:00:00-04:00 2023-07-06T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Experts Mitigate Climate Change Through Restoration Of Coastal Ecosystems]]> 34434 One of the primary drivers of climate change is excess greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Mitigating climate change in the coming century will require both decarbonization — electrifying the power grid or reducing fossil fuel-guzzling transportation — and removing already existing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, a process called carbon dioxide removal. Researchers at Georgia Tech and Yale University have released research proposing a novel pathway involving seagrass and mangroves — known as blue carbon ecosystems — that naturally capture carbon through photosynthesis, which converts carbon dioxide into living tissue. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is a co-author of the research.

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One of the primary drivers of climate change is excess greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Mitigating climate change in the coming century will require both decarbonization — electrifying the power grid or reducing fossil fuel-guzzling transportation — and removing already existing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, a process called carbon dioxide removal. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Yale University have released research proposing a novel pathway involving seagrass and mangroves — known as blue carbon ecosystems — that naturally capture carbon through photosynthesis, which converts carbon dioxide into living tissue. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is a co-author of the research.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1688052997 2023-06-29 15:36:37 1688052997 2023-06-29 15:36:37 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-26T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Georgia Institute Of Technology Leads NASA Center On Lunar Research And Exploration]]> 34434 Georgia Tech researchers have been selected by NASA to lead a $7.5 million center that will study the lunar environment and the generation and properties of volatiles and dust. The Center for Lunar Environment and Volatile Exploration Research (CLEVER) will be led by Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry with an adjunct appointment in the School of Physics. CLEVER is the successor to Orlando’s pioneering REVEALS (Radiation Effects on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces) center, and both are part of NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) program. 

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Georgia Tech researchers have been selected by NASA to lead a $7.5 million center that will study the lunar environment and the generation and properties of volatiles and dust. The Center for Lunar Environment and Volatile Exploration Research (CLEVER) will be led by Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry with an adjunct appointment in the School of Physics. CLEVER is the successor to Orlando’s pioneering REVEALS (Radiation Effects on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces) center, and both are part of NASA’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) program. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1688049565 2023-06-29 14:39:25 1688049565 2023-06-29 14:39:25 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-26T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Area near where submersible vanished known for treacherous conditions]]> 34434 Deep sonar and more high-tech ships were involved in the search to find a missing submersible which disappeared June 18 on the way to the ruins and wreckage of the Titanic with five people aboard. The search area grew exponentially to twice the size of Connecticut. Susan Lozier, Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair of the College of Sciences, and a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, said the spot where the RMS Titanic wrecked in 1912 is home to treacherous conditions both above and below the water. “The thing to keep in mind, just the surface conditions, boats and everything involved in this rescue operation, this part of the ocean is where the Gulf Stream continues up northward very energetically, and interacts with the atmosphere, a stormy area,” said Lozier, a physical oceanographer who has researched ocean currents in the North Atlantic. (Lozier was also interviewed by Atlanta News First.)

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Deep sonar and more high-tech ships were involved in the search to find a missing submersible which disappeared June 18 on the way to the ruins and wreckage of the Titanic with five people aboard. The search area grew exponentially to twice the size of Connecticut. Susan Lozier, Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair of the College of Sciences, and a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, said the spot where the RMS Titanic wrecked in 1912 is home to treacherous conditions both above and below the water. “The thing to keep in mind, just the surface conditions, boats and everything involved in this rescue operation, this part of the ocean is where the Gulf Stream continues up northward very energetically, and interacts with the atmosphere, a stormy area,” said Lozier, a physical oceanographer who has researched ocean currents in the North Atlantic. (Lozier was also interviewed by Atlanta News First.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1687458282 2023-06-22 18:24:42 1687462040 2023-06-22 19:27:20 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-21T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[The evolution of blinking has eluded the research archives. Enter the mudskipper.]]> 34434 Researchers at Seton Hill University, Pennsylvania State University, and the Georgia Institute of Technology looked to the mudskipper, the amphibious fish that spends more than half of its adult life on land to study the evolution of blinking. The study, published in an April edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that blinking may be one of the overlooked and yet important traits that allowed for the successful transition to life on land. Simon Sponberg, Dunn Family Associate Professor in the School of Physics and the School of Biological Sciences, was one of the researchers for the study. (The study was also covered in the Los Angeles Times High School Insider.)

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Researchers at Seton Hill University, Pennsylvania State University, and the Georgia Institute of Technology looked to the mudskipper, the amphibious fish that spends more than half of its adult life on land to study the evolution of blinking. The study, published in an April edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests that blinking may be one of the overlooked and yet important traits that allowed for the successful transition to life on land. Simon Sponberg, Dunn Family Associate Professor in the School of Physics and the School of Biological Sciences, was one of the researchers for the study. (The study was also covered in the Los Angeles Times High School Insider.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686582566 2023-06-12 15:09:26 1687281336 2023-06-20 17:15:36 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-10T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[The Sweet Spark of Life: Unmasking the Origins of Earth’s First Sugars]]> 34434 In a study recently published in the journal Chem, respected origin-of-life chemists from Scripps Research and Georgia Tech put forth a new theory about the origin of the first sugars, integral to the evolution of life, on primitive Earth. They postulated that essential sugars required for creating primordial life forms might have been a result of reactions with glyoxylate (C2HO3–), a fairly basic chemical that plausibly existed on Earth before life evolved. The co-author of the study is Charles Liotta, Regents' Professor Emeritus in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

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In a study recently published in the journal Chem, respected origin-of-life chemists from Scripps Research and Georgia Tech put forth a new theory about the origin of the first sugars, integral to the evolution of life, on primitive Earth. They postulated that essential sugars required for creating primordial life forms might have been a result of reactions with glyoxylate (C2HO3–), a fairly basic chemical that plausibly existed on Earth before life evolved. The co-author of the study is Charles Liotta, Regents' Professor Emeritus in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1687273832 2023-06-20 15:10:32 1687273832 2023-06-20 15:10:32 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-19T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[SXSW Panel: Looking to Our Ocean for Climate Solutions]]> 34434 In this panel from SXSW (South By Southwest) 2023 in March, leading ocean experts discussed the ocean’s role in climate, the potential for ocean-based carbon dioxide removal, and a code of conduct for CO2 removal that could maximize collective societal and environmental benefits for our ocean planet. One of the panelists was Susan Lozier, Dean of the College of Sciences, Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair, and professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Lozier, a physical oceanographer, spoke of her research on global currents, particularly the Atlantic Meriodonal Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which brings water from north to south and back in a long cycle within the Atlantic Ocean. 

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In this panel from SXSW (South By Southwest) 2023 in March, leading ocean experts discussed the ocean’s role in climate, the potential for ocean-based carbon dioxide removal, and a code of conduct for CO2 removal that could maximize collective societal and environmental benefits for our ocean planet. One of the panelists was Susan Lozier, Dean of the College of Sciences, Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair, and professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Lozier, a physical oceanographer, spoke of her research on global currents, particularly the Atlantic Meriodonal Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which brings water from north to south and back in a long cycle within the Atlantic Ocean. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686667687 2023-06-13 14:48:07 1686667687 2023-06-13 14:48:07 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-08T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-08T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-08T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Changes in Glaciers and Ice: How Does This Impact Our Climate System?]]> 34434 Ice is an important facet of Earth’s climate system. Since ice affects our climate and sea levels, understanding the way ice sheets develop and change over time helps us better predict the future of our planet. So, what are researchers finding? Alexander Robel, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences who leads the Georgia Tech Ice and Climate Group, joins the Finding Genius podcast to provide updates on the latest research. By studying the causes of ice sheet change, Robel is on a mission to develop conceptual, mathematical, and computational tools to predict future changes.

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Ice is an important facet of Earth’s climate system. Since ice affects our climate and sea levels, understanding the way ice sheets develop and change over time helps us better predict the future of our planet. So, what are researchers finding? Alexander Robel, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences who leads the Georgia Tech Ice and Climate Group, joins the Finding Genius podcast to provide updates on the latest research. By studying the causes of ice sheet change, Robel is on a mission to develop conceptual, mathematical, and computational tools to predict future changes.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686665514 2023-06-13 14:11:54 1686665539 2023-06-13 14:12:19 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-13T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Over 100 Years Later, Astronomers Finally Have a Clear View of Einstein's Wildest Theory]]> 34434 After a three-year hiatus, scientists in the U.S. have just turned on detectors capable of measuring gravitational waves — tiny ripples in space itself that travel through the universe. Unlike light waves, gravitational waves are nearly unimpeded by the galaxies, stars, gas, and dust that fill the universe. This means that by measuring gravitational waves, astrophysicists can peek directly into the heart of some of these most spectacular phenomena in the universe. Since 2020, the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory — commonly known as LIGO— has been sitting dormant while it underwent some exciting upgrades. These improvements will significantly boost the sensitivity of LIGO and should allow the facility to observe more-distant objects that produce smaller ripples in spacetime. Faculty and students in the School of Physics and Georgia Tech's Center for Relativistic Astrophysics were part of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration when the observatory made the first direct observation of gravitational waves. Laura Cadonati, professor in the School of Physics and associate dean for Research in the College of Sciences, served as LIGO deputy spokesperson and was on its data analysis team.

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After a three-year hiatus, scientists in the U.S. have just turned on detectors capable of measuring gravitational waves — tiny ripples in space itself that travel through the universe. Unlike light waves, gravitational waves are nearly unimpeded by the galaxies, stars, gas, and dust that fill the universe. This means that by measuring gravitational waves, astrophysicists can peek directly into the heart of some of these most spectacular phenomena in the universe. Since 2020, the Laser Interferometric Gravitational-Wave Observatory — commonly known as LIGO— has been sitting dormant while it underwent some exciting upgrades. These improvements will significantly boost the sensitivity of LIGO and should allow the facility to observe more-distant objects that produce smaller ripples in spacetime. Faculty and students in the School of Physics and Georgia Tech's Center for Relativistic Astrophysics were part of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration when the observatory made the first direct observation of gravitational waves. Laura Cadonati, professor in the School of Physics and associate dean for Research in the College of Sciences, served as LIGO deputy spokesperson and was on its data analysis team.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686600857 2023-06-12 20:14:17 1686600857 2023-06-12 20:14:17 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-28T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-28T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-28T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Valedictorians clear-eyed about country’s problems, but remain optimistic]]> 34434 As the Class of 2023 puts high school in its rearview mirror, graduates will go out into the world and wrestle with some of the same problems that their parents’ and grandparents’ generations have. But, in addition to racism and environmental crises, metro Atlanta valedictorians say they expect their generation to face new challenges, such as the ones brought on by rapid technological advances. Whether the problems are old or new, the top students at area schools are confident their peers will bring a new mindset when searching for solutions. Duluth High School’s Hiteshri V. Chudasama, who will be studying biology at Georgia Tech, expects one of the primary issues for the Class of 2023 will be “battling boundaries regarding social media and AI.”

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As the Class of 2023 puts high school in its rearview mirror, graduates will go out into the world and wrestle with some of the same problems that their parents’ and grandparents’ generations have. But, in addition to racism and environmental crises, metro Atlanta valedictorians say they expect their generation to face new challenges, such as the ones brought on by rapid technological advances. Whether the problems are old or new, the top students at area schools are confident their peers will bring a new mindset when searching for solutions. Duluth High School’s Hiteshri V. Chudasama, who will be studying biology at Georgia Tech, expects one of the primary issues for the Class of 2023 will be “battling boundaries regarding social media and AI.”

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686599966 2023-06-12 19:59:26 1686599966 2023-06-12 19:59:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-19T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Restoring Coastal Ecosystems to Mitigate Climate Change]]> 34434 Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Yale University are proposing a novel pathway through which coastal ecosystem restoration can permanently capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Seagrass and mangroves – known as blue carbon ecosystems – naturally capture carbon through photosynthesis, which converts carbon dioxide into living tissue. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, was a researcher for the study. 

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Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology and Yale University are proposing a novel pathway through which coastal ecosystem restoration can permanently capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Seagrass and mangroves – known as blue carbon ecosystems – naturally capture carbon through photosynthesis, which converts carbon dioxide into living tissue. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, was a researcher for the study. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686584487 2023-06-12 15:41:27 1686584487 2023-06-12 15:41:27 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-10T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Bacteria-phage coevolution with a seed bank]]> 34434 Dormancy is an adaptation to living in fluctuating environments. It allows individuals to enter a reversible state of reduced metabolic activity when challenged by unfavorable conditions. Dormancy can also influence species interactions by providing organisms with a refuge from predators and parasites. This study tests the hypothesis that, by generating a seed bank of protected individuals, dormancy can modify the patterns and processes of antagonistic coevolution. The study's researchers include Joshua Weitz, professor and Tom and Marie Patton Chair in the School of Biological Sciences, Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences, and Blaise Pascal International Chair of Excellence at the Ecole Normale Superieure; and Andreea Magalie, Ph.D. Quantitative Biosciences student in the School of Biological Sciences. 

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Dormancy is an adaptation to living in fluctuating environments. It allows individuals to enter a reversible state of reduced metabolic activity when challenged by unfavorable conditions. Dormancy can also influence species interactions by providing organisms with a refuge from predators and parasites. This study tests the hypothesis that, by generating a seed bank of protected individuals, dormancy can modify the patterns and processes of antagonistic coevolution. The study's researchers include Joshua Weitz, professor and Tom and Marie Patton Chair in the School of Biological Sciences, Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences, and Blaise Pascal International Chair of Excellence at the Ecole Normale Superieure; and Andreea Magalie, Ph.D. Quantitative Biosciences student in the School of Biological Sciences. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686583348 2023-06-12 15:22:28 1686583348 2023-06-12 15:22:28 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-07T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-07T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[In New Paradox, Black Holes Appear to Evade Heat Death]]> 34434 In this story about the puzzling behavior that goes on inside black holes, Quanta Magazine uses the 2017 first-ever image of the black hole at the heart of the M87 galaxy captured by an Event Horizon Telescope research team. That team included EHT founding members Feryal Özel, professor and chair of the School of Physics, and Dimitrios Psaltis, a professor in the School. The story also includes the recent machine learning-enhanced version of the image. 

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In this story about the puzzling behavior that goes on inside black holes, Quanta Magazine uses the 2017 first-ever image of the black hole at the heart of the M87 galaxy captured by an Event Horizon Telescope research team. That team included EHT founding members Feryal Özel, professor and chair of the School of Physics, and Dimitrios Psaltis, a professor in the School. The story also includes the recent machine learning-enhanced version of the image. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1686579600 2023-06-12 14:20:00 1686579600 2023-06-12 14:20:00 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-06T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-06T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-06T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Space salads and salty waters]]> 34434 The Planetary Society has announced the second round of winners of its Science and Technology Empowered by the Public (STEP) grant program, in which society members and donors have crowdfunded science and technology projects that advance space science and exploration. A winner of a 2023 STEP grant is a team led by Dartmouth College, which was awarded for their project to study small, extremely salty lakes in British Columbia, Canada, that may be analogous to ancient Mars as well as some of the Solar System’s ocean moons, places of key interest in the search for life. A member of that research team is Emily Hughes, a graduate student in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

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The Planetary Society has announced the second round of winners of its Science and Technology Empowered by the Public (STEP) grant program, in which society members and donors have crowdfunded science and technology projects that advance space science and exploration. A winner of a 2023 STEP grant is a team led by Dartmouth College, which was awarded for their project to study small, extremely salty lakes in British Columbia, Canada, that may be analogous to ancient Mars as well as some of the Solar System’s ocean moons, places of key interest in the search for life. A member of that research team is Emily Hughes, a graduate student in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685975609 2023-06-05 14:33:29 1685975609 2023-06-05 14:33:29 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-31T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-31T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-31T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Restoring coastal ecosystems can mitigate climate change]]> 34434 Excess greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, are a major driver of climate change. Mitigating climate change in the future will require both decarbonization — such as transitioning to renewable energy sources — and carbon dioxide removal, which involves extracting already existing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. A recent study led by Georgia Tech and Yale University has proposed a unique approach to permanently capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through coastal ecosystem restoration. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is one of the study's authors. (The study was also covered in ScienceDaily.)

