<![CDATA[New Integrated Food Chain Center Opens]]> 27328 The newly launched Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center was featured in the March 2010 issue of Food Logistics Magazine. Don Ratliff, Jamie Forrest, and Harvey Donaldson, who head the Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center, appear on the cover of the magazine. The cover story begins on page 14 and continues through page 20.

Finally, the food logistics industry will have a research and resource center to utilize for questions about and solutions to every aspect of managing and monitoring the food cold supply chain. The Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center, formed by the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) and by Sterling Solutions LLC, will be housed within the SCL in Atlanta. The Center - integrating academia with seasoned industry experts - will launch this May and will operate as an international center for applicable knowledge in the fragile cold chain.

Read the entire article at:
http://foodlogistics.epubxpress.com/link/flog/2010/mar/1?s=0.

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1269907200 2010-03-30 00:00:00 1653584976 2022-05-26 17:09:36 0 0 news The newly launched Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center was featured in the March 2010 issue of Food Logistics Magazine.Don Ratliff, Jamie Forrest, and Harvey Donaldson, who head the Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center, appear on the cover of the magazine.

]]>
2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher - Industrial and Systems Engineering

]]>
57735 57735 image <![CDATA[tte62577.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[Making the Case for Cold Chain]]> 27328 "Cool Insights," an annual column in Food Logistics Magazine for 2010, featured an article by David Sterling, a partner in SCL’s new Integrated Food Chain Center, on “Making the Case for Cold Chain.” This second column appeared in the June issue. Read the column: http://www.foodlogistics.com/print/Food-Logistics/Cool-Insights/1$3710

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1281439182 2010-08-10 11:19:42 1653584976 2022-05-26 17:09:36 0 0 news "Cool Insights," an annual column in Food Logistics Magazine for 2010, featured an article by David Sterling, a partner in SCL’s new Integrated Food Chain Center, on “Making the Case for Cold Chain.” This second column appeared in the June issue. Read the column: http://www.foodlogistics.com/print/Food-Logistics/Cool-Insights/1$3710

]]>
2010-08-10T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-10T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-10 00:00:00 Industrial and Systems Engineering

]]>
60383 60383 image <![CDATA[June 2010 Issue of Food Logistics Magazine]]> image/jpeg 1449176267 2015-12-03 20:57:47 1475894523 2016-10-08 02:42:03
<![CDATA[“Rethinking and Rebuilding Supply Chains”: Spring 2010 Supply Chain Executive Forum]]> 27328 “Rethinking and Rebuilding Supply Chains” was the overall theme of the Spring 2010 meeting of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF), which was held April 21 -22, 2010, at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Global Learning Center in Atlanta.

The two-day biannual forum began with a joint meeting between the SCEF and the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) Atlanta Roundtable. John Langley, professor of supply chain management at Georgia Tech and faculty director of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum joined Ben Cubitt of RockTenn and president of the Atlanta CSCMP in giving the Forum’s opening remarks. The remainder of the day was divided between keynote presentations and a panel session focused on the theme of “Supply Chain Innovation.” 

Robert Martichenko, CEO of LeanCor, provided the Forum’s first keynote address, speaking about building discipline for innovation in the lean supply chain.  Among the points he made in his presentation, Martichenko said that lean leaders lead from principles.  “From principles,” “ he said, “they ask questions, make observations, reflect, challenge thinking, teach, coach, and aid in the development of tools and processes to create value, solve problems, and grow people.” Principles of the lean supply chain, according to Martichecko, include making customer consumption visible, reducing lead times, using pull systems, creating velocity and reducing variation, collaborating and focusing on process discipline, and measuring and managing Total Cost of Fulfillment.

Two other presentations included technology-based presentations made by Scott Blatnica, director of Spend Management at Ariba, and Eddie Capel, EVP with Manhattan Associates.

Brian Hancock, VP, Supply Chain with Whirlpool Corporation, gave the closing keynote presentation to the joint SCEF-CSCMP session.  , “Supply Chain Innovation: Transforming Your Supply Chain.”  In this presentation, Mr. Hancock discussed the challenges faced in managing supply chain activities at Whirlpool, catalysts for improvement, and the overall commitment of Whirlpool to sustainability.  His concluding comments suggested that the traditional “functional” views limit the “end-to-end” performance of supply chains, and that “leadership takes an end-to-end orientation emphasizing demand-pull, synchronization and lean operations.

On the second day, when the theme of the SCEF-only sessions evolved to “Rethinking and Rebuilding Supply Chains,” Langley asked participants to consider the following key questions:

The meeting then proceeded with keynote and major presentations. Jim Kellso, senior supply chain master with Intel, gave the day’s first keynote address. In a presentation titled “Innovation and Operational Excellence in the Supply Chain,” Kellso presented details regarding Intel’s “Just Say Yes” initiative. The four pillars of this initiative, are improved responsiveness, forecast accuracy, inventory reduction, and better delivery performance. Intel’s recent expansion of this initiative included transitioning to standard metrics, employing VMI innovatively (with an equivalent focus on non-VMI customers), reducing order (backlog) horizons, enhancing demand processes, and simplifying the planning process. As a result of these initiatives, Intel’s Customer Delight Scores went up by 17 percent between 2006 and 2008, and it’s Supply Chain Delight Score improved by 40 percent. Summarizing what this means, Kellso explains that Intel has improved CPU responsiveness by 300 percent in two years while reducing inventory; that “Just Say Yes” has resulted in significant and tangible business benefits; and that the scope of the innovations has covered people/culture, process, metrics, and tools.

Chris Gaffney, president of Coca-Cola Supply, presented the afternoon keynote, which was divided into two parts: “The Journey to Demand Driven” and “Living Positively in the Supply Chain.”  A demand-driven supply chain, according to Gaffney, is a customer-centric supply chain. “By adapting to make what we sell, rather than sell what we make,” Gaffney explained, “supply chains can finally realize the goal of having their products arrive on the doorsteps of retailers and customers at exactly the right time and in exactly the right volume.” Continuing, Gaffney said that in a demand driven system, consumer demand triggers all activities in the value chain with clearly defined connection points to eliminate waste, reduce variation, and compress lead time.

In the second part of his presentation, on a more personal note, Gaffney addresses issues of leadership, citing individuals and works that have helped shape him not just in business, but in all domains of his life – work, home, community, and self. In concluding his remarks, Gaffney listed three ways to be a good supply chain citizen in the community:

Major presentation sessions punctuated the two keynote addresses. George Abernathy, executive vice president and chief operating officer with Transplace, and Richard Douglass, global industry executive for Manufacturing and Logistics at Sterling Commerce, provided insightful presentations and then participated in a panel session focusing on “Strategic Rethinking of Supply Chains.” Charlie Chesnutt, senior vice president of Technology and Process Improvement for Genuine Parts Corporation, and Jeff Cashman, senior vice president with Manhattan Associates, participated in a technology client-provider session focused on “Transforming Supply Chains through Shared Services.

The Supply Chain Executive Forum experienced a great turnout of members for the Spring 2010 meeting, and is looking forward to the Fall 2010 meeting scheduled for October 6-7, 2010. Click here http://www.scl.gatech.edu/professional-education/scef/ for more information about SCEF.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1274691567 2010-05-24 08:59:27 1653584976 2022-05-26 17:09:36 0 0 news “Rethinking and Rebuilding Supply Chains” was the overall theme of the Spring 2010 meeting of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF), which was held April 21 -22, 2010, at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Global Learning Center in Atlanta.

]]>
2010-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-24 00:00:00 Industrial and Systems Engineering

]]>
<![CDATA[Bill Rouse Releases New Book in Tennenbaum Series on Enterprise Systems]]> 27328 Edie Cohen 1 1275391253 2010-06-01 11:20:53 1653493137 2022-05-25 15:38:57 0 0 news 2010-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-01 00:00:00 50298 50298 image <![CDATA[William Rouse]]> image/jpeg 1449175392 2015-12-03 20:43:12 1475894458 2016-10-08 02:40:58 <![CDATA[Earn Your Supply Chain & Logistics Certificate Online]]> 27328 The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) offers online versions of its entire Supply Chain Management Series, allowing busy executives to study course material at their own pace and schedule, while avoiding the travel costs generally associated with training.

Designed for logistics professionals from across the entire supply chain, the series includes four courses:

--World-Class Inventory Planning and Management. Inventory availability is the most important aspect of customer service, and inventory carrying costs are typically the most expensive and riskiest aspect of logistics and supply chain management. In this course, participants learn how to manage inventories more effectively in order to increase fill rates and inventory turns.

--World-Class Logistics and Supply Chain Strategy. World-class logistics systems improve customer service, reduce operating expenses, and minimize capital investments. In this course, participants will learn how to develop a comprehensive supply chain strategy to improve business performance.

--World-Class Transportation and Distribution . Driven by more frequent and increasingly time-definite shipments, complex security and regulatory requirements, increased fuel and labor costs, and severe shortages in labor and capacity, transportation management has become a critical corporate function. In this course, participants learn how to interpret shipment activity, optimize routes, and manage total transportation for better service and reduced logistics costs.

--World-Class Warehousing and Material Handling . Warehousing minimizes the effects of supply chain inefficiencies, improves logistics accuracy and inventory management, and allows product accumulation, consolidation, and customization. This course focuses on ways to design warehouses to maximize supply chain efficiency and benchmark warehouse performance.

These courses can be taken individually or as part of a certificate program. Participants who complete all four courses will qualify for the Supply Chain & Logistics Certificate. By the end of the series, attendees will have received a broad but intense education covering:

*Customer service and order processing
*Inventory planning and management
*Supply chain integration and transportation
*Warehousing
*Distribution
*Logistics performance measures
*Benchmarking procedures
*Logistics information systems architecture
and implementation
*Third-party logistics strategies
*Logistics organization design

"This online learning experience was a great way to expand into every aspect of logistics, and I was able to complete it at my own pace," said Mark Lamarre, manufacturing manager at Raytheon. "It was straightforward and informative, not trying to be harder than it really is with tricky questions on the exams, like other programs I have done."

The series is taught by Edward Frazelle, PhD, who is known by his students for putting "logic back into logistics."

Each course is divided into nine to twelve sections with an online quiz at the end of each section.

"The online format is perfect for the busy professional as it affords them the flexibility to progress though the course material at their own pace," said Frazelle, author of the book Supply Chain Strategy. "Our online participants have the option of starting and stopping a course as often as they like as long as they complete the course within a twelve-month period."

Online course materials are presented using streaming video presentations synchronized with PowerPoint slides, extensive course notes, and photo galleries that highlight the operation of important logistics systems. The series is offered through a WebCT interface in a point-and-click format. It can be accessed from anywhere, by anyone capable of using a Web browser such as Internet Explorer.

For an online course demo, visit www.scl.gatech.edu/online.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial & Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine of the Stewart School of ISyE.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1262739600 2010-01-06 01:00:00 1479845699 2016-11-22 20:14:59 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) offers online versions of its entire Supply Chain Management Series, allowing busy executives to study course material at their own pace and schedule, while avoiding the travel costs generally associated with training.

]]>
2010-01-06T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-06T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
49736 49736 image <![CDATA[Online Window]]> image/jpeg 1449175408 2015-12-03 20:43:28 1475894463 2016-10-08 02:41:03
<![CDATA[Sensing For Logistics Throughout The Food Chain]]> 27328 Writing for the Cool Insights column in the November/December 2010 issue of Food Logistics magazine, Gary McMurray, division chief for the Food Processing Technology Division at the Georgia Tech Research Institute, picks up a theme that John Bartholdi, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management and research director for the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, discussed in the September 2010 Cool Insights column. According to McMurray, Bartholdi presented an excellent argument for how economic value can be generated by the new trace back laws and how easily this can be done by using data collected for trace back to predict forward in time the quality of the product and its shelf life. Work being done by many research groups around the world, including Georgia Tech, shows that it is possible to develop sensor hardware and software to automatically grade natural products including citrus fruits, apples, corn and jalapenos at the packing houses. The opportunity to apply new technology at the farm that enables predictive modeling of product quality and shelf life has the ability to revolutionize the agribusiness community. Click here to read the article.

This is the sixth installment of the Cool Insights column in Food Logistic magazine hosted by Integrated Food Chain center at Georgia Tech. Click here  to read more about the column and to find links to all six installments.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1292420624 2010-12-15 13:43:44 1475896074 2016-10-08 03:07:54 0 0 news Writing for the Cool Insights column in the November/December 2010 issue of Food Logistics magazine, Gary McMurray says that work being done by many research groups around the world, including Georgia Tech, shows that it is possible to develop sensor hardware and software to automatically grade natural products including citrus fruits, apples, corn and jalapenos at the packing houses. The opportunity to apply new technology at the farm that enables predictive modeling of product quality and shelf life has the ability to revolutionize the agribusiness community.

]]>
2010-12-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-12-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-12-15 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
63195 63195 image <![CDATA[November / December 2010 Issue]]> image/jpeg 1449176668 2015-12-03 21:04:28 1475894554 2016-10-08 02:42:34
<![CDATA[Bill Cook, George Nemhauser and Bo Zhang Among ISyE Faculty/Students Honored at INFORMS Annual Meeting]]> 27328 Each year at its annual meeting, the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) honors deserving members by electing them as Fellows and recognizes outstanding research and life-time achievement through its various and highly prized awards. Among the most prestigious of these are the George Nicholson Student Paper award and the newly created Khachiyan Prize. Two faculty members and one graduate student from the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) were among those receiving these prestigious honors and join other ISyE faculty and students recognized at the meeting.

George Nemhauser, the A. Russell Chandler Chaired Professor, was honored as the first recipient of the newly established Khachiyan Prize, created to recognize an individual or a team for life-time achievements in the area of optimization. The award, named for Leonid Khachiyan, serves as an esteemed recognition of innovativeness and impact in the area of optimization, including theory and applications.

Nemhauser’s remarkable academic career spans nearly a half-century, during which time he has grown into one of the world's foremost experts in discrete optimization and become one of the most recognized members of the INFORMs community. The basis for Nemhauser’s outstanding position as an operations research scientist is his fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of integer programming and combinatorial optimization.

Bill Cook, Chandler Family Chair and professor, is another ISyE faculty member honored at this year’s meeting. Cook was elected INFORMS Fellow, an honor reserved for distinguished individuals who have demonstrated outstanding and exceptional accomplishments and experience in operations research and the management sciences. Their service to the profession and to INFORMS has culminated in election to the INFORMS Fellow Award. Cook, known widely for his work with the Traveling Salesman Problem and his research in combinatorial optimization and integer programming, was elected for his research contributions in both areas. Cook joins a distinguished list, including twelve other ISyE faculty members who have achieved this recognition.

The George Nicholson Student Paper Competition, arguably the most prestigious student award in the operations research community, was awarded to ISyE PhD student Bo Zhang. The George Nicholson Student Paper Competition is held each year to honor outstanding student papers in the field of operations research and the management sciences. Zhang received the Nicholson Award for his paper, “Refined Square-Root Staffing for Call Centers with Impatient Customers,” which he co-authored with Johan van Leeuwaarden and Bert Zwart, ISyE adjunct associate professor and Zhang’s thesis advisor.

Other ISyE faculty and students who received recognition for their outstanding work include:

Li Xu, a third-year PhD student, won the 2010 INFORMS Energy, Natural Resources and the Environment best student paper competition for his paper, "Carbon Emission Permit Price Volatility Mitigation via Financial Options." Xu’s thesis advisor is Shijie Deng.

Pinar Keskinocak, Harold R. and Mary Anne Nash professor and co-director of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, and PhD student Hannah Smalley were finalists for the Daniel H. Wagner Prize for Excellence in Operations Research Practice for their paper, "Universal Tool for Vaccine Scheduling - Applications for Children and Adults." Keskinocak and Smalley co-authored the paper with Dr. Larry Pickering of the Centers for Disease Control and Faramroze Engineer (PhD IE 2009).

PhD student Ran Jin was a finalist for the best student paper award of Quality, Statistics and Reliability section of INFORMS. Ran worked with Jan Shi, the Carolyn J. Stewart Chair professor.

Ozlem Ergun and Julie Swann, associate professors and co-directors of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics; Keskinocak; and PhD students Monica Villarreal and Paul Kerl won third place at the INFORM-ED Case Competition for their paper, "A Leader Home Improvement Retailer Commitment to Disaster Response."  Former students Matthew J. Drake (MS IE 2005, PhD IE 2006) and Gonca Karakus (MS IE 2008) co-authored the paper.

PhD student Kelly Bartlett won the Monday poster session for her poster titled, “Asset Allocation and Routing in a Recruiting Organization.” Bartlett’s advisors are George Nemhauser and Joel Sokol.

Undergraduate students Rene Alvarenga, Dani Slaton, and Jordan Stone won second place in the INFORMS' “Doing Good with Good OR” student competition. Ergun was the advisor.

James Wade (IE 2010) won an honorable mention in the INFORMS undergraduate student paper competition for his paper "Supply Chain Improvements for the World Food Programme."  Ozlem Ergun was the advisor.

INFORMS, the largest professional society in the world for professionals in the field of operations research, management science, and business analytics, serves the scientific and professional needs of operations researchers and those in the management sciences including educators, scientists, students, managers, and consultants. The Institute serves as a focal point for operations research professionals, permitting them to communicate with each other and reach out to other professional societies, as well as the varied clientele of the profession's research and practice.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1292428642 2010-12-15 15:57:22 1475896074 2016-10-08 03:07:54 0 0 news Each year at its annual meeting, the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) honors deserving members by electing them as Fellows and recognizes outstanding research and life-time achievement through its various and highly prized awards. Among the most prestigious of these are the George Nicholson Student Paper award and the newly created Khachiyan Prize. Two faculty members and one graduate student from the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) were among those receiving these prestigious honors and join other ISyE faculty and students recognized at the meeting.

]]>
2010-12-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-12-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-12-15 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62896 63199 63033 62896 image <![CDATA[George Nemhauser]]> image/jpeg 1449176409 2015-12-03 21:00:09 1475894549 2016-10-08 02:42:29 63199 image <![CDATA[Bill Cook]]> image/jpeg 1449176668 2015-12-03 21:04:28 1475894554 2016-10-08 02:42:34 63033 image <![CDATA[Bo Zhang]]> image/jpeg 1449176409 2015-12-03 21:00:09 1475894552 2016-10-08 02:42:32
<![CDATA[2011 EMIL-SCS Class Studies Latin American Logistics]]> 27328 Moving quickly through its eighteen-month program, the EMIL-SCS Class of 2011 recently completed its third residence.  This installment, the Latin American residence, began in Panama City, Panama, included a first-time visit to Lima, Peru, and then concluded with site visits in Sao Paulo, Campinas and Santos, Brazil.

The class began its residence in Panama City with a course in fundamental theory about the region.  Patrice Franko, Grossman Professor of Economics and International Studies at Colby College, presented an overview of Latin America from a geopolitical and socio-economic perspective.  Once the regional framework was set, the class heard from John Bartholdi, Manhattan Associates chair and professor of supply chain and logistics at Georgia Tech.  Bartholdi lectured on warehouse optimization, facility design, IT systems, and software to enhance order fulfillment and distribution. 

Following the two days of intense lecture, the class was ready to get out and experience Panama City and the Colon Free Trade Zone.  First visiting was Manzanillo International Terminal (MIT) Logistics Park site, the class learned the importance of MIT throughout Central America with an emphasis on port operations and performance metrics, rail integration and its support of the Panama Canal and the canal railway, and intermodal truck operations. 

From the MIT offices, the class traveled to J.Cain & Company, a third-party warehouse service provider located on the campus of MIT.  J. Cain presented an overview of the facility and discussed the benefits of being located within the MIT Logistics Park and the benefits and challenges of being inside the Colon Free Trade Zone.  The last essential site visit in Panama was the Panama Canal Authority, where the students learned the rich history of building the Panama Canal, as well as the detailed future plans to expand the canal by 2014.

That evening the class boarded a plane to Lima, Peru, a first-time visit for the EMIL-SCS program.  The class began its Lima visit in the classroom with part two of Bartholdi’s warehouse optimization discussion. Following the lecture, the class made its first site visit in Lima to Ransa, an integrated logistics service provider.  Ransa provided an overview of its port operation logistics services, with a focus on facilitating trade into and out of Lima in support of the mining, retail, consumer, and cold chain industries. 

The class began its second day in Lima with a lecture from Maria Rey Marston, senior lecturer in the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute at Georgia Tech and executive director of the Center for Emerging Logistics & Supply Chains. Marston spoke on logistics and supply chain management in Latin America, with a specific focus on infrastructure needs and understanding the Latin American consumer.

That afternoon the class went to Alicorp, a company dedicated to the preparation of mass consumption products, industrial supplies, and animal nutrition food.  The company presented an overview and then took the class on a tour of the plant and distribution center.  The final site visit in Lima was to Jorge Chaves International Airport for an operational overview of their import - export processes, custom regulations, and the cold chain supply chain supporting fresh fruits, vegetables, and flowers. The class left Lima and flew to Cuzco, Peru, where they visited Machu Picchu over the weekend to tour the Inca ruins.

The class began the second week of its residence in Sao Paulo, Brazil, with Lars Meyer Sanches, PhD, LALT/UNICAMP, Laboratory of Apprenticeship on Logistics and Transportation. Sanches gave an overview of Brazil, specifically addressing logistics and supply chain challenges and opportunities, contract logistics, and managing corporate taxes in Brazil.  Later that day the class met with Antonio Grandini, Brazilian supply chain and logistics consultant, who presented an overview on tax strategies in Brazil, as well as case studies on Landed Cost Models used to offset the impact of the Brazilian Tax Regime.

From Sao Paulo, the class took a bus trip to Campinas, Brazil, to meet with Dell Hortolandia for a site visit and a discussion on logistics issues and opportunities working with customs in Brazil, outbound shipping to other countries within Latin America and to non-Latin American regions, and ocean/air inbound and outbound shipments.  Following the Dell visit, the class toured Viracopos/Campinas Airport Infraero, a customs bonded import-export facility.  As a major hub, Viracopos utilizes express lanes for courier traffic, which are exceptionally quick and less-bureaucratic for Brazilian standards.

The third day in Brazil included a visit to the Port of Santos for a harbor tour and overview of the Port of Santos and its role in support of containerized ocean cargo into and out of Brazil.  While visiting the Port of Santos, the class got the chance to board an incoming ocean vessel out in the harbor and transit with the ship into the Port of Santos.  The class also visited with ELOG-Columbia, where they received an overview of EADI Bonded Warehousing and took a look at the 3PL industry in Brazil.

On the last day of the residence, the students visited GM Automotive Industrial Complex in Sao Paulo.  The class learned about the economic foot print of GM in Sao Paulo - Brazil- Latin America, as well as: factors influencing GM’s choice of Sao Paulo as a location and the current advantages/disadvantages of being located in Sao Paulo; the participation of suppliers in the site and how that influences logistics and procurement practices; the sales process (internet vs. dealers); how the internet process influences the production processes; finished vehicle distribution including modes of transportation and tax considerations; and post sales and service, highlighting which models they run in Brazil and where and how they serve Latin America.

The next destination for the EMIL-SCS Class of 2011 is Residence IV in Asia.  The class will be traveling to Seoul, South Korea; Shanghai, China; and Hong Kong from February 20 – March 3, 2011. 

Click here for more on the EMIL-SCS program or contact Erin Howlette at erin.howlette@isye.gatech.edu.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1292507724 2010-12-16 13:55:24 1475896074 2016-10-08 03:07:54 0 0 news Moving quickly through its eighteen-month program, the EMIL-SCS Class of 2011 recently completed its third residence.  This installment, the Latin American residence, began in Panama City, Panama, included a first-time visit to Lima, Peru, and then concluded with site visits in Sao Paulo, Campinas and Santos, Brazil

]]>
2010-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2010-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2010-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
63250 63251 63253 63250 image <![CDATA[Class tours Alicorp in Lima, Peru]]> image/jpeg 1449176668 2015-12-03 21:04:28 1475894554 2016-10-08 02:42:34 63251 image <![CDATA[Inca ruins in Machu Picchu]]> image/jpeg 1449176668 2015-12-03 21:04:28 1475894554 2016-10-08 02:42:34 63253 image <![CDATA[Class visiting the Miraflores Locks in Panama City, Panama.]]> image/jpeg 1449176668 2015-12-03 21:04:28 1475894554 2016-10-08 02:42:34
<![CDATA[Ergun and Swann Discuss the Role of IEs in Disaster Response]]> 27328 In a recent issue of Industrial Engineer, Professors Julie Swann and Ozlem Ergun were among a number of industrial engineers (IE) interviewed about the logistics of disaster response and the role of IEs in humanitarian relief. Recognizing that there is a lot of uncertainty when a disaster strikes, Swann and Ergun agree that you have to be adaptable in the humanitarian sector, even more so than in a traditional supply chain, because “you just have to figure out creative ways to get stuff where it needs to go” Click here to read the entire article.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1291825126 2010-12-08 16:18:46 1475896074 2016-10-08 03:07:54 0 0 news In a recent issue of Industrial Engineer, Professors Julie Swann and Ozlem Ergun were among a number of industrial engineers (IE) interviewed about the logistics of disaster response and the role of IEs in humanitarian relief. Recognizing that there is a lot of uncertainty when a disaster strikes, Swann and Ergun agree that you have to be adaptable in the humanitarian sector, even more so than in a traditional supply chain, because “you just have to figure out creative ways to get stuff where it needs to go” Click here to read the entire article.

]]>
2010-09-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Chelsea “Chip” C. White III Shares Parting Thoughts]]> 27328 I have been asked to share with you parting thoughts on having been chair of the Stewart School for the five-year period ending June 30, 2010.

 The thought that immediately comes to mind is how uniquely remarkable ISyE is as an academic unit in higher education in the United States and throughout the world. Rankings are not necessarily accurate indicators of quality.

However, having both our graduate and undergraduate programs consistently ranked first by U.S. News & World Report in industrial and manufacturing engineering is a source of great pride to us all. That our graduate program has been ranked first for twenty consecutive years is simply extraordinary. To paraphrase an external review of ISyE written three years ago: ISyE is the nation’s flagship academic unit in industrial engineering and operations research and plays a leading role in shaping the strategic directions of the discipline. Such recognition does not come without significant investments in time, effort, and money by Georgia Tech as an institution and the School’s alumni, faculty, staff, students, and friends over a long period of time. Let me thank all of you for your many contributions that have made ISyE the premier academic unit that it is.

Over the last five years, we strived to ensure continued and increased strength of the School’s foundation disciplines (optimization, stochastics and simulation, and statistics) and to broaden the School’s applied research horizons through continued support of supply chain and logistics initiatives, efforts to revive traditional strengths in health, and new initiatives in health and humanitarian logistics, sustainability and natural systems, and systems informatics and control. ISyE also expanded its international activities beyond those in Singapore to include programs in Shanghai and Latin America. During this period, the faculty strove hard to continuously improve the quality of incoming students and faculty, the mentoring process for junior faculty, and the evaluation processes for faculty reappointment, promotion, and tenure.

In 2006, ISyE received a $20 million commitment from H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart that enabled, and will continue to enable, ISyE to have greater impact on its academic and research communities and on challenges of economic and societal importance. Overall, ISyE foundation accounts more than doubled from endowment gifts and commitments during the last five years, helping to ensure the School’s financial stability and health during the economic downturn and providing resources to help ISyE increase its dominance among its academic peers in the future. Let me end by expressing my appreciation for being given the opportunity to have served as ISyE chair and for the chance it gave me to get to know so many of the fine people—alumni, faculty, staff,students, and friends—who have contributed to ISyE.

Chelsea “Chip” White, the Schneider National Chair in Transportation and Logistics and former H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart Chair of Georgia Tech’s H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, will be spending next year in Abu Dhabi helping to launch an industrial and systems engineering department at Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research (KUSTAR). In his new role, White will help establish the curriculum for KUSTAR’s systems engineering program and recruit systems engineering faculty members. He will also be providing leadership for the Logistics Institute, as well as support in the enrollment of personnel. He will be based at the university’s Abu Dhabi campus. Abu Dhabi, the richest and largest of the seven city-states in the United Arab Emirates, approached Georgia Tech to help them build the educational base Abu Dhabi needs to reduce its economy’s dependence on oil. White is not the only Georgia Tech professor at KUSTAR; professors in Tech’s biomedical engineering and aerospace engineering schools will also be spending the 2010-2011 school year helping KUSTAR build curricula and recruit faculty.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2010 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering: the Alumni Magazine for the Stewart School of ISyE at Georgia Tech.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1291213850 2010-12-01 14:30:50 1475896070 2016-10-08 03:07:50 0 0 news In the Fall 2010 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering, former ISyE Chair Chelsea "Chip" C. White III shared parting thoughts. White, who resigned as chair in June, is spending the next year in Abu Dhabi helping to launch an industrial and systems engineering department at Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research (KUSTAR).

]]>
2010-11-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55103 55103 image <![CDATA[Chelsea “Chip” C. White III]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894486 2016-10-08 02:41:26
<![CDATA[Executive Master's Program Helps Find the Right Balance at MercaSID]]> 27328 In these difficult economic times, any innovation that aims to improve a company’s efficiency while saving money is bound to be given serious consideration. At MercaSID S.A., a seventy-three-year-old food products company based in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, Emile Simon’s approach to inventory management is proving right on target.

Simon, a logistics manager at MercaSID, is a 2009 graduate of Georgia Tech’s Executive Master’s in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy program (EMIL-SCS). The eighteen-month, residence-based program prepares executives to manage a multitude of global logistics and supply chain issues. Working either individually or as a team, EMILSCS participants develop a solution to a real-world problem instead of writing the traditional master’s thesis. Simon chose to focus on a new approach to the product demand planning process as a means of achieving inventory reduction.

A producer of cooking oils and other agricultural-based products, MercaSID is also a major Caribbean distributor for consumer-product giants, including Unilever, Kimberly-Clark, Kellogg, and Clorox. Its inventory is massive—too much so, Simon thought—resulting not only in excessive financial and warehousing costs, but also in less-than-optimal customer service.

The key is to strike a closer balance between demand and inventory while maintaining as high an order fill rate as possible.

“We needed to understand the demand side better,” said Simon. “We had a lot of the right information, but we weren’t using it properly.”

His approach is comprised of two parts. The first involves data collection—basic number crunching—to come up with the projected demand for each product category, and then determine demand estimates for individual products. That information subsequently undergoes a value assessment by representatives of the company’s sales, marketing, and operations departments.

The group arrives at a consensus on final product forecasts, which are used to determine the number of any given item to be maintained in inventory. This final number does not necessarily match the analytical forecast provided by a computer program, because it takes into account factors including market information, market situation, and the company’s marketing plans.

“This process has helped us streamline our inventories and improve our service levels as well,”Simon noted.

The results so far are impressive. While maintaining or exceeding a 90 percent fill rate level across all product categories, inventory was reduced 15 percent last year and an additional 5 percent in the first half of 2010. Further reductions are likely when MercaSID’s suppliers are brought fully into the planning process, probably next year, Simon said.

 “We did get some supplier collaboration in the first phases of this new process, but we know we can take it further,” he said. “That’s going to be a little more difficult because it involves the participation and buy-in of other companies, not just ourselves.” Simon expects MercaSID’s finance department to become more active in the process as it evolves.

Buy-in within MercaSID itself was also crucial for the project’s success, Simon added, pointing out that many people have to believe in the process for it to work. “It has taken discipline, but we did a lot of consensus building about how the process should take place,” he explained. “After we proposed something, we didn’t take it to the next level until all sides of the team—marketing, sales—were in agreement that that’s the way we should go.

“We’ve had a thousand percent support from the highest levels of the company, and that’s made a lot of difference too,” he added.

Simon’s experience is not uncommon among EMIL-SCS graduates. “It’s the only program of its kind,” said Greg Andrews, managing director of the EMIL-SCS program. Students, typically sponsored by their employers, participate in five two-week semesters spread out over eighteen months. The first semester is an “academic boot camp” held at Tech, where students are exposed to the “concepts of industrial engineering as applied to supply chains,” Andrews said. Subsequent semesters are spent traveling to countries in Europe, Asia, and the Americas for a combination of academic study, practical application, and real-world problem solving.

“The 2009 class that Emile Simon is a part of had seven global projects with a combined savings of about $250 million if implemented,” Andrews continued. “That’s a pretty good payback.”

In a fast-moving consumer goods company, finding the right balance between customer service and the cost of doing business makes the difference between success and failure, noted Renato Cantarelli, MercaSID’s vice president of operations. “Key to achieving this balance is to have a robust yet simple demand planning process where sales, marketing, procurement, manufacturing, and distribution are integrated, along with a consolidated operational plan. This was Emile’s project—to conceptualize and implement our demand planning process. Now, after more than one year in operation, this process is fully operational and is well accepted by all levels of our organization. Furthermore, it is delivering the benefits we expected from the outset.

 “The knowledge Emile brought with him from his experience at Georgia Tech was fundamental for him to successfully finish his project and for the business to accrue the benefits. It was money and time well spent—we are very happy!”

Gary Goettling is a freelance writer who writes for Georgia Tech’s Research Horizons and other alumni publications.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1291222785 2010-12-01 16:59:45 1475896070 2016-10-08 03:07:50 0 0 news 2010-11-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
63040 63040 image <![CDATA[Emile Simon]]> image/jpeg 1449176409 2015-12-03 21:00:09 1475894552 2016-10-08 02:42:32
<![CDATA[George Nemhauser Selected First Recipient of the INFORMS Optimization Society Khachiyan Prize]]> 27328 George Nemhauser, the A. Russell Chandler Chaired Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech, has been honored as the first recipient of the newly established INFORMS Optimization Society Khachiyan Prize, created to recognize an individual or a team for life-time achievements in the area of optimization.  

The award is named for Leonid Khachiyan, famous in the optimization community for his use of the ellipsoid algorithm to demonstrate that linear programming, in the Turing machine model, has a polynomial-time algorithm. The Khachiyan Prize recognizes a sustained career of scholarship from nominees who are still active at the year of the nomination. The prize serves as an esteemed recognition of innovativeness and impact in the area of optimization, including theory and applications.

Nemhauser’s remarkable academic career spans nearly a half-century, during which time he has grown into one of the world's foremost experts in discrete optimization and become one of the most recognized members of the INFORMs community. The basis for Nemhauser’s outstanding position as an OR scientist is his fundamental contributions to the theory and practice of integer programming and combinatorial optimization. His integer programming books have guided the field for more than thirty years, each introducing a host of new techniques for handling IP models in theory and practice. As well, Nemhauser’s nearly two hundred research papers in the field are unmatched in their breadth of coverage.

Though he has shown a unique ability to find, solve, and present applied work in Operations Research, Nemhauser is first and foremost a superb contributor to the theory underlying optimization techniques. This is evident from his publications throughout his whole career, starting with traveling-salesman-problem work in 1962 and continuing through his recent papers on piecewise-linear optimization. Fundamental models and techniques covered by Nemhauser include Lagrangian optimization, dynamic programming, capital budgeting, set partitioning, cutting planes, branch-and-price, transportation problems, graph coloring, vertex packing, submodular functions, facility location, cutting stock, and stochastic programming

Nemhauser is a founding partner of the Sports Scheduling Group, a company that does scheduling for various college conferences and major league baseball. He has served ORSA as council member, president, and editor of Operations Research, and he is past chair of the Mathematical Programming Society. Nemhauser is the founding editor of Operations Research Letters, and co-editor of Handbooks of Operations Research and Management Science.  He has also served various governmental agencies, including the National Science Foundation, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the National Research Council.. His other honors and awards include the Kimball Medal, the Lanchester Prize (twice awarded), Morse lecturer of ORSA, and membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

Click here to view Nemhauser's acceptance speech.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1290424521 2010-11-22 11:15:21 1475896070 2016-10-08 03:07:50 0 0 news George Nemhauser, the A. Russell Chandler Chaired Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech, has been honored as the first recipient of the newly established INFORMS Optimization Society Khachiyan Prize, created to recognize an individual or a team for life-time achievements in the area of optimization.

]]>
2010-11-22T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-22T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-22 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62896 62896 image <![CDATA[George Nemhauser]]> image/jpeg 1449176409 2015-12-03 21:00:09 1475894549 2016-10-08 02:42:29
<![CDATA[Bill Cook Elected INFORMS Fellow]]> 27328 William J. Cook, Chandler Family Chair and professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, was elected INFORMS Fellow at the 2010 INFORMS annual meeting in Austin, Texas, in November.

The INFORMS Fellow Award is reserved for distinguished individuals who have demonstrated outstanding and exceptional accomplishments and experience in operations research and the management sciences. Their service to the profession and to INFORMS has culminated in election to the INFORMS Fellow Award.

Cook, known widely for his work with the Traveling Salesman Problem and his research in combinatorial optimization and integer programming, was elected for his research contributions in both areas.  Cook is one of eleven Fellows elected this year.

In addition to his research interests in combinatorial optimization and integer programming, Cook is also heavily involved in research dealing with computational issues involved in treating hard discrete problems such as large instances for the celebrated traveling salesman problem.

Cook is the author or editor of seven books, the latest due out in 2011, and the current editor-in-chief of the Mathematical Programming Computation journal. His awards, in addition to his election as INFORMS Fellow, include the I.E. Block Community Lecturer prize from the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics and the Beale-Orchard-Hays Prize for Excellence in Computational Mathematical Programming.

Cook joins a distinguished list, including the following twelve other ISyE faculty members who have achieved this recognition:

Dr. Jan Shi
Dr. John Bartholdi
Dr. Jim Dai
Dr. Augustine Esogbue
Dr. John Jarvis
Dr. Ellis Johnson
Dr. George Nemhauser
Dr. Donald Ratliff
Dr. William Rouse
Dr. Michael Thomas
Dr. Chelsea White III
Dr. Jeff Wu

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1290525138 2010-11-23 15:12:18 1475896070 2016-10-08 03:07:50 0 0 news William J. Cook, Chandler Family Chair and professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, was elected INFORMS Fellow at the 2010 INFORMS annual meeting in Austin, Texas, in November.

]]>
2010-11-23T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-23T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-23 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62941 62941 image <![CDATA[Susan Albin, INFORMS president, presents plaque to Bill Cook.]]> image/jpeg 1449176409 2015-12-03 21:00:09 1475894549 2016-10-08 02:42:29
<![CDATA[Bo Zhang Wins Prestigious George Nicholson Student Paper Competition and Performance Student Paper Award]]> 27328 Within the span of one week in November, Bo Zhang, a PhD student in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), received both the George Nicholson Student Paper award at the INFORMS annual meeting and the Best Student Paper award at the 28th International Symposium on Computer Performance, Modeling, Measurements and Evaluation (Performance) 2010 conference.

The George Nicholson Student Paper Competition, arguably the most prestigious student award in the operations research community, is held each year to honor outstanding student papers in the field of operations research and the management sciences.

Zhang received the Nicholson Award for his paper, “Refined Square-Root Staffing for Call Centers with Impatient Customers,” which he co-authored with Johan van Leeuwaarden and Bert Zwart, ISyE adjunct associate professor and Zhang’s thesis advisor.

In the paper, Zhang studied how to solve for the minimum staffing level subject to different service-level constraints for call centers with impatient customers. The authors developed an approximate solution procedure, which they named "refined square-root staffing,” and then demonstrated that this approach preserves the insightfulness and computational scalability of the celebrated square-root staffing principle and yet is provably more accurate.

About the paper, Zwart said that it is a “well-written, solid theoretical basis that provides relevant practical insights for the most popular model out there for call centers.”

Zhang wrote the paper while a guest at Bell Labs, but also worked with Sem Borst and Martin Reiman at Alcatel-Lucent and Josh Reed (PhD IE 2007) at NYU. Reed also received the Nicholson Award while a student at Georgia Tech.

