<![CDATA[Georgia Model for Possible Costa Rican Leadership Program]]> 27279

Global Atlanta - July 8, 2009
Based on a Georgia leadership organization's inaugural international retreat in June, the business and educational community in Costa Rica is considering forming its own leadership group to promote continued economic and educational development throughout the country. Leadership Georgia, a non-profit organization housed in the Georgia Chamber of Commerce, invites community leaders from across the state to participate in various weekend-long events during one year to learn about economic development and education initiatives taking place in Georgia. A June 11-14 leadership weekend in Costa Rica was the group's first event outside of the United States... Sebastian Urbina, director of the Georgia Tech's new Trade-chain Innovation & Production (TIP) Center near the capital of San Jose, spoke to the group about that center's research on trade technologies. The center is scheduled for an official opening celebration on Aug. 20.
http://www.globalatlanta.com/article/17439/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1247011200 2009-07-08 00:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Opens Trade Innovation Center in Costa Rica]]> 27279

Global Logistics & Supply Chain Strategies -July 20, 2009

Georgia Tech is launching an initiative in to help boost the speed and efficiency of shipments moving to and from that country. Grand opening of the Trade-Chain Innovation and Productivity (TIP) Center in

San Jose, is scheduled for August 20-21. Costa Rican President Oscar Arias Sanchez and Georgia Tech President G.P. "Bud" Peterson will speak at the opening ceremony. Read more>>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1248048000 2009-07-20 00:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-07-20T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-20T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-20 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Panel seeks new ways to deal with waste]]> 27279

EENews.net - February 9, 2009
The House Science and Technology Committee will meet Wednesday in search of innovative ways to deal with electronic waste. Lawmakers are currently crafting legislation that would support research into better recycling technologies and the use of more environmentally sensitive materials, according to a committee staff member. The problem of disposing discarded electronics such as computers and televisions has been growing as new products rapidly come on the market and consumers discard old models. Those discards end up in the waste stream, where chemicals and other toxic materials break down. According to U.S. EPA, there were 1.9 million to 2.2 million tons of used or unwanted electronics in 2005, of which 345,000 to 379,000 tons were recycled. EPA estimates electronic waste is growing two to three times faster than any other waste stream ... Schedule: The hearing is Wednesday, Feb. 11, at 10 a.m. in 2318 Rayburn. Witnesses: Valerie Thomas, professor at Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering; Jeff Omelchuck, executive director for the Green Electronics Council; Paul Anastas, director at Yale University's Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering; Philip Bond, president of the Information Technology Association of America; and Willie Cade, founder and CEO of PC Rebuilders and Recyclers' Home of the Computers for Schools Program.
Subscription required*

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1234141200 2009-02-09 01:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-09T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[A new Wal-Mart sheriff (aka CEO) is in the house]]> 27279

Fayetteville Free Weekly - June 4, 2009
Expect a more relaxed Wal-Mart host at this year's shareholders meeting. No one, of course, could out do the late ball cap wearing Sam Moore Walton, but Wal-Mart's new president and CEO Michael Duke will sure try. This will be Duke's first shareholders meeting as the man at the top. Despite his humble Kansas upbringing, the former Wal-Mart "high sheriff" H. Lee Scott, who proceeded Duke, could not pull off the down-home image as Wal-Mart head cheerleader. Insiders say that Duke can pull it off. . . . Duke joined Wal-Mart in 1995, coming from the Federated Department Store group and May Department Stores. He is a graduate of Georgia Tech, with a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering.
http://freeweekly.com/?p=3719

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1244073600 2009-06-04 00:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech To Open Logistics Center in Costa Rica]]> 27279

Global Atlanta - June 19, 2009
Georgia Tech's Don Ratliff discusses the new logistics center in Costa Rica. The Georgia Institute of Technology on Aug. 20 will open a center in aimed at improving foreign trade by helping companies there get products to market faster and more efficiently. The Georgia Tech Trade Chain Innovation and