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Excess greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, are a major driver of climate change. Mitigating climate change in the future will require both decarbonization — such as transitioning to renewable energy sources — and carbon dioxide removal, which involves extracting already existing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. A recent study led by Georgia Tech and Yale University has proposed a unique approach to permanently capture carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through coastal ecosystem restoration. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is one of the study's authors. (The study was also covered in ScienceDaily.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685972615 2023-06-05 13:43:35 1685974747 2023-06-05 14:19:07 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-06-01T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Top 5 Technologies That Will Make Mars Habitable]]> 34434 Mars, the fourth planet from the Sun, has long captivated the curiosity of scientists. Some of the most intelligent minds agree that humankind should work towards occupying Mars. And there is a good reason for that. When life on Earth was evolving, Mars was going through significant climate change. Studying the red planet, both its past and present, can help us understand the details of the evolution of Earth and other planets in the solar system. One of the technologies that can help humans establish a base on Mars, fuel-generating microbes, was suggested in a Georgia Tech study led by Pamela Peralta-Yahya, associate professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

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Mars, the fourth planet from the Sun, has long captivated the curiosity of scientists. Some of the most intelligent minds agree that humankind should work towards occupying Mars. And there is a good reason for that. When life on Earth was evolving, Mars was going through significant climate change. Studying the red planet, both its past and present, can help us understand the details of the evolution of Earth and other planets in the solar system. One of the technologies that can help humans establish a base on Mars, fuel-generating microbes, was suggested in a Georgia Tech study led by Pamela Peralta-Yahya, associate professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685468725 2023-05-30 17:45:25 1685468725 2023-05-30 17:45:25 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-27T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Sonification makes astronomy more inclusive and helps scientists fine-tune celestial observations]]> 34434 Technically speaking, there is no noise in deep space. A lack of molecules means there is no medium through which sound waves can travel. Essentially, most of the universe is a giant, near-perfect vacuum. But hot turbulent gas in stars produce internal and surface waves which can be picked up by telescopes. Space telescopes also measure wavelengths of light and send that data back to Earth. Sonification allows the astronomical data transmitted by telescopes to then be turned into sound. Sonification is not only creating greater opportunities for scientific inclusion, but helping astronomers to fine-tune their celestial observations. "The auditory system is a fantastic pattern recognition device. We accomplish speech by listening to changes in a person's voice over time. We can use the same capabilities to listen for changes in a dataset," says Bruce Walker, professor in the School of Psychology and the School of Interactive Computing, and director of Georgia Tech's Sonification Lab

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Technically speaking, there is no noise in deep space. A lack of molecules means there is no medium through which sound waves can travel. Essentially, most of the universe is a giant, near-perfect vacuum. But hot turbulent gas in stars produce internal and surface waves which can be picked up by telescopes. Space telescopes also measure wavelengths of light and send that data back to Earth. Sonification allows the astronomical data transmitted by telescopes to then be turned into sound. Sonification is not only creating greater opportunities for scientific inclusion, but helping astronomers to fine-tune their celestial observations. "The auditory system is a fantastic pattern recognition device. We accomplish speech by listening to changes in a person's voice over time. We can use the same capabilities to listen for changes in a dataset," says Bruce Walker, professor in the School of Psychology and the School of Interactive Computing, and director of Georgia Tech's Sonification Lab

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685463145 2023-05-30 16:12:25 1685463145 2023-05-30 16:12:25 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-22T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-22T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-22T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Tales Of The Tongue ]]> 34434 A small but growing group of researchers is fascinated by an organ we often take for granted. We rarely think about how agile our own tongue needs to be to form words or avoid being bitten while helping us taste and swallow food. But that’s just the start of the tongue’s versatility across the animal kingdom. Without tongues, few if any terrestrial vertebrates could exist. The first of their ancestors to slither out of the water some 400 million years ago found a buffet stocked with new types of foods, but it took a tongue to sample them. The range of foods available to these pioneers broadened as tongues diversified into new, specialized forms — and ultimately took on functions beyond eating. This examination of how animal tongues shaped biological diversity includes  research from David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Physics

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A small but growing group of researchers is fascinated by an organ we often take for granted. We rarely think about how agile our own tongue needs to be to form words or avoid being bitten while helping us taste and swallow food. But that’s just the start of the tongue’s versatility across the animal kingdom. Without tongues, few if any terrestrial vertebrates could exist. The first of their ancestors to slither out of the water some 400 million years ago found a buffet stocked with new types of foods, but it took a tongue to sample them. The range of foods available to these pioneers broadened as tongues diversified into new, specialized forms — and ultimately took on functions beyond eating. This examination of how animal tongues shaped biological diversity includes research from David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Physics

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685462246 2023-05-30 15:57:26 1685462246 2023-05-30 15:57:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-25T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-25T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-25T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[A compendium of bacterial and archaeal single-cell amplified genomes from oxygen deficient marine waters]]> 34434 A major challenge for earth scientists is to understand how oceans respond to decreasing oxygen levels. Areas of low oxygen, oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and anoxic marine zones (AMZs), are predicted to increase in both expanse and frequency in response to climate warming and human modifications of coastal zones. Global warming is causing oxygen-deficient waters to expand and intensify. Therefore, studies focused on microbial communities inhabiting oxygen-deficient regions are necessary to both monitor and model the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystem functions and services. This study presents a compendium of 5,129 single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) from marine environments encompassing representative OMZ and AMZ geochemical profiles. The study's researchers include Frank Stewart, associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Montana State University and an adjunct professor in the School of Biological Sciences

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A major challenge for earth scientists is to understand how oceans respond to decreasing oxygen levels. Areas of low oxygen, oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and anoxic marine zones (AMZs), are predicted to increase in both expanse and frequency in response to climate warming and human modifications of coastal zones. Global warming is causing oxygen-deficient waters to expand and intensify. Therefore, studies focused on microbial communities inhabiting oxygen-deficient regions are necessary to both monitor and model the impacts of climate change on marine ecosystem functions and services. This study presents a compendium of 5,129 single-cell amplified genomes (SAGs) from marine environments encompassing representative OMZ and AMZ geochemical profiles. The study's researchers include Frank Stewart, associate professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Montana State University and an adjunct professor in the School of Biological Sciences

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685461570 2023-05-30 15:46:10 1685461570 2023-05-30 15:46:10 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-27T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[You may have missed… octopus stripes are unique; plant health detecting patch; how to make the best kimchi]]> 34434 Fermented foods like kimchi have been an integral part of Korean cuisine for thousands of years. Today, most kimchi is made through mass fermentation in glass, steel, or plastic containers, but it’s long been claimed that the highest quality kimchi is fermented in traditional handmade clay jars called onggi. David Hu, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the Georgia W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, used fluid dynamics to prove how onggi make kimchi taste so good. The results were published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface(This story was also covered in list23, SFGateThe Washington PostScientific AmericanGulf News, Yahoo!NewsArs Technica and Technology Networks.)

 

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Fermented foods like kimchi have been an integral part of Korean cuisine for thousands of years. Today, most kimchi is made through mass fermentation in glass, steel, or plastic containers, but it’s long been claimed that the highest quality kimchi is fermented in traditional handmade clay jars called onggi. David Hu, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the Georgia W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, used fluid dynamics to prove how onggi make kimchi taste so good. The results were published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface. (This story was also covered in list23SFGateThe Washington PostScientific AmericanGulf News, Yahoo!NewsArs Technica and Technology Networks.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681738684 2023-04-17 13:38:04 1685457613 2023-05-30 14:40:13 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-17T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Zoo’s bird-feeder-like device encourages gorillas to forage for snacks]]> 34434 A team of mechanical engineering students and alumni at Georgia Tech began developing and testing ForageFeeder, a $400 machine partly inspired by deer feeders that can disperse gorillas’ their meals at random intervals and locations throughout the day. Much like modern humans, zoo animals frequently deal with obesity due to a lack of activity. Tools and techniques such as the ForageFeeder not only promote Zoo Atlanta gorillas’ movement, but better simulate their natural foraging world. David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences, the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, and the School of Physics, was faculty advisor for this project. (Read more about the story here.) 

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A team of mechanical engineering students and alumni at Georgia Tech began developing and testing ForageFeeder, a $400 machine partly inspired by deer feeders that can disperse gorillas’ their meals at random intervals and locations throughout the day. Much like modern humans, zoo animals frequently deal with obesity due to a lack of activity. Tools and techniques such as the ForageFeeder not only promote Zoo Atlanta gorillas’ movement, but better simulate their natural foraging world. David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences, the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, and the School of Physics, was faculty advisor for this project. (Read more about the story here.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685457117 2023-05-30 14:31:57 1685457117 2023-05-30 14:31:57 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-26T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[An Experiment Repeated 600 Times Finds Hints to Evolution’s Secrets]]> 34434 Precisely how multicellular organisms evolved from single-celled ancestors remains poorly understood. The transition happened hundreds of millions of years ago, and early multicellular species are largely lost to extinction. To investigate how multicellular life evolves from scratch, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology decided to take evolution into their own hands. Led by William Ratcliff, associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences and director of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, a team of researchers has initiated the first long-term evolution experiment aimed at evolving new kinds of multicellular organisms from single-celled ancestors in the lab. In this case, the cells are snowflake yeast, and they grew so large they could be seen with the naked eye. Other researchers include Ozan Bozdag, research scientist, School of Biological Sciences; Seyed Alireza Zamani Dahaj, computational biologist, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, and the School of Physics; Thomas C. Day, Ph.D. candidate, School of Physics, and Peter Yunker, associate professor, School of Physics.  Anthony J. Burnetti, research scientist; Penelope Kahn, research technician; Dung T. Lac, research technician; Kai Tong, postdoctoral scholar; and Peter Conlin, postdoctoral scholar, are all from the School of Biological Sciences. (This story is also covered at ScienceAlert, NPR, Interesting EngineeringNew Atlas, Newswise, and Tech Explorist. Read more about the research here.)

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Precisely how multicellular organisms evolved from single-celled ancestors remains poorly understood. The transition happened hundreds of millions of years ago, and early multicellular species are largely lost to extinction. To investigate how multicellular life evolves from scratch, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology decided to take evolution into their own hands. Led by William Ratcliff, associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences and director of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, a team of researchers has initiated the first long-term evolution experiment aimed at evolving new kinds of multicellular organisms from single-celled ancestors in the lab. In this case, the cells are snowflake yeast, and they grew so large they could be seen with the naked eye. Other researchers include Ozan Bozdag, research scientist, School of Biological Sciences; Seyed Alireza Zamani Dahaj, computational biologist, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, and the School of Physics; Thomas C. Day, Ph.D. candidate, School of Physics, and Peter Yunker, associate professor, School of Physics.  Anthony J. Burnetti, research scientist; Penelope Kahn, research technician; Dung T. Lac, research technician; Kai Tong, postdoctoral scholar; and Peter Conlin, postdoctoral scholar, are all from the School of Biological Sciences. (This story was also covered at ScienceAlert, NPRInteresting Engineering, New AtlasNewswise, and Tech Explorist. Read more about the research here.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1683828188 2023-05-11 18:03:08 1685456350 2023-05-30 14:19:10 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-10T00:00:00-04:00 670842 image <![CDATA[A snowflake-y clump of yeast cells]]> image/png 1684440056 2023-05-18 20:00:56 1684440056 2023-05-18 20:00:56
<![CDATA[That Famous Black Hole Just Got Even Darker]]> 34434 This story about an AI enhancement of the famous 2018 photo of the first-ever image of a black hole — captured by the Event Horizon Telescope featuring EHT founding members and School of Physics professors Feryal Ozel (also school chair) and Dimitrios Psaltis — is also covered in Scientific American, Ars Technica, The Washington Post, Phys.org, NPR, Sky News, MSN, USA Today, Yahoo!News, CBS News, Space.com, The Associated Press,   LiveScience, Smithsonian Magazine, Economic Times, Voice of America News, and UK Daily Mail

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This story about an AI enhancement of the famous 2018 photo of the first-ever image of a black hole — captured by the Event Horizon Telescope featuring EHT founding members and School of Physics professors Feryal Ozel (also school chair) and Dimitrios Psaltis — is also covered in Scientific American, Ars Technica, The Washington Post, Phys.org, NPR, Sky News, MSN, USA Today, Yahoo!News, CBS News, Space.com, The Associated Press,   LiveScience, Smithsonian Magazine, Economic Times, Voice of America News, and UK Daily Mail

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1685114329 2023-05-26 15:18:49 1685114329 2023-05-26 15:18:49 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Leidos CEO Roger Krone Looks Back On A Stellar Career, And Reflects On What He Has Learned]]> 34434 The Roger A. and Helen B. Krone Engineering Biosystems Building (EBB) at Georgia Tech is an interdisciplinary facility for researchers from biology, chemistry, and engineering, all working to elevate understanding of living systems and bring about new cures for diseases. The facility houses the Children’s Pediatric Technology Center, a research partnership with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University. This Forbes profile of alumni Roger A. Krone, who is retiring as CEO of information systems provider Leidos, looks back on his business career and his ability to adapt to changing times. 

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The Roger A. and Helen B. Krone Engineering Biosystems Building (EBB) at Georgia Tech is an interdisciplinary facility for researchers from biology, chemistry, and engineering, all working to elevate understanding of living systems and bring about new cures for diseases. The facility houses the Children’s Pediatric Technology Center, a research partnership with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University. This Forbes profile of alumni Roger A. Krone, who is retiring as CEO of government information system provider Leidos, looks back on his business career and his ability to adapt to changing times. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1684872124 2023-05-23 20:02:04 1684872124 2023-05-23 20:02:04 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech drives effort to land $500M clean energy hub]]> 34434 A group including Georgia Tech is pursuing up to $500 million for a new regional hub focused on clean energy manufacturing, an industry bringing thousands of jobs to the state. The plan is to apply for the Regional Technology and Innovation Hubs program, federal funding to build tech hubs in key U.S. regions. The process could open this summer and is expected to be highly competitive. The idea is to create additional areas of tech expertise in the country, similar to Silicon Valley or Seattle, said Julia Kubanek, vice president of Interdisciplinary Research, and a professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. It could bring more economic development and secure a more reliable domestic supply chain, Kubanek added.

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A group including Georgia Tech is pursuing up to $500 million for a new regional hub focused on clean energy manufacturing, an industry bringing thousands of jobs to the state. The plan is to apply for the Regional Technology and Innovation Hubs program, federal funding to build tech hubs in key U.S. regions. The process could open this summer and is expected to be highly competitive. The idea is to create additional areas of tech expertise in the country, similar to Silicon Valley or Seattle, said Julia Kubanek, vice president of Interdisciplinary Research, and a professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. It could bring more economic development and secure a more reliable domestic supply chain, Kubanek added.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1684867776 2023-05-23 18:49:36 1684867776 2023-05-23 18:49:36 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-03T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-03T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-03T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[New Proof Finds the ‘Ultimate Instability’ in a Solar System Model]]> 34434 In most of the numerical simulations that depicted the motions of the solar system's planets in the future, everything proceeded as expected. But in one percent of those simulations, things when literally sideways — thanks to Mercury's orbit flattening, causing chaos to other planet's orbits. Perhaps the solar system was not as stable as people once thought. For centuries, ever since Isaac Newton formulated his laws of motion and gravity, mathematicians and astronomers have grappled with this issue. Now, in three research papers, a trio of scientists have proved for the first time that instability inevitably arises in a model of planets orbiting a sun. Rafael de la Llave, a professor in the School of Mathematics whose speciality is dynamical systems, didn't work on the research papers but is quoted in the article. 


 

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In most of the numerical simulations that depicted the motions of the solar system's planets in the future, everything proceeded as expected. But in one percent of those simulations, things when literally sideways — thanks to Mercury's orbit flattening, causing chaos to other planet's orbits. Perhaps the solar system was not as stable as people once thought. For centuries, ever since Isaac Newton formulated his laws of motion and gravity, mathematicians and astronomers have grappled with this issue. Now, in three research papers, a trio of scientists have proved for the first time that instability inevitably arises in a model of planets orbiting a sun. Rafael de la Llave, a professor in the School of Mathematics whose speciality is dynamical systems, didn't work on the research papers but is quoted in the article. 


 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1684856421 2023-05-23 15:40:21 1684856421 2023-05-23 15:40:21 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-16T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[NASA Selects Five Teams to Study Lunar Science and Sample Analysis]]> 34434 A research team from Georgia Tech is one of five chosen by NASA to collaborate on lunar science and lunar sample analysis research to support future exploration of the Moon as part of the agency’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI will support each of the new teams for five years at about $1.5 million per year, jointly funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and Exploration Systems Development Mission Directorate. The Center for Lunar Environment and Volatile Exploration Research (CLEVER) is led by Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry with an adjunct appointment in the School of Physics, The team will characterize the lunar environment and volatile inventories required for near-term sustained human exploration of the Moon. Orlando is principal investigator for another lunar-related research team, Radiation Effects on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces (REVEALS), which is also a part of SSERVI. (Read more about this story here. This story was also covered at Newswise and SpaceRef.com)

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A research team from Georgia Tech is one of five chosen by NASA to collaborate on lunar science and lunar sample analysis research to support future exploration of the Moon as part of the agency’s Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI). SSERVI will support each of the new teams for five years at about $1.5 million per year, jointly funded by NASA’s Science Mission Directorate and Exploration Systems Development Mission Directorate. The Center for Lunar Environment and Volatile Exploration Research (CLEVER) is led by Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry with an adjunct appointment in the School of Physics, The team will characterize the lunar environment and volatile inventories required for near-term sustained human exploration of the Moon. Orlando is principal investigator for another lunar-related research team, Radiation Effects on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces (REVEALS), which is also a part of SSERVI. (Read more about this story here. This story was also covered at Newswise and SpaceRef.com)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1684164233 2023-05-15 15:23:53 1684786558 2023-05-22 20:15:58 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-11T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-11T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-11T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[A science news roundup with Short Wave]]> 34434 NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Regina Barber and Emily Kwong, hosts of the Short Wave podcast, about the top science stories of the week, including the mysteries of multicellular organisms as researched by William Ratcliff, associate professor and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences program in the School of Biological Sciences. Ratcliff and several colleagues, including research scientist Ozan Bozdag, used snowflake yeast to initiate the first long-term evolution experiment aimed at evolving new kinds of multicellular organisms from single-celled ancestors in the lab. Other College of Sciences researchers involved include Seyed Alireza Zamani Dahaj, computational biologist, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, and the School of PhysicsThomas C. Day, Ph.D. candidate, School of Physics, and Peter Yunker, associate professor, School of Physics.  Anthony J. Burnetti, research scientist; Penelope Kahn, research technician; Dung T. Lac, research technician; Kai Tong, postdoctoral scholar; and Peter Conlin, postdoctoral scholar, are all from the School of Biological Sciences. (This segment was also run on Connecticut Public Radio and Georgia Public Broadcasting.) 

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NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with Regina Barber and Emily Kwong, hosts of the Short Wave podcast, about the top science stories of the week, including the mysteries of multicellular organisms as researched by William Ratcliff, associate professor and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences program in the School of Biological Sciences. Ratcliff and several colleagues, including research scientist Ozan Bozdag, used snowflake yeast to initiate the first long-term evolution experiment aimed at evolving new kinds of multicellular organisms from single-celled ancestors in the lab. Other College of Sciences researchers involved include Seyed Alireza Zamani Dahaj, computational biologist, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, and the School of PhysicsThomas C. Day, Ph.D. candidate, School of Physics, and Peter Yunker, associate professor, School of Physics.  Anthony J. Burnetti, research scientist; Penelope Kahn, research technician; Dung T. Lac, research technician; Kai Tong, postdoctoral scholar; and Peter Conlin, postdoctoral scholar, are all from the School of Biological Sciences. (This segment was also run on Connecticut Public Radio and Georgia Public Broadcasting.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1684527816 2023-05-19 20:23:36 1684764318 2023-05-22 14:05:18 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-18T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Stride and Ocean Visions Building Ocean Sustainability World Project in Minecraft]]> 34434 Digital learning provider Stride has announced a partnership with nonprofit research network Ocean Visions to build instructional content for Minecraft: Education Edition to teach students about the science of oceans and support the goals of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, according to a news release. Ocean Visions selected Stride to be its lead education partner as it ramps up efforts to introduce students around the globe to the nonprofit’s Global Ecosystem for Ocean Solutions Decade Programme, or GEOS, through Minecraft. The new content will also be embedded within Stride’s curriculum. Annalisa Bracco, professor and Associate Chair for Research in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is on the Ocean Visions Network's leadership team. 

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Digital learning provider Stride has announced a partnership with nonprofit research network Ocean Visions to build instructional content for Minecraft: Education Edition to teach students about the science of oceans and support the goals of the United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development, according to a news release. Ocean Visions selected Stride to be its lead education partner as it ramps up efforts to introduce students around the globe to the nonprofit’s Global Ecosystem for Ocean Solutions Decade Programme, or GEOS, through Minecraft. The new content will also be embedded within Stride’s curriculum. Annalisa Bracco, professor and Associate Chair for Research in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is on the Ocean Visions Network's leadership team. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1684161761 2023-05-15 14:42:41 1684161761 2023-05-15 14:42:41 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-14T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-14T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-14T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[One of Evolution’s Biggest Moments Was Recreated in a Year]]> 34434 The Atlantic's Pulitzer Prize-winning staff writer Ed Yong writes about the unique experiment involving snowflake yeast conducted by Georgia Tech researchers that shows how multicellular organisms might have evolved from single-celled ancestors. The study, published recently in Nature, provided new insight into how "that change from micro to macro, from one cell to many, was one of the most pivotal evolutionary journeys in Earth’s history." William Ratcliff, associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences program led the research team. Other researchers include Ozan Bozdag, research scientist, School of Biological Sciences; Seyed Alireza Zamani Dahaj, computational biologist, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, and the School of PhysicsThomas C. Day, Ph.D. candidate, School of Physics, and Peter Yunker, associate professor, School of Physics.  Anthony J. Burnetti, research scientist; Penelope Kahn, research technician; Dung T. Lac, research technician; Kai Tong, postdoctoral scholar; and Peter Conlin, postdoctoral scholar, are all from the School of Biological Sciences. (Atlantic subscription required; read more about the research here.)