In addition to the Nicholson Award, Zhang also received the Performance Best Student Paper award for his paper “Optimal Server Scheduling in Hybrid P2P Networks,” which he co-authored with Borst and Reiman.

In this paper, the authors studied how to manage server capacity in hybrid peer-to-peer networks, an increasingly popular type of Internet content distribution paradigm in which each user plays a dual client-server role. According to Zhang, “we find that the structure of optimal server scheduling policies in such systems depends intricately upon the altruism level of users (i.e., users' willingness to stay in the system and continue helping others after their download completion).

About this recent accomplishment, Zhang said that “a lot of credit should go to the four coauthors of the two papers, who are also great mentors, especially my thesis advisor, Bert Zwart.”

Zwart and Zhang’s co-advisor Hayriye Ayhan, ISyE professor, are proud of Zhang, noting that he is exceptional in that he has broad research interests and is able to work on diverse research projects simultaneously. In addition to his work with Zwart and Ayhan, Zhang has collaborated with top researchers in and out of the country, which, according to Ayhan, is very unusual for a PhD student. With Ayhan, Zhang has been developing optimal admission control policies in two-stage loss networks. “To the best of our knowledge,” states Ayhan, Zhang’s “work is the first one that completely characterizes the optimal admission policies in this setting.”

To read Zhang’s research papers, visit his webpage at http://www2.isye.gatech.edu/~bzhang34/.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1291122177 2010-11-30 13:02:57 1475896070 2016-10-08 03:07:50 0 0 news Within the span of one week in November, Bo Zhang, a PhD student in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, received both the George Nicholson Student Paper award at the INFORMS annual meeting and the Best Student Paper award at the 28th International Symposium on Computer Performance, Modeling, Measurements and Evaluation (Performance) 2010 conference.

]]>
2010-11-30T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-30T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
63033 63033 image <![CDATA[Bo Zhang]]> image/jpeg 1449176409 2015-12-03 21:00:09 1475894552 2016-10-08 02:42:32
<![CDATA[First in Its Class: Graduate Study at the Stewart School]]> 27328 The cover story in the Fall 2010 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering focuses on ISyE’s graduate program and celebrates its string of twenty consecutive number one rankings in U.S. News & World Report. While there is no shortage of surveys assessing and comparing academic programs, it remains that the results published annually by U.S. News & World Report probably constitute the most visible source of such rankings and certainly the source most often mentioned. The feature article, “First in Its Class,” describes some attributes that form the underpinnings of a great graduate program and, in that regard, underscores how the program in ISyE measures up in comparison to others. Click here to read the article.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1291132822 2010-11-30 16:00:22 1475896070 2016-10-08 03:07:50 0 0 news The cover story in the Fall 2010 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering focuses on ISyE’s graduate program and celebrates its string of twenty consecutive number one rankings in U.S. News & World Report. While there is no shortage of surveys assessing and comparing academic programs, it remains that the results published annually by U.S. News & World Report probably constitute the most visible source of such rankings and certainly the source most often mentioned. The feature article, “First in Its Class,” describes some attributes that form the underpinnings of a great graduate program and, in that regard, underscores how the program in ISyE measures up in comparison to others. Click here to read the article.

]]>
2010-11-30T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-30T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Supply Chain Flexibility Focus of Fall 2010 Supply Chain Executive Forum]]> 27328 Considering the challenges confronting today’s supply chain executives, the ability to be flexible ranks among the most critical of needed capabilities. But what is supply chain flexibility, why is it important, and how do you achieve it? These were among the important questions covered at the fall 2010 meeting of Georgia Tech’s Supply Chain Executive Forum.

With the theme, “SUPPLY CHAIN FLEXIBILITY: Critical Changes May Require Expanded Flexibility,” the two-day meeting, sponsored by the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering’s (ISyE) Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), featured prominent speakers and facilitated discussions to help stimulate thought and dialogue to address these questions.

John Welling, vice-president of Wal-Mart Innovation; Eric Peters, CEO of FoodLink Online; Jack Allen, director, Global Logistics, Cisco Systems; and John Bauer, director, Global Transportation, Supply Chain Operations for Starbucks Coffee Company all gave presentations tackling the topic of supply chain flexibility in their own companies.

Additionally, Dr. John Langley, SCL professor of Supply Chain Management and Executive Forum faculty director; Dan Gilmore, editor, Supply Chain Digest; and Gene Tyndall, executive vice president – Global, Tompkins Associates, facilitated an interactive session revealing the results of a member survey on supply chain flexibility. A unique feature of this afternoon session was the graphics representation of the discussion facilitated by Martha McGinnis, president of Visual Logic, Inc., a graphic facilitation firm.

The key questions and issues the presenters were asked to address with respect to supply chain flexibility included:

John Welling of Wal-Mart was the first to address these questions in his Wednesday keynote presentation, “Supply Chain Flexibility at Wal-Mart.” Quoting from the article “Perspectives, practices and future of supply chain flexibility” by Dileep More and A. Subash Babu, Welling defined supply chain flexibility as the  inherent ability or characteristics of the supply chain and its partners to be sensitive to minor and major disturbances in the business environment; to correctly assess the actual situation; to quickly respond, adjust and adapt with little time, effort and cost; and to effectively control the organization; and to keep the performance stable. Expanding that definition with his own, Welling said that a flexible supply chain supports multiple, evolving business models by leveraging common physical assets and inventory and collaborates with suppliers to remove waste, reduce cost, and improve service levels.

Continuing the theme on Thursday, FoodLink’s CEO, Eric Peters, in his talk, “Cold-Chain Solutions to Create Supply Chain Flexibility,” said that the produce supply chain is unique in both the way in which product is delivered from farm to consumer, as well as the communication required across links in the chain. Flexibility in that supply chain is important because perishables, unlike dry goods, have a short shelf life and fragmented vendor base, are subject to commodity pricing and purchase order changes, and require multiple pickup locations. For Peters, flexibility starts with the flow of information. “Without an effective trading partner communication channel that is integrated with back-end systems,” Peters points out in his presentation, “perishable procurement becomes extremely difficult.”

In his presentation, “Flexibility at Cisco in Unusually Uncertain Times,” Jack Allen defines supply chain flexibility as the “promptness and degree to which our supply chain can respond with proactive and reactive adaptations of our speed, processes, network locations, and volume in order to handle changes in demand volume (up or down) and mix, operating costs, and business needs.” Continuing, he explains that Cisco’s objective is to satisfy the customer, reduce cost and amount of unsatisfied demand, and improve utilization, all with little or no penalty in response time.

To achieve this, Allen recognizes that there are multiple layers to flexibility, which he describes as:

Rounding out the presentations was Starbuck’s John Bauer, with his talk titled, “Supply Chain Flexibility: The Starbuck’s Coffee Story.”  Bauer discussed Starbuck’s uplifting mission - to inspire and nurture the human spirit – one person, one cup and one neighborhood at a time.  The Starbucks Coffee story reinforced the need to build flexibility into today’s supply chains, in both the short- and long-term. 

The spring 2011 Executive Forum will meet on April 6 - 7, 2011. To learn more about Georgia Tech’s Supply Chain Executive Forum, visit the website at http://www.scl.gatech.edu/professional-education/scef/.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1289825574 2010-11-15 12:52:54 1475896066 2016-10-08 03:07:46 0 0 news Considering the challenges confronting today’s supply chain executives, the ability to be flexible ranks among the most critical of needed capabilities. But what is supply chain flexibility, why is it important, and how do you achieve it? These were among the important questions covered at the fall 2010 meeting of Georgia Tech’s Supply Chain Executive Forum.

]]>
2010-11-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-15 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62761 62763 62764 62761 image <![CDATA[Dr. John Langley welcomes members to the Fall 2010 Supply Chain Exectuive Forum]]> image/jpeg 1449176394 2015-12-03 20:59:54 1475894547 2016-10-08 02:42:27 62763 image <![CDATA[Gene Tyndall, John Langley, and Dan Gilmore conducted an interactive session while Martha McGinnis provided graphic facilitation.]]> image/jpeg 1449176394 2015-12-03 20:59:54 1475894547 2016-10-08 02:42:27 62764 image <![CDATA[(L to R) Jack Allen, Cisco Systems; John Bauer, Starbucks Coffee Company; Dr. John Langley, SCL; Eric Peters, FoodLink Online; John Welling, Wal-Mart Innovation.]]> image/jpeg 1449176394 2015-12-03 20:59:54 1475894547 2016-10-08 02:42:27
<![CDATA[Cool Insights: Extending "Quality Sell-Time" Of Perishables]]> 27328 According to Don Ratliff, UPS and Regents’ Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and executive director of ISyE’s Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, “‘quality sell-time’ is the critical performance driver with respect to perishable food products. In his article, “Quality Sell-Time of Perishables,” which appeared in the October 2010 Food Logistics’ column Cool Insights, Ratliff explains that quality sell-time is “the period of time when the seller has a product available to sell while it is at the peak of its quality life and with enough remaining ‘quality-consume-time’ to meet customer’s expectations.” This is important at every stage of the food supply chain, but is particularly critical for retailers. Click here to read the article.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1288789592 2010-11-03 13:06:32 1475896062 2016-10-08 03:07:42 0 0 news In the October 2010 issue of Food Logistics, Don Ratliff, UPS and Regents’ Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and executive director of ISyE’s Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, authored the fifth installment for the Cool Insights column, titled “Extending ‘Quality Sell-Time’ Of Perishables.”

]]>
2010-11-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62519 62519 image <![CDATA[October 2010 Issue]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894541 2016-10-08 02:42:21
<![CDATA[ISyE Offers New Master of Science in Supply Chain Engineering: A Faster and More Focused Path to a Global Supply Chain Career]]> 27328 To meet the growing demand for business-savvy engineers who can design and synchronize highly complex global supply chains, the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) is launching a new, one-year professional graduate degree program, the Master of Science in Supply Chain Engineering.

“We listened carefully to the industry community and to the students at Georgia Tech to design a program that meets the needs of the supply chain professional of the 21st century,” said Harvey Donaldson, associate chair of industry and international programs at ISyE. “With this degree, students now can pursue a highly focused graduate education experience in supply chain engineering and explore immediate career opportunities with global enterprises.”

The program’s intensive 12- month curriculum delivers academic knowledge in analytic methods, supply chain engineering, and enterprise management while building professional practice skills and real-world industry experience, all leading to a respected graduate degree from the #1-ranked Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering.

Students, who may come from a wide range of academic, business, and geographical backgrounds, will move through the program’s courses together as a cohort, creating strong connections and networks.

The program’s innovative curriculum, which is true to ISyE’s traditions and standards and adaptable to international students and global university partners, is designed to be a new model for a highly focused graduate professional education in supply chain engineering.  The curriculum:

The curriculum is structured around classroom courses (eight required and two elective) offered during the fall and spring semesters and the capstone industry experience, which is completed during the summer term.

Applications for the August 2011 class are already being accepted. Visit www.sce.gatech.edu for more information on joining this class.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1288795900 2010-11-03 14:51:40 1475896062 2016-10-08 03:07:42 0 0 news To meet the growing demand for business-savvy engineers who can design and synchronize highly complex global supply chains, the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering is launching a new, one-year professional graduate degree program, the Master of Science in Supply Chain Engineering.

]]>
2010-11-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62526 62528 62527 62526 image <![CDATA[Summer term is dedicated to the Capstone Industry Experience, where students take on real-world projects.]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894544 2016-10-08 02:42:24 62528 image <![CDATA[The new professional graduate degree program meets the growing demand for business-savvy engineers.]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894544 2016-10-08 02:42:24 62527 image <![CDATA[One of the central objectives of the program will be to produce graduates ready to make an immediate impact.]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894544 2016-10-08 02:42:24
<![CDATA[John H. and Cherie Morris Meet with Morris Fellowship Recipients]]> 27328 John H. Morris (BIE 1965) and his wife, Cherie, were on campus October 21, 2010, to meet and dine with some of the current ISyE graduate students who are recipients of the Morris Fellowship. Morris established the graduate fellowship, which has helped ISyE leverage its strength in attracting many of the best and brightest students to Georgia Tech, as part of the Campaign for Georgia Tech in 2000. This year, the Fellowship is providing support to ten graduate students.

One of those students, Jessica Heier-Stamm, said that the Morris Fellowship has afforded her the opportunity to focus on the research that interests her most, namely applying quantitative industrial engineering methodologies to the challenges of humanitarian relief, disaster response, and public health.  Because of the fellowship,” states Heier-Stamm, “I have also had time to devote to service activities that reach future engineers and scientists.  All of these have increased my awareness of the broader research community, including professional development opportunities, contacts, and funding agencies.”

Morris, who stays in touch with the fellowship program, states that he owes a great deal of his success to Georgia Tech and ISyE. “I am very proud and thankful to be able to help ISyE stay number one by helping to attract top graduate students. I am very impressed by the quality and breadth of the students and know they will be successful.”

Morris is retired co-chair of StoneCreek Capital, a merchant banking firm that sponsors leveraged acquisitions and leveraged buildups in partnership with management teams. He is a former trustee of the Georgia Tech Foundation and an emeritus member of the ISyE Advisory Board. Additionally, Morris is a member of the ISyE Hall of Fame and the ISyE Academy of Distinguished Alumni, and he was honored with the College of Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award in 1996.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1288882529 2010-11-04 14:55:29 1475896062 2016-10-08 03:07:42 0 0 news John H. Morris (BIE 1965) and his wife, Cherie, were on campus October 21, 2010, to meet and dine with some of the current ISyE graduate students who are recipients of the Morris Fellowship.

]]>
2010-11-04T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-04T00:00:00-04:00 2010-11-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62340 62340 image <![CDATA[Seated (L to R): Mike Thomas, John H. Morris, Cherie Morris..Standing (L to R): Hyunwoo Park, Heng Su, Jessica Heir-Stamm, Stefania Stefansdottir, Ran Li, Trustin Clear, Yingyi Zhu, Fatma Kilinc-Karzan. Not pictured: Yijie Wang and Haiyue Yu.]]> image/jpeg 1449176355 2015-12-03 20:59:15 1475894541 2016-10-08 02:42:21
<![CDATA[Fall Advisory Board Meeting Focuses on the Profession of Industrial Engineering]]> 27328 The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) hosted its fall advisory board meeting on October 22, 2010.   Advisory Board Chair Ed Rogers, global strategy manager with UPS’s corporate strategy, welcomed the group to campus and expressed how fortunate the Stewart School and the Board are to have Dr. Mike Thomas return to Tech as interim School chair.

After Rogers’ opening remarks, Thomas updated the board on the ISyE chair search committee and other School activities.   The chair search committee, which formed during the summer and comprises seventeen faculty, staff, and alumni, is being chaired by Vigor Yang, chair of the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering. Current enrollment numbers for ISyE include 1,183 undergraduate students, 231 master’s students, and 171 PhD students.  Thomas introduced the fall 2010 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering magazine, which was hot off the press.  The feature story focuses on ISyE’s graduate program, which U.S. News and World Report ranked first for the 20th consecutive year.  The feature article, “First in Its Class,” describes some of the attributes that form the underpinnings of a great graduate program and underscore how the program in ISyE measures up in comparison to others.  Thomas also reported that the Campaign Georgia Tech, which originally was slated to raise $1 billion and run through 2010, is now most likely going to have a goal of $1.5 billion and run through 2015. Georgia Tech, as a whole, has raised $916.3 million from July 2004 to date, and ISyE, which had an original goal of $50 million, has raised $40.2M to date.  Nancy Sandlin, ISyE director of development, and Thomas will work closely with central development as they determine ISyE's new goal.

Jane Ammons, ISyE professor and associate dean of engineering, hosted a discussion on what industrial engineers do today and where they are headed tomorrow.   Ammons opened her session by showing a video titled Industrial Engineers Make a Difference.  Sponsored by the Council of Industrial Engineering Academic Department Heads, the video features industrial engineers talking about the jobs they do, the satisfaction they experience, and the impact they make in people's lives.

Ammons then focused her discussion on some of the trends and drivers in engineering (climate change; energy needs; middle class growth; consumer demand; transportation; healthcare; waste; information paradigm shifts; shortage of food, clean water, and housing; growth of megacities;  and changes in sea levels), grand challenges in engineering (re-engineering healthcare delivery; engineering a sustainable society; developing better decision-making tools for a dynamic world; mitigating and responding to disasters; point-of-use manufacturing; infrastructure construction; and engineering for a safe, available, and affordable water supply), and strategic directions within the field. 

In summary, she stated that we are now seeing global opportunities in the field of industrial engineering and management, that the grand challenges are strategic imperatives for our research and education, and that we must position our students to achieve maximum impact by exploiting the unique strengths of industrial engineering.  For those interested in more information, she recommended reading NAE’s The Engineer of 2020: Visions of Engineering in the New Century.

 Following this discussion, two undergraduate students (Anna Smoak and Chelsea Sanders) and one graduate student (Animesh Garg) provided their personal perspectives on how they view industrial engineers and where they are in the program.

Ed Rogers discussed Georgia Tech’s new 25-year strategic vision and plan that President G.P. “Bud” Peterson launched in August.  The plan, “Designing the Future,” has five main goals and ten Institute-wide initiatives, which can be found in the full report at www.gatech.edu/vision.   An alumni subcommittee, led by Rogers, was formed to begin discussions on drafting ISyE’s strategic vision and plan.  Rogers concluded the meeting with advisory board business updates and wrap ups.

The spring advisory board meeting will be held on April 22, 2011.

On October 27th, Logistics Viewpoint addressed hiring IE’s in their article, “Supply Chain Teams Should Consider Hiring Industrial Engineers.” Click here to read the article. 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1289310624 2010-11-09 13:50:24 1475896062 2016-10-08 03:07:42 0 0 news The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) hosted its fall advisory board meeting on October 22, 2010.  Ed Rogers, advisory board chair and global strategy manager with UPS’s corporate strategy, gave the opening remarks, which were followed by presentations from Mike Thomas, ISyE interim chair; Jane Ammons, ISyE professor and associate dean of engineering; undergraduate students Anna Smoak and Chelsea Sanders; and graduate student Animesh Garg.

]]>
2010-11-09T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-09T00:00:00-05:00 2010-11-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62612 62610 62612 image <![CDATA[(L to R): Mike Thomas, ISyE interim chair; Ed Rogers, ISyE advisory board chair; and Jane Ammons, ISyE professor and associate dean of engineering.]]> image/jpeg 1449176382 2015-12-03 20:59:42 1475894544 2016-10-08 02:42:24 62610 image <![CDATA[Friont Row (L to R): Anna Smoak and Patti Parker, undergraduate program manager. Back Row (L to R): Animesh Garg and Chelsea Sanders.]]> image/jpeg 1449176382 2015-12-03 20:59:42 1475894544 2016-10-08 02:42:24
<![CDATA[Bartholdi, Hackman Receive CICMHE Outstanding Paper Award]]> 27328 The College Industry Council on Material Handling Education (CICMHE) recognized John J. Bartholdi III, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management and research director, the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, and Steven Hackman, associate professor, as first place winners of the 2010 Outstanding Material Handling & Facility Logistics Research Paper Award for the paper they co-authored, titled Allocating space in a forward pick area of a distribution center for small parts.

CICMHE announced the winners at the Material Handling Industry of America (MHIA) annual meeting on October 5, 2010. MHIA and CICMHE created the award to encourage the development of, and recognize excellence in, material handling-related research. The 2010 award is based on papers published during the 2008 and 2009 calendar years.  Bartholdi and Hackman’s paper was published in IIE Transactions, Vol. 40 (2008).

 The competition is open to any active researchers and educators in the field of material handling and facility logistics from engineering, business, and other allied schools or colleges.  MHIA and CICMHE are interested in groundbreaking papers in a broad sense on material handling in the fields of manufacturing, distribution, warehousing, supply chain, and logistics.  A mix of academic and industry judges evaluate the contributions based on educational value, innovation in research methodology, and contribution to the material handling industry. 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1287414192 2010-10-18 15:03:12 1475896058 2016-10-08 03:07:38 0 0 news The College Industry Council on Material Handling Education (CICMHE) recognized John J. Bartholdi III, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management and research director, the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, and Steven Hackman, associate professor, as first place winners of the 2010 Outstanding Material Handling & Facility Logistics Research Paper Award for the paper they co-authored, titled Allocating space in a forward pick area of a distribution center for small parts.

]]>
2010-10-18T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-18T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62224 62224 image <![CDATA[John J. Bartholdi III (right) accepts award from Mike Ogle, managing director of the College Industry Council on Material Handling Education. Not pictured is co-author Steven Hackman.]]> image/jpeg 1449176355 2015-12-03 20:59:15 1475894539 2016-10-08 02:42:19
<![CDATA[Global Outreach at the Stewart School of ISyE]]> 27328 In his strategic vision and plan for Georgia Tech, President G. P. “Bud” Peterson said that as Georgia Tech defines the research university of the 21st century, it will lead in influencing major technological, social, and policy decisions that address critical global challenges. Recognizing that technological change is fundamental to the advancement of the human condition, Georgia Tech is committed to improving the human condition at home and around the globe. To achieve this vision, five strategic goals were developed, one of which is to expand Georgia Tech’s global footprint and influence to ensure that we are graduating good global citizens.  

 For more than twenty years, Georgia Tech has fostered international alliances to enhance learning experiences, build research collaborations, and promote economic development. In that same period, the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) has been ranked the number one graduate school for industrial and manufacturing engineering by U.S. News and World Reports. Drawing top students and faculty from around the world and fostering its own international relationships through operations research to logistics and supply chain innovation and strategy, ISyE has proven itself a true global academic unit.

To illustrate this, ISyE tracked some faculty and student activity during a four-month period, from May to August 2010, and found that they moved back and forth between six of seven continents – Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.  In that time, ISyE faculty and students conducted applied research projects around the world, participated in a variety of educational opportunities, gave invited keynote presentations, took part in conference leadership roles, and performed outreach that has a positive international health and humanitarian impact.  

 ISyE engaged in numerous ongoing international programs. The Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) held its European residence this summer, visiting the Netherlands, Poland, and Germany.  Professors were in Shanghai to teach the Dual Masters with Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Thirty-two undergraduate students participated in the Beijing/Singapore study abroad program, along with fifteen students from the National University of Singapore and twenty-four students in Tsinghua University.  

Increasingly international institutions are seeking ISyE faculty experts to assist them in developing their programs.  For instance, one faculty member traveled to Israel to chair an international review team, commissioned by the Israel Council of Higher Education, to evaluate each of the industrial engineering and management programs at universities and colleges throughout Israel. Another was selected to spend a year as the founding department chair for the industrial engineering department at the University of Science, Technology and Research in Abu Dhabi.

While some of ISyE’s faculty and students were invited speakers and teachers, others collaborated on a variety of research projects and collaborations from supply chain optimization in Australia to a project in Abu Dhabi evaluating renewable and distributed energy options for countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council.

ISyE, through the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), added Panama to the established networks of Logistics Innovation Centers in Latin America.  The new Georgia Tech Panama Logistic Innovation & Research Center has three core thrusts -- applied research, education, and competitiveness -- and three primary objectives -- to improve the logistics performance in Panama, to establish Panama as the trade hub of the Americas, and to increase human capital with regards to logistics competency.  The SCL team continued their research as part of the Georgia Tech Trade, Innovation & Productivity Center in Costa Rica and began work to add two more centers to the Latin America network – one in Mexico, scheduled to open at the end of this year, and one in Chile, scheduled to be launched in 2011.

Some highlights on ISyE’s efforts in international health and humanitarian response include teams working in Haiti on debris collection and management issues, in Central Africa on efforts to distribute five million textbooks to schools throughout the county, in Singapore on issues in hospitals, and in Italy working with the World Food Programme. 

As they engage in these global activities, ISyE faculty gain a broader understanding surrounding different world issues, which they can covey to their students who are heading into the global economy.  These faculty not only teach their students what is in the text book, they also tell them from personal experience how to apply the methodologies, frameworks, and strategies they teach in the classroom.  ISyE faculty also bring back a world of personal networks that they share with their students in both classroom lectures and through Skype. This sharing of knowledge and experience helps students prepare to lead effectively in an increasingly global marketplace.   And those students learning, working, or living in a foreign country gain a distinct advantage, having many opportunities to conduct real-world global research that better positions them to contribute early on to the international companies that will employ them.

For an ISyE global tour featuring activities from May through August 2010, read the list below, which is divided into four sections (Global Logistics; Health & Humanitarian Outreach; International Education and Outreach; and Scholarly Work, Presentations and Collaboration):

Global Logistics

Continent of Africa

Continent of North America

Continent of South America

 

Health & Humanitarian Outreach

Continent of Asia

Continent of Europe

 Continent of North America

 

International Education and Outreach

Continent of Asia

 Continent of Europe

 Continent of North America

  

Scholarly Work, Presentations and Collaborations

Continent of Asia

 Continent of Australia

 Continent of Europe

 Continent of South America

 Continent of North America

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1288096566 2010-10-26 12:36:06 1475896058 2016-10-08 03:07:38 0 0 news ISyE tracked faculty and student activity during a four-month period, from May to August 2010, and found that they moved back and forth between six of seven continents – Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, North America, and South America.  In that time, they conducted applied research projects around the world, participated in a variety of educational opportunities, gave invited keynote presentations, took part in conference leadership roles, and performed outreach that has a positive international health and humanitarian impact. 

]]>
2010-10-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62352 62351 62353 62352 image <![CDATA[Jane Ammons chaired an international review team that evaluated IE and management programs at universities and colleges throughout Israel.]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894541 2016-10-08 02:42:21 62351 image <![CDATA[John Bartholdi in front of a UNICEF truck in Zimbabwe carrying textbooks for distribution to schools throughout the country.]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894541 2016-10-08 02:42:21 62353 image <![CDATA[2011 EMIL-SCS Class visits Audi in Ingolstadt, Germany.]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894541 2016-10-08 02:42:21
<![CDATA[SCL Designs Company-Specific Executive Education Program: Coca-Cola Mexico Implements New Strategy for Bottlers]]> 27328 Supplying the world's most popular soft drink to its second largest consumer market is a huge job. Coca-Cola Mexico's sixty-three bottling plants supply 358 distribution centers, from which 28,500 vehicles fan out across the country along 11,000 distribution routes, traveling 237 million kilometers to 1.4 million customers at small family stores and other outlets.

It involves a highly efficient logistics and distribution model, but revisions and continuing education are necessary to keep up with changing business conditions. For help with these, Coca-Cola turned to the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute's (SCL) Executive Education Program offered by the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE).

"Our portfolio is growing, and we are trying to reach more customers by expanding our line of beverages," according to Salvador Cárdenas Escareño, Coca-Cola's commercial leadership supply chain senior manager. "That's why we need to revisit our current service models—to make sure that our portfolio is in place and perfectly executed through our different distribution channels, one store at a time."

The Executive Education Program is "a comprehensive curriculum in supply chain and logistics operation management and technology," according to Jaymie Forrest, SCL managing director. Participants receive a certificate upon completion of the intensive series. In addition to the traditional program model conducted on the Georgia Tech campus, online programs are available. Most recently, Georgia Tech has begun to offer a focused curriculum tailored to a specific company's needs and problems. These customized programs "respond to the unique needs of companies and provide them with specific and in-depth knowledge of supply chain engineering and management, "Forrest explained.

One of the first customized programs was developed for Coca-Cola Mexico and selected Central American bottlers and was held over four weeks spanning late 2008 and early 2009. Another four-week program involving Coca-Cola Mexico was held later in 2009. Aspects of these programs were assembled into a new program held this summer for Coca-Cola bottlers in Spain and Portugal. The education program for Coca-Cola Mexico teaches supply chain management for beverage delivery in conjunction with the implementation of a specific delivery framework that was developed by an outside consulting firm expressly for The Coca-Cola Company and its bottlers.

"We decided to hire an institution that leads in the thinking and development of value-chain processes to defragment the consultant's development process and put it in an educational program for high-potential executives of our bottling system," C´rdenas said. "The Georgia Institute of Technology leads all this thinking on what we were looking for in the demand-driven value-chain execution."

The bilingual, 120-hour program is based in the concepts of demand-driven supply networks as a way to innovate service delivery models. "We cover the fundamentals of demand sensing, demand shaping, and demand response while using the Blue Ocean Strategy framework to find new ways to compete in the market via differentiated service delivery models," said Maria Rey, SCL senior lecturer. "The program has different tracks where students understand the strategic imperative to innovate their service delivery strategies, a competencies track to acquire new knowledge and tools to lead the process, and an applied knowledge track for their experimental projects."

The projects, where students solve a business problem that's specific to their company, is a key part of the program, which is structured around four on-site residences that enable participants to build their innovation experiments progressively. Classes and projects are held typically at a local university or executive education facility. The faculty is drawn from Georgia Tech and local universities. Guest speakers provide perspectives on different industries and geographies on topics such as segmentation, innovation, and project management. "It's a two-way learning process, for program attendees and for the faculty involved," Rey noted. Most important from Coca-Cola Mexico's point of view, the program has a significant bottom-line payoff.

 "We trained and certified fifty-five high-potential executives around the new delivery system," C´rdenas said, "and we have the opportunity to experiment with twenty new service models touching more than 10,000 customers.

"It helped us to change our bottlers' mindset to what  we're looking for: execute the picture of success one perfect store at a time. Now the RTM [route-to-market] is part of the processes within their organizations," he added.

Designing and delivering customized education programs may be one of the most important capabilities of universities now and in the future, said Rey. "Customized executive education sits at the crossroads of consulting and education.

Program designers must understand the needs of the client company and translate a solution for those needs in ways of teaching content and real-life projects that corporate attendees can execute. At the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, we believe we have a good competency in designing customized executive education programs, and we look forward to creating value for more firms."

Contact custom programs for more information.

Gary Goettling authored this article, which originally appeared in the Fall 2010 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering: The Alumni Magazine for the Stewart School of ISyE at Georgia Tech

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1288177029 2010-10-27 10:57:09 1475896058 2016-10-08 03:07:38 0 0 news Supplying the world’s most popular soft drink to its second largest consumer market is a huge job. Coca-Cola Mexico’s sixty-three bottling plants supply 358 distribution centers, from which 28,500 vehicles fan out across the country along 11,000 distribution routes, traveling 237 million kilometers to 1.4 million customers at small family stores and other outlets. It involves a highly efficient logistics and distribution model, but revisions and continuing education are necessary to keep up with changing business conditions. For help with these, Coca-Cola turned to the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute’s Executive Education Program offered by the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering.

]]>
2010-10-27T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-27T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
63229 63229 image <![CDATA[Coke Spain Group]]> image/jpeg 1449176668 2015-12-03 21:04:28 1475894554 2016-10-08 02:42:34
<![CDATA[Kobi Abayomi Interviewed in The Whistle]]> 27328 When Kobi Abayomi [assistant professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering] set foot on Georgia Tech’s campus as an under­graduate, he was thinking about how to land a job that involved cars — not about becoming a statistician.

Abayomi started off as a physics major but soon realized that the curriculum wasn’t for him. After visiting an optometrist who had a really nice car, Abayomi decided to try his hand at optometry. “Statistics was a prerequisite for the program, and I loved it,” he added.

Over the years, Abayomi’s inter­est in statistics continued to grow, and he now holds a master’s, master’s of philosophy, and a Ph.D. in Probability and Statistics from Columbia University.  Abayomi has also held positions as a visit­ing professor at Duke University and as a vis­iting fellow at Stanford University. These days, he is an assistant professor in the statistics group at the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering.

 Recently, The Whistle sat down with Abayomi for a conversation about research, teaching, and his favorite lunch spot. Here’s what he shared:

 Explain your research in statistics in one sentence.

I work with data that doesn’t match the bell curve and focus on a lot of sustainability-related issues.

 Tell me about your current research.

I’m analyzing data related to environmental hazards and what areas of the world are most vulnerable. I’m also collaborating with people at Georgia State University’s Law School and the Georgia Innocence Project to determine factors that can identify the wrongfully con­victed.

 What is your greatest challenge when it comes to teaching, and how have you dealt with it?

I feel like I want to teach to the student that I was. But, I’ve realized that everyone doesn’t learn the same way, and everyone doesn’t have the same goals as I did (i.e., they don’t want to go to graduate school).

A few things I’ve done to address this issue is I’ve tried to slow down how quickly I go through the course material. I also try to be very clear about what information will be covered on tests, so students know what they should be studying.

 Who are your teaching mentors?

Maria Montessori because she wrote about student self-determination, and Andrew Gelman because he taught me a few tricks for teaching statistics.

 What is your teaching philosophy?

I wouldn’t assign grades if I didn’t have to. The whole point of grading and testing is to get students to engage themselves in study. The best classes occur after tests when every­one has spent time learning the material.

 What is one thing all faculty and staff should do while working at Tech?

Swim in the Olympic Pool at the Campus Recreation Center and the pool at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center. They’re both impressive.

 Where’s the best place to grab lunch (on or off campus), and what do you order?

Spoon. I like to order tofu pad king.

 Tell us something unusual about yourself.

I have Siberian huskies named “Sasha” and “Trooper” that I rescued using the website www.petfinder.com.

 If you weren’t in your current line of work, what would you be doing?

I’d be living in Encinitas, California, and I’d have a performance shop where I would change automatic transmissions to manual

Amelia Pavlik, new editor for The Whistle, authored this article, which appeared in the October 25, 2010 issue.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1288179176 2010-10-27 11:32:56 1475896058 2016-10-08 03:07:38 0 0 news When Kobi Abayomi set foot on Georgia Tech’s campus as an under­graduate, he was thinking about how to land a job that involved cars — not about becoming a statistician. Abayomi started off as a physics major but soon realized that the curriculum wasn’t for him. After visiting an optometrist who had a really nice car, Abayomi decided to try his hand at optometry. “Statistics was a prerequisite for the program, and I loved it,” he added.  He now holds a master’s, master’s of philosophy, and a Ph.D. in Probability and Statistics from Columbia University. Read more about this ISyE assistant professor.

]]>
2010-10-27T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-27T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62378 62378 image <![CDATA[Kobi Abayomi]]> image/jpeg 1449176369 2015-12-03 20:59:29 1475894541 2016-10-08 02:42:21
<![CDATA[15th Annual Third-Party Logistics Study Examines the Global Market for 3PL Services]]> 27328 For the fifteenth year, Georgia Tech’s Supply Chain & Logistics Institute  in cooperation with Capgemini Consulting, the global strategy and transformation consulting brand of the Capgemini Group, and global logistics provider, Panalpina, have compiled the findings from its Third-Party Logistics (3PL) Study, which examines the global market for 3PL services. This year’s report, released last month, reveals that 3PLs continue to provide important strategic and operational value to shippers throughout the world. However, significant uncertainty about the global economy has impacted spending, with an average of 11 percent of company sales revenues devoted to logistics, and an average of 42 percent of that directed to the outsourcing of logistics services, a decrease of 10 to 15 percentage points from recent years. At the same time, 65 percent of shippers reported an increase in the use of outsourced logistics services relative to total logistics services, suggesting that while outsourcing may have increased, expenditure on 3PL services overall has decreased.

 The 2010 Third-Party Logistics Study is based on almost 1,900 responses from both shippers and logistics service providers in regions including North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific and Latin America, and also provides an in-depth look at the life sciences and fast-moving consumer goods (FMCG) industries. Supplemented with a significant number of focus interviews with industry observers and experts, findings of the web-based survey reveal continued progress and improvement in the shipper-3PL relationship, with 89 percent of shipper respondents overall viewing their 3PL relationships as generally successful and 68 percent indicating that 3PLs help provide them with new and innovative ways to improve operations. However, the report’s findings show that shippers continue their tendency to outsource transactional, operational, and repetitive activities and less so those that are strategic, customer-facing, and IT-intensive despite a large proportion of 3PLs offering more advanced services.

"Many shippers regard logistics and supply chain management as key components of their overall business success. Increased use of outsourcing and high satisfaction levels suggest that 3PLs can certainly take some credit for helping shippers to weather the economic storm,” said C. John Langley Jr., professor of Supply Chain Management at Georgia Tech’s H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and System’s Engineering (ISyE).  “Despite a challenging environment, 3PLs have an opportunity to continue to mature and grow by offering an increasing number of value-added services for shippers.”

One of the critical capabilities most highly valued by shippers in their 3PL provider is accurate reporting and analysis of total landed cost (TLC) – the sum of all costs associated with making and delivering products to the point where they produce revenue. The benefits of solid TLC calculations include more agility and confidence in decision making, better insight into the financial performance of products and partners, and improved supply chain visibility. However, despite the relatively high number of shipper respondents reporting an extensive use of TLC (45 percent), the precision and level of detail of those calculations differ widely.

Calculating the TLC of materials and finished goods is not always an easy task. Difficulty in defining all the factors contributing to total cost, and then obtaining all the necessary data, can be challenging. Too often, businesses rely on only partial data or inaccurate estimates that can lead to incorrect results, with 58 percent of 3PLs reporting a hesitance from shippers to share information with them. That might be the reason why, despite the high value of TLC calculations, just 23 percent of 3PL respondents reported providing extensive TLC analysis to their customers. This level of interaction requires a high level of trust, and considerable discussion is required among 3PLs and their customers to better understand the factors, roles, and KPIs to be used in a shared end-to-end calculation effort.

 “TLC enables companies to capture both the obvious and hidden costs associated with product movement, revealing the true cost of sourcing and logistics decisions,” said Dennis Wereldsma, Global Transportation Sector Lead, Capgemini. “Transforming from basic to more sophisticated TLC application requires C-level leadership, process change, and systems transformation. However, while TLC is highly important, because of the complexities, TLC adoption must be approached as an evolutionary, rather than revolutionary process.”

 Spotlight: 3PL in the Life Sciences Industry:

Within the Life Sciences industry, careful and expedient handling is often critical for product safety and because of this, control and visibility is essential. Logistics challenges here include product integrity and compliance requirements, an inherently complex trading partner ecosystem, and demanding customer service and cost requirements. Fifty-four percent of life sciences shippers surveyed felt the complexity of the supply chain model represents a significant challenge, but 87 percent felt 3PLs could add significant value here by linking together the various different parties involved. In addition, 62 percent of shippers within the Life Sciences industry cite ensuring product quality as a significant challenge and rank quality procedures highly (70 percent) as a service they want 3PLs to provide. Shipment visibility, quality and compliance procedures, stringent inventory control, temperature control capabilities, and security are important steps to ensure product integrity, prevent counterfeiting, and ensure safe delivery, and momentum is moving towards the use of RFID tags here. Indeed, around half of shipper and 3PL respondents agree that there is a strong business case for RFID in Life Sciences.

Spotlight: 3PL in the Fast-Moving Consumer Goods Industry:

Large volumes and low margins mean FMCG companies must respond quickly to deliver in-demand, on-trend products to increasingly demanding shoppers. After cost reduction, FMCG companies’ biggest priorities for logistics include perfect order fulfillment (87 percent), rapidly sensing and responding to changes in consumer demand (83 percent) and shortening new product time-to-market and supply chain integration (81 percent). Also, as sustainability grows in importance for consumers, shippers’ interest in strategies such as improving shipment density and load utilization has also increased. Shippers within the FMCG industry value the role 3PLs play here, as well as with reducing costs and dealing with supply chain disruption, although they are less likely to see 3PLs playing a key role in shortening new product time-to-market and supply chain integration. FMCG shippers’ efforts to reduce logistics costs include warehouse and transportation sharing. Two-thirds of those engaging in these strategies have recognized cost savings but this has been limited, with 58 percent of respondents recognizing less than 5 percent cost savings.

“The differences in the priorities reported by shippers in the Life Sciences and FMCG industries show how important it is for 3PL providers to provide industry-specific solutions and to work closely with their customers to really understand their needs and provide the best possible service, ultimately helping contribute to their overall business success,” said  Sven Hoemmken, Global Head of Sales, Panalpina.