Productivity Center , which will be located in San Jose , is designed to teach graduate students and company executives how to improve supply chains and logistics. It will also serve as a research center in those fields, said Don Ratliff, executive director of Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute... "Supply chains and logistics are fundamental to trade," said Dr. Ratliff. "It would be impossible for anyone to be good at trade that doesn't have good supply chain and logistics capabilities." http://www.globalatlanta.com/article/17407/]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245369600 2009-06-19 00:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Ga. Tech researchers predict North Carolina men to wear NCAA hoop crown]]> 27279

NetworkWorld.com - March 17, 2009 (Computer World)
The computer ranking system out of Georgia Tech seems to hold no grudge against the school's ACC basketball foes: It predicts North Carolina's Tarheels will be the one team standing at the end of the NCAA men's basketball tournament. The Logistic Regression Markov Chain (LRMC) system designed by three Georgia Institute of Technology professors (Joel Sokol, Paul Kvam and George Nemhauser) also has the University of Pittsburgh, University of Memphis and University of Louisville headed to the Final Four, with Memphis losing to North Carolina in the final game on April 6. Georgia Tech, nor any other school in Georgia, qualified for the March Madness this time around.
Read more>>>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1237248000 2009-03-17 00:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-03-17T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-17T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[GT launches supply chain research center]]> 27279

Atlanta Business Chronicle - June 25, 2009
Georgia Institute of Technology has launched a research center in Costa Rica to help develop new supply-chain technologies. The Georgia Tech Trade-chain Innovation and Productivity (TIP) center in Costa Rica aims to combine analytics, digital services and supply chain management to address trade-chain productivity. Read more>>

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245888000 2009-06-25 00:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-06-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Mathematical Team Ranking System]]> 27279

ESPN2 - March 17, 2009

The Stewart School of ISyE Professors Joel Sokol and Paul Kvam discuss their mathematical team ranking system, LMRC. LMRC stands for Logistic Regression and Markov Chain, the mathematical systems they put together.
View the segment at the following link

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1237248000 2009-03-17 00:00:00 1475895985 2016-10-08 03:06:25 0 0 news 2009-03-17T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-17T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Costa Rican President Praises Georgia Tech Logistics Center]]> 27279

Global Atlanta - August 25, 2009
The Georgia Institute of Technology on Aug. 20 formally launched a logistics center in the Costa Rican capital that will help the country realize its trade goals while paving the way for Tech to expand its influence in Latin America. The new Trade, Innovation and Productivity Center will conduct research, accumulate data, teach professionals and develop technologies to help Costa Rican companies export more efficiently. The center is set to become a venue for student and faculty research and exchange, but leaders say its role will go beyond education into a range of factors affecting the small country's quest to transform the way its companies get products to global markets. It also serves as the initial foothold for a planned network of such centers in Latin America, likely starting in Panama and Chile.
http://www.globalatlanta.com/articlevid/17531/543/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1251158400 2009-08-25 00:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2009-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Wal-Mart CEO's journey began in Georgia]]> 27279

Atlanta Journal-Constitution - December 26, 2009
The man who runs the world's largest retailer, a company so big it's a bellwether for the U.S. economy, looks to a rural area 30 miles south of Atlanta when he ponders the people and values that landed him in the office where American icon Sam Walton once sat. It's been about a year since Michael Duke was named the fourth CEO in the history of Wal-Mart Stores... Duke, 60, says he might not be CEO today had he ignored the sage advice dished out long ago by his Fayette County High School physics teacher, a man he still refers to "Mr. McDaniel." Go to Georgia Tech, the teacher told him. Major in industrial engineering. And

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1261789200 2009-12-26 01:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2009-12-26T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-26T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[College Ranking Service Annual Annoucement 2009]]> 27279