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The Atlantic's Pulitzer Prize-winning staff writer Ed Yong writes about the unique snowflake yeast experiment conducted by Georgia Tech researchers that shows how multicellular organisms might have evolved from single-celled ancestors. The study, published recently in Nature, provided new insight into how "that change from micro to macro, from one cell to many, was one of the most pivotal evolutionary journeys in Earth’s history." William Ratcliff, associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences program led the research team. Other researchers include Ozan Bozdag, research scientist, School of Biological Sciences; Seyed Alireza Zamani Dahaj, computational biologist, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences, and the School of PhysicsThomas C. Day, Ph.D. candidate, School of Physics, and Peter Yunker, associate professor, School of Physics.  Anthony J. Burnetti, research scientist; Penelope Kahn, research technician; Dung T. Lac, research technician; Kai Tong, postdoctoral scholar; and Peter Conlin, postdoctoral scholar, are all from the School of Biological Sciences. ((Atlantic subscription required; read more about the research here.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1683915231 2023-05-12 18:13:51 1684158069 2023-05-15 13:41:09 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-12T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[The Oceans Are Missing Their Rivers]]> 34434 In a rhythm that’s pulsed through epochs, a river’s plume carries sediment and nutrients from the continental interior into the ocean, a major exchange of resources from land to sea. More than 6,000 rivers worldwide surge freshwater into oceans, delivering nutrients, including nitrogen and phosphorus, that feed phytoplankton, generating a bloom of life that in turn feeds progressively larger creatures. They may even influence ocean currents in ways researchers are just starting to understand. But today, in rivers around the world, humans are altering this critical phenomenon. In many places, the culprit is a dam. Researchers led by Annalisa Bracco, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, investigated these dynamics in a study of the plume created by the Mekong River, the 12th-longest river in the world. The study found that current and proposed Mekong River dams will dramatically reduce its annual mean flow, its seasonal cycle, and sediment loading. The scientists argue that a reduced productivity of the offshore water of the South China Sea along the pathway of the summer jet may be an undesirable outcome as well. Other EAS researchers in the study are Xiyuan Zeng, graduate student, and Filippos Tagklis, postdoctoral scholar. 

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In a rhythm that’s pulsed through epochs, a river’s plume carries sediment and nutrients from the continental interior into the ocean, a major exchange of resources from land to sea. More than 6,000 rivers worldwide surge freshwater into oceans, delivering nutrients, including nitrogen and phosphorus, that feed phytoplankton, generating a bloom of life that in turn feeds progressively larger creatures. They may even influence ocean currents in ways researchers are just starting to understand. But today, in rivers around the world, humans are altering this critical phenomenon. In many places, the culprit is a dam. Researchers led by Annalisa Bracco, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, investigated these dynamics in a study of the plume created by the Mekong River, the 12th-longest river in the world. The study found that current and proposed Mekong River dams will dramatically reduce its annual mean flow, its seasonal cycle, and sediment loading. The scientists argue that a reduced productivity of the offshore water of the South China Sea along the pathway of the summer jet may be an undesirable outcome as well. Other EAS researchers in the study are Xiyuan Zeng, graduate student, and Filippos Tagklis, postdoctoral scholar. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1683561792 2023-05-08 16:03:12 1683561792 2023-05-08 16:03:12 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-03T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Application of a quantitative framework to improve the accuracy of a bacterial infection model]]> 34434 Model systems are a cornerstone of microbiology. However, despite microbiology’s heavy reliance on laboratory models, these systems are typically not analyzed systematically to improve their relevance. This limitation is a primary challenge to understand microbes’ physiology in natural environments. This study, which includes members of Georgia Tech's Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection (CMDI), provides a proof of concept for generalizable approaches for model improvement using transcriptomic data of the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis. The study's researchers include Marvin Whiteley, professor in the School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Tech Bennie H. and Nelson D. Abell Chair in Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, and Co-Director, Emory-Children’s Cystic Fibrosis Center; Other School of Biological Sciences and CMDI researchers include Gina R. Lewin, postdoctoral scholar, and research scientists Daniel Cornforth and Francis Diggle

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Model systems are a cornerstone of microbiology. However, despite microbiology’s heavy reliance on laboratory models, these systems are typically not analyzed systematically to improve their relevance. This limitation is a primary challenge to understand microbes’ physiology in natural environments. This study, which includes members of Georgia Tech's Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection (CMDI), provides a proof of concept for generalizable approaches for model improvement using transcriptomic data of the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa from sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis. The study's researchers include Marvin Whiteley, professor in the School of Biological Sciences, Georgia Tech Bennie H. and Nelson D. Abell Chair in Molecular and Cellular Biology, Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, and Co-Director, Emory-Children’s Cystic Fibrosis Center; Other School of Biological Sciences and CMDI researchers include Gina R. Lewin, postdoctoral scholar, and research scientists Daniel Cornforth and Francis Diggle

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1683558666 2023-05-08 15:11:06 1683558666 2023-05-08 15:11:06 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-01T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Top 6 Science Facts for Star Wars Day]]> 34434 On May the Fourth, a.k.a. Star Wars Day, Discover took a look at the science behind Georgia Lucas' pop culture phenomenon. It cited a previous Georgia Tech story that quizzed faculty about various aspects of the movie franchise, including A. Nepomuk Otte, professor in the School of Physics, and his argument that The Force ignores a central pillar of physics by acting in a one-sided manner, as when Yoda raised Luke's X-wing fighter from the Dagobah swamp. “Didn't we learn from physics classes about Newton’s third law?” Otte said in the story. “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. So why doesn't the little fella get squished like a mosquito?” 

 

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On May the Fourth, a.k.a. Star Wars Day, Discover took a look at the science behind Georgia Lucas' pop culture phenomenon. It cited a previous Georgia Tech story that quizzed faculty about various aspects of the movie franchise, including A. Nepomuk Otte, professor in the School of Physics, and his argument that The Force ignores a central pillar of physics by acting in a one-sided manner, as when Yoda raised Luke's X-wing fighter from the Dagobah swamp. “Didn't we learn from physics classes about Newton’s third law?” Otte said in the story. “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. So why doesn't the little fella get squished like a mosquito?” 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1683556076 2023-05-08 14:27:56 1683556076 2023-05-08 14:27:56 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-05-04T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-04T00:00:00-04:00 2023-05-04T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Mudskippers could be key to understanding evolution of blinking]]> 34434 Blinking is crucial for the eye. It's how animals clean their eyes, protect them, and even communicate. But how and why did blinking originate? Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Seton Hill University, and Pennsylvania State University studied the mudskipper, an amphibious fish that spends most of its day on land, to better understand why blinking is a fundamental behavior for life on land. By comparing the anatomy and behavior of mudskippers to the fossil record of early tetrapods, the researchers argue that blinking emerged in both groups as an adaptation to life on land. One  of the researchers, Brett Aiello, an assistant professor of biology at Seton Hill University, is a former postdoctoral fellow in the Agile Systems Lab at Georgia Tech. Saad Bhamla, assistant professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is a co-author of the study. (This story is also covered in Earth.comSciTechDaily and the Latrobe Bulletin.) 

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Blinking is crucial for the eye. It's how animals clean their eyes, protect them, and even communicate. But how and why did blinking originate? Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Seton Hill University, and Pennsylvania State University studied the mudskipper, an amphibious fish that spends most of its day on land, to better understand why blinking is a fundamental behavior for life on land. By comparing the anatomy and behavior of mudskippers to the fossil record of early tetrapods, the researchers argue that blinking emerged in both groups as an adaptation to life on land. One  of the researchers, Brett Aiello, an assistant professor of biology at Seton Hill University, is a former postdoctoral fellow in the Agile Systems Lab at Georgia Tech. Saad Bhamla, assistant professor in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is a co-author of the study.  (This story is also covered in Earth.comSciTechDaily and the Latrobe Bulletin.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1682950200 2023-05-01 14:10:00 1682955214 2023-05-01 15:33:34 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-23T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-23T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-23T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[New York Climate Exchange Partners on this Historic Venture]]> 34434 More than 40 partners  —  including Georgia Tech and other higher education institutions, non-profits, corporations, community groups, researchers and arts organizations  —  have joined together to collaborate on climate change solutions at The New York Climate Exchange. Georgia Tech is also a leading partner of the Ocean Visions – UN Decade Collaborative Center for Ocean-Climate Solutions, an international center headquartered at the Georgia Aquarium that aims to co-design, develop, test, fund, and deliver scalable and equitable ocean-based solutions to reduce the effects of climate change and build climate-resilient marine ecosystems and coastal communities. Championed at Georgia Tech by Susan Lozier, dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair in the College of Sciences, the Center also supports opportunities to accelerate ocean-based carbon dioxide removal research and advance sustainable ocean economies.

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More than 40 partners  —  including Georgia Tech and other higher education institutions, non-profits, corporations, community groups, researchers and arts organizations  —  have joined together to collaborate on climate change solutions at The New York Climate Exchange. Georgia Tech is also a leading partner of the Ocean Visions – UN Decade Collaborative Center for Ocean-Climate Solutions, an international center headquartered at the Georgia Aquarium that aims to co-design, develop, test, fund, and deliver scalable and equitable ocean-based solutions to reduce the effects of climate change and build climate-resilient marine ecosystems and coastal communities. Championed at Georgia Tech by Susan Lozier, dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair in the College of Sciences, the Center also supports opportunities to accelerate ocean-based carbon dioxide removal research and advance sustainable ocean economies.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1682951875 2023-05-01 14:37:55 1682951875 2023-05-01 14:37:55 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-24T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-24T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-24T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Mixing Surfaces, Algebra, and Geometry]]> 34434 This feature article is a written version of a lecture that Dan Margalit, professor in the School of Mathematics, gave at the 2022 Joint Mathematical Meetings of the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The Society established the Maryam Mirzakhani Lecture in 2018 to honor the memory of Mirzakhani, the first woman and first Iranian to win the Fields Medal, one of the highest honors in math. Margalit writes that on a basic level, Mirzakhani’s work centers around the geometry of surfaces, as understood through their simple curves: "Starting from this humble-seeming topic, Mirzakhani made surprising and sweeping connections between numerous fields of mathematics, including algebraic geometry, Teichmüller theory, moduli spaces, dynamics, homogeneous spaces, symplectic geometry, and billiards."

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This feature article is a written version of a lecture that Dan Margalit, professor in the School of Mathematics, gave at the 2022 Joint Mathematical Meetings of the American Mathematical Society (AMS). The Society established the Maryam Mirzakhani Lecture in 2018 to honor the memory of Mirzakhani, the first woman and first Iranian to win the Fields Medal, one of the highest honors in math. Margalit writes that on a basic level, Mirzakhani’s work centers around the geometry of surfaces, as understood through their simple curves: "Starting from this humble-seeming topic, Mirzakhani made surprising and sweeping connections between numerous fields of mathematics, including algebraic geometry, Teichmüller theory, moduli spaces, dynamics, homogeneous spaces, symplectic geometry, and billiards."

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1682359100 2023-04-24 17:58:20 1682362646 2023-04-24 18:57:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-24T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-24T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-24T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[New APS Leaders Take Office at Inaugural American Physiology Summit]]> 34434 Karla Haack, who received her Ph.D. in 2009 in molecular biology from the School of Biological Sciences, and is a member of the College of Sciences Advisory Board, is one of five new 2023-2024 member leaders of the American Physiological Society (APS). Haack, a medical writer for Merck, was elected as a councilor during the recent APS Summit in Long Beach, California. Prior to joining Merck in 2021, Haack taught anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology courses at Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia. Haack completed her postdoctoral research at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

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Karla Haack, who received her Ph.D. in 2009 in molecular biology from the School of Biological Sciences, and is a member of the College of Sciences Advisory Board, is one of five new 2023-2024 member leaders of the American Physiological Society (APS). Haack, a medical writer for Merck, was elected as a councilor during the recent APS Summit in Long Beach, California. Prior to joining Merck in 2021, Haack taught anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology courses at Kennesaw State University (KSU) in Georgia. Haack completed her postdoctoral research at the University of Nebraska Medical Center.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1682350348 2023-04-24 15:32:28 1682350348 2023-04-24 15:32:28 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-23T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-23T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-23T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Scientists unveil new and improved 'skinny donut' black hole image]]> 34434 The 2019 release of the first image of a black hole, captured by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), was hailed as a significant scientific achievement. But truth be told, it was a bit blurry - or, as one astrophysicist involved in the effort called it, a "fuzzy orange donut." Scientists on Thursday unveiled a new and improved image of this black hole - a behemoth at the center of a nearby galaxy - mining the same data used for the earlier one but improving its resolution by employing image reconstruction algorithms to fill in gaps in the original telescope observations. The use of machine learning to improve the photo is detailed in a study in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Two professors in the School of Physics who are EHT founding members — Feryal Ozel, who is also school chair, and Dimitrios Psaltis — are co-authors of the study. (This story was also covered in Space DailyScienceDaily and the Calgary Herald.)

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The 2019 release of the first image of a black hole, captured by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), was hailed as a significant scientific achievement. But truth be told, it was a bit blurry — or, as one astrophysicist involved in the effort called it, a "fuzzy orange donut." Scientists on Thursday unveiled a new and improved image of this black hole — a behemoth at the center of a nearby galaxy — mining the same data used for the earlier one but improving its resolution by employing image reconstruction algorithms to fill in gaps in the original telescope observations. The use of machine learning to improve the photo is detailed in a study in the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Two professors in the School of Physics who are EHT founding members — Feryal Ozel, who is also school chair, and Dimitrios Psaltis — are co-authors of the study. (This story was also covered in Space DailyScienceDaily and the Calgary Herald.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681739864 2023-04-17 13:57:44 1682347623 2023-04-24 14:47:03 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Studying the nature of the earth — under earthquakes]]> 34434 In February, the countries of Turkey and Syria were devastated by a pair of high-magnitude earthquakes occurring nine hours apart. The two events, 7.8- and 7.5-magnitudes respectively, caused thousands of deaths and widespread destruction of infrastructure. Both occurred along the East Anatolian fault, one of Turkey’s two main earthquake zones. A team of scientists from Georgia Tech, the University of Missouri, and the Scientific and Technological Research Institution of Turkey (TUBITAK) are working to better understand the makeup of the earthquake zone and surrounding areas to help scientists better explain why February’s earthquakes were unusually intense. Zhigang Peng, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, will join colleagues in placing 250 autonomous, wireless sensors near the fault. (This story was also covered in the Columbia Daily Tribune.)

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In February, the countries of Turkey and Syria were devastated by a pair of high-magnitude earthquakes occurring nine hours apart. The two events, 7.8- and 7.5-magnitudes respectively, caused thousands of deaths and widespread destruction of infrastructure. Both occurred along the East Anatolian fault, one of Turkey’s two main earthquake zones. A team of scientists from Georgia Tech, the University of Missouri, and the Scientific and Technological Research Institution of Turkey (TUBITAK) are working to better understand the makeup of the earthquake zone and surrounding areas to help scientists better explain why February’s earthquakes were unusually intense. Zhigang Peng, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, will join colleagues in placing 250 autonomous, wireless sensors near the fault. (This story was also covered in the Columbia Daily Tribune.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681740608 2023-04-17 14:10:08 1682346617 2023-04-24 14:30:17 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-12T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-12T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Scientists engineer the first light-powered yeast]]> 34434 Yeast are carb lovers, sustaining themselves by fermenting sugars and starches from sources such as dough, grapes, and grains, with bread, wine, and beer as happy byproducts. Now, researchers have made one type of yeast a little less dependent on carbs by enabling it to use light as energy. The work, reported last week on the preprint server bioRxiv, is “the first step in more complex modes of engineering artificial photosynthesis,” says Magdalena Rose Osburn, a geobiologist at Northwestern University who was not involved in the research. The study's four co-authors are all with the School of Biological Sciences and Georgia Tech's Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection: Ph.D. student Autumn Peterson, senior scientist and grant writer Carina Baskett; Will Ratcliff, associate professor and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences; and research scientist Anthony Burnetti

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Yeast are carb lovers, sustaining themselves by fermenting sugars and starches from sources such as dough, grapes, and grains, with bread, wine, and beer as happy byproducts. Now, researchers have made one type of yeast a little less dependent on carbs by enabling it to use light as energy. The work, reported last week on the preprint server bioRxiv, is “the first step in more complex modes of engineering artificial photosynthesis,” says Magdalena Rose Osburn, a geobiologist at Northwestern University who was not involved in the research. The study's four co-authors are all with the School of Biological Sciences and Georgia Tech's Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection: Ph.D. student Autumn Peterson, senior scientist and grant writer Carina Baskett; Will Ratcliff, associate professor and co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences; and research scientist Anthony Burnetti

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1682345942 2023-04-24 14:19:02 1682345942 2023-04-24 14:19:02 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-18T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-18T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Deep Learning Drives Insights into Protein-Protein Interactions]]> 34434 Life depends on molecular machines made of proteins that interact with each other to form functional complexes. Researchers need accurate descriptions of protein-protein interactions to understand molecular biosystems, but obtaining such descriptions is very challenging, especially for theoretical approaches. Generalizing AlphaFold 2, a powerful deep learning algorithm for predicting protein structures from sequence, researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and Oak Ridge National Laboratory proposed a computational approach, AF2Complex, to not only predict the atomic structural models of interacting proteins, but also to predict whether multiple proteins interact, even if they experience transient interactions that are difficult to capture experimentally. The Georgia Tech School of Biological Sciences researchers are Mu Gao, senior research scientist, and Jeffrey Skolnick, Regents' Professor; Mary and Maisie Gibson Chair & GRA Eminent Scholar in Computational Systems Biology. (Their study is funded in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy and the National Institutes of Health.)