 About Capgemini

Capgemini, one of the world's foremost providers of consulting, technology, and outsourcing services, enables its clients to transform and perform through technologies. Capgemini provides its clients with insights and capabilities that boost their freedom to achieve superior results through a unique way of working, the Collaborative Business ExperienceTM. The Group relies on its global delivery model called Rightshore®, which aims to get the right balance of the best talent from multiple locations, working as one team to create and deliver the optimum solution for clients. Present in more than 30 countries, Capgemini reported 2009 global revenues of EUR 8.4 billion and employs 95,000 people worldwide.

Capgemini Consulting is the Global Strategy and Transformation Consulting brand of the Capgemini Group, specializing in advising and supporting organizations in transforming their business, from the development of innovative strategy through to execution, with a consistent focus on sustainable results. Capgemini Consulting proposes to leading companies and governments a fresh approach which uses innovative methods, technology and the talents of over 4,000 consultants world-wide.

 About The Georgia Institute of Technology

The Georgia Institute of Technology, located in Atlanta, is a leader in supply chain and logistics education. Through its School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, Georgia Tech is committed to serving logistics educational needs through its degree programs and its comprehensive professional education program. Georgia Tech also conducts a fully accredited Executive Masters in International Logistics and Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL -SCS ) program, a Supply Chain Executive Forum, and a Leaders in Logistics Research Program and will soon commence a Georgia Tech M.S. Degree in Supply Chain Engineering. Global involvement is facilitated through The Logistics Institute Asia Pacific, a program in partnership with the National University of Singapore, and the SCL ’s recently developed network of Logistics Innovation Centers in Latin America helping countries to improve logistics performance and facilitate trade. SCL currently has centers in Costa Rica and Panama and is developing plans for Mexico, Chile, and Brazil.

 About The Panalpina Group

The Panalpina Group is one of the world’s leading suppliers of forwarding and logistics services, specializing in end-to-end supply chain management solutions and intercontinental air freight and ocean freight shipments. Thanks to its in-depth industry know-how and state-of-the-art IT systems, Panalpina provides globally integrated door-to door services tailored to its customers’ individual needs. The Panalpina Group operates a close-knit network with some 500 branches in over 80 countries. In a further 80 countries, it cooperates closely with partner companies. Panalpina employs over 14,000 people worldwide.

 Panalpina has extensive experience with customers in many key industries. With dedicated experts in key global markets, Panalpina has the people, products, skills, and capabilities to meet the demanding needs of its global customers.

 Panalpina’s business is Global Supply Chain Management. Panalpina delivers compelling solutions that provide value to all customers - every time. Panalpina has a passion for solutions.

 Click here to read the entire study.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1286799506 2010-10-11 12:18:26 1475896054 2016-10-08 03:07:34 0 0 news For the fifteenth year, Georgia Tech’s Supply Chain & Logistics Institute  in cooperation with Capgemini Consulting, the global strategy and transformation consulting brand of the Capgemini Group, and global logistics provider, Panalpina, has compiled the findings from its Third-Party Logistics Study , which examines the global market for 3PL services.

]]>
2010-10-11T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-11T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
61482 57771 61482 image <![CDATA[2010 Third-Party Logistics Study]]> image/jpeg 1449176337 2015-12-03 20:58:57 1475894536 2016-10-08 02:42:16 57771 image <![CDATA[C. John Langley]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[ISyE Distinguished Lecture: Dr. Bradley Efron’s Lecture Now Available Online]]> 27328 Bradley Efron, the Max H. Stein Professor of Statistics and Biostatistics at Stanford University’s School of Humanities and Sciences and the Department of Health Research and Policy with the School of Medicine, was the third distinguished lecturer in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering’s Distinguished Lecture Series. Efron presented his talk, titled “Learning from the Experience of Others,” to a standing-room-only audience on September 23, 2010.

If you were not able to attend the lecture or would like to listen to the lecture again, Dr. Efron’s lecture can be viewed at http://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/35125.

Stating that some statistical estimates are obtained by direct observation, Efron said that sometimes we learn from the experience of others. Efron used several examples, including the likelihood of having identical twins, to show how this works in practice, indicating some of the surprising theoretical ideas involved.

Started in 2008, the annual Distinguished Lecture Series brings in highly prominent speakers who have made a significant contribution to society through research areas of interest to ISyE faculty and students and to provide a forum for the students, faculty, staff, and alumni from the Georgia Tech community to interact with the distinguished lecturer. The two previous distinguished lecturers were Dr. William "Bill" Pulleyblank, vice president of the Center for Business Optimization at IBM Global Business Services, and Dr. Lawrence "Larry" Wein, professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and a Philip McCord Morse Lecturer.   

For more information, visit: http://www.isye.gatech.edu/news-events/dls/.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1286974539 2010-10-13 12:55:39 1475896054 2016-10-08 03:07:34 0 0 news Bradley Efron, the Max H. Stein Professor of Statistics and Biostatistics at Stanford University’s School of Humanities and Sciences and the Department of Health Research and Policy with the School of Medicine, was the third distinguished lecturer in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering’s Distinguished Lecture Series. Efron presented his talk, titled “Learning from the Experience of Others,” to a standing-room-only audience on September 23, 2010.

]]>
2010-10-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
62131 62131 image <![CDATA[Dr. Bradley Efron]]> image/jpeg 1449176355 2015-12-03 20:59:15 1475894539 2016-10-08 02:42:19
<![CDATA[Keskinocak, Team Win 2010 EURO Excellence in Practice Award]]> 27328 After being selected as one of six finalists out of a pool of seventy-three submissions from all over the world, the paper titled “Catch-Up Scheduling for Childhood Vaccination” was awarded the 2010 EURO Excellence in Practice Award. The paper is co-authored by Pinar Keskinocak, who is the Harold R. and Mary Anne Nash Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), co-director in the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, and associate director of research in the Health Systems Institute; former ISyE Ph.D. student Faramroze Engineer (DR IE 2009); and Dr. Larry Pickering from the CDC.

The paper describes the decision-support tool for constructing catch-up schedules for childhood immunization. The web-based tool creates a safe and effective catch-up schedule for any missed vaccinations to ensure that a child receives timely coverage against vaccine-preventable diseases. The catch-up scheduler is available for free download from CDC’s website http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/scheduler/catchup.htm.

According to Keskinocak, “our approach is unique in methodology, information, strategy, and advice it offers to the user.” The tool is being advocated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Keskinocak presented the paper at a special session of the EURO INFORMS 2010 conference in Lisbon, Portugal in July. EURO is the Association of European Operational Research Societies within IFORS, the International Federation of Operational Research Societies.

With the goal of recognizing outstanding accomplishments in the practice of operations research, the Excellence in Practice Award is given based upon scientific quality; relevance to operational research; originality in methodology, implementations and/ or field of application; a real impact to practice; and appreciation by the organization involved with the application.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1286978339 2010-10-13 13:58:59 1475896054 2016-10-08 03:07:34 0 0 news After being selected as one of six finalists out of a pool of seventy-three submissions from all over the world, the paper titled “Catch-Up Scheduling for Childhood Vaccination” was awarded the 2010 EURO Excellence in Practice Award. The paper is co-authored by Pinar Keskinocak, who is the Harold R. and Mary Anne Nash Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), co-director in the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, and associate director of research in the Health Systems Institute; former ISyE Ph.D. student Faramroze Engineer (DR IE 2009); and Dr. Larry Pickering from the CDC.

]]>
2010-10-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60112 60112 image <![CDATA[(From left to right) Pinar Keskinocak, Faramroze Engineer, and Larry Pickering]]> image/jpeg 1449176253 2015-12-03 20:57:33 1475894520 2016-10-08 02:42:00
<![CDATA[Cool Insights: Predictive Modeling for Food Safety]]> 27328 “Predictive Modeling for Food Safety” is the title of the fourth article to appear in Food Logistics’ column Cool Insights and the second to be written by John J. Bartholdi III, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management and Research Director, The Supply Chain & Logistics Institute. The article appeared in Food Logistics’ September 2010 issue. Read the column: http://www.foodlogistics.com/print/Food-Logistics/Cool-Insights/1$4010.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1286285459 2010-10-05 13:30:59 1475896054 2016-10-08 03:07:34 0 0 news “Predictive Modeling for Food Safety” is the title of the fourth article to appear in Food Logistics’ column Cool Insights and the second to be written by John J. Bartholdi III, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management and Research Director, The Supply Chain & Logistics Institute. The article appeared in Food Logistics’ September 2010 issue. Read the column: http://www.foodlogistics.com/print/Food-Logistics/Cool-Insights/1$4010.

]]>
2010-10-05T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-05T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
61461 61461 image <![CDATA[September 2010 Issue of Food Logistics Magazine]]> image/jpeg 1449176337 2015-12-03 20:58:57 1475894536 2016-10-08 02:42:16
<![CDATA[Mike Duke Elected to the National Academy of Engineers]]> 27328 Michael T. Duke (IE 1971), president and CEO of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., was recently inducted into the prestigious National Academy of Engineers (NAE) in a ceremony that took place on Saturday, October 2, 2010, in Washington, D.C. One of sixty-eight new members and nine foreign associates, Duke was recognized by his peers for his leadership and contributions to the design and implementation of innovative logistics and retail technologies.

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. The procedure for nominating and electing member and foreign associate candidates involves a search in all fields of engineering for outstanding engineers with identifiable contributions or accomplishments in one or both of the following categories:

Members, who are recognized by their peers for their professional integrity, have distinguished themselves in business and academic management, in technical positions, as university faculty, and as leaders in government and private engineering organizations. 

Duke was named president and chief executive officer of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc, in February 2009. He joined Wal-Mart in 1995 and was named vice chairman in 2005.  Since joining Wal-Mart, Duke has gained broad experience throughout the company, leading the logistics, distribution, and administration divisions as well as U.S. operations. As vice chairman, Duke has been actively involved in developing and executing corporate strategy. In 2010, Wal-Mart topped Fortune's Global 500 list, with 2010 sales of $408 billion, 8,500-plus stores, and 2.1 million employees.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1286287635 2010-10-05 14:07:15 1475896054 2016-10-08 03:07:34 0 0 news Michael T. Duke (IE 1971), president and CEO of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc., was recently inducted into the prestigious National Academy of Engineers (NAE) in a ceremony that took place on Saturday, October 2, 2010, in Washington, D.C.

]]>
2010-10-05T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-05T00:00:00-04:00 2010-10-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
61462 61462 image <![CDATA[Mike Duke]]> image/jpeg 1449176337 2015-12-03 20:58:57 1475894536 2016-10-08 02:42:16
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute Choose Panama to Establish a Center Of Innovation, Research and Education]]> 27233 The Georgia Tech Panama Logistics Innovation and Research Center was created with the support of the National Secretariat of Science, Technology and Innovation (SENACYT) and its strategic objectives to improve the logistics performance of Panama, both private and public sector, from studies and research that will enable the country to become the center of trade in the Americas.

Read the article the article within the SENACYT website (in Spanish): http://www.senacyt.gob.pa/loUltimo/index.php?idNoticia=1227

]]> Andy Haleblian 1 1285209504 2010-09-23 02:38:24 1475896047 2016-10-08 03:07:27 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Panama Logistics Innovation and Research Center was created with the support of the National Secretariat of Science, Technology and Innovation (SENACYT) and its strategic objectives to improve the logistics performance of Panama, both private and public sector, from studies and research that will enable the country to become the center of trade in the Americas.

]]>
2010-08-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-13 00:00:00 María Gabriela Alvarado
Jefa de Relaciones Públicas y Publicidad
Secretaría Nacional de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación/SENACYT
Ciudad del Saber | Edif. 233 | Panamá
507.517.0014 Ext. 1004 | Directo 507.517.0004

]]>
61165 61165 image <![CDATA[SENACYT and SCL members touring a freight facility in Panama]]> image/jpeg 1449176308 2015-12-03 20:58:28 1475894533 2016-10-08 02:42:13
<![CDATA[New Georgia Tech-Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center Launched]]> 27328 Georgia Tech celebrated the inauguration ceremonies for the Georgia Tech-Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center in Panama City, Panama, on September 7, 2010. The center is the latest addition to the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute’s (SCL) logistics innovation network of centers that focus on improving country-level logistics performance and increasing trade competitiveness.

Under an agreement negotiated with the Panama’s National Secretariat of Science, Technology and Innovation, SCL has established and will operate the Georgia Tech –Panama Logistics Innovation and Research Center located in Panama City, Panama. The center has three core thrusts -- applied research, education, and competitiveness -- and two primary objectives 1) to improve the logistics performance of Panama and 2) to establish Panama as the trade hub of the Americas. The center will establish education programs to increase human capital in logistics with both formal degree programs and through executive education; develop repositories and models to support trade analytics; develop performance, integration and visibility systems; facilitate stronger industry and infrastructure linkages to improve Panama’s competitiveness; provide leadership for the development of a National Logistics Plan and National Logistics Council; and provide innovation for logistics leading to new logistics services and jobs.

Holding a vision of Panama as a logistics, communications, education, research, and scientific tourism hub, Dr. Dario Solis, former director of research and professor of mechanical and electrical engineering at Universidad Tecnológica de Panamá (UTP)/Technological University of Panama, has been tapped as the center's managing director. Solis' many projects have been strategically and synergistically oriented around efforts to improve national infrastructure in transportation, to exploit Panama's competitive advantage in telecommunications, and to exercise its potential as an academic and research destination. Solis sees this as “a historical opportunity for the country of Panama to develop its huge potential and to become a dominate player in global trade.” He believes this opportunity can generate the resources necessary to improve the quality of life for all Panamanians.

Paying close attention to the center’s development is Panamanian President Ricardo Martinelli and Georgia Tech President G. P. “Bud” Peterson, both of whom spoke at the center’s opening program.

"Panama is a natural place for a trade hub,” said Don Ratliff, SCL executive director.  It is well suited for free enterprise growth with convenient air and sea transportation to the rest of Latin America, has an outstanding financial district, and good commercial development infrastructure.

And there's the canal, presently undergoing a multi-billion-dollar expansion. When completed in 2014, the waterway's capacity will be doubled and allow much bigger cargo ships.

"Panama possessive an entrepreneurial spirit and a vision for becoming the trade hub of the Americas," explains Jaymie Forrest, SCL managing director. "Panama is poised for growth and development in the required supporting logistics services.”

A bilingual workforce is another plus, she added, along with Panama's Colon Free Zone, a manufacturing, warehousing, and re-export center that is the second-largest free-trade zone in the world after Hong Kong.

But for all of Panama's hard assets, it lacks the high level of integration necessary for trade-hub status. There is lack of logistics services and supporting infrastructure such as public warehousing, temperature controlled faculties, logistics technology and the human capital experienced in supply chain operations. This is a good opportunity for Georgia Tech to transfer knowledge and apply value.

A value assessment to determine priorities in terms of infrastructure improvement will be one of the center's top orders of business. Ongoing improvements in logistics and the application of relevant new technologies will ensure Panama's competitiveness and build its stature as a trade hub.

Besides the immense economic advantages for Panama, a world-class trade hub, there is also expected to provide new opportunities for U.S. companies serving the logistics industry and, perhaps most importantly, boost American exports.

"We manufacture more products by value than any other country in the world," said Ratliff. "Many of these products are exportable, but they're made by small- and medium-size enterprises that simply don't have the capabilities to export to small countries." Nor is it economically worthwhile for these companies to develop and maintain individual trade relationships with separate Latin American countries representing markets of just four or five million people each, he added.

Typically, government-sponsored trade assistance is limited to marketing and does not address logistics needs, transportation, value-added product-support services and a host of key elements that constitute the practical demands of international trade. The Panama Center will be designed to meet these needs while providing, in effect, a single point of access for these smaller markets.

"If we're going to increase exports, which everyone believes is a good idea, then we have to make it so that exporting to a number of small countries is the same as exporting to one large country," Ratliff explained.

As the largest research group in the world focused on supply chain and logistics, SCL is the ideal partner for Panama's trade-hub development. In recent years, SCL has leveraged its traditional expertise to embrace issues surrounding international trade. SCL founded The Logistics Institute (TLI) Asia-Pacific in 1998 at the request of the government to improve logistics education. Based in Singapore, the center supports Singapore's Asian trade hub with research, education, and consulting expertise in global logistics and supply chain management. The learning’s from TLI-Asia Pacific offers a template for Panama in many ways.

In Central America, SCL established a regional presence in 2009 with its Trade-Chain Innovation and Productivity Center, which opened in Costa Rica to support increasing trade exports and improving logistics performance while supporting some of the countries strategic initiatives and planning investments. In particular this center is focused on food exports and preparing for the challenges of traceability and meeting the forthcoming US food safety regulations.

The Panama center is expected to serve as a springboard for logistics innovation, education and research throughout the Americas, according to Forrest.

SCL's emerging leadership role in international trade also dovetails with Georgia Tech's 25-year strategic plan, which calls for leveraging Tech's global engagement as a means of securing a larger international footprint. Logistics was identified as one of four high-potential industry sectors warranting particular emphasis in research and industry partnerships. The other sectors are energy, healthcare, and transportation.

"What Panama wants to do and what we want to do are very compatible," Ratliff said. "They have all the right pieces -- we'll help bring them all together."

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1283861489 2010-09-07 12:11:29 1475896043 2016-10-08 03:07:23 0 0 news Georgia Tech celebrated the inauguration ceremonies for the Georgia Tech-Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center in Panama City, Panama, on September 7, 2010. The center is the latest addition to the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute’s logistics innovation network of centers that focus on improving country-level logistics performance and increasing trade competitiveness.

]]>
2010-09-07T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-07T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-07 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60825 60827 60825 image <![CDATA[Dr.Dario Solis, Managing Director, Georgia Tech-Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449176296 2015-12-03 20:58:16 1475894528 2016-10-08 02:42:08 60827 image <![CDATA[Cargo ship passes through Panama Canal]]> image/jpeg 1449176296 2015-12-03 20:58:16 1475894528 2016-10-08 02:42:08
<![CDATA[Ellis Johnson: Deep Roots at Georgia Tech]]> 27328 While students were coming to California from all over the world to study in the same program with the man considered the father of linear programming, the esteemed George Dantzig, Ellis Johnson stumbled upon the great teacher, who recognized Johnson’s gift and took him on as his student. In the nearly fifty years since, Johnson, now the Coca Cola chair in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has sealed his own place in the discipline of Operations Research (OR), having made significant contributions to the field both in academia and while working at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research facility. For his efforts, Johnson has been recognized with numerous awards, including the George Dantzig Prize, and an IBM Corporate Fellow, which was responsible for bringing him back to his Georgia roots.

A native of Georgia, Johnson grew up on a farm near Athens. Though Johnson’s father initially wanted his sons and daughter to attend the University of Georgia, Johnson’s older brother, Fred, prevailed in coming to Georgia Tech, and Johnson followed in his footsteps. The deciding factor for their father was Tech’s co-op program, which provided the opportunity to pay for college while gaining valuable work experience.  Johnson, who was initially an aerospace engineering major, spent two quarters as a co-op student at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, which later became NASA, at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia.

After changing his major to math, Johnson was able to piece together a small scholarship, summer and part-time jobs, parental support, and previous savings to complete his degree. He excelled as an undergraduate math major and was encouraged to continue his education at the University of California at Berkely. At a summer job between completing his masters in math and starting his PhD program, Johnson discovered operations research, and that discovery changed the trajectory of his education and career

Though he had gone to UC Berkeley to study probability theory, Johnson said that “operations research just seemed to me to be a much better thing for me to do than what I was doing.” So Johnson changed his major. He registered for his first OR course, which the director of the program was teaching. As it turned out, that director was George Dantzig, a name which meant little to Johnson at the time; however, Johnson soon learned that Dantzig was “sort of the leading light” in OR. As that first year progressed, a mutual respect developed between the teacher and student, and a bond formed between the two that lasted through the remainder of Dantzig’s life.

Crediting Dantzig with setting his career for him, Johnson explains that his first job after completing his PhD was teaching in the industrial administration program at Yale University. During a junior faculty sabbatical at ETH [the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology] in Zurich, Johnson discerned that he wanted to go into a research environment rather than return to Yale.  Though Dantzig, by then at Stanford University, courted Johnson to join him at Stanford, Johnson declined, instead accepting an offer he had received from IBM. However, Johnson explains that had it not been for Dantzig, “I wouldn’t have known those people at IBM, and they would not have known [of] me.” In the end, that experience gave Johnson the chance to work with OR luminaries such as Phil Wolfe, Alan Hoffman and Ralph Gomory. 

After nearly a quarter century with IBM, Johnson decided that he wanted to return to Georgia Tech as a member of its faculty, but in 1990, IBM offered him a prestigious IBM Fellow. Such appointments entitled Fellows to a five-year period of relative freedom in their work. Johnson thought, “If I’ve got that kind of freedom, I want to continue to work with the software we’ve developed at IBM, but I also want to come to Georgia Tech and set up a Computational Optimization Center with George Nemhauser,” the A. Russell Chandler III chaired professor in ISyE.

As an IBM employee, Johnson worked with Nemhauser in setting up classes at Georgia Tech as well as establishing collaborative relationships with users of the software. Then, in 1995, after the five years ended, Johnson retired from IBM and joined the Georgia Tech faculty as the newly endowed Coca Cola chaired professor in ISyE. With that title, Johnson shared the distinction with Nemhauser of being the first two endowed chair-holders in ISyE.

 For Johnson, however, returning to his roots did not just mean returning to Georgia Tech. As a farm boy, Johnson’s roots grow deep in Georgia soil. When he’s not in Atlanta, or teaching in Georgia-Tech’s Dual Masters program in Shanghai, Johnson is at home on his 100-acre farm in Madison, Georgia. Appropriately called the 100- Acre Farm, Johnson’s land, eighty-six acres of which has been set aside as a conservation easement,  is situated where the Apalachee River runs into Lake Oconee. Miles of trails run through woods and alongside creeks and ponds. And so that others can enjoy the land, Johnson also established the Farmhouse Inn Bed & Breakfast, which in addition to serving eggs from their own farm-raised chickens, is also one of the top ten bird watching B&Bs in the country.

 Bringing his worlds together, for the past three summers Johnson has hosted Chinese exchange students at his farm and shown them Madison’s southern charm. Though, as Johnson explains, it’s the student’s choice about how to spend their time, many like to make this trip to Madison.

Offering students the opportunity for a shared learning experience is consistent with Johnson’s teaching philosophy.  One of the things Johnson cares about is collaboration. “I use the analogy of a tapestry,“ he explains. “You’ve got threads, and some of the threads break, and it weakens the whole thing.” Continuing, Johnson says that he tells his students: “Don’t be the thread that breaks; be the thread that fills in and makes it work.”

The thread that runs continuously through Johnson’s own tapestry brought him back to Georgia. Though coming home was an important consideration for Johnson, the real tug was being at Georgia Tech and holding the Coca Cola chair.  In Johnson’s experience, Tech is a positive place, and there’s a degree of flexibility in making things happen that is unusual for a state school. According to Johnson, people know what they are doing, they know what they have to do, and they feel they can do it. At the end of the day, Johnson said, “It just makes me feel better to be here.”

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1283866057 2010-09-07 13:27:37 1475896043 2016-10-08 03:07:23 0 0 news While students were coming to California from all over the world to study in the same program with the man considered the father of linear programming, the esteemed George Dantzig, Ellis Johnson stumbled upon the great teacher, who recognized Johnson’s gift and took him on as his student. In the nearly fifty years since, Johnson, now the Coca Cola chair in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has sealed his own place in the discipline of Operations Research (OR), having made significant contributions to the field both in academia and while working at IBM’s T.J. Watson Research facility.

]]>
2010-09-07T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-07T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-07 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60829 60829 image <![CDATA[Ellis Johnson,Coca Cola chaired professor in ISyE]]> image/jpeg 1449176296 2015-12-03 20:58:16 1475894528 2016-10-08 02:42:08
<![CDATA[Change - the only sustainable goal]]> 27279 Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor at the Stewart School of ISyE, discusses her thoughts on what it means to be sustainable and how she teaches the concept.  The interview appears in the September issue of Air World Cargo.

http://www.aircargoworld.com/Magazine/Features/Change-the-only-sustainable-goal

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1284107966 2010-09-10 08:39:26 1475896043 2016-10-08 03:07:23 0 0 news Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor at the Stewart School of ISyE, discusses her thoughts on what it means to be sustainable and how she teaches the concept.  The interview appears in the September issue of Air World Cargo.  Read more>>

 

]]>
2010-09-10T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-10T00:00:00-04:00 2010-09-10 00:00:00
<![CDATA[ISyE Undergraduate Program Maintains Top Ranking in U.S. News and World Report]]> 27328 The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering’s (ISyE) undergraduate program maintained its top ranking in the 2011 edition of America’s Best Colleges by U.S. News & World Report released in August. This issue marks the sixteenth year that ISyE has ranked as the foremost program of its kind in the nation at the undergraduate level within industrial/manufacturing engineering category.

Georgia Institute of Technology ranks 7th among public universities in the 2011 edition. Georgia Tech has ranked in the top 10 of public universities for more than a decade.

Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering moved up one spot in the undergraduate rankings to fourth for engineering programs at universities where the highest degree is a Ph.D.

While the Stewart School maintained its top ranking, Aerospace Engineering ranked second in its discipline.  Mechanical Engineering moved up one spot to join Biomedical Engineering, and Civil Engineering with all ranked third.  Electrical and Environmental Engineering both ranked 5th among their peers.

For the first time, U.S. News & World Report polled high school guidance counselors.  Georgia Tech ranked 2nd among public institutions, tied with the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the University of Michigan. In rankings including both public and private universities, Georgia Tech tied for 22nd with Boston College, Emory University, Rice University, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, University of Southern California, University of Michigan and Washington University-St. Louis.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1282219017 2010-08-19 11:56:57 1475896039 2016-10-08 03:07:19 0 0 news The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering’s (ISyE) undergraduate program maintained its top ranking in the 2011 edition of America’s Best Colleges by U.S. News & World Report released in August. This issue marks the sixteenth year that ISyE has ranked as the foremost program of its kind in the nation at the undergraduate level within industrial/manufacturing engineering category.

]]>
2010-08-19T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-19T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60515 60515 image <![CDATA[ISyE Maintains Ranking]]> image/jpeg 1449176267 2015-12-03 20:57:47 1475894525 2016-10-08 02:42:05
<![CDATA[EMIL-SCS Class Studies European Logistics]]> 27328 As World Cup Soccer was capturing the attention of people around the globe, the internationally diverse Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) class of 2011 was globe-trotting on its second residence from June 13 through June 24, 2010.  Visiting Eastern Europe, the class began the residence in Cologne, Germany, with Dr. Andreas Staab, founder and director of the European Policy Information Center and author of The European Union Explained. Providing a historical overview of European integration, Staab’s objective was to help the students understand the historical, political, and cultural factors that shaped the integration and evolution of relationships among European countries and between the European Union (EU) and its members.

The next day the class heard from Professor Owen Darbishire, from Pembroke College in Oxford, who lectured on different labor and employment models in the US, EU, and Japan with a focus on the different constraints they impose and opportunities they create.  Following Darbishire’s presentation, Jeanny Wildi-Yune, managing director of the recently launched Kuehne Logistics University in Hamburg, provided an overview of the new program.

After two intense days of theory, the class had their first bus trip and site visit to the Rotterdam Port Authority where they received a presentation on intermodal and rail connections and toured the ECT Delta Container Terminal.  On their last day in Cologne, the class visited Kraftverkehr Nagel, a German family-owned food-logistics company.  The company presented on over-the-road transportation and cold chain in Europe. Focusing on the competitive landscape, the presentation included national carriers and European players and the influences of Central and Eastern European (CEE) competitors.

That evening the class flew to Munich, where they met with Norbert Jungmichel from Systain Consulting, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Otto Group, a major German retailer.  Jungmichel discussed environmental issues in the supply chain, such as the extent to which customers are willing to pay more for more sustainable products and services, as well as the lack of a single international standard for measuring carbon footprint and the uncertainty and complexity this imposes on investment and sourcing decisions.

Later that afternoon the class traveled to Audi in Ingolstadt, where they learned about Audi’s order-to-delivery process and were treated to a tour of the plant. Their visit included an open discussion of in-bound logistics with examples from local sequenced suppliers, as well as suppliers in CEE and North Africa and as distant as Asia and America.

Many of the evenings and weekend days were spent watching the World Cup.  This was especially enjoyable with a class from all parts of the world.  After a weekend of soccer, the class traveled to Krakow, Poland, where they re-visited Dr. Staab for a review of their previous session and a discussion of the financial crisis, sovereign debt issues, as well as other political and economic issues.  

From there the class took a bus to Krakowski Park Technologiczny, a company that supports technological and entrepreneurial development of Małopolska Region and promotes innovativeness and new technologies.  While there, the class met with two additional companies: UPM, one of the world’s leading forest products groups, which discussed their business processes for outsourcing, and Sabre Holdings, a merchandising and retailer of travel products that provides distribution and technology solutions for the travel industry, which discussed their latest in research and development.

Their final site visit was taken by train to WSK "PZL – Rzeszów," one of the leading players in the Central Europe aerospace industry. They presented an overview of one of the most remarkable stories of enterprise transformation and leadership – the evolution and restructuring of WSK "PLZ-Rzeszów" S.A from the “Solidarity” movement of 1980 and the subsequent break with Soviet Union through today.   They also discussed the development of the Aviation Valley in southeastern Poland. 

The next destination for the EMIL-SCS Class of 2011 is Residence III in Latin America.  The class will be traveling from September 10 – 24, 2010. 

 For more on the EMIL-SCS Program, contact Erin Howlette at erin.howlette@isye.gatech.edu or visit http://www.emil.gatech.edu/.

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1282742010 2010-08-25 13:13:30 1475896039 2016-10-08 03:07:19 0 0 news As World Cup Soccer was capturing the attention of people around the globe, the internationally diverse Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy class of 2011 was globe-trotting through Eastern Europe on its second residence, June 13 through June 24, 2010. 

]]>
2010-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60555 60555 image <![CDATA[2011 EMIL Class visits Audi in Ingolstadt, Germany, during its second residence]]> image/jpeg 1449176281 2015-12-03 20:58:01 1475894525 2016-10-08 02:42:05
<![CDATA[Remembering Former ISyE Professor, Harrison Morton Wadsworth, Jr.]]> 27328 Harrison Morton Wadsworth, Jr. died August 3, 2010. He was 85. Wadsworth was a professor of statistics in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech for thirty-one years and taught in China and Turkey. Following his retirement  from Tech in 1991, Wadsworth operated his own quality auditing consulting business.

Wadsworth served in the U.S. Army in World War II and the Korean Conflict. He was a U.S. delegate and subcommittee chair to the International Standards Organization and the American National Standards Institute. He authored or co-authored several textbooks and served as editor of the Journal of Quality Technology. Wadsworth received numerous awards and medals, including the American Society for Quality's highest honor, the Distinguished Service Medal, and he was a Fellow of the American Statistical Association.

Wadsworth is survived by his wife of fifty-nine years, Irene Hawkins Wadsworth; son, Harrison Morton Wadsworth, III, and his wife Toni Wadsworth; daughter, Alice Eleanor Wadsworth; and grandchildren, Renee Wadsworth, Harrison Morton Wadsworth, IV, William Wadsworth, Harrison Ritchie, Benjamin Lunsford, Matthew Lunsford, and Alison Lunsford.

For those wishing to honor Wadsworth, his family has requested that contributions be made to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, P.O. Box 4072, Pittsfield, MA 01202.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1282839437 2010-08-26 16:17:17 1475896039 2016-10-08 03:07:19 0 0 news Harrison Morton Wadsworth, Jr. died August 3, 2010. He was 85. Wadsworth was a professor of statistics in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech for thirty-one years and taught in China and Turkey. Following his retirement  from Tech in 1991, Wadsworth operated his own quality auditing consulting business.

]]>
2010-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60640 60640 image <![CDATA[Harrison Morton Wadsworth, Jr.]]> image/jpeg 1449176281 2015-12-03 20:58:01 1475894525 2016-10-08 02:42:05
<![CDATA[Eva Lee Joins Interdisciplinary Team at Emory’s New Center for Systems Vaccinology]]> 27328 Eva K. Lee, professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech and director of the Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare, joins a highly integrated and interdisciplinary team conducting research in the newly established Center for Systems Vaccinology at Emory University.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health awarded a five-year, $15.5 million grant to the Emory Vaccine Center at Yerkes National Primate Research Center in Atlanta. Scientists in the new Center will employ the modern analytic tools of systems biology to understand the immune responses vaccines stimulate in humans and will use this knowledge to guide design of vaccines against HIV, malaria and other global pandemics

Bali Pulendran, the Charles Howard Candler professor in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Emory University, the Emory Vaccine Center, and Yerkes Research Center, is principal investigator of the center. Rafi Ahmed, director of the Emory Vaccine Center and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar, will serve as co-principal investigator.

Lee and other researchers at the center will address a major challenge thus far in the development of vaccines – that the effectiveness of vaccination can only be ascertained after vaccinated individuals have been exposed to infection. To study vaccine-induced immunity in humans, they will use a multidisciplinary approach Pulendran developed, which involves immunology, genomics and bioinformatics to predict the immunity of a vaccine without exposing individuals to infection.

Researchers working in the new Center for Systems Vaccinology will determine whether Pulendran’s approach can be used to predict the effectiveness of other vaccines, including common vaccines against influenza, pneumococcal disease and shingles. The ability to successfully predict the immunity and efficacy of vaccines would facilitate the rapid evaluation of new and emerging vaccines and the identification of individuals who are unlikely to be protected by a vaccine.

The team’s initial work will focus on two major projects on innate immunity and adaptive immunity that ultimately will facilitate vaccine development in several ways: (1) by enabling a strategy to prospectively predict the immunogenicity of vaccines; (2) by offering new and fundamental insights into the genes, cells and networks that orchestrate vaccine-induced immunity in the young and elderly; and (3) by facilitating the generation of an open access database of vaccine-induced molecular signatures.

The Center’s interdisciplinary team comprises researchers and clinicians in areas as diverse as immunology, vaccinology, clinical medicine, computational modeling, and mathematics. In addition to Lee, the team includes Nick Haining (Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston), Shankar Subramaniam (University of California, San Diego), Alex Sette (La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla), Mark Mulligan (Hope Clinic, Emory Vaccine Center,; and Myron Levine and Adriana Weinberg (University of Colorado, Denver).

Lee, along with Haining and Subramaniam, co-direct the "Genomics and Computational Biology" core of the initiative. The Core will provide expertise, analysis, and experimental platforms to systematically interrogate the immune response to the inactivated trivalent influenza vaccine, the pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, and the live attenuated varicella-zoster vaccine. Two major goals in this Core involve development of gene expression-based predictors of vaccine response in humans and use of genomic techniques as discovery tools to better understand the innate and adaptive immune response to vaccines.

Support for the first year of the Center initiative will come from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1282640858 2010-08-24 09:07:38 1475896035 2016-10-08 03:07:15 0 0 news Eva K. Lee, professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech and director of the Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare, joins a highly integrated and interdisciplinary team conducting research in the newly established Center for Systems Vaccinology at Emory University.

]]>
2010-08-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-24 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55544 55544 image <![CDATA[Eva K. Lee, ISyE professor and director, Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Extends Global Reach with Panama Logistics Innovation and Research Center]]> 27328 Panama is edging closer to its longtime ambition of becoming a trade hub for the Americas — with key assistance from the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), a unit of Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering.

Under an agreement negotiated with the Panamanian government, SCL will establish and operate a Logistics Innovation and Research Center (PLIC) in Panama by the fall of this year. The center's activities will be built around three main areas: applied research, education and competitiveness.

The center will gather data pertaining to logistics and trade and develop analytics to facilitate showing the value and capabilities of Panama. This knowledge base will also drive educational programming in logistics for students and professionals. In addition, the center will facilitate stronger industry and infrastructure linkages, leading to new logistics services and jobs.

With its strategic location, multi-modal transportation access, and deep-water ports situated on each coast, "Panama is a natural place for a trade hub," said SCL Executive Director Don Ratliff. "It is well suited for free enterprise growth with convenient air and sea transportation to the rest of Latin America, has an outstanding financial district, and good commercial development infrastructure.”

And there's the canal, presently undergoing a multi-billion-dollar expansion. When completed in 2014, the waterway's capacity will be doubled and allow much bigger cargo ships.

"There's a lot of entrepreneurial spirit in Panama," said Jaymie Forrest, SCL's managing director.  "Panama is poised for economic growth in the area of logistics and supporting services.”

A bilingual workforce is another plus, she added, along with Panama's Colon Free Zone, a manufacturing, warehousing, and re-export center that is the second-largest free-trade zone in the world after Hong Kong.

But for all of Panama's hard assets, it lacks the high level of integration necessary for trade-hub status. There is lack of logistics services and supporting infrastructure such as public warehousing, temperature controlled faculties, logistics technology and the human capital experienced in supply chain operations. This is a good opportunity for Georgia Tech to transfer knowledge and apply value.

A value assessment to determine priorities in terms of infrastructure improvement will be one of the center's top orders of business. Ongoing improvements in logistics and the application of relevant new technologies will ensure Panama's competitiveness and build its stature as a trade hub.

Besides the immense economic advantages for Panama, a world-class trade hub, there is also expected to provide new opportunities for U.S. companies serving the logistics industry and, perhaps most importantly, boost American exports.

"We manufacture more products by value than any other country in the world," said Ratliff. "Many of these products are exportable, but they're made by small- and medium-size enterprises that simply don't have the capabilities to export to small countries." Nor is it economically worthwhile for these companies to develop and maintain individual trade relationships with separate Latin American countries representing markets of just four or five million people each, he added.

Typically, government-sponsored trade assistance is limited to marketing and does not address logistics needs, transportation, value-added product-support services and a host of other topics that constitute the practical demands of international trade. The Panama Center will be designed to meet these needs while providing, in effect, a single point of access for these smaller markets.

"If we're going to increase exports, which everyone believes is a good idea, then we have to make it so that exporting to a number of small countries is the same as exporting to one large country," Ratliff explained.

As the largest research group in the world focused on supply chain and logistics, SCL is the ideal partner for Panama's trade-hub development. In recent years, SCL has leveraged its traditional expertise to embrace issues surrounding international trade.  SCL founded The Logistics Institute (TLI) Asia-Pacific in 1998 at the request of the government to improve logistics education. Based in Singapore, the center supports Singapore's Asian trade hub with research, education, and consulting expertise in global logistics and supply chain management. The learning’s from TLI-Asia Pacific offers a template for Panama in many ways.

In Central America, SCL established a regional presence in 2009 with its Trade-Chain Innovation and Productivity Center, which opened in Costa Rica to support increasing trade exports and improving logistics performance while supporting some of the countries strategic initiatives and planning investments.

The Panama center is expected to serve as a springboard for logistics innovation and research throughout the Americas, according to Forrest.

SCL's emerging leadership role in international trade also dovetails with Georgia Tech's 25-year strategic plan, which calls for leveraging Tech's global engagement as a means of securing a larger international footprint. Logistics was identified as one of four high-potential industry sectors warranting particular emphasis in research and industry partnerships. The other sectors are energy, healthcare, and transportation.

"What Panama wants to do and what we want to do are very compatible," Ratliff said. "They have all the right parts -- we'll help bring them all together."

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1280137123 2010-07-26 09:38:43 1475896031 2016-10-08 03:07:11 0 0 news Panama is edging closer to its longtime ambition of becoming a trade hub for the Americas — with key assistance from the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), a unit of Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. Under an agreement negotiated with the Panamanian government, SCL will establish and operate a Logistics Innovation and Research Center in Panama by the fall of this year.