Rank Your College.com - September 2, 2009
For the ninth straight year, the College Ranking Service (CRS, rankyourcollege.com), has found that prestige in colleges and universities correlates with the size of endowment. The richest schools are the most prestigious... CRS has found no difference between the prestige of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, MIT, Caltech, and Stanford. . . . they are so wealthy that the CRS wonders why anyone continues to donate money to them. They don't need your money folks. The Fairness Method (6:39 a.m.): 1. Georgia Tech 2. Brandeis 3. Georgetown 4. Northwestern 5. Brown 6. Johns Hopkins 7. North Carolina 8. UCLA 9. Notre Dame
10. Berkeley*Our rankings can change very quickly. Press the reload button on your browser for our latest evaluation.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1251849600 2009-09-02 00:00:00 1475895982 2016-10-08 03:06:22 0 0 news 2009-09-02T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-02T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[EMIL-SCS: Highlights From My International Learning Experience]]> 27279

By Theresa Foran, MS IL 2008

When I enrolled in Georgia Tech's Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) program, I had been working for DB Schenker's Corporate Logistics group for four years. Barry McNeil, Schenker's vice president of operations who had already graduated from the program, assured me that I was in for a unique experience. And he was right.

Through EMIL-SCS, I have learned about global supply chain issues firsthand. I saw trucks lined up at border crossings from Eastern Europe heading into Western Europe and from Mexico into the United States. I experienced traffic in Sao Paulo, Brazil. I wound my way through the airport in Guangzhou, China, and watched huge ships navigate the narrow passage through the Panama Canal's locks. In Hong Kong, I stood on the bridge of the world's biggest container vessel as containers were simultaneously loaded and unloaded. I have talked to local business people about their specific supply chain challenges in China, Malaysia, France, Germany, Chile, Brazil, Mexico, and beyond. Going through EMIL-SCS has been an amazing and informative experience. What is the EMIL-SCS program like? The residence structure is designed for students who work full time. The program is built around five two-week residences in which participants are fully immersed in classes, away from workplace distractions and often in overseas locations. The residences are supported by coursework and assignments, completed by students back at home between sessions. This requires application and commitment from the students, but the program is designed for incorporation around normal work activities. In fact, many of the assignments require students to apply the theory taught in class to the practicalities of their own company and work environments.

The exact details of each residence vary with each class, but here are some highlights from mine.

Residence I - North America: This residence was a very academic baptism by fire into the world of modeling, optimization, finance, and other aspects of technical logistics held on campus at Georgia Tech. This was pretty scary for those of us with liberal arts backgrounds (my undergraduate degree was in French and business studies). The quality of teaching from the likes of Stephen Timme, our charismatic finance professor, and Martin Savelsbergh, who was able to explain optimization to novices (like me) and experts alike, made the eight-hour days in a classroom bearable.

Residence II - Europe: This residence was a complete change in focus from the purely academic to the reality of doing business in Europe. The residence had a mixture of academic classroom sessions (labor relations in Europe, history of the European Union, sustainability in the supply chain, etc.), outside speakers (European trucking operations, discount airline business model), as well as site visits (Port of Le Havre, Kia car factory) in France, Germany, and Slovakia. The residence also involved live case sessions where a host European company outlined a specific relevant supply chain issue the company was facing, and a small group of students worked together to present potential solutions and lead a class discussion with the company about the issue. The live case I worked on was with a French company, Legallais-Bouchard, that was looking to expand into another region of France. My team reviewed and presented several options for a future distribution network that included operational and financial considerations.

Residence II - Latin America: My third residence began with a visit to the Panama Canal. We also took in site tours in Chile and Brazil. Maria Rey, an academically outstanding presenter and previous EMIL-SCS graduate,
explained some of the complexities of logistics in the region. Professor John Bartholdi held some lively classroom exercises on warehouse design. Picking paper clips from cups with tweezers gave us a hands-on opportunity to understand the benefits of the bucket brigades-a way of organizing workers on an assembly line so that the line balances itself.