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Life depends on molecular machines made of proteins that interact with each other to form functional complexes. Researchers need accurate descriptions of protein-protein interactions to understand molecular biosystems, but obtaining such descriptions is very challenging, especially for theoretical approaches. Generalizing AlphaFold 2, a powerful deep learning algorithm for predicting protein structures from sequence, researchers at Georgia Institute of Technology and Oak Ridge National Laboratory proposed a computational approach, AF2Complex, to not only predict the atomic structural models of interacting proteins, but also to predict whether multiple proteins interact, even if they experience transient interactions that are difficult to capture experimentally. The Georgia Tech School of Biological Sciences researchers are Mu Gao, senior research scientist, and Jeffrey Skolnick, Regents' Professor; Mary and Maisie Gibson Chair & GRA Eminent Scholar in Computational Systems Biology. (Their study is funded in part by the U.S. Dept. of Energy and the National Institutes of Health.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1682344513 2023-04-24 13:55:13 1682344513 2023-04-24 13:55:13 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-17T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-17T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[The sound of the stars]]> 34434 Understanding the universe isn't just about visually mapping celestial bodies, it's also about listening to the heavens. Data sonification takes astronomical data and turns it into sound. It could help find new patterns in the huge amount of digital information. And it's a way of enhancing astronomy by promoting greater engagement and accessibility — a musical mix of science, art and cold, hard data. Bruce Walker, professor and associate chair for Research in the School of Psychology, with a joint appointment in the School of Interactive Computing, and director of Georgia Tech's Sonification Lab, will join a panel of scientists for an April 15 program on what sonification can add to astronomy. 

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Understanding the universe isn't just about visually mapping celestial bodies, it's also about listening to the heavens. Data sonification takes astronomical data and turns it into sound. It could help find new patterns in the huge amount of digital information. And it's a way of enhancing astronomy by promoting greater engagement and accessibility — a musical mix of science, art and cold, hard data. Bruce Walker, professor in the School of Psychology and the School of Interactive Computing, and director of Georgia Tech's Sonification Lab, joins a panel of scientists for an April 15 program on what sonification can add to astronomy. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681145280 2023-04-10 16:48:00 1681841693 2023-04-18 18:14:53 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[413 Goldwater Scholars Named in 2023]]> 34434 Nadia Qutob, a fourth-year astrophysics undergraduate in the School of Physics, is one of 413 Goldwater Scholarship winners announced by the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. "The Department of Defense’s continued partnership with the Goldwater Foundation ensures we are supporting the development of scientific talent essential to maintaining our nation’s competitive advantage,” said Dr. Jagadeesh Pamulapati, acting deputy director of Research, Technology and Laboratories. Qutob conducts research for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Collaboration at Georgia Tech, and was also a research assistant during the summer of 2022 for the LIGO Collaboration at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Qutob plans to work toward a Ph.D. in astrophysics and ultimately conduct research on observational gravitational wave physics, and also hopes to teach at the university level.

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Nadia Qutob, a fourth-year astrophysics undergraduate in the School of Physics, is one of 413 Goldwater Scholarship winners announced by the Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in Education Foundation. "The Department of Defense’s continued partnership with the Goldwater Foundation ensures we are supporting the development of scientific talent essential to maintaining our nation’s competitive advantage,” said Dr. Jagadeesh Pamulapati, acting deputy director of Research, Technology and Laboratories. Qutob conducts research for the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) Collaboration at Georgia Tech, and was also a research assistant during the summer of 2022 for the LIGO Collaboration at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Qutob plans to work toward a Ph.D. in astrophysics and ultimately conduct research on observational gravitational wave physics, and also hopes to teach at the university level.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681754061 2023-04-17 17:54:21 1681754105 2023-04-17 17:55:05 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-31T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-31T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-31T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Where did the first sugars come from?]]> 34434 Two prominent origin-of-life chemists have published a new hypothesis for how the first sugars — which were necessary for life to evolve — arose on the early Earth. In a paper in the journal Chem, chemists from Scripps Research and the Georgia Institute of Technology propose that key sugars needed for making early life forms could have emerged from reactions involving glyoxylate (C2HO3–), a relatively simple chemical that plausibly existed on the Earth before life evolved. Charles Liotta, Regents' Professor Emeritus in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is one of the study's authors. (This study was also covered in Astrobiology and Mirage News.)

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Two prominent origin-of-life chemists have published a new hypothesis for how the first sugars — which were necessary for life to evolve — arose on the early Earth. In a paper in the journal Chem, chemists from Scripps Research and the Georgia Institute of Technology propose that key sugars needed for making early life forms could have emerged from reactions involving glyoxylate (C2HO3–), a relatively simple chemical that plausibly existed on the Earth before life evolved. Charles Liotta, Regents' Professor Emeritus in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, is one of the study's authors. (This study was also covered in Astrobiology and Mirage News.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681744461 2023-04-17 15:14:21 1681752071 2023-04-17 17:21:11 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-13T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[30 Under 30 Women in Psychedelics]]> 34434 College of Sciences alumna Natalie Lembeck ('15 Psychology) is included in Psychedelic Spotlight's 30 Under 30 feature on rising stars in the psychedelic field, as they work towards psychedelic legalization and decriminalization, research discoveries, harm reduction, and adequate mental health care. Lembeck has worked in labs and clinics involved in Multidisciplinary Association of Psychedelic Studies-sponsored research, focusing on the use of cannabis and MDMA to aid in the treatment of PTSD. She currently works as the executive assistant to Dr. Michael Mithoefer, clinical researcher and psychotherapist. 

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College of Sciences alumna Natalie Lembeck ('15 Psychology) is included in Psychedelic Spotlight's 30 Under 30 feature on rising stars in the psychedelic field, as they work towards psychedelic legalization and decriminalization, research discoveries, harm reduction, and adequate mental health care. Lembeck has worked in labs and clinics involved in Multidisciplinary Association of Psychedelic Studies-sponsored research, focusing on the use of cannabis and MDMA to aid in the treatment of PTSD. She currently works as the executive assistant to Dr. Michael Mithoefer, clinical researcher and psychotherapist. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681146822 2023-04-10 17:13:42 1681146848 2023-04-10 17:14:08 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-10T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[PAUL GEISLER: A Day for a Daydream?]]> 34434 Eric Schumacher's 2018 research paper on daydreaming and intelligence sets the stage for this column celebrating the power of imagination. Schumacher, professor in the School of Psychology, found that those who let their minds wander score higher on creativity and intelligence tests. Columnist Paul Geisler argues that no matter who many advances the technology world gives us, such as ChatGPT, they will never replace a human's ability to create worlds inside their heads, and possible solutions to problems, via daydreaming. 

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Eric Schumacher's 2018 research paper on daydreaming and intelligence sets the stage in this column celebrating the power of imagination. Schumacher, professor in the School of Psychology, found that those who let their minds wander score higher on creativity and intelligence tests. Columnist Paul Geisler argues that no matter who many advances the technology world gives us, such as ChatGPT, they will never replace a human's ability to create worlds inside their heads, and possible solutions to problems, via daydreaming. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681144079 2023-04-10 16:27:59 1681144079 2023-04-10 16:27:59 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-05T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-05T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-05T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[US teens say they have new proof for 2,000-year-old mathematical theorem]]> 34434 Two New Orleans high school seniors who say they have proven Pythagoras’s theorem by using trigonometry – which academics for two millennia have thought to be impossible – are being encouraged by a prominent US mathematical research organization to submit their work to a peer-reviewed journal. Calcea Johnson and Ne’Kiya Jackson, who are students of St Mary’s Academy, recently gave a presentation of their findings at the American Mathematical Society Southeastern Section meeting at Georgia Tech, hosted by the School of Mathematics. They were reportedly the only two high schoolers to give presentations at the meeting, attended by math researchers from institutions including Georgia Tech and the universities of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana State, Ohio State, Oklahoma and Texas Tech. (This story was also covered in NOLA.comEssenceBlackNews.com, Complex, Yahoo! Entertainment, Crusader Newspaper Group, Atlanta Black Star, and Greek Reporter.) 

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Two New Orleans high school seniors who say they have proven Pythagoras’s theorem by using trigonometry – which academics for two millennia have thought to be impossible – are being encouraged by a prominent US mathematical research organization to submit their work to a peer-reviewed journal. Calcea Johnson and Ne’Kiya Jackson, who are students of St Mary’s Academy, recently gave a presentation of their findings at the American Mathematical Society Southeastern Section meeting at Georgia Tech, hosted by the School of Mathematics. They were reportedly the only two high schoolers to give presentations at the meeting, attended by math researchers from institutions including Georgia Tech and the universities of Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana State, Ohio State, Oklahoma and Texas Tech. (This story was also covered in NOLA.comEssenceBlackNews.com, ComplexYahoo! EntertainmentCrusader Newspaper GroupAtlanta Black Star, and Greek Reporter.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679929646 2023-03-27 15:07:26 1681141733 2023-04-10 15:48:53 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-24T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-24T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-24T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Peat-based soil is an environmental nightmare. Try these alternatives.]]> 34434 Peat, the ingredient that makes bagged soil light and spongy, comes from wetlands. It can increase the amount of water soil holds onto while also, paradoxically, increasing its drainage ability — creating an ideal environment for nurturing plants. But while it does all of those things, extracting it is problematic because it strips the bogs it comes from of their carbon stores, and hinders their ability to keep storing carbon — both important parts of fighting climate change. Caitlin Petro, a research scientist in the School of Biological Sciences who studies peatlands and the plants in them, explains that it can take millennia for just a few feet of peat to form. 

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Peat, the ingredient that makes bagged soil light and spongy, comes from wetlands. It can increase the amount of water soil holds onto while also, paradoxically, increasing its drainage ability — creating an ideal environment for nurturing plants. But while it does all of those things, extracting it is problematic because it strips the bogs it comes from of their carbon stores, and hinders their ability to keep storing carbon — both important parts of fighting climate change. Caitlin Petro, a research scientist in the School of Biological Sciences who studies peatlands and the plants in them, explains that it can take millennia for just a few feet of peat to form. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681140171 2023-04-10 15:22:51 1681140171 2023-04-10 15:22:51 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-05T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-05T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-05T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Chia seedlings verify Alan Turing’s ideas about patterns in nature]]> 34434 Chia seeds sprouted in trays have experimentally confirmed a mathematical model proposed by computer scientist and polymath Alan Turing decades ago. The model describes how patterns might emerge in nature, such as desert vegetation, leopard spots and zebra stripes. But proving that Turing’s model explains patterns in the real world has been challenging. It could be that the idea is a mathematical just-so story that happens to produce similar shapes in a computer, says Flavio Fenton, professor in the School of Physics. Brendan D'Aquino, a Northeastern University computer science undergraduate student who studied in Fenton's lab in the summer of 2022, described his Turing-based experiment at the recent American Physical Society March meeting. (This story also appeared in LiveScience.)

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Chia seeds sprouted in trays have experimentally confirmed a mathematical model proposed by computer scientist and polymath Alan Turing decades ago. The model describes how patterns might emerge in nature, such as desert vegetation, leopard spots and zebra stripes. But proving that Turing’s model explains patterns in the real world has been challenging. It could be that the idea is a mathematical just-so story that happens to produce similar shapes in a computer, says Flavio Fenton, professor in the School of Physics. Brendan D'Aquino, a Northeastern University computer science undergraduate student who studied in Fenton's lab in the summer of 2022, described his Turing-based experiment at the recent American Physical Society March meeting. (This story also appeared in LiveScience.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679925057 2023-03-27 13:50:57 1681138119 2023-04-10 14:48:39 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-26T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-26T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Rising temperatures alter 'missing link' of microbial processes, putting northern peatlands at risk]]> 34434 Georgia Tech researchers show that rising temperatures in northern regions may damage peatlands, critical ecosystems for storing carbon from the atmosphere — and could decouple vital processes in microbial support systems. Joel Kostka, professor and associate chair of Research in the School of Biological Sciences, and Caitlin Petro, research scientist in the School,recently led a collaborative study to investigate how this critical type of ecosystem (and the "missing link" of microbial processes that support it) may react to the increased temperature and carbon dioxide levels predicted to come with climate change.

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Georgia Tech researchers show that rising temperatures in northern regions may damage peatlands, critical ecosystems for storing carbon from the atmosphere — and could decouple vital processes in microbial support systems. Joel Kostka, professor and associate chair of Research in the School of Biological Sciences, and Caitlin Petro, research scientist who works with Kostka, recently led a collaborative study to investigate how this critical type of ecosystem (and the "missing link" of microbial processes that support it) may react to the increased temperature and carbon dioxide levels predicted to come with climate change.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1681137148 2023-04-10 14:32:28 1681137148 2023-04-10 14:32:28 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-03T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-03T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-03T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Scientists examine climate of exoplanets, inspired by Milankovitch cycle]]> 34434 Scientists believe the Milankovitch cycles have influenced Earth's climate for millions of years, causing climate shifts such as ice ages and warmer periods. These cycles are the periodic variations that influence a planet's orbital properties. This, in turn, controls how much sunlight the planet receives over time and thus plays an important role in determining the planet's climate and habitability. A new study, inspired by Milankovitch cycles, has attempted to investigate how orbital changes may affect the climate of exoplanets. They investigated orbit variations in compact multiplanet systems for this purpose. Gongjie Li, assistant professor in the School of Physics, was a co-author of the study. (This story was also covered at Phys.org.)

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Scientists believe the Milankovitch cycles have influenced Earth's climate for millions of years, causing climate shifts such as ice ages and warmer periods. These cycles are the periodic variations that influence a planet's orbital properties. This, in turn, controls how much sunlight the planet receives over time and thus plays an important role in determining the planet's climate and habitability. A new study, inspired by Milankovitch cycles, has attempted to investigate how orbital changes may affect the climate of exoplanets. They investigated orbit variations in compact multiplanet systems for this purpose. Gongjie Li, assistant professor in the School of Physics, was a co-author of the study. (This story was also covered at Phys.org.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1680529238 2023-04-03 13:40:38 1680537295 2023-04-03 15:54:55 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-31T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-31T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-31T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Tiny Lunar Flashlight moon probe is in trouble. NASA has one month to fix it.]]> 34434 A tiny NASA moon probe continues to battle thruster issues as it attempts to reach its destination, but there's still time left to make a fix. Lunar Flashlight launched in December 2022 on a quest to seek lunar ice. But on the way to the moon, the cubesat experienced thruster glitches on its mission to test a new "green" propellant. NASA officials downgraded its mission from orbiting to lunar flybys weeks ago. NASA and mission partners at the Georgia Institute of Technology emphasize the lunar flybys will still be valuable, as they will bring the Cubesat by the south pole of the moon where NASA's Artemis program aims to land astronauts as soon as 2025. A team from the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering runs mission control activities, and Georgia Tech's REVEALS (Radiation Effect on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces) team, led by principal investigator Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and adjunct professor in the School of Physics, will study any data collected on lunar ice.

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A tiny NASA moon probe continues to battle thruster issues as it attempts to reach its destination, but there's still time left to make a fix. Lunar Flashlight launched in December 2022 on a quest to seek lunar ice. But on the way to the moon, the cubesat experienced thruster glitches on its mission to test a new "green" propellant. NASA officials downgraded its mission from orbiting to lunar flybys weeks ago. NASA and mission partners at the Georgia Institute of Technology emphasize the lunar flybys will still be valuable, as they will bring the Cubesat by the south pole of the moon where NASA's Artemis program aims to land astronauts as soon as 2025. A team from the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering runs mission control activities, and Georgia Tech's REVEALS (Radiation Effect on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces) team, led by principal investigator Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and adjunct professor in the School of Physics, will study any data collected on lunar ice.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1680535542 2023-04-03 15:25:42 1680535542 2023-04-03 15:25:42 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-29T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-29T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-29T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Carbon Control: These Climate Tech Companies Are Reducing Emissions on All Fronts]]> 34434 Green companies across the U.S. have developed innovations geared toward minimizing humanity’s carbon dioxide emissions. While carbon dioxide is naturally released from events like volcanic eruptions and wildfires, it’s also the primary greenhouse gas released by transportation, electricity, industrial processes and other activities. Many climate tech businesses are hard at work developing solutions to shrink our carbon footprint. One of the companies highlighted in this profile is Lithos, a carbon capture innovator focused on the agriculture industry. The company’s rock weathering solution is based on a biogeochemical process that uses volcanic basalt rock dust to decompose carbon in fields, as well as nourish growing crops. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is a Lithos co-founder.

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Green companies across the U.S. have developed innovations geared toward minimizing humanity’s carbon dioxide emissions. While carbon dioxide is naturally released from events like volcanic eruptions and wildfires, it’s also the primary greenhouse gas released by transportation, electricity, industrial processes and other activities. Many climate tech businesses are hard at work developing solutions to shrink our carbon footprint. One of the companies highlighted in this profile is Lithos, a carbon capture innovator focused on the agriculture industry. The company’s rock weathering solution is based on a biogeochemical process that uses volcanic basalt rock dust to decompose carbon in fields, as well as nourish growing crops. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is a Lithos co-founder.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1680533350 2023-04-03 14:49:10 1680533350 2023-04-03 14:49:10 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-27T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-27T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-27T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Living on the edge: For a better future Florida, start with better buildings]]> 34434 Buildings equipped to mitigate the heat, flooding and other impacts of climate change — and to limit the structures’ own harm to the environment — are not new. But a new fusion of nature and technology is taking sustainable design a step further to create tangible benefits for people and communities. Projects underway across the world reveal what’s possible in Florida’s future if people begin to reject risky coastal development for homes and workplaces built to keep them safe and healthy and lower carbon emissions. The first example cited in the story is the Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design at Georgia Tech. Several College of Science classes are taught in the building. 

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Buildings equipped to mitigate the heat, flooding and other impacts of climate change — and to limit the structures’ own harm to the environment — are not new. But a new fusion of nature and technology is taking sustainable design a step further to create tangible benefits for people and communities. Projects underway across the world reveal what’s possible in Florida’s future if people begin to reject risky coastal development for homes and workplaces built to keep them safe and healthy and lower carbon emissions. The first example cited in the story is the Kendeda Building for Innovative Sustainable Design at Georgia Tech. Several College of Science classes are taught in the building. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1680532441 2023-04-03 14:34:01 1680532441 2023-04-03 14:34:01 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-04-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-01T00:00:00-04:00 2023-04-01T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Toad Tongues Slay With Seriously Sticky Spit]]> 34434 Toad tongues are ready for their closeup — extremely close closeups — in this video from San Francisco PBS station KQED. The closeups and slow-motion photography are necessary to show the role toad saliva plays in snatching crickets, worms, and other prey in the blink of an eye. Thanks to research from the team of David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences with an adjunct appointment in the School of Physics, science learned that a toad’s saliva starts off thick and sticky. But when the saliva hits prey at a high speed, it thins out dramatically, pouring into every nook and cranny the tongue touches. And then, it becomes sticky again, drawing that meal down the hatch.