]]>
2010-07-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60139 60242 60139 image <![CDATA[New Logistics Innovation and Research Center in Panama]]> image/jpeg 1449176253 2015-12-03 20:57:33 1475894520 2016-10-08 02:42:00 60242 image <![CDATA[Cargo ship travels through Panama Canal]]> image/jpeg 1449176253 2015-12-03 20:57:33 1475894523 2016-10-08 02:42:03
<![CDATA[Supply Chain Trends to Watch]]> 27328 In the July 4, 2010, issue of World Trade Magazine, top academic researchers including Chip White, Don Ratliff, and John Langley, weigh in on trends that will change supply chain operations and management. The arrticle, "Supply Chain Trends to Watch," points out  that the operation and management of today’s global supply chain continues to challenge executives worldwide. While the extended supply chain can make the world seem a whole lot smaller, its changeability, lengthy complexity, and vulnerability can baffle the most astute of operations managers trying to tame it. Many describe the long chain as a constantly moving target in continual flux as U.S. companies do things like continue to merge with other companies and move from one overseas sourcing and manufacturing locale to another in the constant quest for the lowest-cost labor and materials.>> Read more.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1278426925 2010-07-06 14:35:25 1475896023 2016-10-08 03:07:03 0 0 news In the July 4, 2010, issue of World Trade Magazine, top academic researchers including Chip White, Don Ratliff, and John Langley, weigh in on trends that will change supply chain operations and management.

]]>
2010-07-06T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-06T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
59911 59911 image <![CDATA[July 4, 2010, Issue of World Trade Magazine]]> image/jpeg 1449176239 2015-12-03 20:57:19 1475894520 2016-10-08 02:42:00
<![CDATA[Haiti's Heavy Weight]]> 27328 In a recent New York Times editorial, Ozlem Ergun and Julie Swann, associate professors of industrial and systems engineering and co-directors of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, along with coauthor Reginal DesRoches, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Georgia Tech, wrote about the astonishing amount of debris still left in Haiti and the need for a plan for functional accessible infrastructure. >>Read more.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1278581061 2010-07-08 09:24:21 1475896023 2016-10-08 03:07:03 0 0 news In a recent New York Times editorial, Ozlem Ergun and Julie Swann, associate professors of industrial and systems engineering and co-directors of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, along with coauthor Reginal DesRoches, professor of civil and environmental engineering at Georgia Tech, wrote about the astonishing amount of debris still left in Haiti and the need for a plan for functional accessible infrastructure

]]>
2010-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Rethinking Renewables in the Peach State]]> 27328 Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering,is featured in the article, "Rethinking Renewables in the Peach State," in the June/July 2010 Issue of Georgia Engineer. Thomas and other featured Georgia Tech researchers  discuss the practicality of a number of renewable options they are investigating, including biomass, solar, wind, and tidal energies. According to Thomas, getting 20 to 30 percent of Georgia's energy needs from biomass is feasible.  >> Read more.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1277894493 2010-06-30 10:41:33 1475896019 2016-10-08 03:06:59 0 0 news Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering,is featured in the article, "Rethinking Renewables in the Peach State," in the June/July 2010 Issue of Georgia Engineer.

]]>
2010-06-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
59877 59877 image <![CDATA[June/July 2010 Issue Features Valerie Thomas, Other Georgia Tech Researchers]]> image/jpeg 1449176239 2015-12-03 20:57:19 1475894517 2016-10-08 02:41:57
<![CDATA[Thomas Returns to ISyE as Interim Chair]]> 27328 Dr. Michael “Mike” Thomas, former school chair and professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and former provost of Georgia Tech, has been appointed interim school chair for ISyE beginning July 1, 2010. Thomas, who served as ISyE’s third school chair from 1978 to 1989, will fill the position being vacated by Chelsea C. “Chip” White III until a permanent school chair is in place.

 “I am grateful that Mike Thomas has agreed to take on the responsibility of leading the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering as interim school chair in order to assure a smooth transition through the upcoming search for a new school chair,” said Don Giddens, Dean of the College of Engineering. “I know that his faculty colleagues will work closely with him to ensure that we maintain and build on the momentum ISyE has established. We are incredibly fortunate to have a person of this caliber step in to this position.”

Thomas has extensive knowledge of ISyE teaching and research initiatives and has a good rapport with the faculty, staff, and students in ISyE and across campus. “When Mike was ISyE school chair, he brought in and retained key faculty members and placed an emphasis on developing a strong research program that helped propel the Stewart School to the role of national prominence it maintains today,” said White. “We are delighted to have him back with us.”

Thomas also strengthened connections with ISyE alumni. His efforts brought ISyE its first endowed chair, the A. Russell Chandler III Chair, which he later used to attract George Nemhauser, one of the premier operations research faculty in the Unites States, to Georgia Tech. Thomas also recruited ISyE’s second endowed chair, the Coca-Cola Chair, held then and now by Ellis Johnson. And it was during his tenure that the ISyE Alumni Advisory Board was formed to help guide the Stewart School.

 In 1989, Thomas joined the President’s office at Georgia Tech as acting executive vice president, responsible for overseeing Tech's academic restructuring, which resulted in the formation of three new colleges and numerous new degree programs. In addition, he helped to oversee the implementation of many of these degree programs; created new promotion, tenure and reappointment standards; and managed the Institute's budgeting process. In 1996 his title was changed to Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, overseeing all academic and most administrative areas. Thomas retired in 2002, but came out of retirement soon thereafter to serve as interim chair of the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering while a search was underway for a new chair.

Thomas received a BSChE and MSChE from the University of Texas-Austin. In 1965, he received his Ph.D. in operations research from Johns Hopkins University. He was also president of the Operations Research Society (now INFORMS) and elected as a fellow of INFORMS and AIIE.

 Mike and his wife Pat have five children: Michelle Barber, Kevin Gue (MS OR 1992, DR IE 1995), Teresa Genoway, Kathee Pappa and Rebecca MacLean. The Thomas’ also have twenty-two grandchildren, one of whom graduated from Tech with a degree in Mechanical Engineering this past May, and one who will be entering in the fall, also pursuing a degree in Mechanical Engineering.

 Professor Vigor Yang, chair of the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering, is chairing a search committee that has been charged with actively soliciting candidates; evaluating qualifications; and through a screening and interview process, recommending finalists for the position. According to Dean Giddens, this will be an international search to select the best possible person for this important position.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1277826216 2010-06-29 15:43:36 1475896019 2016-10-08 03:06:59 0 0 news Dr. Michael "Mike" Thomas, former school chair and professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and former provost of Georgia Tech, has been appointed interim school chair for ISyE beginning July 1, 2010. Thomas, who served as ISyE's third school chair from 1978 to 1989, will fill the position being vacated by Chelsea C. "Chip" White III until a permanent school chair is in place.

]]>
2010-06-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
59839 59839 image <![CDATA[Mike Thomas, Interim Chair, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering]]> image/jpeg 1449176239 2015-12-03 20:57:19 1475894517 2016-10-08 02:41:57
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Helps Abu Dhabi Ready for Life After Oil]]> 27328 In its July 13th issue, Global Atlanta interviewed Chelsea "Chip" White, the Schneider National Chair in Transportation and Logistics and former H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart Chair of Georgia Tech's H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, about his yearlong mission to Abu Dhabi, the oil-rich Persian Gulf emirate halfway around the world.  White explained that the Stewart school focuses on simplifying industrial processes to improve productivity in complex fields like logistics, health care, computing, and many others. “As economies become more globally connected, the School has become a ‘multinational academic unit’ active in transforming the way countries do business.” >> Read the entire interview

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1279116368 2010-07-14 14:06:08 1475896019 2016-10-08 03:06:59 0 0 news In its July 13th issue, Global Atlanta interviewed Chelsea "Chip" White, the Schneider National Chair in Transportation and Logistics and former H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart Chair of Georgia Tech's H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, about his yearlong mission to Abu Dhabi, the oil-rich Persian Gulf emirate halfway around the world.

]]>
2010-07-14T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-14T00:00:00-04:00 2010-07-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
40613 40613 image <![CDATA[Dr. Chip White]]> 1449174220 2015-12-03 20:23:40 1475894220 2016-10-08 02:37:00
<![CDATA[Industrial Ecology: Moving beyond Traditional Engineering Borders]]> 27328 The Spring 2010 issue of Society of Women Engineers magazine featured an article titled “Industrial Ecology: Moving beyond Traditional Engineering Borders.”  In the article, Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, discusses how a bag of potato chips illustrates the far-reaching implications of industrial ecology.

 Factors like cost and consumer appeal affect most decisions about making and buying products.  Industrial ecology introduces another perspective. A bag of potato chips, according to Thomas, involves decisions about growing potatoes, the materials to make the bag, and where the waste from the potatoes and bag goes.  She clarified, "Consumption and production affect not just the immediate use of products but have a past and a future.  Products do not appear out of nothing and they do not disappear when we throw them away."

>> Read more:.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1276515329 2010-06-14 11:35:29 1475896007 2016-10-08 03:06:47 0 0 news The Spring 2010 issue of Society of Women Engineers magazine featured an article titled "Industrial Ecology: Moving beyond Traditional Engineering Borders."  In the article, Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, discusses how a bag of potato chips illustrates the far-reaching implications of industrial ecology.

]]>
2010-06-14T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-14T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
49873 49873 image <![CDATA[Valerie Thomas]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[EMIL-SCS Welcomes the Class of 2011, Its Most International Class]]> 27328 As the 2010 Executive Masters in International Logistics – Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) class was completing its final residence in March and preparing for graduation in May, the 2011 class met for its first residence in April.  Meeting for Residence I on the Georgia Tech campus in Atlanta, Georgia, the all-male class is the most international in the history of the EMIL-SCS program. 

 Of the sixteen students that comprise the class, twenty-five percent are from Europe, twenty-five percent are from Latin America, six percent are from Asia, and forty-four percent are from the United States.  The EMIL-SCS program views the class diversity as a benefit to the program and the class itself as students face the global logistics and supply chain issues they are expected to encounter during their EMIL-SCS journey.

 Residence I, which some EMIL-SCS alumni affectionately refer to as the “boot camp” residence, was taught by several members of Georgia Tech faculty and adjunct faculty with expertise in specific logistics and supply chain strategy areas pertinent to the industries the student body represents.

 During week one, the class received instruction from Stephen Timme and Ed Frazelle, adjunct professors in the  H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE),  and Martin Savelsbergh and John Vande Vate, ISyE professors. Timme, co-founder and CEO/president of FinListics® Solutions, taught Supply Chain Finance, and Frazelle, founding director of the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) at Georgia Tech and president and CEO of Logistics Resources International, guided the class through an intense and interactive Supply Chain Strategy workshop. Savelsbergh and John Vande Vate introduced the class to Analytics.

 Balancing coursework with play, the class met over the weekend for a Braves game.   This made for great fun since one of the students from Jakarta, Indonesia, had never heard of baseball (though he is an avid NASCAR fan).  The class bonded instantly upon meeting each other and enjoyed their first outing together.  The EMIL-SCS experience will provide the class with many more opportunities to socialize during the eighteen-month program.

 Week two brought its share of theoretical intensity. ISyE Associate Professor Anton Kleywegt led the session on Revenue Management, and College of Management Associate Professor Mark Ferguson taught the session on Inventory Management.  The next session of the week was an overview of the 3PL industry taught by John Langley, ISyE professor and director of Supply Chain Executive Programs. 

Just as the students were becoming a bit overwhelmed, relief was offered.  At the beginning of the residence, the class had been asked to complete the #1 Wall Street Journal and #1 BusinessWeek bestseller StrengthsFinder 2.0 assessment.  This best-selling book and individualized personal assessment provides an in-depth look at a person’s strengths and how to best utilize those strengths within the workplace.  Upon completion of the assessment, the class was joined by Karla Brandau from Improving Human Capital, LLC, for a fun and thought-provoking session on how to understand and focus on individual strengths, making the student more powerful and promotable. 

 The final chapter of the residence was to form the Global Supply Chain Project teams..With the guidance of EMIL-SCS executive director, John Vande Vate, and managing director, Greg Andrews, the class formed five teams that range in industries from retail to 3PL’s.  When the class meets again for Residence II, the Global Project Teams will provide project updates now that their projects have begun to take shape.

The class will meet again from June 13 through the 24, 2010, for Residence II in Europe.  While there, the class will visit Cologne and Munich, Germany, during week one and complete the residence in Krakow, Poland.  The EMIL-SCS program is excited about the newest members of the EMIL-SCS family and eagerly anticipates the next eighteen months while they take on the unique EMIL-SCS academic and socialization experience. 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1275917764 2010-06-07 13:36:04 1475896003 2016-10-08 03:06:43 0 0 news As the 2010 Executive Masters in International Logistics -Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) class was completing its final residence in March and preparing for graduation in May, the 2011 class met for its first residence in April.  Meeting for Residence I on the Georgia Tech campus in Atlanta, Georgia, the all-male class is the most international in the history of the EMIL-SCS program.

]]>
2010-06-07T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-07T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-07 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
57934 57934 image <![CDATA[2011 EMIL-SCS class takes break from intensity of classroom to enjoy a Braves game.]]> image/jpeg 1449176194 2015-12-03 20:56:34 1475894510 2016-10-08 02:41:50
<![CDATA[World Trade Magazine: Optimizing the LTL Industry]]> 27328 In the May 2010 issue of World Trade Magazine, ISyE professors Alan Erera and Martin Savelsbergh discuss their reserach on optimzing the LTL industry in the article "Optimizing the LTL Industry" by April Terreri. Read the article at http://www.worldtrademag.com/Articles/Feature_Article/BNP_GUID_9-5-2006_A_10000000000000815156

 

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1274745600 2010-05-25 00:00:00 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news In the May 2010 issue of World Trade Magazine, ISyE professors Alan Erera and Martin Savelsbergh discuss their reserach on optimzing the LTL industry in the article "Optimizing the LTL Industry" by April Terreri.

]]>
2010-05-25T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-25T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Cool Insights: The Increasing Necessity for Integrated Food Chains]]> 27279 To celebrate the opening of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistic Instiutes new Integrated Food Chain Center (IFC),  Food Logistics Magazine will feature a series of columns titled, Cool Insights, for the rest of 2010 calendar season.

Cool Insights will feature thoughts from the faculty, staff, and partners of the new IFC Center on various aspects of food chain.

The first column, which apprears in the April/May issue, features thoughts from Don Ratliff, executive director of IFC, on the increasing necessity of the integrated food chains.

Read the column: http://www.foodlogistics.com/print/Food-Logistics/The-Increasing-Necessity-For-Integrated-Food-Chains/1$3685

View the entire magazine: http://foodlogistics.epubxpress.com/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1275035784 2010-05-28 08:36:24 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news To celebrate the opening of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistic Instiutes new Integrated Food Chain Center (IFC),  Food Logistics Magazine will feature a series of columns titled, Cool Insights. The first column features thoughts from Don Ratliff, executive director of IFC, on the increasing necessity of the integrated food chains.

]]>
2010-05-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
57708 57708 image <![CDATA[Food Logistics April/May Issue]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[The Increasing Necessity for Integrated Food Chains]]> 27279 To celebrate the opening of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistic Instiutes new Integrated Food Chain Center (IFC), Food Logistics Magazine will feature a series of columns titled, Cool Insights, for the rest of 2010 calendar season.

Cool Insights will feature thoughts from the faculty, staff, and partners of the new IFC Center on various aspects of food chain.

The first column, which apprears in the April/May issue, features thoughts from Don Ratliff, executive director of IFC, on the increasing necessity of the integrated food chains.

Read the column: http://www.foodlogistics.com/print/Food-Logistics/The-Increasing-Necessity-For-Integrated-Food-Chains/1$3685.

View the entire magazine: http://foodlogistics.epubxpress.com/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1275004800 2010-05-28 00:00:00 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news To celebrate the opening of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistic Instiutes new Integrated Food Chain Center (IFC), Food Logistics Magazine will feature a series of columns titled, Cool Insights, for the rest of 2010 calendar season. The first column, which apprears in the April/May issue, features thoughts from Don Ratliff, executive director of IFC, on the increasing necessity of the integrated food chains.

]]>
2010-05-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
57732 57732 image <![CDATA[April/May issue of Food Logistics Magazine]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[Bill Rouse Releases New Book: Engineering the System of Healthcare Delivery]]> 27328 William B. "Bill" Rouse, professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and executive director of the university-wide Tennenbaum Institute for Enterprise Transformation (TI), recently published, Engineering the System of Healthcare Delivery, the third volume in the Tennenbaum Institute Series on Enterprise Systems.  

In Engineering the System of Healthcare Delivery, Rouse and co-editor Denis Cortese, former CEO of the Mayo Clinic, together with a team of highly regarded thought leaders, advocate a complete re-thinking of healthcare from a systems perspective – an engineering approach to healthcare – and they then describe how to set about it.

The authors argue that as the United States continues to debate reform of its healthcare system, providing health insurance for all without improving the delivery system will not improve the current problems of access, affordability, and quality. They maintain that the U.S. healthcare system, while having many excellent components, has evolved haphazardly over time.  And although it has not failed entirely, like any system where attention is paid to individual components at the expense of the system as a whole, it can never hope to succeed. Above all, they point out that the U.S. system does not provide high-value healthcare; it has the highest costs in the world, and yet many other countries have lower infant mortality rates and better life expectancy.

Engineering the System of Healthcare Delivery covers a wide range of subjects, including health care costs and economics, barriers to change, integrated health systems, electronic records and computer-based patient support as well as patient safety and palliative and chronic care.

The mission of the Tennenbaum Institute is the creation and dissemination of information, knowledge, and skills to enable fundamental changes of complex organizational systems. The book series on Enterprise Systems is one of the ways TI facilitates the dissemination of knowledge created by its many partners in academia, industry, and government as well as the Institute’s faculty and staff. TI’s research and education addresses a rich mixture of concepts, principle, models, methods, and tools applicable to a wide range of enterprise domains. Two domains of particular emphasis at TI are healthcare delivery and global manufacturing. Research and education in these two domains are enhanced by strong partnerships with leading companies and agencies in these domains, as well as thought leaders from many organizations.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1275391901 2010-06-01 11:31:41 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news William B. "Bill" Rouse, professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and executive director of the university-wide Tennenbaum Institute for Enterprise Transformation (TI), recently published, Engineering the System of Healthcare Delivery, the third volume in the Tennenbaum Institute Series on Enterprise Systems.

]]>
2010-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
57719 57721 57719 image <![CDATA[William B. "Bill" Rouse]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46 57721 image <![CDATA[Volume 3 in Tennenbaum Institute Series on Enterprise Systems]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[Alan Erera Invited to Lecture at Spring School in Montreal]]> 27328 Alan Erera, associate professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, was invited to lecture on the topic of "Stochastic and Robust Optimization in Logistics" at the Spring School on Combinatorial Optimization in Logistics held at the University of Montreal from May 17 - 20, 2010.

Recognized by the organizers as a top researcher in his field, Erera conducts research primarily on transportation and logistics systems planning and control, with a focus both on innovative modeling and solution methodologies, and on challenging application areas including dynamic and stochastic vehicle routing and scheduling, robust asset management, logistics service network design, integrating security and efficiency in logistics systems, and highway traffic network analysis.

The Spring School on Combinatorial Optimization in Logistics draws students and researchers interested in the area of Combinatorial Optimization, in particular the latest advances in mixed-integer programming and its applications to various classes of problems arising in logistics, including network design, vehicle routing, routing/scheduling, routing/inventory, and location/routing, among others. For more inforamtion about the Spring School, visit the website at https://symposia.cirrelt.ca/COLogistics2010/en.

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1275350400 2010-06-01 00:00:00 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news Alan Erera, associate professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, was invited to lecture on the topic of "Stochastic and Robust Optimization in Logistics" at the Spring School on Combinatorial Optimization in Logistics held at the University of Montreal from May 17 - 20, 2010.

]]>
2010-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
57748 57748 image <![CDATA[tqy99467.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[ISyE Professors, Students Gauge Debris Cleanup in Haiti]]> 27328 On Friday, May 28, 2010, Jim Burress, reporter/ host with WABE/NPR 90.1, interviewed Ozlem Ergun, associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and co-director of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, about her recent trip to Haiti. Ergun, along with Julie Swann, ISyE associate professor and Center co-director; Reginald DesRoches, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE); and students Jessica Heier Stamm (ISyE), Kael Stilp (ISyE), and Josh Gresha (CEE) traveled to Haiti in May to look at debris collection and removal issues there. What they found was that most Haitians are using little more than their own hands to remove decimated homes and buildings."Although essential," states Ergun, "debris collection is an afterthought." >>Listen to the entire segment: 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1275482958 2010-06-02 12:49:18 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news On Friday, May 28, 2010, Jim Burress, reporter/ host with WABE/NPR 90.1, interviewed Ozlem Ergun, associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and co-director of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, about her recent trip to Haiti.

]]>
2010-06-02T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-02T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
57810 57810 image <![CDATA[Debris collection in Haiti.]]> image/jpeg 1449176187 2015-12-03 20:56:27 1475894468 2016-10-08 02:41:08
<![CDATA[ISyE Professors, Students Gauge Debris Cleanup in Haiti]]> 27328 On Friday, May 28, 2010, Jim Burress, reporter/host with WABE/NPR 90.1, interviewed Ozlem Ergun, associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and co-director of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, about her recent trip to Haiti. Ergun, along with Julie Swann, ISyE associate professor and Center co-director; Reginald DesRoches, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE); and students Jessica Heier Stamm (ISyE), Kael Stilp (ISyE) and Josh Gresha (CEE), traveled to Haiti in May to look at debris collection and removal issues there. What they found was that most Haitians are using little more than their own hands to remove decimated homes and buildings."Although essential," states Ergun, "debris collection is an afterthought."

>> Listen to the entire segment: http://www.publicbroadcasting.net/wabe/news.newsmain/article/1/0/1656579/Atlanta/Ga.Tech.Professors..Students.Gauge.Debris.Cleanup.in.Haiti.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1275436800 2010-06-02 00:00:00 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news On Friday, May 28, 2010, Jim Burress, reporter/ host with WABE/NPR 90.1, interviewed Ozlem Ergun, associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and co-director of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, about her recent trip to Haiti.

]]>
2010-06-02T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-02T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Alexopoulos and Goldsman Receive IIE Best Paper Award]]> 27328 Christos Alexopoulos, ISyE associate professor, and Dave Goldsman, ISyE professor, were selected to receive the IIE Transactions' Best Paper Prize in Operations Engineering and Analysis for their paper “Area Variance Estimators for Simulation Using Folded Standardized Time Series.”Alexopoulos and Goldsman co-authored the paper with their former doctoral student, Claudia Antonini, tenured associate professor at Simón Bolívar University in Caracas, Venezuela, and James R. Wilson, professor in the Edward P. Fitts Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at North Carolina State University.

The announcement letter stated that the awards committee selected the paper from journal issues for the one-year period from July 2008 through June 2009.  IIE Transactions is the flagship journal of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE).  The Best Paper Awards are being presented at the Honors and Awards Banquet during the IIE Annual Conference and Expo in Cancún, Mexico, June 5–9, 2010. 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1275652636 2010-06-04 11:57:16 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news Christos Alexopoulos, ISyE associate professor, and Dave Goldsman, ISyE professor, were selected to receive the IIE Transactions' Best Paper Prize in Operations Engineering and Analysis for their paper "Area Variance Estimators for Simulation Using Folded Standardized Time Series."

]]>
2010-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
57813 54736 57813 image <![CDATA[Christos Alexopoulos, ISyE Associate Professor]]> image/jpeg 1449176187 2015-12-03 20:56:27 1475894508 2016-10-08 02:41:48 54736 image <![CDATA[Dave Goldsman, ISyE Professor]]> 1449175474 2015-12-03 20:44:34 1475894481 2016-10-08 02:41:21
<![CDATA[Your Opinion Counts: The 2010 3PL Market Survey]]> 27328 As part of their continuing research into supply chain issues, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Capgemini Consulting, and Panalpina is once again conducting its annual 3PL market study. Each year, many supply chain executives participate in this survey, and this year's study incorporates the views of users, non-users, and providers of third-party logistics services. Additionally, for those working in either the Fast Moving Consumer Goods or Life Sciences industries, the survey contains a short set of questions with direct applicability to those business issues.

The survey, which takes 15 minutes to complete, is being conducted exclusively using the Internet and can be accessed through the following link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/DNBRRTZ

All participants are eligible to receive an advance copy of the 3PL Study final report prior to its general release in September of this year.

Click here http://www.scl.gatech.edu/ for more information about Georgia Tech's Supply Chain and Logistics Institute.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272499200 2010-04-29 00:00:00 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news As part of their continuing research into supply chain issues, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Capgemini Consulting, and Panalpina is once again conducting its annual 3PL market study.

]]>
2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[2010 Health and Humanitarian Logistics Conference]]> 27328 In a year when the world's attention has focused on the vast and complex effort of humanitarian relief, more than 175 people committed to health and humanitarian support came together March 4-5, 2010, for the second annual Conference on Health and Humanitarian Logistics, held at the Georgia Tech Conference Center in Atlanta.

The Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, a unit of the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute (SCL) and a part of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) at Georgia Tech, organized the conference, which had as its main objectives to articulate challenges and successes in preparing for and responding to health and humanitarian crises, including disasters and long-term development, particularly on issues related to logistics.

An impressive gathering of participants from Canada, Croatia, Germany, India, Iraq, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, and United States came together with an ambitious mission: to encourage learning and collaboration within and across institutions; promote system-wide improvements in organizations and the sector as a whole; identify important research issues; and establish priorities for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), corporations, and the government in terms of strategies, policies and investments.

Representatives from the humanitarian sector, government and military, NGOs, foundations and private industry, and academia presented diverse perspectives in health and humanitarian challenges through keynote addresses, panel discussions, focused workshops, lunchtime group discussions, and interactive poster sessions (with over forty-five posters covering a broad set of research topics and applications).

Drawing on the success of last year's inaugural conference and from participants' feedback, ISyE professors Ozlem Ergun, Pinar Keskinocak, and Julie Swann, conference co-chairs and co-directors of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, expanded this year's conference from one day to one and a half days, adding a second keynote presentation and a third workshop.

Keskinocak, who is also the associate director for research of the Health Systems Institute, describes the conference as having been very "intense," with attendees being engaged in various ways during the entire time. "The panels provided a great overview of various topics," Keskinocak explains, "and the post-conference workshops allowed the attendees to go deeper in some of the topics, interact more closely, and exchange ideas with each other and the workshop presenters."

Panel discussions covered long-term development and sustainability; education, community preparedness, and capacity building; improving public health; and disaster preparedness, response, and post-disaster operations. Recognizing that global health is an area of great interest, the conference organizers added the public health panel this year and will continue to expand the Center activities in this area moving forward.

Those attending this year's conference were almost unanimous in their enthusiasm for the event and particularly liked the panels, citing the diversity of representatives and organizations and the different perspectives on a variety of topics.

The agencies, organizations, and businesses represented on the panels include governmental organizations (the Department of Homeland Security, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USAID Food for Peace), nongovernmental organizations (CARE-USA, Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres, Focus Humanitarian Assistance, the Salvation Army, the World Food Programme), industry (Emergency Visions, Sterling Solutions, United Parcel Service, Walmart), academia (Disaster Resilience Academy of Tulane University, New England Center for Emergency Preparedness), and others (Clinton Foundation, U. S, Army Corps of Engineers).

Some of the perspectives covered within the panels include why collaboration matters, how to foster disaster-resilient communities, emergency management in the private sector, how disaster response can be a disaster within a disaster, warehousing for faster response, improving supply chains to meet people in need, and improving global health.

Public health and disaster management were two themes picked up in the keynote addresses. The first of the keynote speakers was Rear Admiral Scott Deitchman, associate director for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response with the National Center for Environmental Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Rear Admiral Deitchman spoke about both the CDC's role in global health, highlighting the newly established Center for Global health, and shared insights from his own experience in Haiti.

Armond Mascelli, vice president for Disaster Services, Operations, with the American Red Cross, presented the conference's second keynote. Mascelli spoke about the spectrum of disasters, which range from emergencies to catastrophic events, and how to better position supply chain technology with NGOs engaged is disaster relief.

The continuous thread throughout the conference was the ongoing poster presentations, which gave individuals and groups a venue for sharing and discussing their research, projects, and activities in health and humanitarian applications.

Following the official conclusion of the conference, attendees were given the option of participating in one of three focused workshops that took place the afternoon of the second day. These workshops covered in greater detail pre-planning and response to large-scale domestic events, dynamic decision-making during emergencies, and preparedness and response in humanitarian logistics.

Already looking forward to next year's conference, the three co-chairs are encouraged by the momentum the conference has gained among participating organizations and countries. Those participating this year have stated that not only would they return next year, but they would also recommend the conference to others. This can only be good news for Ergun, Keskinocak, and Swann, who are striving, through the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, to improve communications between NGOs, governments and private industry and present them with the research and practical applications to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their operations.

The Center's goal is to improve health and humanitarian logistics and ultimately the human condition by system transformation and organization effectiveness through education, outreach, and solutions. The Conference on Health and Humanitarian Logistics is moving the organizers further in realizing that goal.

The Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics received support through the following conference sponsors: UPS Foundation, Kuehne+Nagel, Coca Cola Company, Focus Humanitarian Assistance, and several units from Georgia Tech including the Distance Learning and Professional Education Program, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Supply Chain and Logistics Institute, Health Systems Institute, College of Engineering, and College of Computing.

To learn more about the Conference presentations and workshops and to view videos of the panels, speakers and workshops, visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/humlog2010.
To learn more about ISyE's work in health and humanitarian logistics, visit:
http://humanitarian.gatech.edu.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272499200 2010-04-29 00:00:00 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news In a year when the world's attention has focused on the vast and complex effort of humanitarian relief, more than 175 people committed to health and humanitarian support came together March 4-5, 2010, for the second annual Conference on Health and Humanitarian Logistics, held at the Georgia Tech Conference Center in Atlanta.

]]>
2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
57768 57769 57768 image <![CDATA[tqk67017.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46 57769 image <![CDATA[trx67017.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[Spring 2010 Supply Chain Executive Forum -- Rethinking Supply Chains]]> 27328 "Rethinking and Rebuilding Supply Chains" was the overall theme of the Spring 2010 meeting of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF), which was held April 21 - 22, 2010, at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Global Learning Center in Atlanta.

The two-day biannual forum began with a joint meeting between the SCEF and the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals' (CSCMP) Atlanta Roundtable. John Langley, professor of supply chain management at Georgia Tech and faculty director of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum, joined Ben Cubitt of RockTenn and president of the Atlanta CSCMP in giving the Forum's opening remarks. The remainder of the day was divided between keynote presentations and a panel session focused on the theme of "Supply Chain Innovation."

Robert Martichenko, CEO of LeanCor, provided the Forum's first keynote address, speaking about building discipline for innovation in the lean supply chain. Among the points he made in his presentation, Martichenko said that lean leaders lead from principles. "From principles," he said, "they ask questions, make observations, reflect, challenge thinking, teach, coach, and aid in the development of tools and processes to create value, solve problems, and grow people."

Principles of the lean supply chain, according to Martichecko, include making customer consumption visible, reducing lead times, using pull systems, creating velocity and reducing variation, collaborating and focusing on process discipline, and measuring and managing Total Cost of Fulfillment.

Two other presentations included technology-based presentations made by Scott Blatnica, director of Spend Management at Ariba, and Eddie Capel, EVP with Manhattan Associates.

Brian Hancock, VP - Supply Chain with Whirlpool Corporation, gave the closing keynote presentation to the joint SCEF-CSCMP session. In this presentation, "Supply Chain Innovation: Transforming Your Supply Chain," Hancock discussed the challenges faced in managing supply chain activities at Whirlpool, catalysts for improvement, and the overall commitment of Whirlpool to sustainability. His concluding comments suggested that the traditional "functional" views limit the "end-to-end" performance of supply chains and that "leadership takes an end-to-end orientation emphasizing demand-pull, synchronization and lean operations."

On the second day, when the theme of the SCEF-only sessions evolved to "Rethinking and Rebuilding Supply Chains," Langley asked participants to consider the following key questions:
*What is supply chain innovation and what can companies do to become more involved in supply chain innovation?
*How does one "re-think' supply chains, and what are the roles of transportation and technology in rethinking supply chains?
*What are some good customer-related examples of how to rethink and rebuild supply chains?
*How can we transform supply chains through shared services?
*What are the roles that can be played by technology providers in rethinking and rebuilding supply chains?
*How cans supply chains become more demand-driver?
*What can supply chain executives do to live more positively in the supply chain?

The meeting then proceeded with keynote and major presentations. Jim Kellso, senior supply chain master with Intel, gave the day's first keynote address. In a presentation titled "Innovation and Operational Excellence in the Supply Chain," Kellso presented details regarding Intel's "Just Say Yes" initiative. The four pillars of this initiative are improved responsiveness, forecast accuracy, inventory reduction, and better delivery performance. Intel's recent expansion of this initiative included transitioning to standard metrics, employing VMI innovatively (with an equivalent focus on non-VMI customers), reducing order (backlog) horizons, enhancing demand processes, and simplifying the planning process. As a result of these initiatives, Intel's Customer Delight Scores went up by 17 percent between 2006 and 2008, and its Supply Chain Delight Score improved by 40 percent. Summarizing what this means, Kellso explained that Intel has improved CPU responsiveness by 300 percent in two years while reducing inventory; that "Just Say Yes" has resulted in significant and tangible business benefits; and that the scope of the innovations has covered people/culture, process, metrics, and tools.

Chris Gaffney, president of Coca-Cola Supply, presented the afternoon keynote, which was divided into two parts: "The Journey to Demand Driven" and "Living Positively in the Supply Chain." A demand-driven supply chain, according to Gaffney, is a customer-centric supply chain. "By adapting to make what we sell, rather than sell what we make," Gaffney explained, "supply chains can finally realize the goal of having their products arrive on the doorsteps of retailers and customers at exactly the right time and in exactly the right volume." Continuing, Gaffney said that in a demand driven system, consumer demand triggers all activities in the value chain with clearly defined connection points to eliminate waste, reduce variation, and compress lead time.

In the second part of his presentation, on a more personal note, Gaffney addressed issues of leadership, citing individuals and works that have helped shape him not just in business, but in all domains of his life - work, home, community, and self. In concluding his remarks, Gaffney listed three ways to be a good supply chain citizen in the community:
*Give back to education to grow the next generation of supply chain professionals.
*Give back to industry to support the advancement of supply chain management.
*Advocate with elected officials for efficiency and infrastructure.

Major presentation sessions punctuated the two keynote addresses. George Abernathy, executive vice president and chief operating officer with Transplace, and Richard Douglass, global industry executive for Manufacturing and Logistics at Sterling Commerce, provided insightful presentations and then participated in a panel session focusing on "Strategic Rethinking of Supply Chains." Charlie Chesnutt, senior vice president of Technology and Process Improvement for Genuine Parts Corporation, and Jeff Cashman, senior vice president with Manhattan Associates, participated in a technology client-provider session focused on "Transforming Supply Chains through Shared Services."

The Supply Chain Executive Forum experienced a great turnout of members for the Spring 2010 meeting and is looking forward to the Fall 2010 meeting scheduled for October 6-7, 2010. Click here http://www.scl.gatech.edu/professional-education/scef/ for more information about SCEF.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1274659200 2010-05-24 00:00:00 1475895999 2016-10-08 03:06:39 0 0 news "Rethinking and Rebuilding Supply Chains" was the overall theme of the Spring 2010 meeting of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF), which was held April 21 - 22, 2010, at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Global Learning Center in Atlanta.

]]>
2010-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-24 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
57764 57765 57766 57764 image <![CDATA[tqk14855.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46 57765 image <![CDATA[tjs14855.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46 57766 image <![CDATA[Jim Kellso]]> image/jpeg 1449176051 2015-12-03 20:54:11 1475894506 2016-10-08 02:41:46
<![CDATA[NCAA Brackets: Win Your March Madness Pool]]> 27279

CBSmoneywatch.com - March 15, 2010
Those probability models are where the really mathy folks have made their mark on this process. These guys rate teams according to scoreboard data: wins and losses, home court advantage, opponents' strength, and in some cases, margin of victory. Two of the most popular, which Poologic incorporates, are Jeff Sagarin's and Joel Sokol's. Sagarin, an M.I.T. grad, has been publishing ratings in various sports in USA Today since 1985, and you can see his college basketball picks here. Sokol, a Georgia Tech professor, makes his calculations based on a different formula, LRMC, which stands for logistic regression and Markov Chain. Sokol says he's analyzed data from 10 years of NCAA tournaments and "it's statistically significant that our system predicts more winners." Play around with that function, marvel at the brainpower behind them, and choose what you like. Read more>>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1268611200 2010-03-15 00:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-03-15T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-15T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-15 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Finding a Method to the N.C.A.A. Madness]]> 27279

New York Times - March 16, 2010
The affliction is common at this time of year, perhaps even epidemic. It is short-lived, by necessity, but can seriously sap productivity, energy, the ability to focus on anything but the empty bracket staring back at you on the computer screen... For the math-inclined, there is the system developed by three Georgia Tech professors, called LRMC. Read more>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1268697600 2010-03-16 00:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Filling out the Brackets]]> 27279

ESPN - March 16, 2010
Georgia Tech professor Joel Sokel (ISYE) shares his methodology for predicting Final Four teams. View the segment at the following link:
http://bit.ly/9dZaD0

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1268697600 2010-03-16 00:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech profs predict Kansas to beat Duke in final]]> 27279

Atlanta Business Chronicle - March 17, 2010
A computer ranking system by three Georgia Tech professors predicts Kansas will face Duke in this year's NCAA basketball final with Kansas emerging as the victor. The computer ranking system -- LRMC (Logistic Regression Markov Chain) -- says this year's NCAA Final Four match-ups will be Kansas vs. Syracuse and Duke vs. West Virginia with Kansas taking the title. "There are several upsets predicted in the earlier rounds," said Joel Sokol, operations research professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech. "Among others, San Diego State, Utah State, Murray State and Brigham Young could be surprises. Read more>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1268784000 2010-03-17 00:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-03-17T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-17T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Haiti: Humanitarian Logistics]]> 27279

Science of Better - January 14, 2010
Interview with Professor Pinar Keskinocak, Professor Julie Swann, Georgia Institute of Technology... As the Haitian earthquake tragedy unfolds, the challenge of using the very best humanitarian logistics

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1263430800 2010-01-14 01:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Cold snap costs in millions]]> 27279

Atlanta Journal Constitution - January 14, 2010
...The cost of ripple effects in the economy could easily surpass the direct costs of the storm, said Ozlem Ergun, co-director of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics at Georgia Tech. "You're closing down the schools, you're not only sending the children home, you're also causing one of the parents to stay at home, causing loss of productivity for business," Ergun said. "Also, you're not going out to eat, you're not going out to really buy something, you're really causing a lot of revenue loss." Read more>>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1263430800 2010-01-14 01:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Turning Trash into Cash]]> 27279

TCBmag.com - February 17, 2010
Cash for trash? It's in the works. Smart Trash, a waste-recycling system now in development at Georgia Tech, uses UPC codes to scan discards

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1266368400 2010-02-17 01:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Smart Trash May Be A Profitable Solution for E-Waste]]> 27279

En-Genius.net - February 21, 2010
Smart Trash may sound like an oxymoron but, if my friend Dr. Valerie Thomas has her way, it will be the term that transforms e-waste from a costly problem to a profit center. The basic idea behind Smart Trash is simple

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1266714000 2010-02-21 01:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-21T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-21 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[World's Best Universities: Engineering and IT]]> 27279

US News & World Report - February 25, 2010
U.S.News & World Report's World's Best Universities rankings, based on the QS World University Rankings, identified these to be the world's top universities in 2009. 1 MIT 2. University of California, Berkeley 3 Stanford University 4 University of Cambridge, UK 5 California Institute of Technology (Caltech) 6 University of Tokyo 6 Imperial College London 8 University of Toronto 9 Carnegie Mellon University 10 ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) 11 University of Oxford 12 Georgia Institute of Technology.