Residence IV - Asia: This was probably the most ambitious residence, with visits to Penang, Kuala Lumpur, Hong Kong, a train ride to a manufacturing plant in southern China, Shanghai, and-for a few of us who tagged on an extra weekend-Beijing and the Great Wall. One of the highlights of the residence was a tour of Elly Maersk, the largest container ship in the world, while it was in port in Hong Kong. Others included discussions with Dell, Intel, Jabil, and William Fung on topical supply chain challenges.

Residence V - North America: In our final residence, we came back to the classroom in Atlanta for a week, and then we were off to Laredo, Texas, to experience border operations. Then we headed across the border into Monterrey, Mexico, for discussions on NAFTA and a visit to a maquiladora manufacturing site.

While participating in the residences, we also took part in a global project, based on a real-life supply chain opportunity. We were divided into teams and worked on our project throughout the program. During the final residence, we presented the results of our project to the course directors, our classmates, and members of the EMILSCS advisory board. I was part of a team that analyzed the routing of products and components from sources in Asia to manufacturing and assembly facilities in North America. We were particularly satisfied to hear that our subject company (a major global manufacturer of computer equipment) had decided to implement some of our recommendations as a pilot project just prior to our presentation. If you are interested in the program, you can find out more at www.emil.gatech.edu. If you are fortunate enough to participate, have fun! With so much travel involved, it is always an adventure. Traveling together is a great way to network and bond with your fellow classmates.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1257987600 2009-11-12 01:00:00 1475895971 2016-10-08 03:06:11 0 0 news 2009-11-12T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-12T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-12 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[A Conversation with Valerie Bonebrake]]> 27279

A Conversation with Valerie Bonebrake,
Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain Services, Tompkins Associates and EMIL Advisory Board Member, Georgia Tech

1. What motivated you to get into the Supply Chain and Logistics industry?

I came up through the ranks, entering the industry through truck rental and leasing. As a result of the growth of de-regulation dedicated fleet services I was fortunate to be part of that growing industry. As new services and opportunities developed I was able to be a part of them as well. I also have a background in operations and business development so was able to leverage my experience into positions of increasing responsibility. I was also willing to take some risks, such as relocating and taking on new roles.

2. What are some of the challenges in the industry?

Unfortunately the recession has caused companies across many industries to make deep cuts in staffing across a wide range of disciplines including supply chain and related logistics roles. This has resulted in career setbacks for many talented people and greater competition for available jobs. Also, although it is changing, there is still a lack of "C" level supply chain executives and corresponding authority and recognition of the importance to an organization of an effective supply chain. On the positive side, as industries reach the bottom of their recessionary cycle the need for effective planning and responsive supply chains will increase, and innovation will drive even greater performance. I believe the companies with the best supply chains will recover faster and recognition of the importance of the role played by supply chain professionals will create even greater opportunities in the future.

3. What are some of the new trends in the industry?

Cloud Computing and Software as a Service (SaaS) certainly comes to mind. The future for applications supporting global supply chains will become increasingly available through this emerging delivery vehicle. It has always been important to keep abreast of the latest trends in supply chain software and that has not changed. I am seeing more recently about the role of the CIO and the current window that exists for technology professionals to play more significant roles in driving business strategy, not just technology strategy. This doesn't mean that everyone has to be a technology expert, but greater collaboration, exposure and opening one's mind to new ways of doing things all aid in the development and delivery of new technologies supporting global supply chains.

4. I understand you attended Georgia Institute of Technology to obtain your Master's Degree in International Logistics. Can you tell me about your experience?

The program was the perfect complement to my experience as a logistics service provider and to my desire to increase my knowledge of the global marketplace. We traveled to several regions- the Americas, Europe and Asia, visiting multiple countries along the way. We experienced a deep dive into the economic development, trade policies, logistics infrastructure, labor and education, and industrial evolution and growth of each region. We had the opportunity to visit multi-national companies and to work with them on a variety of supply chain challenges they posed for us. We worked on global projects in small teams which allowed for real depth into business opportunities and the chance to improve our teamwork and collaboration skills, as well as allowing us to tackle and solve problems. I completed my degree in August of 2008 and I can tell you that I am going through withdrawal - missing my wonderful classmates and the EMIL staff and the opportunity to travel with them around the world. The good news is that the friendships and experiences transcend the physical program and I now have a great network around the world to tap into.