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Toad tongues are ready for their closeup — extremely close closeups — in this video from San Francisco PBS station KQED. The closeups and slow-motion photography are necessary to show the role toad saliva plays in snatching crickets, worms, and other prey in the blink of an eye. Thanks to research from the team of David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences with an adjunct appointment in the School of Physics, science learned that a toad’s saliva starts off thick and sticky. But when the saliva hits prey at a high speed, it thins out dramatically, pouring into every nook and cranny the tongue touches. And then, it becomes sticky again, drawing that meal down the hatch.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1680530733 2023-04-03 14:05:33 1680530733 2023-04-03 14:05:33 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-28T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-28T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-28T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[This Is How Long You Would Survive on Each Planet Before Being Vaporized, Crushed or Asphyxiated]]> 34434 If you’ve ever dreamed of skating on Saturn’s rings or making a pit-stop on Venus, maybe those fantasies are best kept to dreamland. In reality, each of the planets in our solar system besides Earth would immediately annihilate you — in pretty much the worst way possible. In short, not even a spacesuit would save you from Jupiter’s insane atmospheric pressure or Venus’s 900-degree temperatures. Unfortunately, you’d pretty much be gone in the blink of an eye — but it’s still fascinating to know exactly how that would happen. Jennifer Glass, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, details how you'd die on Mercury: "“If you died on the hot side, you would be burned to death in seconds, while asphyxiating and having all the water vaporize from your body.” (This story includes other information from an October 2022 Newsweek story, which has more quotes from Glass.) 

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If you’ve ever dreamed of skating on Saturn’s rings or making a pit-stop on Venus, maybe those fantasies are best kept to dreamland. In reality, each of the planets in our solar system besides Earth would immediately annihilate you — in pretty much the worst way possible. In short, not even a spacesuit would save you from Jupiter’s insane atmospheric pressure or Venus’s 900-degree temperatures. Unfortunately, you’d pretty much be gone in the blink of an eye — but it’s still fascinating to know exactly how that would happen. Jennifer Glass, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, details how you'd die on Mercury: "“If you died on the hot side, you would be burned to death in seconds, while asphyxiating and having all the water vaporize from your body.” (This story includes other information from an October 2022 Newsweek story, which has more quotes from Glass.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679932231 2023-03-27 15:50:31 1679932231 2023-03-27 15:50:31 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-22T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-22T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-22T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Algae-farming fish help coral reefs bounce back from bleaching events]]> 34434 Fish that tend patches of stringy algae seem to shield branching corals from the worst effects of marine heat waves and help them recover after bleaching. In 2019, the reefs near the French Polynesian island of Moorea in the South Pacific Ocean endured their worst heat stress event in 14 years. Branching corals there bleached en masse. Some of those colonies were in "gardens" defended by farmerfish, which cultivate their own algae for food and chase off fish that eat plants and corals. The researchers discovered that, after one year, just 44 per cent of colonies inside gardens died compared with 67 per cent of those outside gardens. What’s more, colonies on the turf of the territorial fish were twice as likely to recover living tissue to the levels they had been before bleaching. Mark Hay, Regents Professor and Teasley Chair in the School of Biological Sciences, didn't work on the research but said that tissue recovery was "a big deal" and that the farmerfish seem to be having a positive effect. (Subscription required)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679517105 2023-03-22 20:31:45 1679517428 2023-03-22 20:37:08 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-19T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[Researchers discover new quantum state in a quirky material]]> 34434 A collaboration of physicists working at different institutes in the U.S. — including two at Georgia Tech — has discovered a new quantum state in an alloy made of magnesium, silicon, and tellurium, a press release said. The finding could result in applications in quantum computing, such as building sensors and communication systems. The alloy is a crystalline structure denoted as Mn3Si2Te6 and consists of octagonal cells placed in a honeycomb-like arrangement when viewed from above. Though, when viewed from the side, it consists of stacked sheets. Two researchers in the School of Physics, assistant professor Itamar Kimchi and graduate student Sami Hakani, worked on the study announcing the new quantum state.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1678114984 2023-03-06 15:03:04 1679510795 2023-03-22 18:46:35 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-27T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-27T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-27T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[SBC Digest: Changes in key GuideStone leadership roles]]> 34434 A School of Mathematics alumna has been elected as the new chief insurance officer for GuideStone, which provides retirement solutions, insurance coverage and investment products and services to churches, ministries, organizations and institutions as well as ministry-minded individuals. Nadeena Kersey, B.S. MATH, will provide executive leadership and oversight to the insurance line of business, including product development, sales and marketing, services and operations of life and health plans, property and casualty coverage and ancillary products.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1678116038 2023-03-06 15:20:38 1679510665 2023-03-22 18:44:25 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-03T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Plants seek climate refuge across our changing planet]]> 34434 Plants, like animals and people, seek refuge from climate change. And when they move, they take ecosystems with them. To understand why and how plants have trekked across landscapes throughout time, researchers are calling for a new framework. The key to protecting biodiversity in the future may be understanding the past. Jenny McGuire, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the School of Biological Sciences, spearheaded a U.S. National Science Foundation-supported paper on the topic in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. McGuire and her collaborators highlight the outstanding needs for successful future conservation efforts. The paper brings together conservation research that illuminates the complex and constantly evolving dynamics brought on by climate change and the ever-shifting ways humans use land. These factors, McGuire said, interact over time to create dynamic changes and illustrate the need to incorporate time perspectives into conservation strategies by looking deep into the past. (This research was also covered in Time Magazine.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1678383740 2023-03-09 17:42:20 1679510356 2023-03-22 18:39:16 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[These tools help visually impaired scientists read data and journals ]]> 34434 A small but growing group of researchers is working to make science more accessible to scientists with limited vision. Innovative software and modes of presentation are helping to broaden access to scientific literature. Sonification provides a way for scientists with visual limitations to "see" data; by translating numerical values into sounds with certain parameters — for example, a star’s brightness might be encoded as pitch — researchers can home in on important changes. Highcharts, a charting library service, developed its free tool for exploring charts with sonification at Georgia Tech's Sonification Lab, an interdisciplinary research group based in the School of Psychology and the School of Interactive Computing.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1678120486 2023-03-06 16:34:46 1679509878 2023-03-22 18:31:18 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Covid Fears and Long-Term Planning Play Key Roles in Vaccine Hesitancy]]> 34434 A recent study finds that concerns about the health effects of Covid-19 are a key variable in determining whether people are hesitant to get vaccinated against the virus. The study also found that an individual’s tendency to plan for the future plays a surprising role in people’s vaccine hesitancy. At issue is a psychological trait called proactive coping that refers to a person’s tendency to think about and plan for the future. The study's first author is MacKenzie  Hughes, Ph.D. student in the School of Psychology; Clara Coblenz, Georgia Tech alumna (B.S. PSYCH) who is now a research technician in the School of Psychology's Adult Cognition Lab, is a co-author.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1678119165 2023-03-06 16:12:45 1679509808 2023-03-22 18:30:08 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Making the Most of March: Fun Events and Activities in Atlanta]]> 34434 Even if you failed chemistry in high school, there is guaranteed to be something that sparks your intrigue at the Atlanta Science Festival. With over 150 events taking place across the city leading up to one big scientific soiree in Piedmont Park, dive into myriad topics, from coding to astronomy, and enjoy the fresh air. Several College of Sciences faculty, staff, and students are taking part in many of the events. The Champion Newspaper in DeKalb County also previews the festival, as does the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. (More information on the Atlanta Science Festival can be found here.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1678116371 2023-03-06 15:26:11 1679509556 2023-03-22 18:25:56 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-03T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[A New Controversial Black Hole Theory, Saving The Great Salt Lake.]]> 34434 Black holes remain one of the great mysteries of the universe. Another enigma? Dark energy. Little is known about this concept, aside from the belief that dark energy accelerates the expansion of the universe. There’s a new theory that brings together black holes and dark energy into one mind-bending solution: research led by the University of Hawai’i at Manoa posits that dark energy could actually come from supermassive black holes at the center of galaxiesFeryal Özel, professor and chair of the School of Physics, and a founding member of the Event Horizon Telescope project that has captured images of black holes, joined host Ira Flatow to talk about the new development.

]]>
Black holes remain one of the great mysteries of the universe. Another enigma? Dark energy. Little is known about this concept, aside from the belief that dark energy accelerates the expansion of the universe. There’s a new theory that brings together black holes and dark energy into one mind-bending solution: research led by the University of Hawai’i at Manoa posits that dark energy could actually come from supermassive black holes at the center of galaxiesFeryal Özel, professor and chair of the School of Physics, and a founding member of the Event Horizon Telescope project that has captured images of black holes, joined host Ira Flatow to talk about the new development.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679070948 2023-03-17 16:35:48 1679498931 2023-03-22 15:28:51 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-10T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-10T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-10T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[STEM Education at the Heart of NSWCDD Employee’s Volunteerism]]> 34434 Walking into a high school classroom full of young, eager minds would intimidate some, but for Erica Borgers Klonkowski, who received her B.S. in Biochemistry from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, it’s an opportunity to dazzle and spark inspiration in students with scientific magic. How does she rise to the task? By devoting her time, energy, knowledge and resources to volunteer at local schools and in the community through Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division’s (NSWCDD) STEM educational programs and sponsored events.

]]>
Walking into a high school classroom full of young, eager minds would intimidate some, but for Erica Borgers Klonkowski, who received her B.S. in Biochemistry from the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, it’s an opportunity to dazzle and spark inspiration in students with scientific magic. How does she rise to the task? By devoting her time, energy, knowledge and resources to volunteer at local schools and in the community through Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division’s (NSWCDD) STEM educational programs and sponsored events.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679498817 2023-03-22 15:26:57 1679498844 2023-03-22 15:27:24 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-10T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-10T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-10T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Many Antarctic glaciers are hemorrhaging ice. This one is healing its cracks]]> 34434 Even as some parts of West Antarctica rapidly melt, raising sea level, large swaths of the ice remain stable for the time being. Scientists have now explored one of those stable spots — an isolated nook where the ocean meets the ice. This environment is “really at the edge” between melting and freezing, says Justin Lawrence, Ph.D. student with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The delicate balance between these two processes is shaping the ice into those strange textures, and the result, at Kamb Ice Stream, is that massive cracks in the underside of the ice appear to be freezing back togetherBen Hurwitz, Ph.D. student in Ocean Science and Engineering, and Anthony Spears, Ph.D. student with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, also contributed to the study, published in Nature Geoscience. (The study was also covered at Astrobiology.comAZO Robotics, Eos, and India Education Daily.) 

]]>
Even as some parts of West Antarctica rapidly melt, raising sea level, large swaths of the ice remain stable for the time being. Scientists have now explored one of those stable spots — an isolated nook where the ocean meets the ice. This environment is “really at the edge” between melting and freezing, says Justin Lawrence, Ph.D. student with the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The delicate balance between these two processes is shaping the ice into those strange textures, and the result, at Kamb Ice Stream, is that massive cracks in the underside of the ice appear to be freezing back togetherBen Hurwitz, Ph.D. student in Ocean Science and Engineering, and Anthony Spears, Ph.D. student with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, also contributed to the study, published in Nature Geoscience. (The study was also covered at Astrobiology.comAZO Robotics, Eos, and India Education Daily.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677872496 2023-03-03 19:41:36 1679497721 2023-03-22 15:08:41 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-02T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-02T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-02T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[The ocean is as important to the climate as the atmosphere]]> 34434 For Homo sapiens, a dry-land species, discussions of the climate and how it is changing tend to revolve around what is going on in the atmosphere. This is a dangerously parochial attitude, for the atmosphere is but one of two fluid systems circulating above Earth’s solid surface. The other, the ocean, is in many ways the more important of the pair. Ocean circulation redistributes heat and swallows carbon dioxide. Susan Lozier, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair of the College of Sciences, spoke about the assumptions many people have about oceans and ocean circulation during the recent American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS) annual meeting. (This story was also covered in Yahoo!Finance and Science.)

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For Homo sapiens, a dry-land species, discussions of the climate and how it is changing tend to revolve around what is going on in the atmosphere. This is a dangerously parochial attitude, for the atmosphere is but one of two fluid systems circulating above Earth’s solid surface. The other, the ocean, is in many ways the more important of the pair. Ocean circulation redistributes heat and swallows carbon dioxide. Susan Lozier, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair of the College of Sciences, spoke about the assumptions many people have about oceans and ocean circulation during the recent American Association for the Advancement of Sciences (AAAS) annual meeting. (This story was also covered in Yahoo!Finance and Science.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679072999 2023-03-17 17:09:59 1679497556 2023-03-22 15:05:56 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-08T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-08T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-08T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Gorillas Face Many Dangers. But They Can Count on Tara Stoinski]]> 34434 Țară Stoinski, president/CEO and chief scientific officer for the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund, doesn't just have to worry about increasing the numbers of the various species of gorillas under her group's conservation care. Stoinski, who received her Ph.D. from the School of Psychology in 2000 and joined the Fossey Fund while working at Zoo Atlanta, also has to try to find more land for the animals, protect them from poachers, and deal with the challenges that arise from civil unrest in countries where the gorillas have their habitats. 

]]>
Țară Stoinski, president/CEO and chief scientific officer for the Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund, doesn't just have to worry about increasing the numbers of the various species of gorillas under her group's conservation care. Stoinski, who received her Ph.D. from the School of Psychology in 2000 and joined the Fossey Fund while working at Zoo Atlanta, also has to try to find more land for the animals, protect them from poachers, and deal with the challenges that arise from civil unrest in countries where the gorillas have their habitats. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679497133 2023-03-22 14:58:53 1679497185 2023-03-22 14:59:45 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-09T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-09T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-09T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Scripps Oceanography Leads Sessions on Climate Change, Space, and Blue Tech at SXSW 2023]]> 34434 One of those sessions, Looking to Our Ocean for Climate Solutions, featured Susan Lozier, College of Sciences Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair. As greenhouse gases warm our planet, our ocean plays a significant role in regulating heat and absorbing carbon dioxide, absorbing a third of the carbon and more than 90 percent of the extra heat we add to our atmosphere. There are consequences to this, as scientists track warming temperatures, depleting oxygen zones, a more acidic ocean, and rising sea levels. The ocean can also be a potential solution if we can leverage the ocean’s existing ability to remove carbon dioxide.

]]>
One of those sessions, Looking to Our Ocean for Climate Solutions, featured Susan Lozier, College of Sciences Dean and Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair. As greenhouse gases warm our planet, our ocean plays a significant role in regulating heat and absorbing carbon dioxide, absorbing a third of the carbon and more than 90 percent of the extra heat we add to our atmosphere. There are consequences to this, as scientists track warming temperatures, depleting oxygen zones, a more acidic ocean, and rising sea levels. The ocean can also be a potential solution if we can leverage the ocean’s existing ability to remove carbon dioxide.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679493597 2023-03-22 13:59:57 1679495986 2023-03-22 14:39:46 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-06T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Eric Schmidt Is Building the Perfect AI War-Fighting Machine]]> 34434 Expensive military hardware, like a new tank undergoes rigorous testing before heading to the battlefield. A startup called Istari, backed by Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google and chair of Alphabet, reckons some of that work can be done more effectively in the metaverse. Ishtari uses machine learning to virtually assemble and test war machines from computer models of individual components, such as the chassis and engines, that are usually marooned on separate digital drawing boards. Will Roper, B.S. and M.S. PHYS, and a former assistant secretary of the Air Force, is founder and CEO of Ishtari.

]]>
Expensive military hardware, like a new tank undergoes rigorous testing before heading to the battlefield. A startup called Istari, backed by Eric Schmidt, the former CEO of Google and chair of Alphabet, reckons some of that work can be done more effectively in the metaverse. Ishtari uses machine learning to virtually assemble and test war machines from computer models of individual components, such as the chassis and engines, that are usually marooned on separate digital drawing boards. Will Roper, B.S. and M.S. PHYS, and a former assistant secretary of the Air Force, is founder and CEO of Ishtari.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679332612 2023-03-20 17:16:52 1679495323 2023-03-22 14:28:43 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-13T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Learning is fun at the Atlanta Science Festival]]> 34434 The final week of the Atlanta Science Festival (ASF) is underway (March 20-25), and there are still plenty of activities for families to enjoy around the city. Now in its 10th year, the festival explores the intersection of science, technology, engineering and math with food, nature and the arts. It’s an enlightening and entertaining way to learn about the many ways science is woven into our everyday lives. Several Georgia Tech College of Sciences faculty, staff, and students are taking part in the event. Check here for more ASF details. 

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The final week of the Atlanta Science Festival (ASF) is underway (March 20-25), and there are still plenty of activities for families to enjoy around the city. Now in its 10th year, the festival explores the intersection of science, technology, engineering and math with food, nature and the arts. It’s an enlightening and entertaining way to learn about the many ways science is woven into our everyday lives. Several Georgia Tech College of Sciences faculty, staff, and students are taking part in the event. Check here for more ASF details. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1679428723 2023-03-21 19:58:43 1679493719 2023-03-22 14:01:59 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-21T00:00:00-04:00 2023-03-21T00:00:00-04:00
<![CDATA[How did life begin? One key ingredient is coming into view ]]> 34434 Billions of years ago, before there were beasts, bacteria or any living organism, there were RNAs. These molecules were probably swirling around with amino acids and other rudimentary biomolecules, merging and diverging, on an otherwise lifeless crucible of a planet. Did one of those biomolecules lead to the development of 'protoribosomes' that would work their magic to kickstart life on early Earth? An Israeli biologist won a share of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for that theory. That scientist and another in Japan say they're closing in on building that protoribosome in their labs. Nature asked scientists to weigh in on that prospect, and one of them is Anton Petrov, research scientist and evolutionary biologist in the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Petrov is also a member of Georgia Tech's Center for the Origins of Life (COOL).

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677694947 2023-03-01 18:22:27 1677705169 2023-03-01 21:12:49 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-03-01T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-01T00:00:00-05:00 2023-03-01T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Benford's law applications and earthquakes]]> 34434 It was anticipated more than a century ago that the distribution of real-world observations' first digits would not be uniform but would exhibit a trend where numbers with lower first digits (1,2,...) occur more frequently than those with higher first digits (...,8,9). This phenomenon is known as Benford's law, the law of anomalous numbers, or the first-digit law. It was finally proven in 1995 by Theodore P. Hill, emeritus professor in the School of Mathematics. This law has been found to apply to a wide range of datasets, from countries' populations to financial data, physical constants and earthquakes. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677512549 2023-02-27 15:42:29 1677685051 2023-03-01 15:37:31 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[One easy way to fight antibiotic resistance? Good hand hygiene]]> 34434 Can washing your hands help stop the evolution of antibiotic resistance? Mathematically, it’s possible. While bacteria that are more sensitive to the antibiotics are killed off, those that are able to survive will continue to reproduce with less competition. This results in increasing abundance of resistant bacteria that can undermine the effectiveness of the antibiotic. Kristofer Wollein Waldetoft is a postdoctoral fellow in infection medicine for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and the School of Biological Sciences who researches in the lab of Sam Brown, professor and member of the Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection. Woldetoft collaborated with Brown and other colleagues to develop a mathematical model of antibiotic resistance evolution to learn the role hygiene plays in that process.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677617695 2023-02-28 20:54:55 1677617695 2023-02-28 20:54:55 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-28T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-28T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-28T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Why wombats have cubed-shaped poop]]> 34434 Walk around a forest in Canada and you can’t miss the precise piles of round animal poop: Deer, moose, and rabbits. But there is one animal in the world (that we know of) that poops in cubes and it’s a wombat. How does the Tasmanian mammal do that? Yes, serious researchers want to know. A team from the University of Tasmania has determined that a wombat’s surprisingly long and intermittently stretchy intestines compress their poop (or stool) into cubes. David Hu, professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Biological Sciences, worked on the wombat research with the University of Tasmania.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677510512 2023-02-27 15:08:32 1677594339 2023-02-28 14:25:39 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-22T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-22T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-22T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Adaxis Collaborates with Stilride to Incorporate 3D Printing in the Industrial-Origami Manufacturing Arsenal]]> 34434 The headline for this article refers to a Swedish technology startup company using origami-inspired techniques for its 3D printing services. But it also mentions Georgia Tech winning a Department of Defense grant for a project titled Programming Multistable Origami and Kirigami Structures via Topological Design, which investigated how concepts from the art of paper folding can be combined with 3D printing to create lightweight, flexible structures that can change shape. Zeb Rocklin, an assistant professor in the School of Physics, was part of the project team.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677511347 2023-02-27 15:22:27 1677511347 2023-02-27 15:22:27 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-21T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[The thrill of discovery: Atlanta Science Festival returns next month]]> 34434 The Atlanta Science Festival will take place from March 10-25. This will be the 10th festival and is set to be the largest yet, with 150 science events over the course of 2 weeks (65 of which are free). These events are not just for kids. Some adult-friendly events to look out for are the recurring Breaking Down the Bean events, focused on coffee brewing, and the Water, the Source of Civilizations event exploring water’s role in human history through art. Several College of Sciences faculty, students, and staff are taking part in the festival. A recent Atlanta Science Festival media preview in Decatur included hive insects from the Goodisman Lab, led by Michael Goodisman, professor in the School of Biological Sciences. Also the last event in the Festival is set for Piedmont Park March 25. (More information on the Atlanta Science Festival can be found here.)