Read more>>>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1267059600 2010-02-25 01:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2010-02-25T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-25T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Hill Society Membership Honors Virginia and Joe Mello]]> 27328 Georgia Tech’s Hill Society, a prestigious association of alumni, corporations, foundations, and friends who are principal benefactors of Georgia Tech, has honored ISyE alumnus Joseph C. Mello (IE 1980) and his wife, Virginia C. Mello, for their leadership in the healthcare industry.

Mello, who recently retired from his position as chief operating officer for DaVita, the largest independent provider of dialysis services in the United States, has been a leader in the healthcare industry throughout his career. While a student at Georgia Tech, Mello worked as a paramedic at nearby Grady Hospital to help cover the costs of his education. Since then, he has gone on to an illustrious career. In addition to DaVita, Mello has served in key management positions with MedPartners Inc. and Vivra Asthma & Allergy Inc. Understanding the need for increased research and intellectual scholarship concerning the systems-based approach to healthcare delivery, the Mellos have generously supported initiatives at Georgia Tech, including the establishment of a professorship in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering in support of health systems.

According to the award citation, the Mello’s “philanthropic investment will have an enormous impact on the Institute and its role in defining the technological future of the rapidly changing healthcare profession. “

A member of the College of Engineering’s Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni, Mello also provides volunteer leadership and service to the Institute through his involvement with the ISyE advisory board.

"As one of the nation’s premier research universities” the citation continues, “Georgia Tech is educating the technological workforce of the twenty-first century and conducting research that drives innovation. Thanks to the support of principal benefactors like Mr. and Mrs. Mello, Georgia Tech continues to reach new heights, building upon academic strengths and addressing the challenges facing our region, our nation, and the world. It is with profound gratitude that the Georgia Institute of Technology honors Virginia C. and Joseph C. Mello as members of the exceptional fellowship of The Hill Society. “

Members of The Hill Society are a critical part of the Institute's effort to continue the growth of its reputation for excellence and to provide an exemplary education to students from the state, nation, and world.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1274706651 2010-05-24 13:10:51 1475895978 2016-10-08 03:06:18 0 0 news Georgia Tech's Hill Society, a prestigious association of alumni, corporations, foundations, and friends who are principal benefactors of Georgia Tech, has honored ISyE alumnus Joseph C. Mello (IE 1980) and his wife, Virginia C. Mello, for their leadership in the healthcare industry.

]]>
2010-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-24 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55869 55869 image <![CDATA[Chip White presents Joe Mello (IE 1980) with the Hill Society Award for his leadership in the healthcare industry]]> image/jpeg 1449175556 2015-12-03 20:45:56 1475894494 2016-10-08 02:41:34
<![CDATA[2010 EMIL-SCS Class Completes Latin American Residence]]> 27279  

Atlanta (November 19, 2009) - The 2010 class in the Executive Master's in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) Program completed its fourth and much anticipated Latin American residence in early September, spending two weeks studying in Costa Rica, Panama and Brazil. With an in-depth look at distribution facilities, infrastructure, intermodal transportation, government and finance, the 2010 EMIL-SCS class experienced a first-hand exploration into the regional supply chains throughout Latin America and the role of that region in the global supply chain.

Class touring the Dos Pinos Manufacturing and Distribution Center in San Jose, Costa Rica

Beginning its residency in Costa Rica's capital city of San Jose, the class received a rich introduction to Latin America and a geopolitical and economic overview of the region from Patrice Franko, Grossman Professor of Economics and International Studies at Colby College in Waterville, Maine.

While in San Jose, the class made a site visit to Intel Corporation, where they learned about Intel's economic footprint in Costa Rica and its motivation for manufacturing there, site competitiveness, and logistics challenges faced over the ten years in Costa Rica and progress made during the same timeframe. Additionally the students toured the Intel Innovation Center, an opportunity very few outsiders have the privilege to experience.

John Bartholdi, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, lectured on warehouse distribution facilities and presented a case study on Dos Pinos, a production, processing, and distribution company of dairy products headquartered in San Jose. The students were challenged with providing direct feedback and input to Dos Pinos for improving their processes of matching supply to demand. The class visited the Dos Pinos distribution center to observe the operational issues within the facility and joined the Dos Pinos logistics management team for a discussion on enterprise resource planning and SAP. The site visit ended with a sampling of Dos Pinos ice cream.

The class ended the Costa Rican segment of its residency meeting with Costa Rica Investment and Development (CINDE). A private, nonprofit apolitical organization, CINDE endeavors to advance the country's social and economic development by promoting foreign direct investment into the country.

Class crossing the Panama Canal by walking on Miraflores Locks

From Costa Rica, the class proceeded to Panama City, Panama. The focus of the intense two-day trip to Panama was to visit and tour the Manzanillo International Terminal and Logistics Park in Colon, Panama; meet with the Colon Import & Export company, a third-party warehouse service provider located in the Colon Free Trade Zone; and visit and tour the Panama Canal Authority. While at the Panama Canal, the students learned the history of building the Panama Canal, future plans to expand the canal, and the supply chain challenges the canal faces on a daily basis due to increased manufacturing in Mexico, GDP growth in South America, and partnerships with steamship lines. Although the program has visited the Panama Canal many times, the 2010 class was the first to have the experience of crossing the canal on foot by walking across the Miraflores Locks.

International Soccer Club game in Porto Alegre, Brazil

Leaving Panama, the class moved on to Porto Alegre, Brazil. Beginning its visit with a Brazilian soccer game, the class resumed its curriculum with a corporate visit to Springer/Carrier, a United Technologies Company. The class met with the supply chain team and discussed the flow of raw materials into Brazil, specifically focusing on the distribution of finished goods in support of Brazil's domestic demand, distribution of goods exported to South and Central America, navigating through the Brazilian tax structure, and security issues in transporting Carrier products.

Following its visit to Springer/Carrier, the class toured the largest General Motors subsidiary in South America and the third largest in the world. Class discussions focused on the differences between United States and South American plants utilizing VMI and sub-assemblies in the manufacturing process over traditional automotive assembly. From General Motors, the class made its last stop in Porto Alegre at John Deere Montenegro. The discussion there centered on John Deere's supply chain network and South American strategy, highlighting its carbon footprint reduction within an ECO-friendly manufacturing plant.

Winding down its Latin American residence, the class made its last stop in Campinas, Brazil. An alumnus of the 2009 EMIL-SCS class hosted the program at Dell Hortolandia for a site visit and discussion of Dell's logistics issues and opportunities working with customs in Brazil, outbound shipping to other countries within Latin America and to non-Latin American regions, and ocean/air inbound and outbound shipments.

Following the Dell tour and presentation, the class met with Dr. Lars Sanchez, professor in Transportation Engineering at UNICAMP and INSPER in Brazil. Dr. Sanchez's presentation dove deep into the overall logistical challenges throughout Brazil. The day concluded with Baxter Healthcare, which reviewed lessons and case studies about tax strategies in Brazil.

The class concluded its 2010 Latin American residence with both a lecture and site visit. Maria Rey, founder and executive director of the Atlanta-based Center for Emerging Logistics and Supply Chains and adjunct faculty in the EMIL-SCS program, spoke to the class about logistics and supply chain management in Latin America, with a specific focus on infrastructure needs and understanding the Latin American consumer. Following Rey's lecture, the class toured Viracopos/Campinas Airport Infraero, a customs bonded import-export facility. As a major hub, Viracopos utilizes express lanes for courier traffic, which are exceptionally quick and less-bureaucratic for Brazilian standards.

The fifth and final residence for the 2010 EMIL-SCS class beings February 28, 2010, in Monterrey, Mexico, and runs through March 12, 2010, wrapping up in Atlanta. Applications for the 2011 class are being accepted through January 4, 2010.

For more information contact:
Barbara Christopher, Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher bchristopher@isye.gatech.edu
404.385.3102

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1266368400 2010-02-17 01:00:00 1475895971 2016-10-08 03:06:11 0 0 news 2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Passport To Knowledge: Gaining a Global Perspective]]> 27279

The sun never sets on the global supply chain. Advanced education programs at a variety of universities offer logistics professionals a world tour unlike any other . . .Got the travel bug? Read on for a sampling of some global education programs. GEORGIA TECH... For the working professionals who enroll in the Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) program at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, the whole world is a classroom. Greg Andrews earned his EMIL degree in 2005 while employed as director of global logistics for a telecommunications firm in the southeastern United States. Today, he serves as managing director of the 18-month graduate program sponsored by Georgia Tech's H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering... Graduate and executive education programs at TLI-Asia Pacific are similar to programs offered at Georgia Tech's Supply Chain and Logistics Institute, says Harvey Donaldson, the Institute's director and associate chair of industry and international studies at the Stewart School. Students who complete the master's program earn two degrees, one from NUS and one from Georgia Tech.

http://www.inboundlogistics.com/articles/features/0209_feature01.shtml

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1268956800 2010-03-19 00:00:00 1475895961 2016-10-08 03:06:01 0 0 news 2010-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[2009 EMIL-SCS Students Complete Global Supply Chain Projects]]> 27279

Atlanta (January 4, 2010) - In lieu of a traditional master's thesis, students enrolled in Georgia Tech's Executive Master's in International Logistics and Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) undertake a Global Supply Chain Project to fulfill the requirements of this eighteen-month residence-based program. Participants use this project as an opportunity to gain knowledge through the academic curriculum and apply those resources to a critical supply chain concern specific to their sponsoring companies.

The sixteen students in the 2009 EMIL-SCS class, which graduated in August of 2009, made full use of the program's resources in designing and completing their global projects, extending beyond their current scope of responsibility and realizing significant savings for their companies. Forming teams comprising from one to five people, the students completed six projects, described below:

Demand Planning and Inventory Visibility across Europe

This project's objectives were to identify waste in the value chain; establish clear and simple metrics for measuring process efficiency in logistics; improve, standardize, automate, and increase the frequency of forecasting process; and establish better integration and visibility between distribution and factories. Through these objectives, the project reduced warehouse costs by $65 million (35%), increased inventory turns from 4.3T to 5.0T, increased service rate from 85% to 91%, and reduced part lead time and administration order process from 127 days to 73 days.

Demand Planning for a Major Commodity and Retail Channel in the Caribbean

The focus of this project was to ensure a strong liaison between demand and supply through a robust (but simple) demand planning process, reducing finished goods inventory by at least 10%, while maintaining at least 90% fill rate level. Divided into three phases, the project focused on SKU rationalization, the demand planning process, and supplier collaboration, respectively. Phase I yielded a 3.5% reduction in the number of SKUs across all the product categories. Phase II yielded inventory reductions of 15% and the elimination of warehouse rental for additional savings. Phase III, although still in development, has a potential to reduce inventories by an additional 10%.

Implementation and Roll-Out of a Demand and Inventory Planning System at a Major Convenience Store Retail Chain

In this project, the company must identify ways to increase the per-store revenue and at the same time reach efficiencies across the supply chain in order to reduce operational costs. Project design and implementation includes the evaluation of the Retek-Oracle Replenishment and Forecasting modules, a total investment of $10 million. In Phase I of the implementation, the level of lost sales decreased more than 50% and product availability at the store level increased more than 65%. Depending on certain categories, revenue is expected to increase 4% to 6% at the store level. The payback period of the project will be approximately three years.

Low Cost Supply Chain Project

The objective was to develop a business model to profitably deliver low-cost products at price points that target customers can afford through analysis of the benefits of a redesigned, Low Cost Supply Chain (LCSC) model versus the current state. The cost savings resulting from this project was $221 million over five years, or $124 million on a discounted (net present value) basis. The primary reasons for the cost savings are reductions in inventory purchasing costs (19% of the savings) and inventory carrying costs (79% of the savings). Inventory carrying costs and inventory purchasing costs were reduced by almost 80%.

Optimal Sourcing Strategy in Latin America

The company's current supply chain for key countries in Latin America is based on sourcing product out of the United States and Asia. The company has been moving from the single-channel, single-sourced, configure-to-order model to a multi-channel, multi-source model that will provide much greater flexibility and convenience to customers at different price points. With this transition and the availability of new sources and new supply chain capabilities, the question is to determine the optimal supply chain strategy to satisfy the customer needs in key Latin American countries-Colombia, Argentina, and Chile. The recommendations of the project have the potential to achieve approximately $5 to $10 million in annualized savings over current status and to reduce cycle time for several destination countries by one to three days.

Supply Chain Network Optimization Project

The company currently outsources about 70% of its products to Asia and builds 30% in-house domestically in the United States. The project evaluates five separate finished goods assemblies, using a total landed cost model to determine the optimal geographic areas for sourcing and manufacturing against internal and local options. The model included dynamic conditions for currency fluctuation, volatile fuel prices, and variable labor conditions across the geographic areas to better achieve a solid understanding of the total landed-cost of the assembly. As a result of the project, the range of savings based on probability is $1.5 million and $1.9 million and the most probable total cost opportunity for implementing this optimized scenario is approximately $1.5 million annually.

As the 2010 EMIL-SCS class anticipates its fifth and final residence in March 2010, the 2011 class is currently forming, with an expected start date in spring 2010. To learn more about the EMIL-SCS program or read more about the 2009 Global Supply Chain projects, visit the EMIL-SCS website at www.emil.gatech.edu.

For more information contact:
Barbara Christopher, Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher bchristopher@isye.gatech.edu
404.385.3102

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1266368400 2010-02-17 01:00:00 1475895961 2016-10-08 03:06:01 0 0 news 2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[UPS Team Wins Spring 2010 Senior Design Project Competition]]> 27328 In a field of outstanding project teams, the UPS team stood out as the Spring 2010 winner of the renowned Senior Deign Project competition. Considered to be the most important and most challenging undergraduate industrial engineering course, Senior Design pushes students to apply what they have learned in the classroom in solving a complex real-world problem.

 With the top teams all being outstanding, Chen Zhou, associate professor and associate chair of undergraduate programs, stated that the overall quality was amazing and that the selection process was difficult.

ISyE Senior Design, which Zhou says has become known for its quality, challenge and rewards, has worked with organizations ranging from local startups to Fortune 100 companies to international humanitarian organizations. The impact of Senior Design projects has been felt not only in the Atlanta area, but across the country and as far away as Europe, Africa, and Asia. The average team is able to use its IE skills to create hundreds of thousands of dollars in value for the company they work with.

 For UPS, team members, Anish Bhatt, Justin Chmielewski, Nupur Patel, Rathin Ramesh, Nik Reddy, Ryan Smith, Zoheb Virani, and Ian Yancey, with faculty advisor Alex Shapiro, redesigned UPS’ warranty policy. Currently UPS spends $330,000 more than it recovers from its warranty system each year, and the team’s goal was to shift the focus from maximum dollars recovered to maximum net return. By using sophisticated data analysis and model building the team developed a drastically different approach to the warranty policy which, if implemented, could save UPS up to $1.8 million per year.

 Finalists in the competition were the Senior Design teams who worked with Burger King® Restaurant Operations, Radiant Systems, and Norfolk Southern Corporation.

Working on a project titled "Process Improvement of Burger King® Restaurant Operations", team members Jennifer LaPerre, Matthew Powers, Jared Trammell Sears, Stephen Spicher,Patrick Sugar, and Kristen Vila, under the guidance of faculty advisor Craig Tovey, addressed three areas of improvement for Burger King®: determining the optimal number of point-of-sale units, eliminating excessive labor hours, and reducing wait times in the drive-thru. The team developed the following three project deliverables: a stochastic model, a labor scheduling integer program, and a series of simulations. These resulted in a potential cost savings of over $6 nillion annually.

With guidance from faculty advisor Xiaoming Huo, team members Dillon Blakes, Josh Click, Ian Craig, Randy Darnowsky, Joel Feyereisen, Kristina Kaylen, Jesse Kent, and Mackenzie Weber developed a redesign project for Radiant Systems Field Services. The team recommended a facility layout redesign and an inventory management tool for their Radiant Systems’ field services division. Intensive data collection, a thorough simulation, labor optimization analysis, and robust sensitivity analysis resulted in reduced overtime, transfer/walking time, and linestock stockouts. Project deliverables will save Radiant Systems, the leading global manufacturer ofpoint-of-sale products, $1.28 million over the three- year lifetime of the project.

Shabbir Ahmed, associate professor and advisor to the Fall 2009 Senior Design winners, advised David Chen, Susan Curry, Aldren Lobo, Yatong Lu, Tom Minderman, MatthewThornton, and Sheng-Bo Zhu on their projected titled “Optimization of Locomotive Fueling Policy for Norfolk Southern Corporation.” The team worked with Norfolk Southern Railway to optimize its locomotive fueling policy. Implementation of a simulation-based optimization model gave an immediate value added of $8 million annually. The team recommended future changes, which will allow Norfolk Southern to increase its potential savings to $29 million.

All three teams gave presentations of their work on Wednesday, May 5, 2010, to a room filled with faculty, company sponsors, students and parents.

For more information on the senior design program, or if you are interested in sponsoring a student team, please visit http://www.isye.gatech.edu/seniordesign/.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1274084341 2010-05-17 08:19:01 1475895957 2016-10-08 03:05:57 0 0 news In a field of outstanding project teams, the UPS team stood out as the Spring 2010 winner of the renowned Senior Deign Project competition. Considered to be the most important and most challenging undergraduate industrial engineering course, Senior Design pushes students to apply what they have learned in the classroom in solving a complex real-world problem.

]]>
2010-05-17T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-17T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55637 55637 image <![CDATA[Spring 2010 Design Team Winners (from left to right, back row): Anish Bhatt, Zoheb Virani, and Alex Shapiro (middle row): Ryan Smith, Rathin Ramesh, Ian Yancey, and Nik Reddy( front row): Nupur Patel and Justin Chmielews]]> image/jpeg 1449175556 2015-12-03 20:45:56 1475894494 2016-10-08 02:41:34
<![CDATA[Spring 2010 ISyE Advisory Board Meets to Discuss School Updates]]> 27328 The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) hosted its spring advisory board meeting on April 22, 2010.  Stewart School Chair Chelsea C. White III and Advisory Board Chair Christopher B. Lofgren led the meeting.    

In his opening remarks, Lofgren discussed the search for ISyE’s new chair.  As many of you may know by now, Chip White announced his intention to step down as school chair at the end of his five-year term, effective June 30, 2010.  College of Engineering Dean Giddens has initiated a search for the new chair by establishing a search committee to actively solicit candidates, evaluate qualifications, and, through a screening and interview process, recommend finalists for the position.  An interim chair will be announced most likely by the end of May with the new chair expected to be on board within a year.

Lofgren also introduced the new advisory board member nominees and confirmed their appointments for the 2010 – 2014 term.  The new board members are: David Bailey (IE 1969), Robert "Bpb" Martin (IE 1969), Phillip J. Scott (IE 1969), John A. White III (IE 1992), and Charlene Zalesky (1977).  Ed Rogers (IE 1982, MS IL 2002) succeeds outgoing chair Chris Lofgren, who served from 2008 – 2010.

Lofgren expressed his gratitude for working with the board and for Georgia Tech in general.  “Georgia Tech is a special place,” he said.  “What makes it so special is the people.  For those new on the advisory board, you will develop great friendships that will be lasting and spectacular.  It has been an honor to work with so many phenomenal individuals.”

After Lofgren’s opening remarks, White updated the board on the Stewart School’s continuing successes and upcoming challenges as the nation’s largest and highest ranked industrial engineering program.  For an unprecedented twentieth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report has ranked ISyE as the number one graduate program for industrial and manufacturing engineering in the nation.  The undergraduate program has been ranked number one every year but one by U.S. News & World Report.  The National Research Council has ranked the faculty number one with ranking done once every ten years.  ISyE has the highest quality faculty at both the senior and junior levels, including five NAE members and eleven endowed chairs.

In discussing how ISyE is doing, White noted that budgets are tight and vigilance is required.  However, ISyE is using the economic downturn as an opportunity to renew and strengthen its programs and plans to exit the downturn stronger than when we entered it, relative to our peers.  ISyE has made excellent progress with the new emerging directions in areas of significant real-world importance as in health and humanitarian logistics; medical OR/biostats; energy, environment, and sustainability; as well as in finance and security.   Our current international presence is growing including our programs in Shanghai, Singapore, and Costa Rica with other international possibilities in the works.  

Nancy Sandlin, ISyE director of development, reported on ISyE’s fundraising efforts to date.  Some of the development needs discussed were support for faculty and students, ISyE Distinguished Lecture (naming gift), Senior Design program, Workforce Communications Lab, Humanitarian Logistics, Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy, external alumni events, and general unrestricted support.   She also reviewed a way to support the future of Georgia Tech by making a will provision to the Georgia Tech Foundation where you may leave a percentage of the remainder of your estate or a fixed amount to support the future of ISyE.

Professor Pinar Keskinocak presented the group with an update on the efforts of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, which is housed in ISyE’s Supply Chain & Logistics Institute.  The mission of the Center is to improve health and humanitarian logistics and ultimately the human condition by system transformation and organization effectiveness through education, outreach, and solutions.  The opportunities in humanitarian response and world health are vast.  Constrained recourses, uncertainty in demand and supply, and many other variables in these settings make quantitative analysis and mathematical modeling excellent tools for decision support.   Learn more about this important work at:http://www.scl.gatech.edu/research/humanitarian/.

Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies Chen Zhou discussed the strengths of the undergraduate program.  He also presented a refinement in the academic tracks within the undergraduate curriculum.   They are moving from six tracks to five, consolidating the tracks to increase depth and breadth of studies.  The new tracks are Supply Chain Engineering, Economics and Financial Systems, Operations Research, Quality and Statistics, and General.

Professor Valerie Thomas presented an update on ISyE’s work in energy and sustainability.  Thomas stated that through this work ISyE faculty and student will develop new approaches to sustainability challenges, using and expanding the methods of industrial and systems engineering.   ISyE will contribute to the understanding of sustainability challenges at the national and international level and is the premier location for energy and sustainability training for industrial engineers.   ISyE also has as a goal to be the leading industrial engineering program for energy and sustainability education, at the undergraduate, masters, and PhD levels.   To learn more about Thomas and this vital work visit:  http://www2.isye.gatech.edu/people/faculty/Valerie_Thomas/index.php.

Harvey Donaldson, SCL managing director and associate chair of Industry and International Programs, brought the board up to date on the new proposed MS in Supply Chain Engineering.   This new MS in Supply Chain Engineering has been approved by Georgia Tech and is awaiting final approval by the University System of Georgia’s Board of Regents. 

Jaymie Forrest, director of business development at the Supply Chain & Logistics Center, discussed the recent creation of the Integrated Food Chain Center (IFC).  IFC will focus on cold chain management of perishable goods, researching food safety (compliance), product quality (monitor & control), performance (analytics), and technology (showcase).   She also reported on our Latin American initiatives including TLI-Asia Pacific in Singapore, the Trade, Innovation & Productivity in Costa Rica, as well as other proposed centers throughout Latin America.  To learn more on these efforts visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/.

As the meeting drew to a close, Lofgren thanked Larry Bradner (former chair 2006-2008) for guiding him in his role as advisory board chair.  White then expressed his deep appreciation to Lofgren for serving as ISyE’s advisory board chair for the last four years.  Lofgren then passed the gavel to Ed Rogers, who will serve a one-year term as ISyE’s new advisory board chair.

Before concluding the meeting, Joe Mello (IE 1980) was presented the Hill Society Award for his leadership in the healthcare industry. Mello’s Hill Society Award citation read:

“Throughout his career, Joseph C. Mello, IE 1980, has been a leader in the healthcare industry. While a student at Georgia Tech, he worked as a paramedic at nearby Grady Hospital to help cover the costs of his education. Since then, he has gone on to an illustrious career, serving in key management positions at MedPartners Inc. and Vivra Asthma & Allergy Inc. In 2000, Mr. Mello was named chief operating officer of DaVita, the largest independent provider of dialysis services in the United States. Understanding the need for increased research and intellectual scholarship concerning the systems-based approach to healthcare delivery, Mr. and Mrs. Mello have generously supported initiatives at Georgia Tech. They have demonstrated their commitment to the Institute with the establishment of a professorship in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering in support of health systems. Their philanthropic investment will have an enormous impact on the Institute and its role in defining the technological future of the rapidly changing healthcare profession. A member of the College of Engineering’s Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni, Mr. Mello also provides volunteer leadership and service to the Institute through his involvement with the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering Advisory Board.

 "As one of the nation’s premier research universities, Georgia Tech is educating the technological workforce of the twenty-first century and conducting research that drives innovation. Thanks to the support of principal benefactors like Mr. and Mrs. Mello, Georgia Tech continues to reach new heights, building upon academic strengths and addressing the challenges facing our region, our nation, and the world. It is with profound gratitude that the Georgia Institute of Technology honors Virginia C. and Joseph C. Mello as members of the exceptional fellowship of The Hill Society. “

The fall advisory board meeting will be held in October; dates to be announced.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1274195090 2010-05-18 15:04:50 1475895957 2016-10-08 03:05:57 0 0 news The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) hosted its spring advisory board meeting on April 22, 2010.  Stewart School Chair Chelsea C. White III and Advisory Board Chair Christopher B. Lofgren led the meeting.  

]]>
2010-05-18T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-18T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55869 55870 55871 55869 image <![CDATA[Chip White presents Joe Mello (IE 1980) with the Hill Society Award for his leadership in the healthcare industry]]> image/jpeg 1449175556 2015-12-03 20:45:56 1475894494 2016-10-08 02:41:34 55870 image <![CDATA[Chris Lofgren (Chair 2008 – 2010) thanks Larry Bradner (former Chair 2006-2008) for guiding him in his role as advisory board chair.]]> image/jpeg 1449175598 2015-12-03 20:46:38 1475894496 2016-10-08 02:41:36 55871 image <![CDATA[Chris Lofgren passes the gavel to Ed Rogers who will serve a one-year term as ISyE’s new advisory board chair]]> image/jpeg 1449175598 2015-12-03 20:46:38 1475894496 2016-10-08 02:41:36
<![CDATA[Student Spotlight: Emmanuel Miller Honored as the 2010 Work Abroad Student of the Year]]> 27328 Emmanuel Miller, a fifth-year year Industrial and System Engineering student who graduates in August, chose to study at Georgia Tech for two primary reasons: its industrial engineering (IE) program and Tech’s strong global presence. Miller, who recognized his passion for travel as a child and for IE in high school, has taken full advantage of Tech’s resources in both areas. In 2007, Miller participated in the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology study abroad program, and just this past summer he spent three and a half months in Klingenberg, Germany, working with WIKA Instruments. As an ambassador to the Division of Professional Practice’s (DoPP) work-abroad and co-op programs, Miller enthusiastically shares his experience with other students. In recognition of his contribution to the program, his work performance, and his general attitude and responsiveness, DoPP awarded Miller one its highest honors, the 2010 Work Abroad Student of the Year. When asked what advice he would offer other students preparing to work abroad, Miller said “to take the risk of abandoning your comfort zone, but remain true to who are.  You will be quite surprised by the experiences you will have.”

To learn more about this well-traveled industrial engineering student, continue reading the interview that follows.

ISyE: What other advice do you have for students about working or studying abroad?

EM: Make friends. Build as many high-quality and lasting relationships as you can. The people that you meet and work with will have a tremendous impact on your experience.  Get rid of any stereotype that you may have by developing firsthand knowledge of your own. 

ISyE: What does it mean to be an ambassador of the co-op and work abroad programs?

EM: Being an ambassador of the co-op and work abroad programs is another enriching part of the professional practice experience here at Georgia Tech.  As a recent work abroad participate, it’s great to have the opportunity to share my experiences with other students who are preparing for a journey of their own.  Other students find it very beneficial to ask me questions or hear about my work aboard term.  These opportunities also give me the chance to reminisce.  Learning and growing from people and different cultures is a passion that I have been able to nurture through my study and work abroad experiences at Georgia Tech.  I’m excited anytime I have the opportunity to assist the Work Abroad Program continue the valuable contribution that it provide students.

ISyE: I understand that you wanted to participate in the co-op and work abroad program to gain work and international experience. Why is that important to you and how does that impact your major?

EM: I believe that developing relevant work experience through the co-op program has been a crucial part of my education. Moreover, participating in the work abroad program has allowed me to develop a greater appreciation for cross-cultural exposure and exploration. These experiences are important because they afforded me the opportunity to learn industrial engineering through significant practical work experience in multinational environments.

ISyE: What motivated you to want to work abroad?

EM: Working in another country had always been a goal of mine. I wanted to experience the type of cultural immersion that a work abroad experience provides.

ISyE: Tell me about your work abroad experience.  What were your responsibilities? 

EM: As a work abroad co-op, I worked in the Electronic Pressure Measurement Innovation group in WIKA Germany.  I led a team of three professionals to research and determine how to implement flexible circuitry into a current manufacturing operation.  During my term, I was responsible for:

 

ISyE: What was one of the most valuable life lessons you learned from working with WIKA?

EM: The most valuable life lesson I learned from my work experience with WIKA is the importance of collaboration.  I found that teamwork and engaging my co-workers was the most rewarding part of my experience. From a professional stand point, I was able to reduce my learning curve through teaming up with others. In a personal sense, I will always value the friendships that I was able to develop from my time in Germany.

ISyE: Did you speak German or did you learn it there?

EM: I did not speak German prior to my work abroad term; however I did take a class, and I learned some German abroad.

ISyE: Had you lived or traveled abroad prior to coming to Tech, and if so, when and where?

EM: When I was a child, I lived in Germany for three years. In that time I traveled to France, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, the Czech Republic, and Slovakia. I also travel to Jamaica, where my father was born and raised, as well as Panama, where my mother was born and raised.

As a student at Tech, I had the opportunity to participate in the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology study abroad program for the fall semester of 2007. During that semester, I was able to travel extensively throughout southeastern China.

ISyE: As an IE major, what is your specific area of interest?

EM: One of the great things about IE is that is it very diverse. With that said, I find all the areas interesting. I find supply chain engineering and human-integrated systems to be the most appealing areas of industrial engineering.

ISyE: When will you graduate, and what are your plans following graduation?

EM: I plan to be working in industry when I graduate in August. Within three to five year of work experience, I will return to school to complete an MBA program.

ISyE: What do you read for pleasure, and what are you reading now?

EM: I enjoy reading biographies and self development books, but I usually find myself reading multiple books at the same time. I am currently reading The Conversation by Hill Harper, The Play of Your Life by Colleen Sabatino, and Strength Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath.

ISyE: What is the best piece of advice you’ve received and from whom?

EM: This question reminds me of a book I read, The Big Picture by Ben Carson M.D. One of the best pieces of advice I have received is [from this book]:

Even though I may develop my ability to the highest levels, there is only so much I can do. I have to have a plan of action, I have to be able to articulate the plan, and I need the skills to execute it. But there is always more help available. Once I do my best, I can trust GOD for the rest. . . .

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272273481 2010-04-26 09:18:01 1475895953 2016-10-08 03:05:53 0 0 news Emmanuel Miller, a fifth-year Industrial and System Engineering student who graduates in August, has been awarded one of the Division of Professional Practice's (DoPP) highest honors, the 2010 Work Abroad Student of the Year. Miller, who is an ambassador to DoPP's work-abroad and co-op programs, enthusiastically shares his experience with other students. He received the award in recognition of his contribution to the program, his work performance, and his general attitude and responsiveness.

]]>
2010-04-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-26T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55338 55338 image <![CDATA[Emmanuel Miller, 2010 Work Abroad Student of the Year, with Debbie Gulick, director of Work Abroad Programs and interim executive director, Division of Professional Practice]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894489 2016-10-08 02:41:29
<![CDATA[Your Opinion Counts: The 2010 3PL Market Survey]]> 27328 As part of their continuing research into supply chain issues, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Capgemini Consulting, and Panalpina is once again conducting its annual 3PL market study. Each year, many supply chain executives participate in this survey, and this year’s study incorporates the views of users, non-users, and providers of third-party logistics services. Additionally, for those working in either the Fast Moving Consumer Goods or Life Sciences industries, the survey contains a short set of questions with direct applicability to those business issues.

The survey, which takes 15 minutes to complete, is being conducted exclusively using the Internet and can be accessed by clicking  here.

All participants are eligible to receive an advance copy of the 3PL Study final report prior to its general release in September of this year.

Click here  for more information about Georgia Tech’s Supply Chain and Logistics Institute.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272456982 2010-04-28 12:16:22 1475895953 2016-10-08 03:05:53 0 0 news As part of their continuing research into supply chain issues, the Georgia Institute of Technology, Capgemini Consulting, and Panalpina is once again conducting its annual 3PL market study.

]]>
2010-04-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-28T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Joel Sokol Receives Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Operations Research]]> 27328 Joel Sokol, associate professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), is the recipient of the 2010 Annual Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Operations Research from the Institute of Industrial Engineers’ (IIE) Operations Research (OR) Division.

Sokol was nominated in recognition of his outstanding teaching in the required core Engineering Optimization course and the follow‐on Advanced Optimization elective.

Dave Coit, IIE OR division president, stated that the award committee was impressed with the innovative techniques Sokol developed to facilitate better learning experiences for his students. Colt went on to state that the selection process for the 2010 IIE OR Teaching Award was an extremely difficult process. “There were more nominees than there has ever been and the quality of the nomination packages was uniformly excellent. “

Ozlem Ergun, ISyE associate professor who nominated Sokol for the award, said in her nomination letter that the “Engineering Optimization class Dr. Sokol teaches is one that I have also taught. From all I have seen and heard from students who took the class when he taught it, it is clear that Dr. Sokol is the ‘gold standard’ for teaching Engineering Optimization.” Ergun said that is not just her opinion, but also the opinion of the ISyE faculty at large.

In addition to the IIE award, Sokol  is also the recipient of some of Georgia Tech's highest awards for teaching, including  the Class of 1934 Outstanding Innovative Use of Educational Technology Award 2010,  the Class of 1940 W. Howard Ector Outstanding Teaching Award 2008,  and the CETL/BP Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award 2006.

Sokol's research interests include operations research and its application in a wide variety of areas, from logistics, manufacturing, and network design to biology, social logistics, and sports modeling. His research has won the EURO Management Science Strategic Innovation Prize, and his LRMC method (predictive modeling for the NCAA basketball tournament) has been featured in the New York Times and on CNN and ESPN.

Sokol shares this honor with co-recipient Amy Cohn of the University of Michigan. The two professors will receive their awards at the OR Division Town Hall Meeting during the IIE Annual Conference in Cancun, Mexico, June 5 - 9, 2010.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272536395 2010-04-29 10:19:55 1475895953 2016-10-08 03:05:53 0 0 news Joel Sokol, associate professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), is the recipient of the 2010 Annual Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Operations Research from the Institute of Industrial Engineers’ (IIE) Operations Research (OR) Division.

]]>
2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55507 55507 image <![CDATA[Joel Sokol, ISyE associate professor]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[Responding to a Crisis: 2010 Health and Humanitarian Logistics Conference]]> 27328 In a year when the world's attention has focused on the vast and complex effort of humanitarian relief, more than 175 people committed to health and humanitarian support came together March 4 - 5, 2010, for the second annual Conference on Health and Humanitarian Logistics, held at the Georgia Tech Conference Center in Atlanta.

The Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, a unit of the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute (SCL) and a part of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) at Georgia Tech, organized the conference, which had as its main objectives to articulate challenges and successes in preparing for and responding to health and humanitarian crises, including disasters and long-term development, particularly on issues related to logistics.

An impressive gathering of participants from Canada, Croatia, Germany, India, Iraq, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, and United States came together with an ambitious mission: to encourage learning and collaboration within and across institutions; promote system-wide improvements in organizations and the sector as a whole; identify important research issues; and establish priorities for nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), corporations, and the government in terms of strategies, policies and investments.

Representatives from the humanitarian sector, government and military, NGOs, foundations and private industry, and academia presented diverse perspectives in health and humanitarian challenges through keynote addresses, panel discussions, focused workshops, lunchtime group discussions, and interactive poster sessions (with over 45 posters covering a broad set of research topics and applications).

Drawing on the success of last year’s inaugural conference and from participants’ feedback, ISyE professors Ozlem Ergun, Pinar Keskinocak, and Julie Swann, conference co-chairs and co-directors of the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, expanded this year’s conference from one day to one and a half days, adding a second keynote presentation and a third workshop.

Keskinocak, who is also the associate director for research of the Health Systems Institute, describes the conference as having been very "intense," with attendees being engaged in various ways during the entire time. “The panels provided a great overview of various topics,” Keskinocak explains, “and the post-conference workshops allowed the attendees to go deeper in some of the topics, interact more closely, and exchange ideas with each other and the workshop presenters.”

Panel discussions covered long-term development and sustainability; education, community preparedness, and capacity building; improving public health; and disaster preparedness, response, and post-disaster operations. Recognizing that global health is an area of great interest, the conference organizers added the public health panel this year and will continue to expand the Center activities in this area moving forward.

Those attending this year’s conference were almost unanimous in their enthusiasm for the event and particularly liked the panels, citing the diversity of representatives and organizations and the different perspectives on a variety of topics.

The agencies, organizations, and businesses represented on the panels include governmental organizations (the Department of Homeland Security, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, USAID Food for Peace), nongovernmental organizations (CARE-USA, Doctors Without Borders/Medecins Sans Frontieres, Focus Humanitarian Assistance, the Salvation Army, the World Food Programme), industry (Emergency Visions, Sterling Solutions, United Parcel Service, Walmart), academia (Disaster Resilience Academy of Tulane University, New England Center for Emergency Preparedness), and others (Clinton Foundation, U. S, Army Corps of Engineers).

Some of the perspectives covered within the panels include why collaboration matters, how to foster disaster-resilient communities, emergency management in the private sector, how disaster response can be a disaster within a disaster, warehousing for faster response, improving supply chains to meet people in need, and improving global health.

Public health and disaster management were two themes picked up in the keynote addresses. The first of the keynote speakers was Rear Admiral Scott Deitchman, associate director for Terrorism Preparedness and Emergency Response with the National Center for Environmental Health and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. Rear Admiral Deitchman spoke about both the CDC’s role in global health, highlighting the newly established Center for Global health, and shared insights from his own experience in Haiti.

Armond Mascelli, vice president for Disaster Services, Operations, with the American Red Cross, presented the conference’s second keynote. Mascelli spoke about the spectrum of disasters, which range from emergencies to catastrophic events, and how to better position supply chain technology with NGOs engaged is disaster relief.

The continuous thread throughout the conference was the ongoing poster presentations, which gave individuals and groups a venue for sharing and discussing their research, projects, and activities in health and humanitarian applications.

Following the official conclusion of the conference, attendees were given the option of participating in one of three focused workshops that took place the afternoon of the second day. These workshops covered in greater detail pre-planning and response to large-scale domestic events, dynamic decision-making during emergencies, and preparedness and response in humanitarian logistics.

Already looking forward to next year’s conference, the three co-chairs are encouraged by the momentum the conference has gained among participating organizations and countries. Those participating this year have stated that not only would they return next year, but they would also recommend the conference to others. This can only be good news for Ergun, Keskinocak, and Swann, who are striving, through the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, to improve communications between NGOs, governments and private industry and present them with the research and practical applications to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of their operations. The Center’s goal is to improve health and humanitarian logistics and ultimately the human condition by system transformation and organization effectiveness through education, outreach, and solutions. The Conference on Health and Humanitarian Logistics is moving the organizers further in realizing that goal.

The Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics received support through the following conference sponsors: UPS Foundation, Kuehne+Nagel,  Coca Cola Company, Focus Humanitarian Assistance, and several units from Georgia Tech including the Distance Learning and Professional Education Program, H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Supply Chain and Logistics Institute, Health Systems Institute, College of Engineering, and College of Computing.

To learn more about the Conference presentations and workshops and to view videos of the panels, speakers and workshops, visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/humlog2010.