5. What attracted you to the EMIL program versus other programs?

I had long been a fan of Georgia Tech, having worked with many of the logistics graduates and faculty over the years. The global aspect of the program interested me greatly. Additionally, the ability to complete my degree while I was working full time was a huge benefit. Lastly, the class is made up of peers and professionals with significant experience, so the learning is not just from the faculty, guest lecturers and sponsoring companies, but from other students as well.

6. How have you benefited from the EMIL program? How has your company benefited from your experience with the EMIL program?

I recently had the opportunity to make a career change and have moved from the ranks of logistics service provider to consulting services as Senior Vice President, Global Supply Chain Services, at Tompkins Associates, a global supply chain consulting firm. Tompkins is global in scope, as are the many clients we serve. Our whole focus is supply chain so my EMIL degree is the perfect complement to my working experience in global logistics. Companies today have tremendous challenges as well as opportunities. There is no doubt that the EMIL program broadened my view of the world and my ability to think strategically - and globally - as I work with clients across a broad spectrum of supply chain initiatives. It was clearly a win-win situation.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1243382400 2009-05-27 00:00:00 1475895971 2016-10-08 03:06:11 0 0 news 2009-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[EMIL Expands Name to EMIL-SCS]]> 27279

Atlanta (October 6, 2009) - In the fall of 2009, the Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) through the support and guidance of its Advisory Board, alumni, and staff elected to expand its name to the Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS). This expanded name more appropriately and accurately reflects the comprehensive education provided by EMIL-SCS to senior executives working within the many principals of supply chain management.

For more than 10 years EMIL-SCS, through the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has provided an extensive curriculum focused on international logistics, business management and supply chain strategy. By adding supply chain strategy to the program name we are more clearly representing the core teaching of EMIL-SCS and differentiating the program in the eyes and minds of the experienced supply chain professional.

The EMIL-SCS Program is a unique 18-month masters program designed to fit the busy work schedules of executives, allowing the company to keep key employees on the job while they participate in five (5) two-week residences. The academic curriculum is designed to cover the extended supply chain and regional differences across Europe, Asia, Latin America, and the United States. EMIL-SCS provides participants with the analytical skills and intellectual framework needed to succeed in designing and implementing creative supply chain strategies and global logistics solutions necessary to compete in today's global markets.

The EMIL-SCS Program is offered through the # 1 nationally ranked Industrial and Systems engineering school at Georgia Tech. Please visit our website at http://www.emil.gatech.edu/ for more detailed information.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1254355200 2009-10-01 00:00:00 1475895971 2016-10-08 03:06:11 0 0 news 2009-10-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[EMIL Participants Visit & Study Logistics Challenges in Asia]]> 27279

Atlanta (June 3, 2009) - Georgia Tech's Executive Master's in International Logistics (EMIL) program completed its Asian residence in March. The two-week trip provided 32 corporate students with a unique look at how companies are reacting to difficult conditions and combating negative influences on supply chains.

Created in 1999, EMIL is an 18-month program delivered in an Executive format that teaches techniques for decreasing logistics costs and improving supply chain efficiency. The program's structure allows participants to remain on-the-job while they work toward a Master's of Science in International Logistics. The program intersperses distance learning methods among five global residences, each supplying an intense two weeks of classes and site tours.

The Asia residence is designed to expose executive students to the challenges and differences that exist in the region's infrastructure for logistics, distribution, and fulfillment. The residence benchmarks manufacturing, sourcing, distribution, tax, and investment strategies employed across numerous industries in China and throughout Asia. Participants network with and learn from industry experts, government officials, trade associations, professors, and EMIL's growing alumni base.