 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677508988 2023-02-27 14:43:08 1677509278 2023-02-27 14:47:58 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-26T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-26T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-26T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Machine learning makes long-term, expansive reef monitoring possible]]> 34434 Machine learning can help conservationists monitor climate impacts across large swaths of marine ecosystems over extended periods of time, a task never possible before. The Delta Maps machine learning tool provides a new way to assess which reefs might be best-suited for survival and which play a key role in delivering larvae to others, and therefore should be targeted for preservation efforts, according to researchers in a paper published recently in the journal Communications Biology. Two scientists in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences conducted the research: Annalisa Bracco, professor and associate chair, and Lyuba Novi, postdoctoral fellow.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1677255942 2023-02-24 16:25:42 1677255942 2023-02-24 16:25:42 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-23T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-23T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-23T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[A torpedo-like robot named Icefin is giving us the full tour of the ‘Doomsday’ glacier]]> 34434 Thwaites, a notoriously unstable glacier in western Antarctica, is cracking and disintegrating, spelling bad news for sea level rise across the globe. Efforts are afoot to understand the geometry and chemistry of Thwaites, which is about the size of Florida, in order to gauge the impact that warming waters and climate change may have on it. An 11-foot tube-like underwater robot called Icefin — first developed at Georgia Tech — is offering us a detailed look deep under the ice at how the vulnerable ice shelf in Antarctica is melting. By way of two papers published this week in the journal Nature, Icefin has been providing pertinent details regarding the conditions beneath the freezing waters. Justin Lawrence, a graduate student in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is one of the co-authors of the papers. (This research is also covered in Wired, BBC.com, and at NYU.edu. Alexander Robel, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences who leads the Ice and Climate Group, is quoted in the Wired article.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676906447 2023-02-20 15:20:47 1677086757 2023-02-22 17:25:57 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-17T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[A U.S. Vice President, Atmospheric Scientist, And Oceanographer - That’s Black History]]> 34434 Marshall Shepard, Georgia Athletic Association Distinguished Professor and director of the University of Georgia's Atmospheric Sciences Program, wrote this article on the experience of sharing a Ferst Center for the Arts stage February 8 with Vice President Kamala Harris and oceanographer Isaiah Bolden, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. The topic was climate change from an economic and racial justice viewpoint, but Shepard writes about the impact of the event happening during Black History Month. While Shepard writes that more work is needed diversifying the atmospheric and ocean sciences, "this moment in Black History cannot be overlooked. In February 2023 two black scholars and a black woman, who just happens to be the Vice President of the United States, sat on a stage discussing climate, environmental policy, and why it matters to all communities, but particularly those with people that look like them." (The climate conversation at Georgia Tech was also covered by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Fox5 Atlanta, Georgia Public Broadcasting, E&E News, and the Technique. A White House transcript of the event is found here.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676565117 2023-02-16 16:31:57 1676920474 2023-02-20 19:14:34 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-15T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-15T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[EAS school unveils three new major programs]]> 34434 Beginning this upcoming summer term, Georgia Tech’s School of Earth & Atmospheric Sciences (EAS) will offer three new Bachelor of Science degrees. These undergraduate opportunities will expand the breadth of the EAS program while simultaneously allowing students in the program to develop a more specialized plan of study in a field that aligns with their interests. The University System of Georgia (USG) has approved two new degrees within the school: Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences (AOS) and Solid Earth and Planetary Sciences (SEP). They also approved a new bachelor’s degree in Environmental Sciences (ENVS) that will be an interdisciplinary degree between EAS and the School of Biological Sciences (BIOS). (More information is available here.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676911998 2023-02-20 16:53:18 1676920166 2023-02-20 19:09:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-13T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-13T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Two Comets Shine Brightly on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 for Science List]]> 34434 One of those "comets" named to Forbes' 2023 30 Under 30 For Science list is Emma Xu, who graduated from the University of Texas at Dallas with a B.S. in Physics in 2015. While at UTD, Xu's research advisor pointed her towards a summer National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program at Georgia Tech. Xu credits that experience with helping her win an NSF graduate research fellowship. Xu is now the co-founder and CEO of her own science startup, and she is working on her Ph.D. at Columbia University. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676920094 2023-02-20 19:08:14 1676920094 2023-02-20 19:08:14 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-03T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[A quick guide to what’s in development in downtown Atlanta, what’s proposed, and what might have been]]> 34434 This roundup of all the major construction projects happening now in Downtown Atlanta includes Science Square. Developers broke ground last summer on a 13-story laboratory and office tower, the first building in the 18-acre, $1 billion development. The project is dedicated to life sciences research and biomedical technology. The development is located at the south end of campus at North Avenue and Northside Drive. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676919354 2023-02-20 18:55:54 1676919354 2023-02-20 18:55:54 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-03T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Atlanta Science Festival brings 150-plus events to 80 locations throughout metro area]]> 34434 Want to touch a human brain, learn the mechanics behind animation or attend the “nerdiest fashion show of the year”? At the Atlanta Science Festival, you can. The Atlanta Science Festival (ASF) is back for its 10th edition from March 10 to 25. ASF is an annual celebration of learning, science and STEM career opportunities around the Atlanta region. This year, the line-up features 150 events across 80 locations in the city and metro area. Faculty members, staff, and students from the College of Sciences will be taking part in the two weeks of activities. (Schedule of events and other information is available here.)

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676912858 2023-02-20 17:07:38 1676912858 2023-02-20 17:07:38 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-10T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-10T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-10T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Making the case for a successor to silicon]]> 34434 A pressing quest in the field of nanoelectronics is the search for a material that could replace silicon. Graphene has seemed promising for decades. But, its potential faltered along the way, due to damaging processing methods and the lack of a new electronics paradigm to embrace it. With silicon nearly maxed out in its ability to accommodate faster computing, the next big nanoelectronics platform is needed now more than ever. Walter de Heer, Regents’ Professor in the School of Physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology, has taken a critical step forward in making the case for a successor to silicon. De Heer and his collaborators, including Claire Berger, fellow School of Physics professor, developed a new nanoelectronics platform based on graphene — a single sheet of carbon atoms.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676911567 2023-02-20 16:46:07 1676911567 2023-02-20 16:46:07 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-02T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[More than 2,300 dead as powerful quake hits southern Turkey and Syria]]> 34434 More than 2,300 people have died and rescuers are racing to pull survivors from beneath the rubble after a devastating earthquake ripped through Turkey and Syria, leaving destruction and debris on each side of the border. One of the strongest earthquakes to hit the region in a century shook residents from their beds at around 4 a.m. on Monday, sending tremors as far away as Lebanon and Israel. Karl Lang, an assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, told CNN the area hit by the quake Monday is prone to seismic activity. “It’s a very large fault zone, but this is a larger earthquake than they’ve experienced any time in recent memory,” Lang said. (Lang's comments also appeared at Kake.com,  ABC7 Chicago, The Hindu, and Newsweek.)

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<![CDATA[Quantum Field Theory Pries Open Mathematical Puzzle]]> 34434 Last month, mathematicians Karen Vogtmann and Michael Borinsky posted a proof that there is a truckload of mathematical structure within a hitherto inaccessible mathematical world called the moduli space of graphs, which Vogtmann and a collaborator first described in the mid-1980s. “That’s a super hard problem. It’s amazing they were able to,” said Dan Margalit, professor in the School of Mathematics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. (Margalit did not work on the moduli space proof.) 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676909813 2023-02-20 16:16:53 1676909813 2023-02-20 16:16:53 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Penn State biochemist Denise Okafor receives 2023 Marion Milligan Mason Award]]> 34434 C. Denise Okafor (M.S. CHEM 2010, Ph.D. CHEM 2015), assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology and of chemistry at Penn State, has been selected as a recipient of the 2023 Marion Milligan Mason Award for Women in the Chemical Sciences by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The Mason Award commemorates the late chemist and AAAS member Marion Tuttle Milligan Mason, who wanted to support the advancement of women in the chemical sciences. Okafor’s research combines computational and experimental investigations to develop a fundamental understanding of how protein function is regulated.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676908886 2023-02-20 16:01:26 1676908886 2023-02-20 16:01:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-16T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-16T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Oceanographer Isaiah Bolden ’15 Discusses Climate Change with Top White House Official]]> 34434 In early February, Isaiah Bolden (B.A. Bowdoin '15) moderated a discussion on climate change with Vice President Kamala Harris at Georgia Tech, where he is an assistant professor at the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences. Addressing a venue "filled to the brim," Harris emphasized the importance of creating an equitable clean-energy economy as we transition away from fossil fuels. “In order for us to truly achieve that, it’s going to require all to be involved"--scientists, researchers, and academics, she said. Bolden described being greatly affected by witnessing a terrible flood displace whole communities in Nashville, Tennessee, his hometown. “I had this passion burgeoning right then and there as someone who has this aptitude for science, this aptitude for math, but then seeing that the science is not reaching the public in a way that it should,” he said. “What can I then do with my career as an environmental scientist to generate data and get that data into the hands of people who could do something with it?”

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676907141 2023-02-20 15:32:21 1676907141 2023-02-20 15:32:21 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-17T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Mathematicians Eliminate Long-Standing Threat to Knot Conjecture]]> 34434 Over 60 years ago, Ralph Fox posed a problem about knots that haunts mathematicians to this day. His question is now often formulated as the “slice-ribbon conjecture,” which posits that two seemingly distinct groups of mathematical knots are actually the same. With its suggestion of elegant simplicity within the world of knots, it’s become one of the most high-profile problems in knot theory. For decades, one particular knot was suspected to be a possible route to settling the conjecture. Yet in a paper posted last summer, five mathematicians found that this knot isn’t going to work after all. While the arguments they introduced will provide new insights into a broader class of knots, the work as a whole leaves mathematicians uncertain about the conjecture. Jen Hom, associate professor in the School of Mathematics, has previously collaborated with two of the new paper's authors, and she weighs in on the results. 

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<![CDATA[Plants Must Migrate to Survive Climate Change. But They Need Our Help]]> 34434 The sheer speed of temperature increases in the climate crisis era, combined with the fragmentation of landscapes by human activity, is making it harder for trees and other plants to follow their preferred climate conditions. These changes are disrupting a millennia-old process of plant migration, and it could pose a major challenge to global efforts to protect wildlife and reforest land to fight climate change. A study published Feb. 6 by Georgia Tech researchers found that 75% of the dominant plant groups in North America, including trees like pines and oaks, have migrated across the region over the last 18,000 years to track the movement of their ideal growing conditions. That plant migration will be harder to pull off over the coming decades, according to Jenny McGuire, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and the School of Biological Sciences, and a co-author of the study. “There’s so many barriers and filters to plant movement now. That could prevent them from shifting in some places,” she says.

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<![CDATA[On Magic and Math—A Conversation with Matt Baker]]> 34434 Matt Baker, professor in the School of Mathematics and associate dean for Faculty Development in the College of Sciences, is on the cover of the current issue of Math Horizons, a journal of the Mathematical Association of America (MAA). Baker, who is also a two-time winner of the Greater Atlanta Magician of the Year Award, is profiled about his love of math and magic, and his use of magic in researching and demonstrating math theorems. "I thought math and magic were two separate things," Baker said. "Until I was really shown the connection, I didn’t try too hard to think about creating my own magic tricks based on math principles, and now I’m kind of obsessed with that and spend a lot of time doing it."

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676397330 2023-02-14 17:55:30 1676401453 2023-02-14 19:04:13 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-08T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Department of Energy funds peatlands greenhouse gas study conducted by FSU Scientists]]> 34434 Florida State University climate scientists and others were recently granted $3.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy to investigate carbon storage in the peatlands environment. Peatlands can be found across the globe, covering almost every continent. The largest area of peatlands can be found towards the Northern and Southern hemispheres and closest to the equator. In Florida, the greatest example of a peatland environment is the Everglades. FSU will work with Georgia Tech researchers on the DOE grant, including Joel Kostka, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676322588 2023-02-13 21:09:48 1676322606 2023-02-13 21:10:06 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-09T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Special feature looks at history for biodiversity conservation]]> 34434 Without conservation-based understanding and intervention, plant and animal species across the globe face rapidly changing ecosystems that will require dynamic adaptation or lead them toward extinction. A special feature titled “The past as a lens for biodiversity conservation on a dynamically changing planet” in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and the overview article of the same name delves into how recent work in conservation biology, ecology and paleontology reveals how plants and animals respond to rapid and dynamic environmental changes. Jenny McGuire, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Science and the School of Biological Sciences, is a co-author of the study.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676321506 2023-02-13 20:51:46 1676321506 2023-02-13 20:51:46 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-08T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-08T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Machine learning predicts biodiversity and resilience in the Coral Triangle]]> 34434 Coral reef conservation is a steppingstone to protect marine biodiversity and life in the ocean as we know it. The health of coral also has huge societal implications: reef ecosystems provide sustenance and livelihoods for millions of people around the world. In the face of climate change, Annalisa Bracco, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and Lyuba Novi, a postdoctoral fellow, offer a new methodology that could revolutionize how conservationists monitor coral. The researchers applied machine learning tools to study how climate impacts connectivity and biodiversity in the Pacific Ocean’s Coral Triangle — the most diverse and biologically complex marine ecosystem on the planet.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1676318576 2023-02-13 20:02:56 1676318576 2023-02-13 20:02:56 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-09T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[This startup aims to capture 10,000 tons carbon from farmland this year using volcanic rock dusts]]> 34434 Lithos Carbon, a US-based startup transforming farmland into carbon removal centers using the power of volcanic rocks, aims to capture 10,000 tons of carbon this year. Lithos accelerates mineral weathering by spreading basalt on croplands to increase dissolved inorganic carbon with eventual storage as ocean carbonates. Its technology uses novel soil models and machine learning to maximize carbon dioxide (CO₂) removal while boosting crop growth. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is one of the three co-founders of Lithos Carbon. 

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<![CDATA[How origami inspires world-changing technology]]> 34434 Just like fashioning decorative shapes and figures using the Japanese art of folding paper, tracing when and where origami originated is complicated. But what cannot be disputed is its incredible influence in modern engineering. While styles of origami can be incredibly diverse, the art is rooted in mathematical principles that make it applicable to science and industry. This story in E&T mentions scientists at Georgia Tech exploring origami, kirigami (where paper is cut as well as folded) and specific folding techniques for building everything from furniture to bridges. One of those scientists is D. Zeb Rocklin, assistant professor in the School of Physics

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<![CDATA[Harnessing good fats to relieve MS symptoms]]> 34434 Basic nutrition teaches that fat, when consumed in large quantities, is harmful to human health. However, the components that make up fats are complex. Good, unsaturated fats, or lipids, can lower disease risk. In fact, in a new study, researchers found that a good fat derivative may be able to relieve symptoms in patients suffering from chronic inflammatory diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. The study's authors include two researchers from the School of Chemistry and BiochemistryAdita Das, associate professor, and Justin Kim, postdoctoral fellow. 

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<![CDATA[Breaking the Stigma around Community College]]> 34434 Astrobites, a daily astrophysical literature journal written by graduate students in astronomy since 2010, features a guest column written by two Ph.D. students extolling the virtues of community college. One of the authors is School of Physics alumna Kiersten Boley, B.S PHYS 2019, now seeking a Ph.D. in astronomy from Ohio State University. Boley writes that she didn't want to become a physicist until she attended community college, where her professor in introductory physics "sparked my love of science." Boley credits that with helping her thrive at Georgia Tech. 

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<![CDATA[I Bought a CO2 Monitor, and It Broke Me]]> 34434 Atlantic staff writer Katherine J. Wu wanted to find out if she could fix the air quality in her New England apartment. That led her to discover carbon dioxide-monitoring devices with varying degrees of success. Wu turned to climate and air quality experts for some advice, and learned that other pollutants besides CO2, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxide, and ozone, can be even more harmful to health and environments. There's also the matter of, well, particulate matter, and whether the devices pick those up on their monitors. One of the experts Wu consulted is Nga Lee (Sally) Ng, Love Family Professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, and the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

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<![CDATA[The Flu-ification of COVID Policy Is Almost Complete]]> 34434 In an advisory meeting in late January, the FDA signaled its intention to start doling out COVID vaccines just like flu shots: once a year in autumn, for just about everyone, ad infinitum. Joshua Weitz is a professor and Tom and Marie Patton Chair in the School of Biological Sciences, co-director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences, and Blaise Pascal International Chair of Excellence at the Ecole Normale Superieure. Weitz said that recommendations on the proper timing and number of doses have changed so many times that many Americans have simply "checked out." After the bivalent recipe debuted, polls found that an alarming proportion of people didn’t even know the shot was available to them. That is what the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) for the week of January 20 found. Weitz and Stephen Beckett, a research scientist in the School of Biological Sciences, conducted research for the CDC report. 

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<![CDATA[Tech initiates new carbon neutrality plan by 2050]]> 34434 Georgia Tech has announced its commitment to addressing climate change by launching a Climate Action Plan. Its development began in 2022 and the plan will be put into place this year.  According to a press release from the Institute, the plan “will include developing a greenhouse gas inventory, modeling potential mitigation strategies and engaging with faculty, students and staff from across campus.” Some of those students, including Rachel Chin, a fifth-year student in the School of Biological Sciences, are anxious to know more about carbon neutrality goals and other aspects of the plan.