To learn more about ISyE's work in health and humanitarian logistics, visit:
http://humanitarian.gatech.edu.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272548523 2010-04-29 13:42:03 1475895953 2016-10-08 03:05:53 0 0 news In a year when the world's attention has focused on the vast and complex effort of humanitarian relief, more than 175 people committed to health and humanitarian support came together March 4  - 5, 2010, for the second annual Conference on Health and Humanitarian Logistics, held at the Georgia Tech Conference Center in Atlanta.

]]>
2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55510 55509 55510 image <![CDATA[Four panel discussions covered sustainability, community preparedness, public health, and disaster response.]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31 55509 image <![CDATA[The 45 poster presentations gave individuals and groups a venue for sharing and discussing their research, projects, and activities in health and humanitarian applications.]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[Five Distinguished Alumni Join the Stewart School of ISyE Advisory Board]]> 27328 Five distinguished alumni have joined the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) advisory board for the 2010 - 2014 term. David Bailey, Robert Martin, Phillip Scott, John A. White III, and Charlene Zalesky bring diverse professional and community leadership skills to the board, which has as its mission to serve as a sounding body for the School chair in an advisory capacity as well as assist with the School"s development goads. Ed Rogers, who joined the advisory board in 2007, has been selected to serve as the board"s new chair.

"We are delighted to welcome our newest members to the ISyE Advisory Board. Their commitment and dedication to the Stewart School is extremely valuable to ISyE's continued success," said Chelsea C. White, III, ISyE school chair.

The new board members bring decades of experience in their respective areas of expertise. Retiring from BASF after thirty-three years, David Bailey consults much of the year, assisting manufacturing sites in finding and applying effective business process solutions for their planning and supply issues in complex local and global environments. Robert Martin has over thirty years of financial, general management, and consulting experience, both in the U.S. and internationally. He is currently a partner with the Interlochen Group, a boutique financial advisory firm, which does interim chief financial officer and financial project work. In 1983, Phillip Scott helped found and then served as a chief operating officer for Paging Network, which became the largest paging company in the United States. Scott returned to Atlanta in 1993, where he purchased Southern Ideal Door, a company he continues to own and operate. John A. White III, who has more than twenty years consulting experience, is the president of Fortna, Inc., a leading provider of supply chain solutions. At Fortna, White is responsible for U.S. and Canadian operations and personnel as well as participating in all strategic matters for the firm outside of North America. Charlene Zalesky has fifteen years experience as an internal and external consultant in health care, manufacturing, banking, and public water service industries.  Consulting with companies such as Clorox, Citibank, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Northern California and East Bay Municipal Utility District, Zalesky’s work has focused on traditional IE applications of work simplification, cost-benefit analysis, facility design, staffing, project management and organizational development.  

Ed Rogers, who remains on the board as chair, has twenty-eight years of experience in industrial engineering, management consulting, program management, business process redesign, operations improvement and strategic planning. He is a global strategy manager with UPS’s corporate strategy group and is responsible for global scenario planning, enterprise strategic planning, and the company’s sustainability strategy.

To find out more about these interesting new advisory board members, continue reading their individual biographies.

David Bailey (IE 1969) worked for BASF for thirty-three years, retiring in 2003.  His last position was with the company’s internal supply chain consulting team.  Since retiring, Bailey continues to work with the consulting team much of each year.  His primary area of interest is assisting manufacturing sites in finding and applying effective business process solutions for their planning and supply issues in complex local and global environments.  Earlier in his career, Bailey used applied simulation techniques to define and confirm design parameters for automatic palletizing systems and complex wire guided material transport systems.  He has written customized planning and scheduling tools for a number of manufacturing processes.

Robert D. (Bob) Martin (IE 1969) has over thirty years of financial, general management, and consulting experience, both in the U.S. and internationally.   He has worked in public companies (divisions and on corporate staffs), had active roles with global equity investors, and consulted with businesses, large and start-ups.  Industries with which he has been associated include consumer products, sports, apparel and textiles, and casualty insurance.

Martin is a partner with the Interlochen Group, a boutique financial advisory firm, which does interim chief financial officer (CFO) and financial project work. He was senior vice president and chief financial officer of Russell Athletic Corporation from 2000 to 2004 and was the International Division senior vice president and CFO of Sunbeam Corporation from 1999 to 2000. He held various positions at Sara Lee Apparel Group from 1977 to 1999, including divisional chief  financial officer, vice president, and general manager, and was CFO of the European Apparel Group (fifteen divisions across Europe and South Africa), headquartered in Paris, France, from 1990 to 1998.

In addition to his bachelor of Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech, Martin earned an MBA from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.  He was a lieutenant in the U.S. Army Chemical Corps from 1970 to 1972, during which time he received the Army Commendation Medal. He serves as an advisory board member for the International Center of Executive Options, is a member of Financial Executives International, and was a member of Business Executives for National Security.   He is on the Board of Trustees of a Georgia Tech-related 501-C-3 organization and has assisted at ISyE.  Martin has been inducted in Georgia Tech’s Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni.

Martin has two children. a son and a daughter, and two grandchildren.   He and his wife Sheree live in Smyrna, Georgia.

Ed Rogers (IE 1982, MS IL 2002) is a global strategy manager with UPS’s corporate strategy group.  He is responsible for global scenario planning, enterprise strategic planning, and the company’s sustainability strategy. Rogers has twenty-eight years of experience in industrial engineering, management consulting, program management, business process redesign, operations improvement and strategic planning.

Rogers joined the UPS corporate engineering group in Atlanta in 1994, helping to establish an internal consulting group, a process reengineering team, and a program management group.  After rotating through special assignments in the Alabama, Tennessee, and Georgia districts, Rogers became the Industrial Engineering manager for the Gulf South district in 1999, where he led the operational planning, productivity improvement, service quality enhancement, and technology support for that district’s $200 million annual business.  In 2002 he returned to headquarters to join the corporate strategy group.

Prior to UPS, Rogers served four years as a U.S. Air Force officer, managing programs to modernize the defense manufacturing industry.  Then for eight years he was an engineering management consultant, first with BDM International and later with Coopers & Lybrand Consulting where he consulted on a variety of manufacturing and logistics systems improvement projects for more than twenty clients, including UPS.

Rogers affiliations include the Institute of Industrial Engineers and the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals.

Phillip Scott (IE 1969) served in the U.S. Air Force as a Logistics Officer after graduating from Georgia Tech with his bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering in 1970.  He went on to earn an MBA from Claremont Graduate School in 1972.

 Scott held several management positions with AT&T before joining Gencom, Inc., a paging company in Atlanta as vice president and general manager.  Scott moved to Dallas, Texas, in 1983 as one of the early founders and then chief operating officer of Paging Network. The company grew to become the largest paging company in the U.S. and went public in 1991.  Scott returned to Atlanta in 1993 to pursue other interests and investments.  He purchased Southern Ideal Door in 1994 and continues to own and operate it.

Scott has served on the Alexander-Tharpe Fund Board and on the Board of Trustees of the Tech Alumni Association.

John A. White III (IE 1992) is the president of Fortna, Inc., a leading provider of supply chain solutions. Fortna designs, implements, and supports business solutions to optimize its client’s supply chain.

At Fortna, White is responsible for U.S. and Canadian operations and personnel as well asparticipating in all strategic matters for the firm outside of North America. White has over twenty years of consulting experience with the top tier consulting firms as well as working for a leading software provider in supply chain management strategy, supplier relationship management, and price and revenue optimization.

Prior to Fortna, White was a managing officer and vice president of Supply Chain Management with Cap Gemini, LLC.  Prior to Cap Gemini, White served in a number of senior executive management positions including Manugistics, Inc., as the group vice president of Strategic Consulting Services and Supplier Relationship Management, and Accenture, where he was a senior manager in their Strategic Services Supply Chain Management Practice.

White is a past president of the Atlanta chapter of the Warehousing Education and ResearchCouncil and a past advisory board member of the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute’s Leaders in Logistics. He is a member of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals, the Board of Trustees for the United Methodist Children’s Home, and the Board of Advisors for wRatings. White is a frequent speaker and contributor on the subjects of supply chain strategy, supply chain planning, global supply chain operations, supplier relationship management, fulfillment strategy, and warehouse and distribution design.

In addition to his bachelor’s in Industrial Engineering, White holds an Accelerated Executive MBA certificate from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management.

Charlene Zalesky (IE 1977), who specialized in Health Systems, has fifteen years experience as an internal and external consultant in health care, manufacturing, banking, and public water service industries.  Consulting with companies such as Clorox, Citibank, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Northern California and East Bay Municipal Utility District, Zalesky’s work has focused on traditional IE applications of work simplification, cost-benefit analysis, facility design, staffing, project management and organizational development.   She established Employee Involvement Teams in all of these organizations and Multidisciplinary Productivity Coaching Program at Clorox.

The subject areas of Zalesky’s publications and conference presentations have included emergency room staffing using queuing analysis, nurse staffing models, keeping emergency rooms open, use of employee involvement teams in problem solving, and company-wide cost reduction and productivity improvement programs.

Zalesky currently lives outside of Houston, Texas, with her husband Rick (CE 1978) and daughter Zola.  Their son, Zack, is a sophomore co-op student in Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech.  Zalesky has spent 20 years working with a number of non-profit and educational agencies as consultant, volunteer, educator, board member, and board president.  She spends much of her time working with high school students and mentoring and educating parents of teens.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272879025 2010-05-03 09:30:25 1475895953 2016-10-08 03:05:53 0 0 news Five distinguished alumni have joined the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) advisory board for the 2010 - 2014 term.David Bailey, Robert Martin, Phillip Scott,  John A. White III, and Charlene Zalesky bring diverse professional and community leadership skills to the board, which has as its mission to serve as a sounding body for the School chair in an advisory capacity as well as assist with the School's development goads. Ed Rogers, who joined the advisory board in 2007, has been selected to serve as the board's new chair.

]]>
2010-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55421 55422 55424 55425 55426 55421 image <![CDATA[David Bailey]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31 55422 image <![CDATA[Robert D. "Bob" Martin]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31 55424 image <![CDATA[Phillip Scott]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31 55425 image <![CDATA[John A. White III]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31 55426 image <![CDATA[Charlene Zalesky]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[ISyE Ranks Number One for 20th Consecutive Year]]> 27328 For an unprecedented twentieth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report has ranked Georgia Tech's H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) as the number one graduate program for industrial and manufacturing engineering in the nation. 

Since 1990, with the magazine's inaugural issue of the rankings, the School has been named number one 21 times; in only 1991 was it ranked number two. That makes 21 number one rankings in 22 years!

The College of Engineering (COE), which houses ISyE, has retained its status as the fourth-ranking graduate program overall for engineering for the sixth consecutive year.

"We are pleased to report that once again the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) is ranked first in industrial and manufacturing engineering in the annual U.S. News & World Report America’s Best Graduate School guide," said Chelsea C. White III, ISyE School Chair. “Although we are aware of the issues surrounding such rankings, we take pride in the fact that our hard work and dedication to excellence in education and research continues to be recognized by our peers.”

Each year, the publication collects data from educational institutions and ranks the nation's top programs in each discipline using indicators such as program size, external reputation, student selectivity, faculty honors, and research activity. This year, 192 of 198 schools surveyed provided data, with Georgia Tech coming out on top once again.

Eight other COE programs have again ranked in the top ten, including biomedical (No. 2), civil (No. 3), aerospace (No. 4), environmental (No. 5), electrical (No. 6), mechanical (No. 6), nuclear (No. 8) and materials (No. 8). Of particular note, the civil engineering program moved up to No. 3 from last year’s No. 6 ranking.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272880897 2010-05-03 10:01:37 1475895953 2016-10-08 03:05:53 0 0 news For an unprecedented twentieth consecutive year, U.S. News & World Report has ranked Georgia Tech's H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) as the number one graduate program for industrial and manufacturing engineering in the nation. The College of Engineering (COE), which houses ISyE, has retained its status as the fourth-ranking graduate program overall for engineering for the sixth consecutive year.

]]>
2010-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55484 55484 image <![CDATA[ISyE Ranked #1 in 2011 U.S. News & World Report's Best Graduate Schools]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[Analytics Goes to War Against Cancer: Eva Lee Interviewed on Operations Research:The Science of Better]]> 27328  When physicians choose radiation to battle cancer and cancerous tumors, they are fighting not just in three dimensions but four, the dimension of time.  In a recent podcast for Operations Research: The Science of Better, which aired on Friday, April 30, 2010, Eva K. Lee, associate professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and director of the Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare at Georgia Tech spoke with host Barry List about how physicians must take into account not only the shape and size of the cancer, but also the dimension of time in modeling treatment. In the podcast, Lee explains how her operations research innovations have helped create treatment plans that do a better job healing patients, avoiding radiation damage to healthy tissue, and saving a half billion dollars in related healthcare costs. She also reflects on improved homeland security modeling for biological events ranging from the outbreak of the H1N1 flu outbreak to bio-terror attacks. Click here to hear the podcast.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1272889575 2010-05-03 12:26:15 1475895953 2016-10-08 03:05:53 0 0 news Hear Eva Lee speak about innovations in cancer treatment and improved homeland security modeling for biological events.

]]>
2010-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-03T00:00:00-04:00 2010-05-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55544 55544 image <![CDATA[Eva K. Lee, ISyE professor and director, Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[Logistics Data Key to Humanitarian Aid]]> 27328 A summary, titled "Logistics data key to humanitarian aid," of the 2010 Health and Humanitarian Logistics Conference was featured in the April issue of Air Cargo World.

"As the UN reports $2.3 billion in aid to Haiti, including over $500 million from the US, speakers at last month's Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) conference on humanitarian logistics said some aid isn't helpful.

"The Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics [which sponsored the conference], a unit of the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute of Georgia Tech, was founded in 2007 with the goal of improving the human condition through advanced science and technology. The recent conference included attendees from Canada, Croatia, Germany, India, Iraq, Kenya, Mexico, Nigeria, South Africa, Switzerland, Turkey and the United Kingdom."

Read the entire article at: http://www.aircargoworld.com/Magazine/World-News/April-10-Americas/Logistics-data-key-to-humanitarian-aid

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1270512000 2010-04-06 00:00:00 1475895949 2016-10-08 03:05:49 0 0 news A summary, titled "Logistics data key to humanitarian aid," of the 2010 Health and Humanitarian Logistics Conference was featured in the April issue of Air Cargo World.

]]>
2010-04-06T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-06T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Jeff Wu's Vision of World-Class Statistic's Program in ISyE Realized]]> 27328 Recognized as an icon in the field of engineering statistics, Jeff Wu, professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics, has galvanized ISyE"s statistics group since coming to Georgia Tech in 2003 and has strategically drawn to the program some of the most talented young statisticians and PhD students in the world. 

”You couldn’t write a case history or a template much better in terms of how you can create a program and enhance it any better than by following the recipe that Jeff did, “states R. Gary Parker, ISyE professor and associate chair for graduate studies. “But through the strength of his own personality, will, and established reputation, Jeff put it together, and this is what you get.”

What Georgia Tech has gotten is the elevation of ISyE’s engineering statistics program to world-class standing as evidenced by an extraordinary five National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER awards among the first five faculty Wu hired into the existing program.

Wu joined the Georgia Tech faculty following a search initiated by then ISyE chair Bill Rouse. With an unfilled Coca Cola chair in 2001, Rouse queried a lot of the ISyE faculty, asking them if they could hire only one senior, well-known person in any area, where would it make the most difference. “The notion,” explains Rouse, “was to pick a group where we could invest and rapidly advance their credibility.” And the consensus was statistics.

A member of the National Academy of Engineering and former head of the statistics program at the University of Michigan, Wu is a well-known entity in engineering statistics, and he had a very clear vision of what he wanted to do once he got here.

Coming to a school strong in science and engineering, Wu wanted to build statistics research that would allow for interaction and collaboration with engineers and scientists and information technology. He envisioned a diversified faculty where every member of the statistics group would collaborate and do joint work with other groups across disciplines.

“I was given a mandate,” Wu explains, “to try something no one had tried before, namely building a strong statistics and quality program within engineering.”

To fulfill that mandate, Wu asked for and was granted five assistant professor slots to be filled one a year over five years. Using his network of professional colleagues internationally allowed Wu to get to know some of the people he brought in before he hired them and to a level of depth where he could identify significant talent.

Within three years, Wu had filled the five positions, hiring Roshan Joseph Vengazihiyil, Ming Yuan, Nagi Gebraeel, Yajun Mei, and Nicoleta Serban, all of whom have received the NSF CAREER Award.

 “These CAREER awards are kind of rare to begin with, “explains Chip White, H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart Chair and Schneider National Chair in Transportation and Logistics .“To have the insight to be able to identify junior faculty capable of successful CAREER award winners is phenomenal.”

But, White points out that significant talent can flounder unless it is properly mentored, and according to his colleagues, Wu is the consummate mentor. Wu deflects that credit, pointing instead to the Georgia Tech, College of Engineering and ISyE environments as well as the students themselves and their work. Nonetheless, Wu has worked incredibly hard to take the talent he was able to identify and turn them into really remarkable researchers. “He’s definitely tilted the playing field in their favor,” White states, “and that is what we want to do for young faculty.”                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           According to both White and Parker, Wu also understands that the right environment for high-quality faculty includes high-quality PhD students. To be able to execute his vision, Wu would need to play a role in identifying good potential doctoral students and recruiting at that level as well.

“They go hand in hand, “ adds White. “High-quality faculty, high-quality doctoral students. The combination, if everything goes well, results in some really terrific synergies.”

Working closely with Parker, Wu has been able to attract to ISyE’s statistic’s program PhD applicants from around the world despite ISyE not yet having a dedicated PhD degree in statistics. Statistics is a specialization within Industrial Engineering (IE), and PhDs are awarded in IE. Though there is conversation about establishing a PhD in statistics, a few years away at best, one does not currently exist. That fact has not discouraged some of the best candidates from applying to Georgia Tech. And Wu has been very effective at making sure the statistics program is recognized. According to White, Wu has been very good in that regard because he is so well-connected.  

And that has paid off.  Tirthankar Dasgupta, who received his PhD in 2007 and is now assistant professor in the department of statistics at Harvard, cites two reasons for his decision to come to ISyE, the first being “the opportunity . . . to work under the supervision of Professor Jeff Wu, a true icon in the field of engineering statistics, and second, the fact that this was the top-ranked Industrial Engineering department in America having several eminent scholars amongst the faculty.”

With his most recent hire of Kobi Abayomi, Wu’s program has grown to fourteen (not counting the group of seven or eight probabilists in ISyE), which rivals the size of stand-alone statistics departments at other universities. And the boundaries in Wu’s program are very clear. “Of all the sub disciplines in ISyE,” states Parker, “it is probably the nearest sub group that really exists in a very, very defined way.” For the most part, the professors in ISyE’s statistics program teach only in statistics, and they attract students who come directly to work with them in terms of PhDs. “So it is extraordinary to have a group that has all the credentials, has the numbers, and the extraordinary stature of a stand-alone statistics department.” 

From an historical perspective, Parker explains that over the years, there had been several task-force level efforts put together to look into establishing a stand-alone statistics department at Georgia Tech, but those efforts never led anywhere. Ultimately, there were two units on campus that covered the interests in statistics: the school of mathematics and ISyE. Over time, however, a shift started to occur where the staffing of statistics started to draw down in math as interest in ISyE went in the other direction.

It was becoming clear that ISyE had a lot of interest with PhD applicants who had very serious statistics backgrounds and wanted more applied statistics. “We had some young statisticians that had just been hired,” says Parker, “a couple of senior people who were coming more from the culture of statistics. Their PhDs were in statistics from some of the top programs in the country (e.g., Wisconsin).”  So, the signs were there, but there still hadn’t been a big commitment, and that is where Wu entered in.

Parker says that he thinks it would be completely fair to say that Wu changed the dynamic, changed the culture. “He went after young people who he hand-picked and just kicked it up a whole different notch from where it had been, “ Parker explains, adding that he’s pretty sure that there is no place with ISyE’s reputation that exists this way.

Georgia Tech is possibly the only place where the statistics program is within the school of industrial engineering.” states Roshan Joseph Vengazhiyil, associate professor and one of Wu’s five initial hires. This is attractive to Vengazhiyil because his research interests are in engineering statistics. “I felt that my efforts would be most appreciated in this place.” For Vengazhiyil, working within an engineering school rather than in a department of statistics gives him better exposure to the latest developments and trends in engineering and provides him better opportunities to collaborate with the engineers.

And that collaboration was part of Wu’s vision, which is being realized. The tentacles that spread out from Wu’s group vis a vis research activities strengthen that bond within ISyE and across campus. Examples of its success include Nicoleta Serban’s collaboration with Bill Rouse and the Tennenbaum Institute on health care, Yajun Mei’s collaboration with the Georgia Tech Research Institute on indoor air quality, Ming Yuan’s revolutionary bioinformatics techniques to successfully address questions related to aging and diabetes and Nagi Gebraeel’s new degradation lab in the Manufacturing Research Center. White reflects that these links into other departments help ISyE extend its contribution to another school, and vice versa. “That helps to promote the synergies that you want to see in a university.”

And Parker agrees that ISyE’s program is often recognized as the statistics program for Georgia Tech. When other schools have a statistics issue, they frequently come to ISyE for that, and the Institute Graduate Committee, on which Parker served for years, is likely to refer petitioners to ISyE if they are proposing a statistics course that duplicates what is already being taught there. In fact, Parker states, the committee has often said, “’You have a stat department in engineering; it’s called ISyE.’ And that’s a very powerful thing.”

For a full listing of the Statistic / Quality Group faculty, the breadth of their research and the scope of their work, visit their website at http://www2.isye.gatech.edu/statistics/index.php.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1270565436 2010-04-06 14:50:36 1475895949 2016-10-08 03:05:49 0 0 news Recognized as an icon in the field of engineering statistics, Jeff Wu, professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics, has galvanized ISyE"s statistics group since coming to Georgia Tech in 2003 and has strategically drawn to the program some of the most talented young statisticians and PhD students in the world.

]]>
2010-04-08T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-08T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55298 55297 55298 image <![CDATA[Seated: Jeff Wu. Standing (left to right): Yajun Mei, Ming Yuan, Nicoleta Serban, Roshan Joseph Vengazihiyil, and Nagi Gebraeel.]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894489 2016-10-08 02:41:29 55297 image <![CDATA[Jeff Wu, professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894489 2016-10-08 02:41:29
<![CDATA[Student Spotlight: Alina Staskevicius Receives Tau Beta Pi Cup]]> 27328 Alina Staskevicius, an Industrial Engineering major who graduates in May, has been selected to receive the Tau Beta Pi Cup, which some say is arguably the highest honor that an undergraduate engineering student can earn at Georgia Tech. The Tau Beta Pi Cup was funded through a generous endowment from Narl Davidson, faculty ombudsman and professor emeritus of Mechanical Engineering, and his brothers in memory of their parents. Based not only on excellent scholarship, but also outstanding accomplishments and contributions, the award recognizes the top Georgia Tech engineering undergraduate who has demonstrated academic excellence, leadership, and service to the field and the Institute, and who has shown potential for continuing growth.  Humble about the expectations of continued growth, Staskevicius leaves a deep imprint at Georgia Tech, spending her final year serving the Institute and her classmates as undergraduate student body president. At the Georgia Tech student honors day luncheon on
April 22. 2010, Staskevicius will receive the traditional engraved Tau Beta Pi Cup as well as a $5,000 award.  Learn more about Staskevicius in the interview that follows.

ISyE: Tell me what the Tau Beta Pi Cup award means to you.

AS: Receiving this award is extremely humbling. I am tremendously honored. I have so much respect for all Tech students, which makes the receipt of this award all the more overwhelming. Receiving the Tau Beta Pi Cup award also serves as a charge for me moving forward; I hope to live up to the expectations of continued growth and excellence in the future, and represent Georgia Tech well as an alumna.

ISyE : What piqued your interest in becoming an industrial engineer? (Were you always interested in ISyE?)

AS: When I visited Georgia Tech in the spring of my senior year of high school, my host, an ISyE student herself, introduced me to Industrial Engineering. I had always known that I wanted to pursue a degree heavy in mathematics, but one with a practical component to it as well. Industrial Engineering seemed like the perfect fit – and I was right!

ISyE : Favorite ISyE course and why?

AS: My favorite ISyE course was Senior Design. Everything came together for me that semester, and I enjoyed the overlaying of the various concepts I had learned in different classes preceding Senior Design. I also very much enjoyed the teamwork involved in working on my project and how we were able to solve real world problems.

ISyE : Favorite ISyE professor and why?

AS: My favorite ISyE professor was my ISyE 2028 professor, Dr. Nagi Gebraeel. Although Dr. Gebraeel was relatively new to GT when I took his class back in Fall 2007, he was extremely personable during lecture, taught the material effectively, and always greeted students with a wave when we see him around campus.

ISyE : Research interests?

AS: I have always been interested in research in the Health Systems area. Although I am not pre-med, I am drawn to the medical field, and I would like to learn more about how Industrial Engineering can be applied to concepts such as disease treatment.

ISyE : Biggest achievement?

AS: My biggest achievement was being elected undergraduate student body president last spring.

ISyE : Tell me about your role in SGA and some of your accomplishments?

AS: As SGA president this academic year, I served a dual role: I coordinated the activities of the executive branch of student government, and I also served as the primary voice of the student body to the Georgia Tech administration and others external to Tech. Although serving as president has kept me exceptionally busy throughout the final year of my undergraduate education, it has been the most exciting, challenging, and rewarding experience of my life thus far. Throughout my tenure, I have been able to meet with legislators to discuss budget issues, serve as a student representative on Tech’s Strategic Planning Steering Committee, help pass a reformed Dead Week policy, organize a GT White Out Football game, oversee the development of a new campus portal, launch a new SGA web site, and advocate for better faculty-student relations.

ISyE : Other non-academic interests?

AS: I love to learn new languages! I can speak French, English, and Lithuanian fluently, and have taken Spanish and German classes. I am an avid Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets sports fan, love to travel, and most of all enjoy spending time with my friends.

ISyE : Prospective career goals?

AS: I am working for Deloitte Consulting starting in July; in Fall 2012, I will attend Harvard Business School. Long term, I hope to either end up in the medical field in hospital management, or working for the Department of Education.

ISyE : Last book you read for pleasure?

AS: Pelican Brief by John Grisham

ISyE : What’s in your mp3 player?

AS: Too many songs to count! Some of my favorite songs include:

• “Tiny Dancer” by Elton John

• “Night Moves” by Bob Seger

• “When You Say Nothing at All” by Alison Krauss

ISyE : Favorite spot on campus?

AS: Although I have spent countless hours in the SGA office and in the library, my favorite spot on campus is Tech Tower. A true symbol of my undergraduate education, the Tower represents the rich history of the Institute and its commitment to academic excellence. The sight of this particular building will always remind me of the legacy I am a part of as a Yellow Jacket.

ISyE : Best piece of advice you ever received?

AS: This is not a piece of advice so much as a quote that I truly believe in: “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.” – Margaret Mead

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1271060855 2010-04-12 08:27:35 1475895949 2016-10-08 03:05:49 0 0 news Alina Staskevicius, an Industrial Engineering major who graduates in May, has been selected to receive the Tau Beta Pi Cup, which some say is arguably the highest honor that an undergraduate engineering student can earn at Georgia Tech.

]]>
2010-04-12T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-12T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-12 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55334 55334 image <![CDATA[Alina Staskevicius]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894489 2016-10-08 02:41:29
<![CDATA[Harris, Martin, Mitchell, and O'Brien Recognized at COE Awards Ceremony]]> 27328 Georgia Tech's College of Engineering (COE) honored four Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) graduates for their outstanding professional and personal achievements.

 Charles L. Harris (IE 1981), Robert D. Martin (IE 1969), Stephen M. Mitchell (IE 1965, MS IE 1967), and Thomas J. O’Brien (IE 1981) were inducted into the College of Engineering Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni.  This award recognizes alumni who have made significant contributions to the profession, field, Institute, or society at-large. Candidates are highly placed executives and are actively involved in engineering or management, industry, academia or government.

 The annual Alumni Awards Induction Ceremony was held on March 19, 2010,  at the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center.   The Awards Ceremony was created in 1994 under the leadership of then Dean Dr. John A. White. It was done in order to highlight the accomplishments of engineering students and emphasize the reputation of the COE. White passed the torch on to Dean Jean-Lou Chameau and today, Dean Don Giddens continues the tradition. Each year, the COE recognizes select alumni who have contributed to the profession, advanced their careers and enhanced the lives of others personally and professionally.

 More about ISyE’s award recipients:

 Charles L. Harris, IE 1981 Partner, Accenture

Harris was born and raised in Atlanta. Upon graduating Georgia Tech, he worked for Arthur Anderson, now Accenture. After returning from an assignment in Paris, Harris was assigned to NASA in Huntsville, AL, designing and implementing a single platform accounting and financial management system for NASA operations nationwide.

 Robert D. Martin, IE 1969 CFO Consultant, Interlochen Group

Martin has over 30 years of financial, general management and consulting experience both nationally and internationally. He is currently a partner with Interlochen Group, a boutique financial advisory firm, but his career includes working for Russell Athletic Corp., Sumbeam Corp., and Sara Lee Corp. Martin earned a BS in industrial engineering (IE) from Tech and an MBA from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He was lieutenant in the US Army Chemical Corps.

 Stephen M. Mitchell, IE 1965, MS IE 1967 CEO and President, Sertec Corporation

Mitchell has led Sertec for 15 years as CEO, taking it from an idea to being the leader in incident data intake and management. Mitchell has not only built Sertec into a successful, debt-free company, he has also led three others, and won the WalMart “Vendor of the Year” Award with Norcom, Inc. Mitchell has a BS and MS in IE from Tech, where he served as a trustee and is a registered Professional Engineer.

 Thomas J. O’Brien, IE 1981 President and CEO, Axion Biosystems

O’Brien is the CEO of Axion Biosystems, an early stage start-up company based on proprietary electronics and unique micro-fabrication technology invented in the neuroengineering laboratory in biomedical engineering and licensed from Tech. O’Brian has successfully led a private placement raising $1 million in capital and managed the effort to secure $1.3 million in state and federal funds. He has held a number of senior executive positions in public and private companies in the US and overseas. After graduating with highest honors at Tech, O’Brien received an MBA from the University of Chicago. He is a donor to Georgia Tech and a member of the Wallace H. Coulter Department Biomedical Engineering Advisory Board.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1269270086 2010-03-22 15:01:26 1475895945 2016-10-08 03:05:45 0 0 news Georgia Tech's College of Engineering honored four ISyE graduates for their outstanding professional and personal achievements.

]]>
2010-03-22T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-22T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-22 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55335 55040 55335 image <![CDATA[(L to R): Sheree Zachary with husband and COE honoree Robert "Bob" Martin; Charles Harris, COE honoree; Nancy Sandlin, ISyE development director; Chip White, H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart chair of ISyE; and James Wade, ISyE graduating senior.]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894489 2016-10-08 02:41:29 55040 image <![CDATA[Nancy Sandlin, ISyE development director, with Robert "Bob" Martin, COE honoree]]> image/jpeg 1449175490 2015-12-03 20:44:50 1475894486 2016-10-08 02:41:26
<![CDATA[Jim Kellso Reflects on a Decade with EMIL-SCS]]> 27328 For the Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS), 2010 marks its 10th anniversary as a successful program in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) at Georgia Tech. Throughout its first decade, Jim Kellso, Senior Supply Chain Master at Intel Corporation, chaired the program’s advisory board, a role from which he stepped down this past May.

As EMIL-SCS looks toward its second decade with two new co-chairs -- Gene Long, a director in Deloitte’s Strategy & Operations consulting practice, and Richard L. “Dick” Hunter, a retired Dell executive -- the program acknowledges Kellso’s years of service and for sending18 Intel executives through the program to date.

 Reflecting on the program’s first decade, Kellso said that there are three key accomplishments of which he is most proud:

With Georgia Tech recognized as the “undisputed number one” in industrial engineering, Kellso points out that the advantages of the EMIL-SCS program is its international residences that provide opportunities for those who have never been overseas or at least have never operated in the supply chain activities overseas a chance to see, understand, and get a true flavor of the differences in operation, culture, and key issues from one geographic region to the next.  According to Kellso, this is manifested in two ways:  the actual time overseas, which Kellso sees as a great learning opportunity, and the international flavor of the participants, which Kellso says provides a daily opportunity to gain multiple perspectives for the attendees as they go through the classes. This diversity allows students to learn a great deal from one another in addition to class material and to build a network of close contacts that would not be possible any other way. Further, Kellso states that “the opportunity to engage in this program; get a full, regular master’s degree from Georgia Tech; and only be gone from your job for five, two-week sessions is truly unique in the education industry.”

Kellso’s enthusiasm for the program underpins his commitment.  With eighteen of its executives having completed the program thus far, Intel has consistently had its EMIL-SCS graduates perform very well after their engagement in the program. “The real key,” Kellso states, “is that most of our EMIL-SCS graduates have continued to thrive in our highly competitive environment and have had their careers enhanced by their engagement with EMIL.” Kellso explains the program further educates, refines rough edges, and provides cross-organizational and cross-geographic exposure so that the candidates selected can fulfill their promise of success.

 As an example of fulfilling one’s promise of success, Kellso cites one Intel executive who started in Materials (purchasing). She moved to Transportation and participated in the EMIL-SCS program, from which she received, according to Kellso, “very good grounding and cross-geographic experience.” She then moved back to Materials and was named a -Supply Chain Master. After being selected to work on a highly visible strategic program, she moved back to the Planning and Logistics group to lead the next round of implementation of a totally new supply chain for Intel.  Kellso states, “this is certainly a success story by any measure.”

 Generally, Kellso said that employees who go through the program immediately bring practical skills back to the company, including modeling, financial analysis, understanding of international trade practices, and a heightened familiarity with how different companies solve common problems. These are all insights that the students can bring immediately back to their work. “Furthermore, the actual project that they do is a tactical benefit during and immediately after the program concludes.”

 The project to which Kellso is referring is the hands-on Global Supply Chain project, which students complete in lieu of a traditional master’s thesis. As Kellso describes it, the difference between the Global Project and a traditional master’s thesis is that there are typically students from several companies working together to collectively solve a real- world problem. This brings an intelligence and diversity of backgrounds that cannot be gained in a single thesis or even in a project comprising a single company.  The results are always richer with multiple company backgrounds and capabilities represented.

 Looking ahead, Kellso said that he hopes to see the EMIL-SCS program  achieve general recognition as a supply chain program for executives, not simply a logistics program.  Although the program has done this to a large degree with its curriculum, Kellso said that he looks forward to EMIL-SCS achieving this status in world-wide recognition and perception of the program. “Hopefully what will happen,” Kellso adds, “is that the program will thrive and become the ‘gold standard’ program for supply chain executives.”

 Though Kellso has stepped down as chair, he maintains a strong support for the program and anticipates continued involvement with EMIL-SCS through the advisory board and teaching.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1269358634 2010-03-23 15:37:14 1475895945 2016-10-08 03:05:45 0 0 news For the Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS), 2010 marks its 10th anniversary as a successful program in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) at Georgia Tech. Throughout its first decade, Jim Kellso, Senior Supply Chain Master at Intel Corporation, chaired the program's advisory board, a role from which he stepped down this past May.

]]>
2010-03-23T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-23T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-23 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
54866 54867 54866 image <![CDATA[Jim Kellso (r), former EMIL-SCS advisory board chair, with John Vande Vate (l), EMIL-SCS executive director]]> image/jpeg 1449175474 2015-12-03 20:44:34 1475894483 2016-10-08 02:41:23 54867 image <![CDATA[Jim Kellso instructing 2010 EMIL-SCS class during Atlanta residence]]> image/jpeg 1449175474 2015-12-03 20:44:34 1475894483 2016-10-08 02:41:23
<![CDATA[Chelsea C. White III to Step Down as ISyE School Chair in June]]> 27279 Chelsea "Chip" C. White III, the H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart Chair of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has announced he will be stepping down as School Chair on June 30, 2010. However, White will not be leaving the Stewart School.  He will be returning to the faculty to resume his work as the Schneider National Chair in Logistics and Transportation and co-director of the Global Transportation Center of Focused Research within the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute.

"Chip has been an outstanding School Chair in the College, providing thoughtful leadership not only for ISyE, but also within the group of College of Engineering (COE) school chairs," said Dean Don P. Giddens. "And despite the heavy administrative role demanded of COE school chairs, Chip's national and international recognition for his own professional scholarship has been maintained."

White assumed his duties as School Chair on July 1, 2005, following Bill Rouse, who served as chair from 2001 to 2005.  During White's tenure as school chair, ISyE has strived to insure continued and increased strength of the School's foundation disciplines (optimization, stochastics & simulation, and statistics) and to broaden its applied research horizons through continued support of supply chain & logistics initiatives, efforts to revive traditional strengths in health, and new initiatives in health & humanitarian logistics, sustainability & natural systems, and systems informatics & control.  ISyE has also expanded its international activities beyond those in Singapore to include programs in Shanghai and Costa Rica.  Commenting on White's contributions, Dean Giddens said "I am greatly indebted to him for steering the school into broadening their horizons."

Also during White's tenure as School Chair, ISyE received a $20M commitment to the School from Carolyn J. and Milton H. Stewart that is enabling ISyE to have greater impact on its academic and research communities and on challenges of economic and societal importance.  In 2006, the School was named the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering.  Overall, ISyE Foundation accounts have increased from $24M to $64M from endowment gifts and commitments during the last five years, helping to insure the School’s financial stability and health during the economic downturn and providing resources to help ISyE increase its dominance among its academic peers.  ISyE's graduate program has now been ranked by U.S. News and World Reports first in industrial & manufacturing engineering for an unprecedented 19 years straight.  'All of our success would not have been possible without the commitment to excellence of the faculty, staff, and students and the support of the administration, our alums, and friends," said White.  

In a note to the ISyE faculty and staff, White stated that these past five years as School chair have been "personally and professionally rewarding.  I have enjoyed interacting with the wonderful faculty, staff, alumni, advisory board, students, and friends who make up the ISyE community," said White.  He also expressed his "gratitude to Dean Giddens and the Georgia Tech administration, for their interest in helping ISyE continue to be the best academic unit of its kind internationally."

As of July 1, 2010, White will turn his attention back to his research as the Schneider National Chair in Logistics and Transportation and co-director of the Global Transportation Center of Focused Research within the Supply Chain &amp; Logistics Institute and will resume his research on important issues to the supply chain &amp; logistics industry.  

Dean Giddens is working closely with the ISyE Faculty Advisory Committee and Professor White to establish a search committee and undertake a national search for the next school chair. Professor Vigor Yang, Chair of the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering, will chair the committee. An interim chair will be named to be effective on July 1, 2010, and until the position is filled.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1269506344 2010-03-25 08:39:04 1475895945 2016-10-08 03:05:45 0 0 news Chelsea "Chip" C. White III, the H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart Chair of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has announced he will be stepping down as School Chair on June 30, 2010. However, White will not be leaving the Stewart School. He will be returning to the faculty to resume his work as the Schneider National Chair in Logistics and Transportation and co-director of the Global Transportation Center of Focused Research within the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute.

]]>
2010-03-25T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-25T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-25 00:00:00 Quotes

"Chip is a warm and supportive leader of ISyE during a difficult period for the School as well as the Institute. As a member of the Statistics/Quality Group, I am particularly grateful for his consistent and firm support of the program. The recent success of the group, including a perfect record in the NSF Career Award applications, could not have been achieved without the work of senior leaders like him." - Jeff Wu, Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics and Professor.