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<![CDATA[SIU’s Tenney lecture to focus on interdisciplinary teaching of math, art and science]]> 34434 Elisabetta Matsumoto, an associate professor in the School of Physics, will present “Knotty Knits: A Chat about Math and Crafts” beginning at 3 p.m. March 3, at Southern Illinois University's Guyon Auditorium. Matsumoto, whose research interests include soft condensed matter physics and the geometry of materials, uses knitting to illustrate the math and mechanics within the craft, and how studying the physics of knitting could lead to applications such as wearable electronics. 

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<![CDATA[Science isn't as disruptive as it used to be. Now we need to understand why]]> 34434 Is science better when it disrupts or when there are just incremental improvements to previous knowledge? The topic was analyzed in a recent study, and it seems that researchers have spent these past years improving things rather than trying to revolutionize everything. The study suggests that the level of "disruptiveness" in scientific research has gone way down in the 2000s compared to the last half-century. Yian Yin, a computational social scientist at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, highlights how disruptiveness is not inherently good, and incremental science is not necessarily bad. Yin cites the first direct observation of gravitational waves, a landmark discovery that was both revolutionary and the product of incremental science. Georgia Tech researchers, many from the School of Physics, worked with researchers at the Laser Interferomoter Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) on the gravitational wave observations. (This coverage also appeared in Nature and Inside Higher Education.)

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<![CDATA[President Biden Announces Key Appointments to Boards and Commissions ]]> 34434 The White House has announced that former College of Sciences professor Kim Cobb, currently a professor in Earth, Environmental, and Planetary Sciences at Brown University, has been named to the President's Intelligence Advisory Board. Prior to joining Brown in 2022, she served as director of the Global Change Program at Georgia Tech, professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and ADVANCE Professor for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. Cobb is also director of the Institute at Brown for Environment and Society (IBES). 

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<![CDATA[2023 Atlanta 500: Education & Healthcare]]> 34434 Two College of Sciences alumni are included in Atlanta Magazine's 2023 list of the Atlanta 500, highlighting the city's leaders in a variety of fields. Georgia Tech President Angel Cabrera, MS Psy 93, PhD Psy 95, is the Institute's 12th president. During his first year as president, he steered the institution through the Covid-19 pandemic and produced a new strategic plan focused on impact, access, and inclusive innovation. Also, Valerie Montgomery Rice, BS CHEM 83, is the President and Dean of Morehouse School of Medicine, and was the first woman to serve in that role. Montgomery Rice was founding director of the Center for Women’s Health Research at Meharry Medical College in Nashville, one of the nation’s first research centers devoted to studying diseases that disproportionately affect women of color.

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<![CDATA[Local weather forecast office to partner in new Georgia Tech degree program]]> 34434 Beginning Summer 2023, prospective and current Georgia Tech students will have three new Bachelor of Science degrees to choose from in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, including one that involves the National Weather Service Forecast Office in Peachtree City as an integral partner in providing practical instruction for students in the B.S. Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences (AOS) Degree. The AOS degree program uses the current Meteorology track as its foundation and will include aspects of Atmospheric Sciences, Oceanography and Climate Sciences. The AOS degree is designed to take advantage of Atlanta as a “hotspot” for major meteorological organizations including The Weather Channel, CNN, local stations in a top 10 TV market, and the National Weather Service (NWS) Peachtree City, Georgia office.

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<![CDATA[Green comet will pass by Earth this month]]> 34434 Comet Lulin, a rare green comet discovered in 2007, is set to make its closest approach to the Earth around Feb. 24. The comet's green color comes from the gases that make up its atmosphere. Its closest approach to Earth will be 38 million miles. James Sowell, principal academic professional in the School of Physics and director of the Georgia Tech Observatory, joins Atlanta News First to talk about the best times to view the comet, where it may have originated, and how rare green comets are in the universe.  

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<![CDATA[Looking to Our Ocean for Climate Solutions]]> 34434 Susan Lozier, Dean of the College of Sciences, Betsy Middleton and John Clark Sutherland Chair, and a professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, will appear on a panel examining climate change and the Earth's oceans at the 2023 South by Southwest (SXSW) Conference in Austin, Texas, March 10. Lozier, who also serves as president of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), will join leading ocean experts to discuss the ocean’s role in climate, the potential for ocean-based carbon dioxide removal, and a code of conduct for CO2 removal that could maximize collective societal and environmental benefit for our ocean planet. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1675353415 2023-02-02 15:56:55 1675353415 2023-02-02 15:56:55 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2023-02-02T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[How clean hospitals can reduce antibiotic resistance and save lives]]> 34434 A new paper in Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that antibiotic resistance may result from poor hygiene practices in hospitals or other medical facilities. Researchers addressed whether hygiene weakens the effect of antibiotic pressure on resistance evolution. The authors first developed a mathematical model of resistance to predict how good or poor hygiene might affect how rapidly resistant bacteria increase in abundance due to antibiotic treatment. Kristofer Wollein Waldetoft, a postdoctoral researcher with the Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection (CMDI) in the School of Biological Sciences, and Sam Brown, professor in the School and former CMDI director, collaborated on the research.

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<![CDATA[Cats land on their feet, which could help humans walk better]]> 34434 The legendary ability of cats to fall back on their paws could one day help humans walk better after a spinal cord injury, according to research done at the Université de Sherbrooke. The knowledge could also help seniors whose sense of balance is more precarious. In collaboration with researchers from Georgia Tech and Drexel, the Sherbrooke researchers wanted to better understand how what science calls a somatosensory return allows a cat to coordinate the movement of its four legs. Boris Prilutsky, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences, collaborated on the research.

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1674500469 2023-01-23 19:01:09 1674500906 2023-01-23 19:08:26 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-01-23T00:00:00-05:00 2023-01-23T00:00:00-05:00 2023-01-23T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Active matter theory explains fire-ant group behavior]]> 34434 Ants are social insects and the Solenopsis invicta species —known as the fire ant— is no exception. The social interactions of this invasive insect, which comes from South America, are framed within the context of the theory of Active Matter, which would explain the ants’ group behaviour as a reaction to the intrinsic mechanisms in the system. This is one of the conclusions of an article published in the journal Science Advances by two University of Barcelona researchers along with Guillermo Goldsztein, professor in the School of Mathematics

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<![CDATA[Shake, Rattle, and Roll: Inside the Elgin earthquake swarm]]> 34434 An unprecedented wave of minor earthquakes focused near Elgin, a small town in Kershaw County in South Carolina, have local residents struggling to describe what they’re experiencing. For a big chunk of 2022, “Did you feel that?” became almost as common a greeting as “How are you?” across the Midlands. The U.S. Geological Survey refers to the Elgin phenomenon as a “swarm.” It began Dec. 27, 2021, with a magnitude 3.3 earthquake. Since then, upward of 80 earthquakes have been recorded. Zhigang Peng, a professor of geophysics in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, says magma or fluid movement can cause quakes, but scientists haven't found evidence of those with the Elgin swarm.

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<![CDATA[Four Chemists Receive 2023 Marion Milligan Mason Award]]> 34434 Four early-career chemists, including a School of Chemistry and Biochemistry alumna, have been awarded funding to kickstart their research, ranging from biochemistry to polymers, thanks to a fund created to advance women in the chemical sciences. Marion Milligan Mason Award winners also receive leadership development, mentoring opportunities, and a network of women in the chemical sciences. One of the four Mason Award winners is Denise Okafor, MS CHEM 2010, Ph.D BIOCHEM 2015. Okafor is now an assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State Eberly College of Sciences

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<![CDATA[Yale study finds significant protection in annual COVID-19 booster]]> 34434 A recent study led by researchers at the Yale School of Public Health has indicated that regular COVID-19 boosters may be key in reducing infection. The study found that receiving a booster shot once or twice a year significantly reduces the probability of COVID-19 infection. Despite hopes that the initial COVID-19 vaccination series would be effective at preventing long term infection, short-term studies involving SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies have indicated that antibody protection against infection wanes significantly post-vaccination and even post-booster. Researchers involved in the study include Hayley Hassler, a Ph.D. student in Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Biosciences (QBioS) at Georgia Tech.

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<![CDATA[A look at Zoo Atlanta’s breakthrough research findings in 2022]]> 34434 2022 was an instrumental year for Zoo Atlanta’s research team, spearheading studies that change the way scientists and wildlife experts understand different species — ranging from mammals to reptiles — and inform best ways to care for and protect the animals. Last year, the team and partners published 16 peer-reviewed papers in total, according to Joseph Mendelson, adjunct professor in the School of Biological Sciences who is also Zoo Atlanta's Director of Research. For one paper, David Hu, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering was part of a study that focused on the mechanics of the skin wrinkles and folds in an elephant's trunk. Other School of Biological Sciences researchers assembled the genome of the critically endangered Guatemalan beaded lizard. Those researchers include former graduate student Carl J. Dyson, doctoral student Aaron Pfennig, Joseph Lachance, associate professor; Joseph Mendelson, and Michael Goodisman, professor. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1674492668 2023-01-23 16:51:08 1674492668 2023-01-23 16:51:08 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2023-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2023-01-20T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[How to push, wiggle, or drill an object through granular material]]> 34434 Pushing a shovel through snow, planting an umbrella on the beach, wading through a ball pit, and driving over gravel all have one thing in common: They all are exercises in intrusion, with an intruding object exerting some force to move through a soft and granular material. Predicting what it takes to push through sand, gravel, or other soft media can help engineers drive a rover over Martian soil, anchor a ship in rough seas, and walk a robot through sand and mud. But modeling the forces involved in such processes is a huge computational challenge that often takes days to weeks to solve. Now, engineers at the Massachusette Institute of Technology and Georgia Tech have found a faster and simpler way to model intrusion through any soft, flowable material. Daniel Goldman, Dunn Family Professor in the School of Physics, joined MIT researchers for this project. 

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<![CDATA[Key Industries Sustain Momentum for State's Economic Development]]> 34434 Governor Brian P. Kemp, in conjunction with the Georgia Department of Economic Development (GDEcD), today announced that Georgia sustained its momentum through economic development projects in key industries during the first half of Fiscal Year 2023 (July 1 through December 31, 2022). The 218 locations or expansions supported by GDEcD’s Global Commerce division are expected to create approximately 17,500 new jobs and more than $13 billion in investment for the state. Both the number of locations and total investment amount increased over the same period last year. Included in the roundup is Science Square. Georgia Tech hosted an August groundbreaking for the purpose-built district near campus on North Avenue, designed as a hub for biosciences/life sciences research and development.

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<![CDATA[FSU climate scientists receive Department of Energy funding to study greenhouse gas emissions from peatlands]]> 34434 Peatlands store a significant amount of the Earth’s carbon and have functioned as an important moderator of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere for thousands of years. But as peatlands are lost to overextraction and affected by a warmer climate, the impact on these natural carbon scrubbers remains unclear. A team of researchers from Florida State University, Georgia Institute of Technology, Oak Ridge National Lab and the University of Arizona received a $3.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy to investigate the status of carbon stored in peatlands, environments that are at risk of carbon release due to climate change. The Georgia Tech researchers include Joel Kostka, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences; Kostas Konstantinidis, Richard C. Tucker Professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and the Ocean Science and Engineering interdisciplinary graduate program; and Caitlin Petro, research scientist, and Katherine Duchesneau, doctoral student, both with the School of Biological Sciences. (Here's how the College of Sciences covered this story in October 2022.)

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<![CDATA[Survey Finds Americans Still Don’t Know They’re Eligible for Updated COVID-19 Booster Shot]]> 34434 The updated COVID-19 booster shot that targets two omicron subvariants as well as the original coronavirus strain has been available to most Americans for more than four months, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says just 18% of adults have gotten it. Despite COVID deaths in the U.S. once again being on the rise, the months-long booster campaign appears to have an education problem, according to a report published Thursday by the CDC. The most common reason given for not getting the booster shot was a lack of knowledge about eligibility for it, followed by a lack of knowledge about vaccine availability, and a perceived belief that they were already protected against infection. Two School of Biological Sciences,researchers were involved in the CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR):  Joshua Weitz, professor, Tom and Marie Patton Chair, Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences, and Blaise Pascal International Chair of Excellence at the Ecole Normale Superieure; and Stephen Beckett, research scientist. (The CDC report is also mentioned in this story by the Los Angeles Times.)

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<![CDATA[Wibbly wobbly melty welty: A new tool for processing Martian ice cores]]> 34434 A research team featuring Georgia Tech scientists has designed an instrument to aid in the analysis of Martian ice cores. The Melter-Sublimator for Ice Science, or MSIS, methodically melts and sublimates ice samples. With humans likely to visit the Red Planet in the coming decades, exploring ice-rich areas like its South Pole, now seems an excellent time to test out the MSIS. The device consists of two separate components, the Melter on top and the Sublimator beneath it. When combined, they allow the controlled initial processing of an ice core or smaller ice fragments, turning a sample ice into either vapor or meltwater, after which specialized tools could be used to perform a detailed analysis, perhaps searching for concentrations of isotopes or the signatures of microorganisms. Chris Carr, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is one of the MSIS researchers. 

]]> Renay San Miguel 1 1673989211 2023-01-17 21:00:11 1673989211 2023-01-17 21:00:11 0 0 hgTechInTheNews 2023-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2023-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2023-01-14T00:00:00-05:00
<![CDATA[Nobel laureate takes pride in success of bioorthogonal chemistry for cancer treatment]]> 34434 Carolyn Bertozzi, professor of chemistry at Stanford University, and K. Barry Sharpless, a professor at Scripps Research, were two of the three winners of the 2022 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their role in developing bioorthogonal reactions, which enable scientists to explore cells and track biological processes without interfering with the normal chemistry of the cell. That has led to development of a safe way to deliver high doses of chemotherapy without impacting nearby tissues. M.G Finn, professor and chair of the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and James A. Carlos Family Chair for Pediatric Technology, developed so-called click chemistry with Sharpless in 2001. It involves chemical reactions in which specific pairs of molecules react selectively with one another and ignore their environment.

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<![CDATA[Virivores, the organism can eat up to a million viruses a day]]> 34434 While the term doesn’t officially exist yet, a group of American researchers have discovered two groups of microorganisms that are neither animals, nor plants, nor fungi – but neither are they simple bacteria. While they are not the first virus-eating organisms to have been identified, they are apparently able to survive and thrive exclusively by feeding on viral material. The researchers have been studying viruses from a different perspective: not as pathogenic biological entities, but rather, as basic nutrients in the life cycle. One of those researchers is Joshua Weitz, Professor and Tom and Marie Patton Chair in the School of Biological Sciences, Co-Director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Quantitative Biosciences, and Blaise Pascal International Chair of Excellence at the Ecole Normale Superieure.

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<![CDATA[Summit Supercomputer, Deep Learning Power Protein Interaction Prediction]]> 34434 Understanding protein interactions is key to innumerable fields — including, notably, drug design. Now, researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology have developed a machine learning tool to predict interactions between multiple proteins, paving the way for easier identification of drug targets for antibiotics and therapeutics. The open-source, publicly available tool is called AF2Complex — short for AlphaFold 2 Complex, since the tool is built on top of London-based artificial intelligence lab DeepMind’s AlphaFold 2 protein structure prediction program. Jeffrey Skolnick, Regents' Professor and Mary and Maisie Gibson Chair in the School of Biological Sciences, and Mu Gao, senior research scientist, are co-authors of the study. 

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<![CDATA[Cat locomotion could unlock better human spinal cord injury treatment]]> 34434 Cats always land on their feet, but what makes them so agile? Their unique sense of balance has more in common with humans than it may appear. Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology are studying cat locomotion to better understand how the spinal cord works to help humans with partial spinal cord damage walk and maintain balance. Georgia Tech partnered with researchers at the University of Sherbrooke in Canada and Drexel University in Philadelphia to better understand how signals from sensory neurons coordinate movements of a cat's legs. Leading the Georgia Tech research team is Boris Prilutsky, professor in the School of Biological Sciences. (This research was also covered in The Medical Republic.)

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<![CDATA[School of Math Alumna to Speak at American Mathematical Society Sectional Meeting]]> 34434 Blair D. Sullivan, B.S. MATH/CS 2003, will be one of four plenary speakers at the Spring Southeast Sectional Meeting of the American Mathematical Society, scheduled for March 18-19 at Georgia Tech. Sullivan is now an associate professor in the School of Computing at the University of Utah, with an adjunct appointment at North Carolina State University. Her research interests include parameterized algorithms, structural graph theory, applied discrete mathematics, random graphs, and combinatorial scientific computing. Sullivan was also a research scientist in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at Oak Ride National Laboratory. Several School of Mathematics faculty members are organizing panels and other discussions during the Spring Southeast Sectional Meeting. 

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<![CDATA[What are the odds of winning the Mega Millions $1.1B jackpot?]]> 34434 After several drawings with no winner, the Mega Millions jackpot has soared to $1.1 billion. If someone wins Tuesday night’s drawing, it will be the third-largest jackpot in Mega Millions history, falling behind a $1.5 billion ticket sold in South Carolina in 2018 and a $1.3 billion ticket sold in Illinois last summer. If it seems like these enormous jackpots are happening more often, it’s because they are. And that’s not by chance. “They changed the rules so that the pool of numbers you’re selecting from is bigger, so it’s harder to actually get the winning numbers,” said Lew Lefton, who just retired after 23 years at Georgia Tech, where he was a senior academic professional in the School of Mathematics, as well as Assistant Dean for Information Technology and Associate Vice President for Research Computing with the College of Sciences. 

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<![CDATA[A New Computer Proof ‘Blows Up’ Centuries-Old Fluid Equations]]> 34434 For centuries, mathematicians have sought to understand and model the motion of fluids. The equations that describe how ripples crease the surface of a pond have also helped researchers to predict the weather, design better airplanes, and characterize how blood flows through the circulatory system. Perhaps the oldest and most prominent of these equations, formulated by Leonhard Euler more than 250 years ago, describe the flow of an ideal, incompressible fluid: a fluid with no viscosity, or internal friction, and that cannot be forced into a smaller volume. Mathematicians have long suspected that there exist initial conditions that cause the equations to break down. But they haven’t been able to prove it. In a preprint posted online in October, a pair of mathematicians has shown that a particular version of the Euler equations does indeed sometimes fail. Rafael de la Llave, a professor in the School of Mathematics who studies dynamical systems and mathematical physics, comments on the findings. 

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<![CDATA[President Obama Reunites with Iowa Campaign Organizers on 15th Anniversary of Caucus Win]]> 34434 Ahead of the fifteenth anniversary of the 2008 Iowa Caucuses, President Barack Obama held a roundtable discussion with six former campaign organizers to reflect on their work in Iowa and how, 15 years later, they have continued making an impact within their communities. “I really rode the wave of your work and that ultimately led to a historic election,” said President Obama, who spoke of how seeing campaign organizers and volunteers working so hard up close inspired him to be a better candidate and the role they played in the early victory that put him on a viable path to the presidency. One of those advisors is Shannon Valley, M.S. EAS 2016, Ph.D. EAS 2019. Currently, Valley is a American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow placed at the U.S. Agency for International Development. Before that, she was a postdoctoral scholar at Woods Hole Oceanographic InstitutioAfAfter n.