"Chip is very approachable and supportive of faculty Initiatives. He is willing to help and put his heart into making the School a success". - Jan Shi, Carolyn J. Stewart Chair Professor

]]>
Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55103 55103 image <![CDATA[Chelsea “Chip” C. White III]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894486 2016-10-08 02:41:26
<![CDATA[In Memory: Anne Marie Eaton, 102]]> 27328 Anne Marie Eaton died at Hospice Atlanta from natural causes on March 27, 2010. She was 102 years old. 

Ann Marie was a lifelong friend of the Stewart School of ISyE and a strong advocate for education.   She often stressed the importance of learning, stating "No one can ever take an education away from you." She and her husband Paul learned hard lessons of resilience as they migrated to the United States from Nazi Germany in 1938. In fact, her continued learning has allowed her to reinvent herself as mother and wife, methods analyst, import/export manager, Tech faculty wife, college student, gerontology expert, and author.

In 1942, Anne Marie and Paul enrolled in Georgia Tech's evening school to study a new field called industrial engineering. Under the War Manpower Act, Anne Marie studied industrial engineering at Tech for two years while working for companies such as Sears, Lockheed, and Rich's department store.   Paul joined ISyE's faculty in 1948, becoming a Fulbright professor and rising to international prominence in the field. Anne Marie later earned a master's in sociology with a minor in gerontology from Georgia State then returned to Tech in 1987 to study psychology.

Among her numerous achievements, Anne Marie helped start the nation's largest Life Enrichment Center for seniors in DeKalb County, work that led to the Georgia Senate naming her 1999's Distinguished Senior Georgian. She has represented DeKalb and Rockdale counties at a White House Council on Aging and has served as a representative on aging issues to Germany. In the 90's, she established the Paul Eaton Scholarship to support undergraduate students in the Industrial and Systems Engineering School at Georgia Tech.

In 2002, Anne Marie wrote a book on successful aging titled, Anything in Life is a Challenge, based on her own aging process and to assist other still-functioning elderly to understand that "old age is a stage of life just as any other stage in which one can be productive, learn, and pursue numerous goals based on ability, talents, experience, and desires." In the book's last chapter as Anne contemplated medical treatment, she summarized her life:  "During my long life I have learned that there is always some positive thought of escape attached towards the solution of a very difficult problem. I got to thinking that I had a spectacular life behind me.  Actually I had two lives, so different from each other."

A memorial service will be held on April 9, 2010, at 11:00 a.m.. at Oak Grove Methodist Church.  Visitation will follow the service. Anne Marie is survived by a daughter, Clairelis Baxter of Athens; two sons, Charles Eaton of Greer, S.C., and Goetz Eaton of Anderson, S.C.; 11 grandchildren; and 22 great-grandchildren.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1269945778 2010-03-30 10:42:58 1475895945 2016-10-08 03:05:45 0 0 news Anne Marie Eaton, a lifelong friend of the Stewart School of ISyE and a strong advocate for education, died at Hospice Atlanta from natural causes on March 27, 2010. She was 102 years old. 

]]>
2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55164 55164 image <![CDATA[(L-R): Stewart School Chair Chelsea White, Anne Marie Eaton, and Freida Breazeal]]> image/jpeg 1449175327 2015-12-03 20:42:07 1475894403 2016-10-08 02:40:03
<![CDATA[New Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center Opens]]> 27328 The newly launched Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center was featured in the March 2010 issue of Food Logistics Magazine. Don Ratliff, Jaymie Forrest, and Harvey Donaldson, who head the Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center, appear on the cover of the magazine.  The cover story begins on page 14 and continues through page 20.

Finally, the food logistics industry will have a research and resource center to utilize for questions about and solutions to every aspect of managing and monitoring the food cold supply chain. The Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center, formed by the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) and by Sterling Solutions LLC, will be housed within the SCL in Atlanta. The Center – integrating academia with seasoned industry experts – will launch this May and will operate as an international center for applicable knowledge in the fragile cold chain.

Click here to read the article in its entirety.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1269946770 2010-03-30 10:59:30 1475895945 2016-10-08 03:05:45 0 0 news The newly launched Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center was featured in the March 2010 issue of Food Logistics Magazine. Don Ratliff, Jaymie Forrest, and Harvey Donaldson, who head the Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center, appear on the cover of the magazine.

]]>
2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55166 55166 image <![CDATA[(L-R): Don Ratliff, Jaymie Forrest, and Harvey Donaldson, who head the Georgia Tech Integrated Food Chain Center, appear on cover of Food Logistics Magazine.]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894489 2016-10-08 02:41:29
<![CDATA[EMIL-SCS Class of 2010 Completes Residence V-The Americas]]> 27328 The Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) class of 2010, which began in October 2008, just completed its fifth and final residence.  Breaking from tradition, the class flipped the order of the residence: They held their first week in Monterrey, Mexico, from February 28, 2010, through March 5, 2010, and then ended the residence on the Georgia Tech campus, back where it all started, in the Industrial and Systems Engineering  Executive Classroom and the Georgia Tech Hotel and Conference Center from March 6, 2010, through March 12, 2010. 

During the first week, the residence focused on the four walls of manufacturing, the logistics infrastructure, cross-border logistics, NAFTA-US-Mexico trade agreements, and a look at Maquiladora manufacturing and sourcing strategies for Mexico.  They particularly focused on the recent move towards near-shoring and re-shoring as key strategies to lower supply chain costs. The students began the residence with a deep dive into Factory Physics techniques with the objective of removing constraints, improving throughput, and improving productivity.  The course was taught by Dr. Mark Spearman, founder, president, and chief executive officer of Factory Physics, Inc.

EMIL-SCS alumnus Maria Rey (MS IL 2002), executive director, Latin American Logistics Center, provided two half-days of instruction, as well as organizing and facilitating a full-day panel discussion. On her first day of instruction, Rey provided a close look into the Mexican consumer, current geopolitical issues influencing and shaping logistics and supply chain management in Mexico, the current economic climate in Mexico with special attention on near-shoring and the migration of manufacturing back into Mexico, Mexico’s role in Central and South America, and risks and promises of doing business in Mexico.  On day two, Rey discussed the scope, implemented areas, and pending issues of the NAFTA Agreement, and she also reviewed the benefits of Maquiladoras and the challenges within cross-border supply chains.  

For the day-long panel, ten speakers joined Rey in analyzing a beverage supply chain in Mexico focusing on Coca-Cola.  The panelists examined the company’s supply chain strategies from PET packaging, to bottlers, to distribution and the logistics necessary to meet consumer demand in Mexico.

Also while in Mexico, the class heard from Eduardo Aspero, general director with Pacer International, who discussed the rail and intermodal industry in Mexico, and Armando Beltrán, vice-president-general manager for Schneider National, Mexico, who discussed trucking in Mexico.  Both speakers focused on how NAFTA, safety concerns, cross- boarder operations, and government regulations impacted doing business in Mexico.

Jorge Fares (MS IL 2009), supply chain manager of Oxxo (the largest convenience store chain in Mexico), walked the class through distribution and fulfillment in the retail consumables market in Mexico.  The students saw this firsthand with a tour of the distribution center.  Another EMIL-SCS alumnus, Gabriela Toro (MS IL 2005), distribution supply chain manager with Sunbeam, provided a close look into distribution and warehousing, models within Mexico, and the strategies used to overcome and navigate the import restrictions and penalties associated with importing raw material and finished goods into Mexico from Asia.

With this week behind the Class of 2010, the students were a week away from completing their EMIL-SCS program requirements. The next and largest hurdle was to present their Global Projects to the EMIL-SCS staff and advisory board, which they did on days three and four of the second week.  In lieu of a traditional master's thesis, the student executives use this project as an opportunity to gain knowledge through the EMIL-SCS academic curriculum garnered over the eighteen months of the program and apply those resources to a critical supply chain initiative within their respective sponsoring companies.   

Additionally, the students received instruction from Shijie Deng, associate professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech, who provided the students with a general introduction into the concepts of risk management in the financial and operational aspects of logistics and supply chain management.  Jim Kellso, supply chain strategist with Intel Corporation and former EMIL-SCS advisory board chair, gave a presentation on supply chain innovation, optimization/customer alignment, and transformation.  Tom Dadmun, vice-president, project management with Adtran shared his experience with supply chain corporate alignment initiatives, supply chain optimization, and engineering.

The final site visit for the class was to Norfolk Southern Intermodal yard in Austell, Georgia, to discuss intermodal trends in the U.S.  Dave Beasley, division terminal manager for Norfolk Southern, led the terminal tour and operations overview.  Aaron Katrancha, assistant manager, national accounts, intermodal marketing, led a discussion on the current state of the rail industry in the U.S. and role of Norfolk Southern’s involvement with development of railroads in emerging markets, capacity and volume constraint issues, capital investment plans for relief efforts, security concerns, and green-sustainability initiatives that are currently underway.

Joe Peppard, Professor of Information Systems, and Lee Marston, a research fellow, both with the Information Systems Research Centre at the Cranfield University School of Management, gave a review of supply chain technology, highlighting how to build IT/SCM organizational capability, IT-enabled SCM innovation, and the future of logistics and SCM technology.

This group will meet once more on May 7, 2010, to participate in spring commencement and receive their degrees from Georgia Tech.  The EMIL-SCS program is extremely proud of the newest group of alumni and is excited about their future, as well as the continued networking and partnership opportunities with both the alumni and their sponsoring companies.  

For more about the EMIL-SCS program, visit their website at http://www.emil.gatech.edu/.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1269951312 2010-03-30 12:15:12 1475895945 2016-10-08 03:05:45 0 0 news The Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) class of 2010, which began in October 2008, just completed its fifth and final residence.  The class met from February 28, 2010, through March 12, 2010, spending one week in Monterrey, Mexico, and its final week in Atlanta. 

]]>
2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55141 55144 55141 image <![CDATA[Students tour the distribtuion center of Oxxo, the largest convenience store chain in Mexico]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894486 2016-10-08 02:41:26 55144 image <![CDATA[John Dunkin (left), Intel Corporation, Ellen Ewing (middle), UPS, and Michael Vance (right), Intel Corporation, present Intel-UPS global project]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894486 2016-10-08 02:41:26
<![CDATA[Four ISyE Faculty Featured in Research Horizons Profile of Cancer Research at Georgia Tech]]> 27328 Four faculty members in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering are among the Georgia Tech faculty whose cancer research is profiled in the winter issue of Research Horizons. With this issue, the magazine wraps up a three-part series that focused on cancer research at Georgia Tech. The series presented a thorough overview of research that spans origins, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

The article, “Treating Cancer: Researchers Develop and Improve Techniques for Attacking Cancer,” features the research of Shabbir Ahmed, Eva Lee, Martin Savelsbergh, and Ming Yuan

Ahmed and Savelsberg, along with graduate student Halil Ozan Gozbasi, are improving intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans to minimize damage to critical organs. This type of treatment plan is challenging because some organs move. In her research, Lee is addressing motion issues, specifically with liver and lung cancer patients, to develop treatment plans that account for breathing, motion, and shape changes throughout the treatment regime. In another project, Lee is incorporating biological information into treatment planning for prostate cancer, IMRT and brachytherapy – the placement of radioactive “seeds” inside a tumor. Ming Yuan, a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar, is using computational and mathematical approaches to analyze how gene expression evolves over time in individuals with breast cancer and whether these patterns can predict treatment outcome. In another project, Yuan is collaborating with two University of Wisconsin professors to conduct expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies, the analysis of which allows the researchers to identify genomic hot spots that regulate gene transcription and expression on a genome-wide scale.

Click here/ to read the entire article. To read the previous two reports in the series, click here  for the first report, titled “Understanding the Origins of Cancer: Scientists Investigate the Molecular Changes that Lead to Disease,” and click here  for the second report, titled “Diagnosing Cancer: Researchers Pursue Many Directions Toward Early Detection and Diagnosis.”

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1271147759 2010-04-13 08:35:59 1475895945 2016-10-08 03:05:45 0 0 news Four faculty members in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering are among the Georgia Tech faculty whose cancer research is profiled in the winter issue of Research Horizons. With this issue, the magazine wraps up a three-part series that focused on cancer research at Georgia Tech. The series presented a thorough overview of research that spans origins, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

]]>
2010-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2010-04-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55348 55348 image <![CDATA[Winter 2010 issue of Research Horizons features ISyE faculty]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894489 2016-10-08 02:41:29
<![CDATA[Nicoleta Serban Receives NSF CAREER Award]]> 27328 Nicoleta Serban, assistant professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has received the prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award. NSF recognized Serban for her innovative proposal and work in statistical modeling of service distribution equity.

The NSF offers this prestigious award as part of the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.

“Nicoleta is a promising and innovative researcher in the emerging and important area of research into the use of statistical modeling techniques in the service sector” states Jeff Wu, ISyE professor and Coca Chair in Engineering Statistics. “In particular, she is looking into the development of novel spatio-temporal modeling of service distribution equity with applications to financial and healthcare industries. ISyE is proud of having such talented young researchers among its ranks. “

Professor Serban is the fifth NSF CAREER Award winner in the statistics/quality group at the Stewart School of ISyE in the last four years. She joins the ranks of professors Roshan Vengazhiyil, Nagi Gebraeel; and Ming Yuan, who received the award in 2006, 2007 and 2009, respectively, and Professor Yajun Mei, who also received the award this year. 

Professor Serban received her B.S. in Mathematics and an M.S. in Theoretical Statistics and Stochastic Processes from the University of Bucharest. She went on to earn her Ph.D. in Statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. Before joining Georgia Tech,  Professor Serban's research focused on nonparametric statistical methods motivated by recent applications from proteomics and genomics. Her current research focuses on multiple functional estimation and clustering with applications to industrial performance, service site location, socio-economics and NMR biomolecular studies.

In addition to the NSF CARRER Award, Professor Serban has also received the following honors and awards:

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1268240432 2010-03-10 17:00:32 1475895941 2016-10-08 03:05:41 0 0 news Nicoleta Serban, assistant professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has received the prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award. NSF recognized Serban for her innovative proposal and work in statistical modeling of service distribution equity.

]]>
2010-03-11T00:00:00-05:00 2010-03-11T00:00:00-05:00 2010-03-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
54665 54665 image <![CDATA[Nicoleta Serban]]> image/jpeg 1449175459 2015-12-03 20:44:19 1475894478 2016-10-08 02:41:18
<![CDATA[Yajun Mei Receives NSF CAREER Award]]> 27328 Yajun Mei, assistant professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has received the prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award. The NSF recognized Mei.for his exemplary work in sequential analysis and decentralized network.

 The NSF offers this prestigious award as part of the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.

Jeff Wu, Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics at IsyE, states that “Yajun belongs to a select group of young statisticians who excel in esoteric (and elegant) theory such as sequential analysis as well as significant applications such as decentralized sensor network. ISyE is proud of having such talented young researchers among its ranks.”

 Professor Mei is the fourth NSF CAREER Award winner in the statistics/quality group at the Stewart School of ISyE in the last four years. He joins the ranks of professors Roshan Vengazhiyil, Nagi Gebraeel; and Ming Yuan, who received the award in 2006, 2007 and 2009, respectively.

 Professor Mei’s research interests include change-point problems and sequential analysis in Mathematical Statistics; sensor networks and information theory in Engineering; and longitudinal data analysis, random effects models, and clinical trials in Biostatistics.

 He received a B.S. in Mathematics from Peking University in P.R. China, and a PhD in Mathematics with a minor in Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Mei also worked as a Postdoc in Biostatistics for two years in the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, WA.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1268058762 2010-03-08 14:32:42 1475895941 2016-10-08 03:05:41 0 0 news Yajun Mei, assistant professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has received the prestigious National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award.

]]>
2010-03-08T00:00:00-05:00 2010-03-08T00:00:00-05:00 2010-03-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
54664 54664 image <![CDATA[Yajun Mei]]> image/jpeg 1449175327 2015-12-03 20:42:07 1475894403 2016-10-08 02:40:03
<![CDATA[SCL Offers Free Online Inventory Optimization Webinar]]> 27328 Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute is hosting a free Inventory Optimization webinar on Monday, March 15th from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. (Eastern time). The webinar will consist of an online inventory optimization presentation, conducted by Edward H. Frazelle, Ph.D.

Dr. Frazelle will lead participants through an inventory optimization evaluation, teaching them how to maximize financial performance of inventory and increase service at the same time.

Focusing on world-class inventory planning and management, a variety of professionals would benefit from this course: executives and managers of supply chain, logistics, and distribution; inventory managers/directors; warehousing, material handling, and material management personnel; industrial engineers; operations and facility managers; key personnel committed to improving inventory management; and systems analyst, among others.

To register for this event, visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/webinar

 

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1266973200 2010-02-24 01:00:00 1475895938 2016-10-08 03:05:38 0 0 news Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute is hosting a free Inventory Optimization webinar on Monday, March 15th from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. (Eastern time). The webinar will consist of an online inventory optimization presentation, conducted by Edward H. Frazelle, Ph.D.

]]>
2010-02-24T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-24T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-24 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[SMART Companies Work Together]]> 27328 The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) in collaboration with the U. S. Department of Commerce and the Georgia Department of Natural Recourses is sponsoring “SMART Companies Work Together,” a no-cost event for manufacturers seeking to improve the efficiency of their supply chain while lowering their environmental impact.

 The event, scheduled for February 22, 2010, is the sixth in the Department of Commerce’s series of Sustainable Manufacturing American Regional Tours (SMARTs). Those attending will have an opportunity to network with other local businesses and together:

 The one-day event, to be held at the Georgia Department of Natural Resources from 8 a.m. until 5:30  p.m. is divided into morning and afternoon sessions.

 During the morning session, attendees will hear firsthand accounts from companies that have enhanced their competitiveness through improvements to environmental performance, service providers that work with manufacturers throughout the supply chain to improve efficiency and sustainability, and federal and state resource providers that can help companies get started.

 The afternoon session will consist of site visits to two local manufacturing facilities that are leaders in sustainability, including one to Interface, the worldwide leader in design, production and sales of environmentally responsible modular carpet and a recognized leader in the area of industrial ecology. Attendees will be able to see how these companies have incorporated sustainable principles into their manufacturing processes and in their relationships with their supply chains.

 Robert Martichenko, PhD, SCL senior lecturer of SCL’s newly initiated lean supply chain professional certificate series (www.scl.gatech.edu/lean) will present the keynote address. 

 Chip White, PhD, School Chair of the H. Milton School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, will moderate one of the panel discussions, titled “External Factors to increase Efficiency in Your Supply Chain.” 

 Those interested in attending this free event can register for either the morning session (click here ) or the full day (click here).

For more information abouat the event contact:

Morgan Barr

(202) 482-3704

www.manufacturing.gov/sustainability

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1265889818 2010-02-11 12:03:38 1475895933 2016-10-08 03:05:33 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) in collaboration with the U. S. Department of Commerce and the Georgia Department of Natural Recourses is sponsoring “SMART Companies Work Together,” a no-cost event for manufacturers seeking to improve the efficiency of their supply chain while lowering their environmental impact.

]]>
2010-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
52031 52031 image <![CDATA[Supply Chain & Logistics Institute co-sponsors SMART event with the U. S. Department of Commerce and the Georgia Department of Natural Recourses]]> image/gif 1449175449 2015-12-03 20:44:09 1475894473 2016-10-08 02:41:13
<![CDATA[Langley to Speak at National Logistics Conference in April]]> 27328 John Langley, professor of supply chain management in Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) and director of Supply Chain Executive Programs, will be one of the featured speakers at the 6th annual National Logistics & Distribution Conference (NLDC). The conference, which SCL is co-hosting with the Metro Atlanta Chamber, is scheduled for April 12-14, 2010, at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center.

NLDC was created to provide an educational conference for senior supply chain executives to hear from key industry speakers. With 2010 promising to be yet another challenging year for supply chain professionals, executives in all industries are looking for ways to reduce costs, optimize inventory, increase returns on assets, and improve service. With that in mind, the 6th annual NLDC features the brightest minds in supply chain logistics prepared to share experiences and information that can help forge a stronger supply chain that can successfully adapt in a dynamic world.

The conference's executive presentations and programming feature real-world case studies, leading technology solutions, and strategies for supply chain success. Presentation topics include:

To learn more about the conference and to register, visit the conference website at http://www.nldc2010.com/.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1266368400 2010-02-17 01:00:00 1475895933 2016-10-08 03:05:33 0 0 news John Langley, professor of supply chain management in Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) and director of Supply Chain Executive Programs, will be one of the featured speakers at the 6th annual National Logistics & Distribution Conference (NLDC). The conference, which SCL is co-hosting with the Metro Atlanta Chamber, is scheduled for April 12-14, 2010, at the Georgia Tech Global Learning Center.

]]>
2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
52922 52922 image <![CDATA[C. John Langley]]> image/jpeg 1449175459 2015-12-03 20:44:19 1475894476 2016-10-08 02:41:16
<![CDATA[In Memory: Robert N. “Bob” Lehrer, ISyE Chair, 1966 to 1978]]> 27328 Robert N. “Bob” Lehrer, the second of only six men thus far to chair Georgia Tech’s School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), passed away on Monday, January 25, 2010. He was 88.

 Originally from Sandusky, Ohio, Bob Lehrer started his engineering education at the University of Cincinnati. Like so many engineering professors of the time, Lehrer joined the military during World War II and was stationed at Purdue University in 1943 as part of the Navy’s V-12 College Training Program. After the war, Lehrer returned to Purdue, where he completed his graduate degrees and went on to teach at Purdue and Oregon State University, before joining the Georgia Tech faculty in 1950. Frank F. “Colonel” Groseclose, Industrial Engineering (IE) School chair from 1946 to 1966, hired Lehrer, who became one of fifteen faculty in the school at that time. Groseclose soon put Lehrer in charge of the graduate program; however, the Ph.D. program was slow in starting, and in 1957, Lehrer left for Northwestern University to establish a doctoral program in Industrial Engineering. Four years later, Lehrer moved his family to Mexico for one year at the request of the United Nations Educational, Social, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). As his year began to wind down, Groseclose asked Lehrer to return to the School as associate director. The Ph.D. program was now up and running. Lehrer returned to Atlanta in 1963, and Groseclose handed him the reins in 1966. He served as Chair until 1978.

During his tenure as chair of the School, Lehrer is credited with modernizing the Industrial Engineering program and with adding the word “Systems” to the School’s name, reflecting in full the School’s philosophy. In an article in the Fall 2005 issue of Engineering Enterprise; however, Lehrer stated that he believed his number one legacy was the strength of the faculty he hired. Some of his hires still involved with the School include Austin Esogbue; R. Gary Parker, associate chair for Graduate Studies; and Leon McGinnis, Eugene C. Gwaltney Chair in Manufacturing Systems.

According to McGinnis, Lehrer was “one of the first IE department heads to embrace the quantitative side of IE, by hiring some really good young OR [operational research] people like Mike Shetty, John Jarvis [School chair from 1989 to 2001], and Mo Bazaara. But he also understood the need for balance in developing a faculty with strong representation from the engineering side of IE, like Jim Apple and John White, and the human side of IE, like Alan Porter and Terry Connolly. Bob left an indelible mark, not just on us, but on Georgia Tech and on the profession.”

 About Lehrer’s hires, R. Gary Parker, states that “these were people who brought to ISyE a perspective that facilitated our upward movement among the ranks of more serious
IE/OR academic programs.”

 Lehrer was a member of: Phi Delta Theta, Tau Beta Pi, Phi Kappa Phi, and Alpha Pi Mu. He was the author of five books translated into seven languages and was editor-in chief of the Journal of Industrial Engineering. Among his awards and honors, Lehrer was the recipient of the Frank and Lillian Gilbreth Industrial Engineering Award, IE's highest award as well as being the first recipient of the Distinguished Alumnus Award in Industrial Engineering from Purdue University (1964). He was named Outstanding Industrial Engineer in 1997.

 Lehrer is survived by Pat, his wife of 64 years; daughter and son-in-law, Joan and Hunter Hess; his brother, Dr. Richard Lehrer of Florida; his sister-in-law, Janice Lehrer of Hilton Head, S.C.; and fifteen nieces and nephews. A private family service was held on Friday, January 29, 2010, at St. Luke's Episcopal Church. Memorials in his memory may be sent to The Residence and Endowment Fund, Canterbury Court, 3750 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, GA. 30319.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1265190352 2010-02-03 09:45:52 1475895856 2016-10-08 03:04:16 0 0 news 2010-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-03T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
50758 50758 image <![CDATA[Robert N. "Bob" Lehrer]]> image/jpeg 1449175437 2015-12-03 20:43:57 1475894471 2016-10-08 02:41:11
<![CDATA[ISyE Home for New Simulation Software]]> 27328 Simio, a developer of 3D object-oriented simulation software, has awarded a $306,900 grant to Christos Alexopoulos and David Goldsman, professors at Georgia Tech’s H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE). The grant gives Georgia Tech academic edition licenses to support teaching and research in simulation.  ISyE will be the primary home for the research license and will use the Simio grant to remain at the forefront of research and education at all levels.

 “We are pleased to be the recipient of such cutting-edge software,” states Chip White, H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart chair of ISyE, “and we will certainly put it to good use in a variety of classes and research activities involving simulation and stochastic processes.”

Simio Academic Edition is fully capable software with no model size limits and includes discrete and continuous modeling, object library development, and 3D animation.

 “The faculty at Georgia Tech is committed to providing the best environment for their students to learn simulation,” said Dr. Dennis Pegden, Founder and CEO of Simio. “We are honored to provide them with the best software available to teach their students.”

Users of the software will be able to model systems using intelligent objects and the software’s direct connection to Google’s 3D Warehouse – two features unique to Simio.

The intelligent objects are built by modelers and then may be reused in multiple modeling projects. These objects can be stored in libraries and easily shared. Simio’s connection to Google’s 3D Warehouse gives access to a free online library of thousands of graphic objects  – providing students with the ability to solve real-world problems in visually-rich environments.

With this grant, Georgia Tech joins over a 100 universities across the globe to join Simio’s academic program, which offers Simio’s 3D modeling software to schools at no charge.

Simio LLC, a private company headquartered in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania,  is dedicated to delivering leading edge solutions for the design, emulation, and scheduling of complex systems.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1265887165 2010-02-11 11:19:25 1475895856 2016-10-08 03:04:16 0 0 news Simio, a developer of 3D object-oriented simulation software, has awarded a $306,900 grant to Georgia Tech, giving it academic edition licenses to support teaching and research in simulation. The H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) will be the primary home for the research licenses and will make the software available to students and researchers throughout the Institute.

]]>
2010-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2010-02-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Distinguished Professor Yurii Nesterov Visiting ISyE This Spring]]> 27328 Yurii Nesterov, the world’s leading authority on the efficiency of algorithms for continuous optimization, is a visiting professor this spring at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) at Georgia Tech. On sabbatical from the Center for Operations Research and Economics (CORE) at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belguim,  Professor Nesterov is on campus for four months to work with Arkadi Nemirovski, Hunter Chair in ISyE.

Professors Nesterov and Nemirovski have a long history of collaboration. For the past twenty-five years they have joined forces to work on various projects, such as the book they co-authored, Interior-Point Polynomial Algorithms for Convex Programming, which develops the theory of self-concordant functions to unify global complexity results obtained for convex optimization problems including linear, second-order cone and semi-definite programming.  To many scholars this book is considered the most important contribution to optimization theory and applications in the last twenty years.

Professor Nesterov is the recipient of several awards and honors. Among those are the George B. Dantzig Prize and the John Von Neuman Prize, awarded also to Ellis Johnson, Coca-Cola Chaired professor in ISyE, and Professor Nemirovski. The Dantzig Prize, awarded jointly by the Mathematical Programming Society and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, is awarded for original research, which by its originality, breadth and scope, is having a major impact on the field of mathematical programming.  The John von Neuman Prize is awarded annually to a scholar (or scholars in the case of joint work) who has made fundamental, sustained contributions to theory in operations research and the management sciences.

Additionally, Professor Nesterov, along with Professor Shapiro, has been invited to speak at the upcoming prestigious International Congress of Mathematicians (ICM) to be held in Hyderabad, India, August 19-27, 2010. Convening once every four years, the ICM is the largest meeting of mathematicians from around the world. Professors Shapiro and Nesterov join ISyE professors Nemirovski, William Cook, Chandler Family Chair, as well as courtesy appointed Professor Robin Thomas from the School of Mathematics , as among the few to receive this exceptionally prestigious honor.

According to R. Gary Parker, ISyE professor and associate chair for Graduate Studies, very few invited talks are awarded at the ICM, and it is very rare for faculty in such departments as “industrial engineering” or even “operations research” to receive such an honor. “Remarkably,” states Parker, ISyE “has three sitting faculty who have been so honored and four counting courtesy appointed Professor Robin Thomas.”

In addition to the textbook he co-authored with Professor Nemirovski, Professor Nesterov co-authored a subsequent paper, which introduced the theory of self-scaled cones to unify the theory of primal-dual algorithms for these same problem classes. Nesterov is also the author of the monograph Introductory Lectures on Convex Optimization, which develops state-of-the-art theory at a level appropriate for introductory graduate courses. In recent work he has obtained improved results on the global convergence of a regularized Newton’s method for unconstrained optimization and established a theory of smoothing that allows for the applicability of optimal first-order methods to large-scale problems with nondifferentiable objectives.

Professor Nesterov will be visiting Georgia Tech through April 2010.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1264695157 2010-01-28 16:12:37 1475895852 2016-10-08 03:04:12 0 0 news 2010-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
50242 50242 image <![CDATA[Left to right: Arkadi Nemirovsk, Hunter Chair in ISyE; Yurii Nesterov, visiting professor from the Center for Operations Research and Economics at the Catholic University of Louvain in Belguim; and Alex Shapiro, ISyE professor]]> image/jpeg 1449175437 2015-12-03 20:43:57 1475894471 2016-10-08 02:41:11
<![CDATA[Santanu Dey Selected for 2009 IBM Faculty Award]]> 27328 Santanu Dey, assistant professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has been selected to receive the IBM Faculty Award for 2009. The IBM Faculty Award is a worldwide competition program intended to foster collaboration between researchers at leading universities worldwide and those in IBM research, development and services organizations and to promote courseware and curriculum innovation to stimulate growth in disciplines and geographies that are strategic to IBM.

Dey joins the ranks of other ISyE faculty who have received the award, including Shabbir Ahmed in 2002 and 2005; Jiangang  (Jim) Dai in 2003; William “Bill” Rouse in 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008; and Bert Zwart in 2008.

Having worked as a research fellow at the Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) of the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium, Dey’s research interests are in the areas of large-scale optimization, mixed integer programming, and applications of discrete optimization.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1264697738 2010-01-28 16:55:38 1475895852 2016-10-08 03:04:12 0 0 news 2010-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
50244 50244 image <![CDATA[Santanu Dey]]> image/jpeg 1449175437 2015-12-03 20:43:57 1475894471 2016-10-08 02:41:11
<![CDATA[Focus On: Ann Melissa Campbell Examines New Network Design Problems]]> 27328 Ann Melissa Campbell (PhD OR 2000) is an associate professor in the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Her research interests include routing and related distribution problems, including new network design problems based on challenges faced by UPS and new delivery pricing problems inspired by e-grocers. She also studies stochastic routing problems and efficient ways to solve them.

One of the problems she examined for UPS involves how to design a delivery network to move ground shipments from their origins to their destinations in a cost-efficient manner that satisfies promised delivery time commitments. This is a problem that has become increasingly challenging for companies such as UPS, as more customers are opting for the shorter delivery times that many ground freight companies now offer. At the same time, completely redesigning a company's delivery network based on these new delivery times is a very expensive proposition.

Campbell and co-authors Barrett Thomas (also at the University of Iowa) and Hui Chen (a former PhD student at Iowa and now a senior analyst at Northwest Airlines) have focused on a version of the problem where none of the hubs move, since the hubs would be the most expensive part of the network to change. Each "connection" represents a truck and a driver carrying ground freight from one hub to another. From each hub, there may be connections going to a single hub or to many other hubs. The number of connections has a significant impact on cost (as a truck and a driver represent a substantial investment) and on the ability to satisfy all promised delivery time commitments. Thus, Campbell, Thomas, and Chen specifically examine how to find the best possible set of connections that satisfy delivery time commitments given a limit on the total number of connections that may be used.

For many potential scenarios, there is not a feasible network that satisfies all delivery time commitments, so they measure the amount of violation of these commitments and seek to minimize either the maximum violation or the total sum of violations. For the maximum violation version of the problem, they have developed algorithms that solve several versions of the problem exactly. For the total sum version, exact solutions are not possible, but the authors have created some clever heuristics that capitalize on the solution structure.

In their computational experiments based on different ground networks in the United States, they found the solutions to problems with lower budgets always took on the appearance of connecting each hub to a "superhighway" going across the country. As budgets increase, the superhighway remains, but with additional connections added. This solution structure reveals the importance of having high-flow lanes and prioritizing movement of freight on these lanes to promote service quality and customer satisfaction.

Campbell received a prestigious NSF CAREER grant in 2003 and was awarded a Hesse Fellowship at the University of Iowa in 2004. She was named an associate editor of Transportation Science in 2007 and has authored twenty journal articles and four book chapters.

This article fist appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial & Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine of the Stewart School of ISyE.

 

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1262739600 2010-01-06 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news Ann Melissa Campbell (PhD OR 2000) is an associate professor in the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. Her research interests include routing and related distribution problems, including new network design problems based on challenges faced by UPS and new delivery pricing problems inspired by e-grocers. She also studies stochastic routing problems and efficient ways to solve them.

]]>
2010-01-06T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-06T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49734 49734 image <![CDATA[Ann Melissa Campbell]]> image/jpeg 1449175408 2015-12-03 20:43:28 1475894463 2016-10-08 02:41:03
<![CDATA[Senior Design Team Optimizes Auctions for UPS Service]]> 27328 Less than a decade ago, UPS Supply Chain Solutions began offering a ground shipping service called Direct Ship to serve large retail clients in the United States. Direct Ship clients who previously shipped small packages through UPS sortation hubs at both the origin and destination were now able to combine packages into full-truckload (FTL) shipments directly from a warehouse to a UPS hub near the packages' destination. At the hub, individual packages would be sorted and sent to their final destinations via UPS Ground. Skipping the UPS sortation hub at the origin zone led to quicker shipment times and lower costs, and Direct Ship was used by dozens of major retailers on hundreds of lanes.

Rather than use its own fleet for the FTL shipments from warehouses to hubs, UPS subcontracted each lane to an FTL carrier. Carriers would bid for the right to carry shipments on each lane, with UPS awarding lanes to the low bidders or, in some cases, to incumbent carriers with strong performance records. The resulting shipment network used a hodgepodge of almost 50 carriers, including national, local, and niche carriers of different sizes and varying reliability.

In practice, UPS found its Direct Ship network to be unwieldy. Managing and coordinating almost 50 different shippers was difficult, and the on-time service performance on some of the lanes was worse than UPS's 98% target.

In the spring of 2008, UPS desired to re-bid its network and reassign lanes to carriers, and they turned to ISyE Senior Design for assistance. A team of six ISyE undergraduate students comprised of Katie Buckler, Carlanna Cunningham, Jay Hennington, Kevin Kitchens, Patrick Odneal, and Richard Ward worked with UPS to provide not just a new selection of carriers but also a new way of approaching the entire process of choosing a carrier for each lane. While still hoping to minimize the total network cost, UPS had several characteristics they wanted in a new carrier assignment:
(1) Fewer total carriers, preferably 8-10 of the largest and most reliable.
(2) Balanced assignments of lanes to carriers with respect to mileage and revenue.
(3) 98% or higher on-time service for the largest 25 Direct Ship customers.

At the same time, the ISyE Senior Design team realized that UPS might pay more than necessary to its carriers by bidding out each lane separately. For example, a carrier bidding on lanes from Atlanta to Chicago and Chicago to Atlanta might run the risk of winning just one of the two and having to deadhead drivers on the return trip. To mitigate that risk, the carrier would need to place a higher bid on each lane. But if the carrier were allowed to place a bid for the pair of lanes together, the risk would be removed and the price UPS pays could be lower. More generally, carriers would mix-and-match combinations of lanes that fit best within their networks, offering UPS lower prices in return for the benefit of getting exactly the set of lanes they want. Called combinatorial (or combinational) bidding, these types of auctions have been used in many areas from transportation lane assignments to cell phone frequency sales, resulting in millions of dollars in benefits.

With this design in mind, the ISyE Senior Design team created a user-friendly tool for UPS to run its auctions. The Java-based tool reads auction and carrier data from UPS's Excel files and gives UPS the opportunity to add custom restrictions, define tolerances for mileage and revenue balance, and create differing total-carrier and service-level scenarios. Then, it creates and solves an optimization problem to find the lowest-cost carrier assignments that satisfy UPS's desired characteristics.

In addition to providing a single solution based on each of UPS's scenario inputs, the tool also does what-if sensitivity analysis to point out which bids would be most valuable for negotiation and on which lanes it might be very valuable for UPS to accept a small niche carrier's bid.

Overall, based on the bids received by UPS in 2007, the ISyE Senior Design team's approach was able to save UPS about $1.3 million per year in carrier costs, while reducing the number of carriers in the Direct Ship network from 46 to 8, balancing mileage and revenue among the carriers, and increasing the service level above the desired 98%.

For questions or to become involved in the Senior Design program, contact Joel Sokol at joel.sokol@isye.gatech.edu or visit www.isye.gatech.edu/seniordesign.

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial & Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine for the Stewart School of ISyE.

 

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1263430800 2010-01-14 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news In the spring of 2008, UPS desired to re-bid its network and reassign lanes to carriers, and they turned to ISyE Senior Design for assistance. A team of six ISyE undergraduate students comprised of Katie Buckler, Carlanna Cunningham, Jay Hennington, Kevin Kitchens, Patrick Odneal, and Richard Ward worked with UPS to provide not just a new selection of carriers but also a new way of approaching the entire process of choosing a carrier for each lane. The ISyE Senior Design team created a user-friendly tool for UPS to run its auctions and was able to save UPS about $1.3 million per year in carrier costs.

]]>
2010-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49722 49722 image <![CDATA[UPS Team]]> image/jpeg 1449175421 2015-12-03 20:43:41 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06
<![CDATA[Moving the World with Ocean Cargo]]> 27328 Beginning in the latter stages of the twentieth century, the forces of globalization that reshaped industrial supply chains were influenced by two primary factors: the very large differential in labor costs between developed and developing countries and the availability of high volume, inexpensive international freight transportation.

When it comes to moving finished goods and intermediate products between continents to consumers and businesses, the dominant mode of transportation is containerized ocean cargo. In fact, since the early 1990s, the use of container shipments worldwide has grown more than three times the rate of the global GDP. Despite the recent economic downturn that has significantly cooled international trade, it is likely that ocean container cargo will continue to be important for years to come.

Researchers within the Stewart School have been active in ocean cargo research throughout the past decade. In this article, we highlight two recent research efforts supported by both the National Science Foundation and the Singapore Economic Development Board.

Professor Ozlem Ergun and Richa Agarwal (PhD IE 2007) recently completed a set of work culminating in Agarwal's thesis, "Network Design and Alliance Formation for Liner Shipping." Today's large ocean carriers, like Maersk, Hapag Lloyd, and NOL, face challenging problems in service network design, the task of determining which routes or services to operate and at what frequencies and how to assign ships to these services. An important new challenge is that most transoceanic routes today are operated jointly by a number of different carriers working together within an alliance. Thus, the research also focuses on how to jointly plan the operations of multiple collaborative carriers, including how to allocate the capacity of different services among carriers.

To solve these problems, Agarwal and Ergun developed a new integrated optimization model to solve the ship scheduling problem and the cargo routing problem simultaneously -- the first such model to incorporate transshipment ports (where cargo is transferred from one service to another). Since the model is too large to be solved directly with commercial optimization solvers, the team developed various customized heuristic and exact solution approaches and demonstrated their applicability on realistically sized problems.