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<![CDATA[The Top 20 American Universities For R And D Funding In Engineering]]> 34434 Where is cutting-edge engineering research being conducted in the U.S.? What are our leading universities for sponsored research in engineering subfields such as chemical engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering? One answer to those questions can be found in the Higher Education Research and Development (HERD) Survey, released in December by the National Science Foundation (NSF). That survey measures the dollars spent annually on research and development (R and D) at American colleges and universities. Georgia Tech is second on the overall list, with $839,071 on research and development expenditures. 

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<![CDATA[Around the Web: Marketing Muster. Creating Crayons. Joe’s Journalism. Going Graphene. Feather Photography. Car Colors. Checking Chuckling. Fish Fiasco.]]> 34434 This roundup of news items includes a report updating research on graphene, a possible successor to silicon as the foundation for all electronics, from Walter de Heer, Regent's Professor in the School of Physics. De Heer's latest advance involves developing a new  nanoelectronics platform based on graphene. The technology is compatible with conventional microelectronics manufacturing, a necessity for any viable alternative to silicon. In the course of its research, de Heer's team may have also discovered a new quasiparticle. Their discovery could lead to manufacturing smaller, faster, more efficient, and more sustainable computer chips, and has potential implications for quantum and high-performance computing.

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<![CDATA[Howard Hughes Medical Institute Grant to Support Inclusive Science Education]]> 34434 The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) awarded the University of Maryland a six-year, $505,000 grant to continue UMD’s work toward the inclusion of all students in science through HHMI’s Inclusive Excellence 3 (IE3) initiative. HHMI awarded IE3 grants totaling more than $60 million over six years to collaborate on strategies for creating more welcoming, inclusive learning experiences for students pursuing degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). HHMI reviewed 354 proposals and awarded grants to 104 schools, dividing them into seven Learning Community Clusters, or LCCs. Georgia Tech is included in the University of Maryland's LLC. Lewis Wheaton, associate professor in the School of Biological Sciences and Director of the Center for Promoting Inclusion and Equity in the Sciences (C-PIES); Carrie Shepler, principal academic professional in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Assistant Dean for Teaching Effectiveness in the College of Sciences; Jennifer Leavey, principal academic professional in the School of Biological Sciences and Assistant Dean for Faculty Mentoring in the College of Sciences; and David Collard, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Senior Associate Dean in the College of Sciences led this grant initiative for Georgia Tech.

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<![CDATA[Encore: How much water do you actually need? Here's the science]]> 34434 Many of us feel tethered to our water bottles because we've been told that being hydrated is key to being healthy. NPR's Life Kit and Short Wave colleagues teamed up to talk about what science says about hydrating. Turns out much of the lore is due for an update. Example: drinking eight glasses of water a day is good for you. That actually depends on body size and activity level. But Mindy Millard-Stafford, professor in the School of Biological Sciences and director of Georgia Tech's Exercise Physiology Lab, says even mild dehydration, or a two percent loss of water, can impact the brain's executive functions and ability to pay sustained attention. 

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<![CDATA[Heavier, curvy stones can give surprising results in skipping, physicists say]]> 34434 Skipping a stone across water requires skill and patience and, of course, a great stone. Personal preference may send you to a flat, light one, which seems to skip easier. But scientists have found that is not the only way to get impressive leaps. A recent University of Bristol study researched how shape and mass affect the way objects interact with water. And it found that a heavier rock with a good curve — imagine the shape of a mango but smaller —  can get an impressive bounce. David Hu, a professor with the School of Biological Sciences and the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, and an adjunct professor in the School of Physics, did not take part in the study but comments on how surprised he was that the Bristol scientists studied curved objects. 

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<![CDATA[‘InspiHER movement’ helps Newton County female students see future in tech industry]]> 34434 The InspiHer program created by Dr. Jennifer Williams has a mission that runs deep in Newton County. In fact, it was an inspired Williams who piloted the program seven years ago for purpose of exposing females — specifically minority females — to coding and computer science at a young age. That small, founding club has evolved into a county wide movement to inspire young females students throughout all Newton County schools to consider careers in coding and computer technology. Partnerships included Georgia Tech’s CEISMC program (Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing) sending five women to lead a session of the Earsketch program, a branch of InspiHer where girls get to code music and create original songs. Lizanne DeStefano is CEISMC's executive director and a professor in the School of Psychology. 

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<![CDATA[Wild mission concepts would melt into icy moons, surf on sunlight to the ice giants, and more]]> 34434 At the 2022 American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting in December, planetary scientists gathered to discuss their visions for the future of solar system exploration — visions that include drilling into the surface of the moon, peering into the atmosphere of Mars, sniffing out what's in water spurting out of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus, and more. One of those projects is the Ice Shell Impact Penetrator (IceShIP), a probe that would hit the icy ocean surface of Jupiter's moon Europa "faster than a bullet" according to Chinmayee Govinda Raj, a doctoral candidate in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry. The impact would melt some of the ice, and the probe would also carry heaters to help melting along. Then, the spacecraft would sip up that extraterrestrial liquid, sending it to internal instruments that could analyze it for signs of life. Raj and a team of scientists conducted a 2022 study of IceShIP's post-impact components.

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<![CDATA[Black Hole Astrophysics w/ Feryal Özel]]> 34434 In this episode of the Talk Nerdy podcast, host Cara Santa Maria is joined by Feryal Özel, professor and chair of the School of Physics. They talk about her incredible career as a theoretical astrophysicist, her important work on the recent imaging of a black hole with the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration, and the critical need for representation in science.

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<![CDATA[Computing function from form]]> 34434 Over the past two years, artificial intelligence has shown it can predict what many cellular components look like. For instance, the AlphaFold deep-learning tool developed by Google sister company DeepMind has decoded how nearly every amino acid sequence folds into defined shapes. With a grant of computing time from the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) Leadership Computing Challenge, a team led by Jeffrey Skolnick, Regents' Professor, Mary and Maisie Gibson Chair & GRA Eminent Scholar in Computational Systems Biology in the School of Biological Sciences, is extending that work to unfurl how those proteins interact and form complex, working structures in living systems. More details on this development can be found at the College of Sciences News Center here

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<![CDATA[A New Puzzle Turns Earth Into a Rubik’s Cube, but More Complex]]> 34434 Henry Segerman, a British American mathematician and mathematical artist at Oklahoma State University, has invented a puzzle to help explain the Earth's annual trip around the sun: Continental Drift, a 3-D sliding puzzle that made its debut earlier this year. The underlying geometric concept is holonomy: When you travel a loop on a curved surface and return to the starting point, you arrive somewhat turned around, rotated, perhaps by 180 degrees. It's just one of Segerman's inventions that help visualize mathematics. A few years ago, Dr. Segerman demonstrated Extensors: a construction kit for making extending mechanisms from scissor-like hinged parts. Sabetta Matsumoto, an associate professor in the School of Physics, applied mathematician, and Dr. Segerman’s partner, gave input into the contraption’s development and came up with the name Extensor. Between them, math is “a pretty common conversation,” said Matsumoto, who was featured in a 2019 New York Times story about her project to investigate the mathematics and mechanics of knitting. (This story also appears in Yahoo! News.)

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<![CDATA[How sounds from space are revealing otherwise hidden cosmic phenomena]]> 34434 It sounds like a firework, a bang followed by a crackle of faint sparkles. Then, a background hum builds. Soon, that is overtaken by what sounds like crashing waves. In between them, random notes beep. This is the sound of a black hole. Specifically, a “black hole-star system” around 7800 light years from Earth called V404 Cygni. The firework is the sound of the black hole. This isn’t what a black hole would sound like in reality. It is a soundscape created by NASA to represent data from telescopes. Using sound this way, known as sonification, isn’t new. But in recent years, more and more astronomers are realizing the benefits of “listening” to the universe. “Our auditory system can often discern patterns and extract meaning, even when our visual system is not able to do so,” says Bruce Walker, professor in the Schools of Psychology and Interactive Computing who directs the Georgia Tech Sonification Lab.

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<![CDATA[Strange, tentacled microbe may resemble ancestor of complex life]]> 34434 By growing an unusual tentacled microbe in the lab, microbiologists may have taken a big step toward resolving the earliest branches on the tree of life and unraveling one of its great mysteries: how the complex cells that make up the human body — and all plants, animals, and many single-celled organisms — first came to be. Such microbes, called Asgard archaea, have previously been cultured — once — but the advance reported in Nature marks the first time they’ve been grown in high enough concentrations to study their innards in detail. Jennifer Glass, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a geo-microbiologist, didn't work on the study, but her research in 2020 finding unusual ribosome structures in Asgard microbes helped the scientists published in Nature zero in on what to look for in their specimens.

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<![CDATA[Pursuing Premier Public Health]]> 34434 As the home of prominent research universities like Georgia Tech, medical schools and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Georgia is uniquely positioned to be a leader in public health — not just for the U.S. but around the world. Bolstered by the Georgia Research Alliance (GRA), whose mission is to bring government, business and academia together to expand and further university research, the state is able to recruit the scientists who are making breakthroughs in major health issues. These include forecasting the next pandemic, developing new antibiotics, and tackling chronic health problems like high blood pressure. Marvin Whiteley, professor in the School of Biological Sciences, Bennie H. and Nelson D. Abell Chair in Molecular and Cellular Biology, and Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar is interviewed about his research into the social behaviors of bacteria and how they can point the way to new treatments.

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<![CDATA[Whole Ecosystem Warming Stimulates Methane Production from Plant Metabolites in Peatlands]]> 34434 Scientists working at the ongoing Department of Energy’s (DOE) Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Changing Environments (SPRUCE) experiment use the site’s northern Minnesota bog as a laboratory. SPRUCE allowed scientists to warm the air and soil by zero to 9 degrees C above ambient temperatures to depths more than 2m below ground. This warming simulates the effects of climate change on the carbon cycle at the whole ecosystem scale over the long term. The research found that the production of the potent greenhouse gas methane increased at a faster rate than carbon dioxide in response to warming. The results indicate that carbon dioxide release and methane production are stimulated by plants‘ release of metabolites, chemicals that plants create for protection and other functions. The scientists included a team from Georgia Tech led by Joel Kostka, professor and associate chair of research for the School of Biological Sciences, with an adjunct appointment in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

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<![CDATA[An international center focused on ocean-based climate solutions launched last month in Atlanta]]> 34434 The Ocean Visions-U.N. Decade Collaborative Center for Ocean-Climate Solutions, which launched in November, is a partnership between the Georgia Aquarium, Georgia Tech, and the nonprofit Ocean Visions.The center leads and supports ocean-based climate solutions that mitigate and reverse the effects of climate change. Headquartered at the Georgia Aquarium, the center is part of the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals to achieve by 2030. The center is also looking at ocean-based renewable energy technologies, and sustainable fisheries and aquaculture to produce low carbon food, just to name a few. Center officials hope to partner with local communities and universities throughout the state.

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<![CDATA[Ocean Bacteria Reveal an Unexpected Multicellular Form]]> 34434 Most people may think of bacteria, regardless of species and shape, as a single cell, or maybe several free-living cells. The problem with this image, according to microbiologists, is that it doesn’t reflect how most bacteria are likely to live. Often, bacteria use sticky molecules to anchor themselves to a surface, growing in collectives called biofilms. A new study shows that even bacteria floating in the open ocean, which lack an anchoring point for forming large conglomerates, exist in multicellular forms. The study builds on 2021 published research from Georgia Tech scientists that showed unicellular yeast forming multicellular clusters. The School of Biological Sciences researchers include Ozan Bozdag, research scientist; William Ratcliff, associate professor; Kai Tong, Ph.D. Quantitative Biosciences student, and Penelope Kahn. School of Physics researchers involved include Peter Yunker, assistant professor;  Thomas C. Day, graduate student; and Seyed Alireza Zamani-Dahaj, Ph.D. student. 

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<![CDATA[Computer Proof ‘Blows Up’ Centuries-Old Fluid Equations]]> 34434 For centuries, mathematicians have sought to understand and model the motion of fluids. The equations that describe how ripples crease the surface of a pond have also helped researchers to predict the weather, design better airplanes, and characterize how blood flows through the circulatory system. Perhaps the oldest and most prominent of these equations, formulated by Leonhard Euler more than 250 years ago, describe the flow of an ideal, incompressible fluid: a fluid with no viscosity, or internal friction, that cannot be forced into a smaller volume. In a new study, mathematicians show that a particular version of the Euler equations does indeed sometimes fail. The proof marks a major breakthrough — and while it doesn’t completely solve the problem for the more general version of the equations, it offers hope that such a solution is finally within reach. Rafael de la Llave, professor in the School of Mathematics who did not work on the study, comments on its findings. 

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<![CDATA[A Mathematician Who Fled to Freedom but Still Stares Down Doubts]]> 34434 On paper, it might come as no surprise that Svetlana Jitomirskaya, born in Kharkiv, Ukraine, in 1966, became a mathematician. Everyone in her family was one, and her mother was Ukraine’s only female full professor of mathematics. Jitomirskaya is now an award-winning mathematician, a distinguished professor at the University of California, Irvine, and was recently named the Elaine M. Hubbard Chair in the School of Mathematics. In this Q-and-A with Quanta Magazine, Jitomirskaya talks about her research, her experiences as a young Jewish woman in the former Soviet Union, and her hopes for math education. 

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<![CDATA[This US startup uses volcanic rock dust to capture carbon on farms]]> 34434 On a Midwestern farm growing corn and beans, a tractor will soon spread 1,543 tons of rock dust over 140 acres. The goal: fighting climate change. Over the next two growing seasons, the dust — crushed basalt — is expected to capture 384 tons of carbon on the farm while helping crops grow. The farm is one of 14 that are working with Lithos, a new startup pioneering an unusual approach to carbon capture. Instead of pulling carbon dioxide from the air, when rain falls, it combines with atmospheric carbon dioxide to make it slightly acidic, and when the combination hits certain kinds of rocks, it causes a chemical reaction that slowly removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Chris Reinhard, associate professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, is a Lithos cofounder. (This story is also covered in GeekWire and Carbon Herald.)

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<![CDATA[How Artemis rocket launch will prepare astronauts to head back to moon]]> 34434 The Artemis 1 mission to the Moon, launched from Kennedy Space Center on Nov. 16, did not have astronauts on board. It did have what NASA is calling "moonikins" — dummies wearing special spacesuits that will measure data on vibration, acceleration, and cosmic radiation. Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and an adjunct professor in the School of Physics, will study that data. Orlando is also the principal investigator for Georgia Tech's REVEALS (Radiation Effects On Volatiles And Exploration Of Asteroids And Lunar Surfaces), which will help NASA design the next generation of spacesuits and astronaut habitats. 

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<![CDATA[IceCube neutrino analysis pegs possible galactic source for cosmic rays]]> 34434 Scientists with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in Antarctica have now analyzed a decade's worth of such neutrino detections and discovered evidence that an active galaxy called Messier 77 (aka the Squid Galaxy) is a strong candidate for one such high-energy neutrino emitter, according to a new paper published in the journal Science. It brings astrophysicists one step closer to resolving the mystery of the origin of high-energy cosmic rays. The IceCube international collaboration of scientists includes Ignacio Taboada, professor in the School of Physics who also serves as IceCube's spokesperson. (Coverage of this story also appears at Space.com, MSN.com, the Wall Street Journal (registration required), Phys.org, CNET, SciTechDaily, and Inverse.)

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<![CDATA[Weather Geeks: Cryospheric Changes & Coastal Communities]]> 34434 Climate change and melting glaciers are synonymous at this point when the topic is discussed, and usually addresses the future impacts of melting ice and its effects on coastal communities. But how do we determine what those impacts are and when they could occur? Joining the Weather Geeks podcast to talk about this topic is Alex Robel, assistant professor in the School of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and a climate researcher who helps to develop mathematical models that provide this information.

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<![CDATA[Chemistry Nobel Prize awarded for click chemistry]]> 34434 On Oct. 5th, 2022, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences (RSAS) announced it would be awarding the 2022 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to three individuals “for the development of click chemistry and bio-orthogonal chemistry" — Carolyn R. Bertozzi of Stanford Univ., Morten Meldal from the Univ. of Copenhagen, and K. Barry Sharpless from Scripps Research in La Jolla, California. M.G. Finn, professor and chair of the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, deals directly with click and bio-orthogonal chemistry in his lab and research. Finn was also co-author on the original click chemistry paper alongside Hartmuth C. Kolb and Nobel laureate Sharpless.

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<![CDATA[Powerball jackpot makes history as it grows to record-breaking $1.9 billion, but winner could face massive tax bill ]]> 34434 The tax bite is not the only issue to worry about when playing the Powerball lottery. Maximizing your chances at winning what is now a record-breaking payout would mean buying more tickets. "The investment you make by playing multiple games also goes up, and the payoffs in a real lottery vary," said Lew Lefton, senior academic professional in the School of Mathematics, and assistant dean of IT and associate vice president for research in the College of Sciences. In other words, investing more money into a higher number of tickets may not always be worth the expense.

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<![CDATA[Georgia Tech’s Aloha Telescope brings thrilling images to K-12 classrooms]]> 34434 Retired engineer Tom Crowley proves that you can play around with a hobby you love and see it grow into something extraordinary. The 80-year-old has turned his love of astronomy into consulting work with Georgia Tech's Aloha Telescope outreach program. He operates the robotic telescope on Maui through high-speed internet connections from his home in Stone Mountain. Crowley works in partnership with James Sowell, principal academic professional and astronomer in the School of Physics, and director of the Institute's observatory. Together, they’re bringing live video images of the moon into Georgia K-12 classrooms. (More information is available at the Georgia Tech Research Institute’s Direct to Discovery outreach program website, which is creating a Zoom option so that multiple schools can participate at the same time.)

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<![CDATA[NASA’s Lunar Flashlight Ready to Search for Water Ice on the Moon]]> 34434 Although it’s understood that water ice exists below the lunar regolith (broken rock and dust), scientists don’t yet know whether surface ice frost covers the floors inside cold, dark craters. NASA is sending Lunar Flashlight, a small satellite (or SmallSat) no larger than a briefcase to find out. The mission, which will use lasers to shed light on those dark craters, will launch in mid-November aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Lunar Flashlight will be operated by Georgia Tech with its data set to be studied by the REVEALS (Radiation Effects on Volatiles and Exploration of Asteroids and Lunar Surfaces) Lab, a collaborative effort involving students and researchers from the Colleges of Sciences and Engineering. Thomas Orlando, professor in the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and an adjunct professor in the School of Physics, is the principal investigator with REVEALS.

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