In the second part of the study, Agarwal and Ergun focused specifically on alliance formation among liner carriers, using techniques from optimization and algorithmic game theory to propose an approach to design a collaborative service network. To manage interactions among participating carriers, their approach determines appropriate prices for capacity exchange between carriers to induce participants to follow an optimal collaborative strategy.

Professor Alan Erera and Aykagan Ak (PhD IE 2008) have recently studied another important aspect of ocean container operations: scheduling problems at seaports. Ak's thesis, "Berth and Quay Crane Scheduling: Problems, Models, and Solution Methods," is an integrated study that investigates how to optimally plan ship loading and unloading operations at container seaports. Managing berthing space and the large dockside quay cranes that are used to service vessels is a critical operational challenge; efficiency gains here allow ports to maximize container throughput while meeting the service requirements of carriers.

Berth allocation is the problem of determining where to moor a sequence of arriving vessels over time, while quay crane allocation and scheduling problems focus on which quay cranes to assign to berthed vessels. At large modern seaports, it is possible to simultaneously berth multiple vessels of varying lengths along long linear berthing areas with a shared set of cranes, which can be moved from one vessel to another (without passing each other) at any time, thus leading to very complex scheduling problems.

Ak's work was among the first to consider joint planning of berth allocation and quay crane scheduling, and he developed very fast solution heuristics based on tabu search to quickly find near-optimal solutions to these problems. His methods are currently being used as part of a large research effort focused on risk mitigation at U.S. seaports to simulate how port operators might re-optimize operations if cranes or berth sections are damaged.

Professors Alan Erera and Ozlem Ergun prepared this article fo the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine for the Stewart School of ISyE.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1263344400 2010-01-13 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news When it comes to moving finished goods and intermediate products between continents to consumers and businesses, the dominant mode of transportation is containerized ocean cargo. Despite the recent economic downturn that has significantly cooled international trade, it is likely that ocean container cargo will continue to be important for years to come.

]]>
2010-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[The Great Races]]> 27328 How hard is it to get a package to say, Khartoum, Sudan, or to Split, Croatia, or to transport a shipping container filled with medical supplies to a hospital in Ghana? Undergraduate students from Professor John Bartholdi's class know, as they discovered in two fascinating and fun class projects: The Great Package Race and the new Great Container Race.

Running in this race are four of the major package carriers -- DHL, FedEx, UPS, and USPS. Since 2003, Bartholdi and his students have tracked packages going to designated locations to analyze the routes and determine which carrier can get a package to the final destination first and in the best condition. Because each carrier has its own freight network through which a package travels, the experience of each package depends on the structure of the network.

This is not an easy race; destinations are intentionally chosen to challenge package carriers. All packages leave from the same location on Georgia Tech's campus, but are shipped to various thematic locations. One year they may ship to off-the-beaten-path exotic locales, another year to great centers of commerce around the globe, and yet in another year, students may ship packages to their mothers who reside around the world.

"It is remarkable that most packages eventually reach their destinations, even under difficult circumstances, but there have been some dramatic lapses," Bartholdi noted. "One package was carried back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean nine times before delivery. Another was sent to Costa Rica instead of Croatia. One carrier claimed that the destination country did not exist. It does."

There have been dramatic finishes as well. In 2006, one carrier beat another to Croatia by a mere three minutes. A race to Singapore ended in a tie when delivery personnel from two of the carriers arrived at the door simultaneously, even though the packages had taken completely different routes to get there.

Last year, Bartholdi broadened the scope of his Great Package Race to create the Great Container Race. This time, running in the race were two international shipping containers filled with medical supplies. For the first Great Container Race, the class tracked and then analyzed the routes of the two containers as they traveled by alternate routes and carriers to the University of Cape Coast Hospital in the West African nation of Ghana. In an international shipment, a container might travel by any combination of transportation modes. This requires carefully choreographed handoffs, from truck to port and then from port to ship, for example. Each handoff brings a chance of delay. Speed also depends on schedules of shipping companies, throughput capacities at ports, and precision of scheduling pickups and drop-offs.

For this first race, one container traveled by rail to Savannah, took a French ocean liner to Le Havre, transshipped to Tema, and then continued by truck 100 miles to Cape Coast. The other traveled by truck to Savannah, took a Danish liner to Algeciras, Spain, transshipped to Tema, and then traveled by truck to the final destination of Cape Coast, Ghana.

Or at least that was the plan. What actually happened was that the container was stuck in Algeciras for a month due to congestion at the port. Meanwhile, the other container was also stuck, but in customs at Tema. Eventually congestion dissipated, customs worked its way through the complex bill of lading, and both shipments were delivered safely. But then, this is what global freight transport is all about: Dealing with the unexpected.

This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine of the Stewart School of ISyE.

 

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1263344400 2010-01-13 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news How hard is it to get a package to say, Khartoum, Sudan, or to Split, Croatia, or to transport a shipping container filled with medical supplies to a hospital in Ghana? Undergraduate students from Professor John Bartholdi's class know, as they discovered in two fascinating and fun class projects: The Great Package Race and the new Great Container Race.

]]>
2010-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49729 49730 49729 image <![CDATA[Package Race]]> image/jpeg 1449175408 2015-12-03 20:43:28 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06 49730 image <![CDATA[Container Race]]> image/jpeg 1449175408 2015-12-03 20:43:28 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06
<![CDATA[EMIL-SCS: Highlights From My International Learning Experience]]> 27328 When I enrolled in Georgia Tech's Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) program, I had been working for DB Schenker's Corporate Logistics group for four years. Barry McNeil, Schenker's vice president of operations, who had already graduated from the program, assured me that I was in for a unique experience. And he was right.

Through EMIL-SCS, I have learned about global supply chain issues firsthand. I saw trucks lined up at border crossings from Eastern Europe heading into Western Europe and from Mexico into the United States. I experienced traffic in S**o Paulo, Brazil. I wound my way through the airport in Guangzhou, China, and watched huge ships navigate the narrow passage through the Panama Canal's locks. In Hong Kong, I stood on the bridge of the world's biggest container vessel as containers were simultaneously loaded and unloaded. I have talked to local business people about their specific supply chain challenges in China, Malaysia, France, Germany, Chile, Brazil, Mexico, and beyond. Going through EMIL-SCS has been an amazing and informative experience.

What is the EMIL-SCS program like? The residence structure is designed for students who work full time. The program is built around five, two-week residences in which participants are fully immersed in classes, away from workplace distractions and often in overseas locations. The residences are supported by coursework and assignments, completed by students back at home between sessions. This requires application and commitment from the students, but the program is designed for incorporation around normal work activities. In fact, many of the assignments require students to apply the theory taught in class to the practicalities of their own company and work environments.

The exact details of each residence vary with each class, but here are some highlights from mine.

*Residence I***North America: This residence was a very academic baptism by fire into the world of modeling, optimization, finance, and other aspects of technical logistics held on campus at Georgia Tech. This was pretty scary for those of us with liberal arts backgrounds (my undergraduate degree was in French and business studies). The quality of teaching from the likes of Stephen Timme, our charismatic finance professor, and Martin Savelsbergh, who was able to explain optimization to novices (like me) and experts alike, made the eight-hour days in a classroom bearable.

*Residence II***Europe: This residence was a complete change in focus from the purely academic to the reality of doing business in Europe. The residence had a mixture of academic classroom sessions (labor relations in Europe, history of the European Union, sustainability in the supply chain, etc.), outside speakers (European trucking operations, discount airline business model), as well as site visits (Port of Le Havre, Kia car factory) in France, Germany, and Slovakia. The residence also involved live case sessions where a host European company outlined a specific relevant supply chain issue the company was facing, and a small group of students worked together to present potential solutions and lead a class discussion with the company about the issue. The live case I worked on was with a French company, Legallais-Bouchard, that was looking to expand into another region of France. My team reviewed and presented several options for a future distribution network that included operational and financial considerations.

*Residence III***Latin America: My third residence began with a visit to the Panama Canal. We also took in site tours in Chile and Brazil. Maria Rey, an academically outstanding presenter and previous EMIL-SCS graduate, explained some of the complexities of logistics in the region. Professor John Bartholdi held some lively classroom exercises on warehouse design. Picking paper clips from cups with tweezers gave us a hands-on opportunity to understand the benefits of the bucket brigades -- a way of organizing workers on an assembly line so that the line balances itself.

*Residence IV***Asia: This was probably the most ambitious residence, with visits to Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Hong Kong, a train ride to a manufacturing plant in southern China, Shanghai, and -- for a few of us who tagged on an extra weekend -- Beijing and the Great Wall. One of the highlights of the residence was a tour of Elly Maersk, the largest container ship in the world, while it was in port in Hong Kong. Others included discussions with Dell, Intel, Jabil, and William Fung on topical supply chain challenges.

*Residence V***North America: In our final residence, we came back to the classroom in Atlanta for a week, and then we were off to Laredo, Texas, to experience border operations. Then we headed across the border into Monterrey, Mexico, for discussions on NAFTA and a visit to a maquiladora manufacturing site.

While participating in the residences, we also took part in a global project, based on a real-life supply chain opportunity. We were divided into teams and worked on our project throughout the program. During the final residence, we presented the results of our project to the course directors, our classmates, and members of the EMIL**-SCS advisory board. I was part of a team that analyzed the routing of products and components from sources in Asia to manufacturing and assembly facilities in North America. We were particularly satisfied to hear that our subject company (a major global manufacturer of computer equipment) had decided to implement some of our recommendations as a pilot project just prior to our presentation.

If you are interested in the program, you can find out more at www.emil.gatech.edu. If you are fortunate enough to participate, have fun! With so much travel involved, it is always an adventure. Traveling together is a great way to network and bond with your fellow classmates.

Theresa Foran prepared this article for the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine for the Stewart School of ISyE.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1263430800 2010-01-14 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news 2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49724 49725 49726 49724 image <![CDATA[Foran in Normandy]]> image/jpeg 1449175421 2015-12-03 20:43:41 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06 49725 image <![CDATA[Panama Canal]]> image/jpeg 1449175421 2015-12-03 20:43:41 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06 49726 image <![CDATA[Great Wall]]> image/jpeg 1449175421 2015-12-03 20:43:41 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06
<![CDATA[Transportation Research in ISyE]]> 27328 The modern global economy functions in part due to the availability of efficient and reliable transportation systems that enable the mobility of people and freight locally, regionally, and globally. Focusing on the United States, the scale of many of these transportation systems is staggering: in 2006, 1.7 trillion vehicle-miles were traveled by passenger cars on our nation's highways, 700 million passengers were transported by airlines, 1.8 trillion ton-miles of freight were moved by railroads, and 2.6 billion tons of freight passed through seaports.

Large-scale, complex transportation systems pose significant challenges in terms of design and control. Many of these challenges, however, are well suited to analytical techniques of operations research and industrial engineering that form the core expertise of the faculty in the Stewart School. Operations research has a long history of successful application to transportation planning problems of a tactical nature. Such problems (including network design, service scheduling, fleet sizing and positioning, and resource and crew scheduling) have traditionally been modeled as large-scale deterministic optimization problems. More recently, researchers have addressed planning problems with models that explicitly consider inherent uncertainty in such systems. In response to continual improvements in computing power and information technology, the focus today has expanded to include problems of operational control where models can support decisions in real time.

Faculty and student researchers within the Stewart School have been active participants in the application of operations research to problems of transportation system design and control, and they continue that tradition to date. The group of industry sponsors and collaborators who have worked recently with faculty and student research teams includes industry leaders such as UPS, Schneider National, Norfolk Southern, Delta Airlines, ExxonMobil, Yellow-Roadway, and the Georgia Ports Authority.

Research and industry-sponsored educational activities in the area of transportation systems take a variety of forms at the Stewart School. Researchers are supported by federal grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), and the Department of Homeland Security, as well as funds from the State of Georgia through the Center of Innovation for Logistics and from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Industry Studies Program. Large industry-funded collaborations are typically managed by contracts through Georgia Tech's Office of Sponsored Programs. Other industry collaborations are formalized as Leaders in Logistics projects through the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL). Finally, transportation problems are frequently the focus of undergraduate Senior Design projects.

NSF funded a $1.1 million, three-year project titled "Collaborative Logistics," supporting the work of ISyE faculty members John Bartholdi, Ozlem Ergun, Pinar Keskinocak, Anton Kleywegt, George Nemhauser, Martin Savelsbergh, and their PhD students. The study, which concluded in 2007, covered a wide-range of topics, including inventory pooling in supply chains, collaborative procurement of truckload transportation services, dynamic pricing with buyers' learning, and carrier alliances and resource sharing. Another recent NSF award, to study "Risk Mitigation for Strategic Ports," provided $3.6 million in funding to support a large interdisciplinary research team led by Georgia Tech to investigate how to protect critical seaport infrastructure from major operational disruptions. Investigator Alan Erera is developing berth and quay crane scheduling optimization methods for this project to understand how to best recover operating capacity when some port components are damaged.

FHWA has supported ISyE research through a $1.4 million, multi-year grant to fund the "Transportation Research Center for Freight, Trade, Security, and Economic Strength." Co-directed by School Chair Chelsea C. White III and Erera, the center supported a diverse set of transportation-related research activities. On one project, the co-directors, along with faculty member Hayriye Ayhan, developed technology to improve route-finding for commercial vehicles given highway congestion, and efforts are underway to deploy this technology for rail container drayage trucks in the Kansas City area as part of the Cross-Town Improvement Project. Another project, led by faculty members Christos Alexopoulos and Dave Goldsman, focuses on developing a detailed simulation of operations at the Georgia Ports Authority's Savannah container port facility. Matching support for this research was provided by the Georgia Center of Innovation for Logistics.

In addition to government funding, ISyE researchers are often supported directly by companies through research grants. Two large contract research programs focused on transportation problems have been led by George Nemhauser and Savelsbergh. The first, funded by DayJet Corporation through 2008, focused on the development of various scheduling algorithms to support the operations of an airline offering per-seat, on-demand air transportation using a large fleet of very light jets. Unlike traditional airline planning problems where resource schedules can be planned in advance, the on-demand business model requires scheduling engines that can be used in real-time to determine whether to accept or reject a customer flight request and that can optimize resource schedules overnight for the next day's operation. A second ongoing project, funded by ExxonMobil, focuses on maritime routing and inventory management. Optimization technology is being developed for cost-effectively routing a pool of vessels and timing the loading, transporting, and discharging of bulk products to and from multiple ports.

Many companies choose to establish a research relationship with ISyE faculty through SCL's Leaders in Logistics program. One of the longest industry partnerships under this program supported the work of Savelsbergh with the industrial gas producer Praxair. The various research projects conducted over the years all focused on effectively exploiting the distribution flexibility offered by Praxair's vendor managed inventory resupply agreements with its customers.

Every research project described above has involved one or more graduate students in our School, typically those pursuing a PhD. By working on applied research, these students benefit by developing a solid understanding of how operations research and industrial engineering methodologies are used in practice and when and how existing tools must be extended to tackle new problems or enhanced to provide better solutions to old problems. Undergraduate students in our Senior Design program also have a chance to interact directly with faculty on problems faced by the transportation industry. Over the years, many projects have been sponsored by companies seeking to improve transportation activities; recent examples include projects from UPS on truck scheduling and auction-based procurement, from RaceTrac on routing and scheduling for fuel resupply at service stations, and from the Home Depot on managing the daily operations of a private fleet of trucks.

Transportation research and education activity is clearly alive and well within the Stewart School.

Professors Martin Savelsbergh and Alan Erera prepared this article for the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine of the Stewart School of ISyE.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1263344400 2010-01-13 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news Large-scale, complex transportation systems pose significant challenges in terms of design and control. Many of these challenges, however, are well suited to analytical techniques of operations research and industrial engineering that form the core expertise of the faculty in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech.

]]>
2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49732 49732 image <![CDATA[Shipping collage]]> image/jpeg 1449175408 2015-12-03 20:43:28 1475894463 2016-10-08 02:41:03
<![CDATA[Haiti: Humanitarian Logistics]]> 27279 In the wake of the Haitian earthquake, two of our experts in humanitarian logistics - Professors Julie Swann and Pinar Keskinocak - participated in a podcast hosted by Barry List of Operations Research: Science of the Better about the unique challenge of delivering relief to the troubled people of impoverished Haiti.

To listen to the postcast, visit:
http://www.scienceofbetter.org/podcast/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1263862800 2010-01-19 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news In the wake of the Haitian earthquake, two of our experts in humanitarian logistics - Professors Julie Swann and Pinar Keskinocak - participated in a podcast about the unique challenge of delivering relief to the troubled people of impoverished Haiti. The podcast has been posted online.

]]>
2010-01-19T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-19T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Atlanta plays pivotal relief role with quake victims: Logistics]]> 27279 Atlanta Journal-Constitution (January 24, 2010)
As the world scrambles to help Haiti, businesses and organizations in Atlanta are concerning themselves with some key, if mundane, relief items, namely: buckets, underwear and biscuits. The logistical world of emergency relief – which has a large footprint in Atlanta – is being tested as in few other natural disasters. Desperately needed supplies of food, water and medicine are being slowed by torn roads, inadequate security and distribution bottlenecks. "The general public doesn't realize how complicated logistics are in a disaster," said Julie Swann, co-director of Georgia Tech's Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics. Sudden floods of supplies can worsen emergencies. "It's not good for the system for everyone to send everything as fast as they can." Atlanta, long a center for commerce and distribution, is now a center for relief, Swann said. "Very few places have this critical mass of organizations."

Read entire article at:
http://www.ajc.com/search/content/printedition/2010/01/24/haiti01241.html

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1264467600 2010-01-26 01:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news Atlanta Journal-Constitution (January 24, 2010) As the world scrambles to help Haiti, businesses and organizations in Atlanta are concerning themselves with some key, if mundane, relief items, namely: buckets, underwear and biscuits...The logistical world of emergency relief - which has a large footprint in Atlanta - is being tested as in few other natural disasters. Desperately needed supplies of food, water and medicine are being slowed by torn roads, inadequate security and distribution bottlenecks.. "The general public doesn't realize how complicated logistics are in a disaster," said Julie Swann, co-director of Georgia Tech's Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics. Sudden floods of supplies can worsen emergencies. "It's not good for the system for everyone to send everything as fast as they can.".. .Atlanta, long a center for commerce and distribution, is now a center for relief, Swann said. "Very few places have this critical mass of organizations."

]]>
2010-01-26T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-26T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Chip White Appointed to Advisory Committee on Council of Competitiveness]]> 27328 Chelsea “Chip” C. White III, Schneider National Chair in Transportation and Logistics, was recently appointed to serve on the Executive Advisory Committee for the Council on Competitiveness’ new U.S. Manufacturing Competitiveness Initiative (USMCI).  Founded in 1986, the Council on Competitiveness is a nonpartisan, non-profit organization focused on enhancing the economic competitiveness of the U.S.  Based in Washington D.C., its members comprise corporation chief executives, university presidents, and labor leaders. 

The Executive Advisory Committee will help shape different aspects of the USMCI, provide expertise, and address integration issues. The USMCI, guided by input from the Executive Advisory Committee, will work to ensure that America is an attractive environment for high-value manufacturing and that the U.S. retains its position of leadership in an increasingly crowded and sophisticated global economic arena.

Former Georgia Tech president Wayne Clough also served in various leadership roles on the Council, including university co-vice chair. The Council is made up of three co-vice chairs, representing industry, universities, and labor that together make up the governing body of the Council on Competitiveness. Clough, with co-chair Sam Palmisano, chairman and CEO of IBM, also helped the Council launch the National Innovation Initiative.—a call to action to bolster U.S. competitiveness and innovation—that paved the way for the American COMPETES Act, which President George W. Bush signed into law in 2007.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1280744291 2010-08-02 10:18:11 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news Chelsea “Chip” C. White III, Schneider National Chair in Transportation and Logistics, was recently appointed to serve on the Executive Advisory Committee for the Council on Competitiveness’ new U.S. Manufacturing Competitiveness Initiative.

]]>
2010-08-02T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-02T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55103 55103 image <![CDATA[Chelsea “Chip” C. White III]]> image/jpeg 1449175507 2015-12-03 20:45:07 1475894486 2016-10-08 02:41:26
<![CDATA[ISyE, CDC Collaborate on Newly Released Adult Immunization Scheduler]]> 27328 Most adults understand the importance of childhood immunizations; however, they may not realize that adults also need to receive vaccines. Pinar Keskinocak, associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), co-director of the Health and Humanitarian Logistics Center, and associate director for research of the Health Systems Institute at Georgia Tech, and ISyE Ph.D. student Hannah Smalley have worked in collaboration with Dr. Larry Pickering, Shilpa Kottakapu, and Cathy Hogan from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to create the newly released Adult Immunization Scheduler. The Adult Scheduler is a free resource and is available from CDC's website.

A companion to the Childhood Catch-Up Immunization Scheduler (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/schedules/index.html), another CDC/ISyE collaboration released in 2008 for children through six years of age, the Adult Scheduler is a downloadable application for people nineteen years of age or older. From information such as birth date and gender, underlying medical conditions, past vaccine doses and approximate dates, the scheduling tool generates a concise printout that lists doses needed to catch up to current vaccine recommendations. The printout also shows dates for future doses that will ensure long-term protection. The scheduler can be downloaded onto a personal computer, at which time entered data can be stored.

Many adults are unaware of recently licensed vaccines, such as shingles and HPV, that can protect them from disease. Most adults do not realize that getting a booster dose of Tdap can protect them and help protect infants and children from pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough.

Updates will be incorporated into the tool when CDC recommendations change. Users of the Adult Scheduler can sign up for "e-mail updates" to ensure they are notified when there are changes to the adult recommended immunization schedule.

The adult vaccine scheduling work was supported in part by a seed grant from the Health Systems Institute at Georgia Tech.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1268697600 2010-03-16 00:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news Most adults understand the importance of childhood immunizations; however, they may not realize that adults also need to receive vaccines. Pinar Keskinocak, associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), co-director of the Health and Humanitarian Logistics Center, and associate director for research of the Health Systems Institute at Georgia Tech, and ISyE Ph.D. student Hannah Smalley have worked in collaboration with Dr. Larry Pickering, Shilpa Kottakapu, and Cathy Hogan from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to create the newly released Adult Immunization Scheduler.

]]>
2010-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-16T00:00:00-04:00 2010-03-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher

Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
54951 54954 54951 image <![CDATA[Pinar Keskinocak]]> 1449175421 2015-12-03 20:43:41 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06 54954 image <![CDATA[ISyE, CDC Collaboration]]> 1449175392 2015-12-03 20:43:12 1475894458 2016-10-08 02:40:58
<![CDATA[Airline Optimization in ISyE]]> 27328 We first entered the field of airline optimization about twenty years ago with a project on fleet assignment for Delta Airlines.

There is an amusing story about how this work for Delta began. At the time, Delta was using a new crew scheduling system that was based on the polynomial time linear programming algorithm developed by Narendra Karmarkar at AT&T Bell Labs and implemented in the KORBX optimization system, an eight processor Alliant computer. The system reputedly cost $8.9 million and, not surprisingly, only two such systems were ever sold. Delta bought one of them to solve crew scheduling. The important point to note is that crew scheduling is an integer programming problem, which is hard to solve, and KORBX could only solve linear problems, which are much easier relatively. So, the AT&T folks could only provide a heuristic for converting linear solutions to integer solutions.

We had some new ideas for solving crew scheduling problems; however, our attempts to contact Delta fell on deaf ears until Mike Thomas, then school chair, had a brilliant idea. Ron Allen, an ISyE graduate, class of 1964, had recently been appointed CEO of Delta. Thomas arranged a dinner at which Allen would be honored, and we would get a chance to suggest to him that we could help Delta with scheduling. The evening went well except for the end. Atlanta had just started car emission checks, and because of the low fee paid to the stations that could perform them, there were very long lines. A black market emerged for the emission stickers that were attached to license plates.

When we left the Alumni House at the end of the dinner, we discovered that each of the cars that previously held these stickers were missing the part of their license plate where the sticker had been. Allen's car was one of them. Nevertheless, from Allen we got an inroad to Delta's IT group. Because of their work with KORBX, they were not interested at the time in help with crew scheduling. But they decided to work with us on plane scheduling, which is called fleet assignment in the industry.

Given a schedule that lists the time, origin, and destination of all flights, fleet assignment addresses the question of what type of aircraft should be assigned to each flight. The answer is driven by demand and the network structure of all of the flights. Large planes should be assigned to high-demand legs. However, if a large plane is assigned to a flight from A to B, then there should be a flight from B that departs soon after the A-to-B flight that also has large demand and so on. The optimization model minimizes flying costs and the costs of lost demand. Cindy Barnhart, then an assistant professor in our group, now a professor and associate dean at MIT and a leading international expert in airline research, got her start on the Delta project. We successfully completed this project and then went on to do research sponsored by almost all of the major domestic carriers, including American, Northwest, United, and US Air, as well as the National Science Foundation.

By the mid-1990s, we began to tackle harder problems including systems optimization and uncertainty. Traditionally, fleet assignment was done before crew scheduling since crews are scheduled by aircraft type. However, an optimal solution for fleet assignment could lead to very costly crew schedules. For example, a crew might spend more than twenty-four hours simply waiting for the next airplane they could fly. We developed technology for optimizing fleet and crew assignments together.

Schedules were developed assuming no disruptions. But weather, equipment problems, and many other causes led to delays that propagated throughout the system. We developed some of the first technology for fast reoptimization or recovery of crew and fleet schedules when the current schedule was broken. We provided technology for producing robust schedules that make it easier to recover from these disruptions. To evaluate the quality of schedules in an uncertain environment, we developed SIMAIR, which allowed operations to be simulated for millions of days to evaluate the performance of different schedules.

Most of this work was done in collaboration with Sabre Decision Technologies, led by Barry Smith, and United Airlines, where Eric Gellman headed the operations research group. This work led to many publications, about ten dissertations, and some national awards to the students. Some of these students are now in operations research groups in the airline industry, and several others are faculty at other universities and continue to do good work on airline optimization.

Recently, our focus has shifted to on-demand air transportation, which involves unscheduled airlines where service is requested simply by origin***destination pairs and time windows. There are many ways of delivering this type of service including charter, fractional ownership, and air taxi. Professors Ellis Johnson and Ozlem Ergun have an ongoing project with Citation Shares to fulfill requests from individuals or companies that have fractional ownership rights to a fleet of planes. A business model that potentially can be widely used in place of standard airline transportation is an air taxi service. Anyone can request a seat on a plane by providing the earliest departure time from origin, latest arrival time at destination, and number of passengers. The planes can fly to and from very small airports. The cost can be made nearly competitive with commercial service. The convenience of such a service can be very appealing to business people, especially those who do not live close to a major airport. In many situations, it is an attractive alternative to car trips of several hours. Professors George Nemhauser and Martin Savelsbergh worked with DayJet, which at the time was the leading company providing this service using lightweight Eclipse jets. Unfortunately, the recent economic downturn has caused DayJet to terminate operations.

Air transportation networks have always been a fertile field for optimization applications and will continue to be so as we begin to work on new problems involving online optimization and optimization under uncertainty.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1262566800 2010-01-04 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news Air transportation networks have always been a fertile field for optimization applications and will continue to be so as we begin to work on new problems involving online optimization and optimization under uncertainty.

]]>
2010-01-04T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-04T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49739 49740 49739 image <![CDATA[Nemhauser and Johnson]]> image/jpeg 1449175408 2015-12-03 20:43:28 1475894463 2016-10-08 02:41:03 49740 image <![CDATA[Flight pattern image]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55
<![CDATA[2009 EMIL-SCS Students Complete Global Supply Chain Projects]]> 27328 In lieu of a traditional master's thesis, students enrolled in Georgia Tech's Executive Master's in International Logistics and Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) undertake a Global Supply Chain Project to fulfill the requirements of this eighteen-month residence-based program. Participants use this project as an opportunity to gain knowledge through the academic curriculum and apply those resources to a critical supply chain concern specific to their sponsoring companies.

The sixteen students in the 2009 EMIL-SCS class, which graduated in August of 2009, made full use of the program's resources in designing and completing their global projects, extending beyond their current scope of responsibility and realizing significant savings for their companies. Forming teams comprising from one to five people, the students completed six projects, described below:

Demand Planning and Inventory Visibility across Europe

This project's objectives were to identify waste in the value chain; establish clear and simple metrics for measuring process efficiency in logistics; improve, standardize, automate, and increase the frequency of forecasting process; and establish better integration and visibility between distribution and factories. Through these objectives, the project reduced warehouse costs by $65 million (35%), increased inventory turns from 4.3T to 5.0T, increased service rate from 85% to 91%, and reduced part lead time and administration order process from 127 days to 73 days.

Demand Planning for a Major Commodity and Retail Channel in the Caribbean

The focus of this project was to ensure a strong liaison between demand and supply through a robust (but simple) demand planning process, reducing finished goods inventory by at least 10%, while maintaining at least 90% fill rate level. Divided into three phases, the project focused on SKU rationalization, the demand planning process, and supplier collaboration, respectively. Phase I yielded a 3.5% reduction in the number of SKUs across all the product categories. Phase II yielded inventory reductions of 15% and the elimination of warehouse rental for additional savings. Phase III, although still in development, has a potential to reduce inventories by an additional 10%.

Implementation and Roll-Out of a Demand and Inventory Planning System at a Major Convenience Store Retail Chain

In this project, the company must identify ways to increase the per-store revenue and at the same time reach efficiencies across the supply chain in order to reduce operational costs. Project design and implementation includes the evaluation of the Retek-Oracle Replenishment and Forecasting modules, a total investment of $10 million. In Phase I of the implementation, the level of lost sales decreased more than 50% and product availability at the store level increased more than 65%. Depending on certain categories, revenue is expected to increase 4% to 6% at the store level. The payback period of the project will be approximately three years.

Low Cost Supply Chain Project

The objective was to develop a business model to profitably deliver low-cost products at price points that target customers can afford through analysis of the benefits of a redesigned, Low Cost Supply Chain (LCSC) model versus the current state. The cost savings resulting from this project was $221 million over five years, or $124 million on a discounted (net present value) basis. The primary reasons for the cost savings are reductions in inventory purchasing costs (19% of the savings) and inventory carrying costs (79% of the savings). Inventory carrying costs and inventory purchasing costs were reduced by almost 80%.

Optimal Sourcing Strategy in Latin America

The company's current supply chain for key countries in Latin America is based on sourcing product out of the United States and Asia. The company has been moving from the single-channel, single-sourced, configure-to-order model to a multi-channel, multi-source model that will provide much greater flexibility and convenience to customers at different price points. With this transition and the availability of new sources and new supply chain capabilities, the question is to determine the optimal supply chain strategy to satisfy the customer needs in key Latin American countries -- Colombia, Argentina, and Chile. The recommendations of the project have the potential to achieve approximately $5 to $10 million in annualized savings over current status and to reduce cycle time for several destination countries by one to three days.

Supply Chain Network Optimization Project

The company currently outsources about 70% of its products to Asia and builds 30% in-house domestically in the United States. The project evaluates five separate finished goods assemblies, using a total landed cost model to determine the optimal geographic areas for sourcing and manufacturing against internal and local options. The model included dynamic conditions for currency fluctuation, volatile fuel prices, and variable labor conditions across the geographic areas to better achieve a solid understanding of the total landed-cost of the assembly. As a result of the project, the range of savings based on probability is $1.5 million and $1.9 million and the most probable total cost opportunity for implementing this optimized scenario is approximately $1.5 million annually.

As the 2010 EMIL-SCS class anticipates its fifth and final residence in March 2010, the 2011 class is currently forming, with an expected start date in spring 2010. To learn more about the EMIL-SCS program or read more about the 2009 Global Supply Chain projects, visit the EMIL-SCS website at www.emil.gatech.edu.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1262566800 2010-01-04 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news 2010-01-04T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-04T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49744 49744 image <![CDATA[EMIL-SCS Logo]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55
<![CDATA[Three ISyE Graduates Selected for Gold & White Honors]]> 27328 Three graduates of the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering are recipients of the 2010 Gold & White Honors, the most prestigious awards that the Alumni Association gives in recognition for outstanding contributions on campus, in communities, and to humanity.

The Alumni Association describes this year's winners as tireless volunteers, thoughtful philanthropists and business leaders, and passionate educators.

Richard Guthman Jr. (IE 56) and Willis Potts (IE 69) are recipients of the Dean Griffin Community Service Award, presented for positively impacting the quality of life of others while serving as a role model in the process.

Mr. Guthman is retired senior vice president of government and public institutions for First American Bank of Georgia. Mr. Potts, who is retired president and general manager of Temple Inland Corporation, chaired the Board of Regents' search committee that brought G. P. "Bud" Peterson to Georgia Tech.

Bird Blitch (IE 97), executive vice president and co-founder of BroadSource, is the recipient of the Outstanding Young Alumnus/Alumna Award. This award is given to a high achiever under age 40 who has contributed to Georgia Tech, the community and the business world.

The Gold & White Honors' recipients will be recognized for their accomplishments and their generosity during a celebratory dinner and awards ceremony February 18, 2010, at the Atlanta History Center.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1262739600 2010-01-06 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news Three graduates of the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering are recipients of the 2010 Gold & White Honors, the most prestigious awards that the Alumni Association gives in recognition for outstanding contributions on campus, in communities, and to humanity.

]]>
2010-01-06T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-06T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[GE Energy Team is Fall 2009 Senior Design Project Winner]]> 27328 The GE Energy Senior Design team captured first place in the renowned end-of-the semester Senior Design Competition. Senior Design, considered to be the most important and most challenging industrial engineering course an undergraduate student will experience, sets students in motion to become successful industrial engineers. During the course, students are pushed to think outside the box as they adapt what they have learned in their classes to tackle a complex real world problem.

Joel Sokol, ISyE associate professor and Senior Design coordinator, states that "every semester, our students do some extremely good work, and the competition to be named a finalist or winner is intense." According to Sokol, ***this year's finalists creatively used advanced techniques in operations research, logistics, and statistics to create millions of dollars in value for a diverse set of corporate clients."

ISyE Senior Design has worked with organizations ranging from local startups to Fortune 100 companies to international humanitarian organizations. The impact of Senior Design projects has been felt not only in the Atlanta area, but across the country and as far away as Europe, Africa, and Asia. The average team is able to use their ISyE skills to create hundreds of thousands of dollars in value for the company they work with.

This was certainly true of the GE Energy Senior Design team, which demonstrated savings to the company of $8.6 million per year. Associate Professor Shabbir Ahmed advised the winning team, which included Charles Ballowe, Viviana Gonzalez, Sharece Hall, David Liss, Meghna Mukherjee, and Stefan Solntsev. The goal of the project, titled Procurement Planning for GE Energy, was to determine the minimal cost policy for the procurement of wind turbine towers for GE Energy The team developed software based on forecasting and optimization models that take into account purchasing and transportation costs, government policies, and renewable energy demand.

About his team's project, Professor Ahmed said that "the high volatility in the wind energy market made this project an extremely challenging one. The team developed a rigorous method for forecasting wind turbine demand and integrated it with a sophisticated stochastic optimization model to come up with an economic parts procurement plan. The explicit consideration of the various uncertain factors in the wind energy sector was key to the success of the team's approach."

Runners up in the competition were the Senior Design teams who worked with the American Honda Motor Company, Inc., and Manheim Auto Auctions.

The American Honda Motor Company, Inc., team focused on a project titled, Developing a Stand-Alone Vehicle Routing Tool Utilizing a Tabu Search Heuristic to Create a Set of Vehicle Routes to Minimize Cost and Maximize Service Level. Advised by Associate Professor Ozelm Ergun, the team included Alyssa Gangone, Steven Grimes, Caroline Jones, Max Moriarity, and Alex Paquette. The purpose of the project was to create a stand-alone vehicle routing tool that would allow Honda to create a set of vehicle routes to deliver spare automobile parts to the 240 Honda and Acura dealers located in the southeastern United States. The routing tool the team created takes into account the current operations parameters and metrics including fixed and variable route costs, multiple depot locations and soft-time window constraints. The model then finds the best-known solution in order to lower the operational cost and raise the service level. About the project, the Honda project sponsor stated that he has seen "routing proposals" from very different companies (big and small players) over the last 25 years, and this was one of the best among them.

The project team working with Manheim Auto Auctions learned that in 2009, Manheim's clients missed bidding on 50 percent of the cars in which they were interested. With a project titled Manheim Auto Auction Aggregate Planning and Forecasting, the team comprising Dustin Crance, Raymond Demere, Caroline Ferreira, Terence Norman, Brad Strickland, and Charles Welch used regression analysis and forecasting to create dynamic schedule updating predicted arrival windows for each vehicle at any given auction. Additionally, the team provided Manheim with a decision-making driver staffing tool, which it did not have. In total, this project adds $1.8 million yearly to eleven of Manheim's locations. Chang Kang, visiting professor from Hanyang University , Korea, advised the Manheim team.

All three teams gave presentations of their work on Wednesday, December 8, 2009, to a room filled with faculty, company sponsors, students and parents. Chen Zhou, associate professor and associate chair of undergraduate programs, stated that all the finalists were outstanding.

For more information on the senior design program, or if you are interested in sponsoring a student team, please visit http://www.isye.gatech.edu/seniordesign/.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1262566800 2010-01-04 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news 2010-01-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-15T00:00:00-05:00 2010-01-15 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49742 49742 image <![CDATA[GE Energy]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55
<![CDATA[Keskinocak Publishes Viewpoint on Disaster Recovery in Air Cargo World]]> 27328 Viewing collaboration as the key to disaster recovery, Pinar Keskinocak, co-director in the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, associate director of research in the Health Systems Institute, and associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech, builds her case in “Collaborative Key to Disaster Recovery,” a viewpoint published in the June 2010 issue of Air Cargo World.

 “It is time for all of us who work in the humanitarian logistics field to engage with others within and outside of our organizations and begin building our relationships,”  Keskinocak stresses. “This can result in remarkable synergies, more efficient and effective use of limited resources, and positive impact on people’s lives.”

 >>Read the entire viewpoint.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1275585746 2010-06-03 17:22:26 1475895789 2016-10-08 03:03:09 0 0 news Viewing collaboration as the key to disaster recovery, Pinar Keskinocak, co-director in the Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics, associate director of research in the Health Systems Institute, and associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech, builds her case in "Collaborative Key to Disaster Recovery,"a viewpoint published in the June 2010 issue of Air Cargo World.

]]>
2010-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2010-06-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
57933 57933 image <![CDATA[Pinar Keskinocak]]> image/jpeg 1449176194 2015-12-03 20:56:34 1475894510 2016-10-08 02:41:50
<![CDATA[Haitian Photo Journey on YouTube]]> 27328 (YouTube) View Professors Ozlem Ergun (ISyE), Julie Swann (ISYE), Reginald DesRoches, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE); and graduate students Jessica Heier Stamm (ISyE), Kael Stilp (ISyE) and Josh Gresha (CEE) photo journey from their travel to Haiti to investigate debris collection and removal issues that are blocking the road to recovery in Haiti.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1Pc3jLlNkY.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1281438240 2010-08-10 11:04:00 1475895650 2016-10-08 03:00:50 0 0 news (YouTube) View Professors Ozlem Ergun (ISyE), Julie Swann (ISYE), and Reginald DesRoches, School of Civil & Environmental Engineering (CEE); and graduate students Jessica Heier Stamm (ISyE), Kael Stilp (ISyE) and Josh Gresha (CEE) photo journey from their travel to Haiti to investigate debris collection and removal issues that are blocking the road to recovery in Haiti. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y1Pc3jLlNkY.

]]>
2010-08-10T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-10T00:00:00-04:00 2010-08-10 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
60377 60377 image <![CDATA[Workers remove debris in Haiti]]> image/jpeg 1449176267 2015-12-03 20:57:47 1475894523 2016-10-08 02:42:03