The program's two-week trip to Asia began in Seoul, marking the first time that South Korea has hosted an EMIL residence. Professor Linda Low, Senior Fellow of the Institute of Asian Studies, gave an economic overview that focused on Asia, China, and the Middle East. She also presented material on social, political, economical, demographic, and security issues in these regions. Additionally, Low compared and contrasted the national perspectives of India, Singapore, and other Asian nations against the trade blocs of Europe, the Americas, Africa, and the Middle East. Lastly, she spoke on the impact of globalization on Asian and worldwide crises such as contagion and economic uncertainty.

While in Seoul, EMIL visited with Hanjin Shipping and CJ Global Logistics. Hanjin Shipping discussed infrastructure problems within Korea and other emerging markets throughout Asia. CJ Global Logistics discussed strategies to satisfy domestic demand and overcome barriers unfamiliar to the United States. In particular, the company highlighted customs issues that hinder the movement of goods, disadvantageous tariffs, and capacity constraints of air and water freight services. The EMIL class then toured the CJ GLS Logistics Center in Sin Duk Pyoung, South Korea.

Later in the residence, EMIL again blazed new ground by embarking on its first trip to Beijing, China. The participants learned about sourcing strategies in China from Raymond J. Chou, Managing Director of Home Depot's Asia Sourcing division. EMIL also met with Intel China and learned about the firm's migration of manufacturing to western China. Byron Ba, Greater China Logistics Manager for Intel and 2002 graduate of the EMIL program, led the discussion.

Additionally, the class experienced site visits and corporate discussions with SinoTrans Integrated Logistics. The dialogue focused on the logistics infrastructure in China, contract logistics-distribution, freight forwarding and customs clearance, and the impact of the economic recession on China. Afterward, the group adjourned for a site visit to John Deere during which the students learned about inbound logistics and protecting the "frozen zone" in Tianjin, China.

The recent Asian residence brought together two different EMIL classes for the first time in the program's existence. EMIL's Class of 2009 participated on the Asian tour in fulfillment of its fourth residence while the Class of 2010 completed its second residence. The decision to unite two classes at different stages in the program went off without a hitch, and the two groups forged new relationships and broadened both their EMIL experiences and professional networks. The Class of 2010 will depart for Europe next on June 14th, and the Class of 2009 completed its final residence in the United States in May, graduating from the EMIL program.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1255910400 2009-10-19 00:00:00 1475895971 2016-10-08 03:06:11 0 0 news 2009-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[EMIL Class Studies European Logistics in Europe]]> 27279

Atlanta (September 3, 2009) - The students enrolled in the Stewart School of ISyE's Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) program spent the summer trailblazing through Europe. In June, our Class of 2010 completed their third residence.

The European residence kicked off in Amsterdam, which was a first-time visit for the program. Professor Andreas Staab, Director of the European Policy Information Center and author of The European Union Explained, provided a historical overview of European integration with the objective of helping the students understand the historical, political, and cultural factors that shaped the integration and the evolution of the relationships among European countries and between the European Union and its members. While in Amsterdam, the class also visited Schiphol Airport and met with the Port of Rotterdam Council to learn about operations and future growth for one of the largest ports in the world.

EMIL at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam

From Amsterdam the class traveled by train to Stuttgart, Germany, where they became heavily engaged in a combination of theory and site visits. Bublu (Sarbani) Thakur-Weigold, Project Manager with Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and an EMIL alumna, presented the integration of Europe and the recent accession of 10 countries in Eastern Europe, differences in labor costs, changes in the ownership and structure of transportation, energy costs, and how environmental concerns have had a profound impact on the structure of European distribution networks.

The class then heard from Dr. Peter Klaus of Fraunhofer University, who presented an overview of the 3PL Industry in Europe and the world. He also discussed the impacts of structural changes like privatization, deregulation, and the participation of "national" players from postal services, rail roads, and financial organizations. He reviewed the relationship between large pan-European providers and small local companies, and presented a comparison of logistics services in Europe versus the United States.

While in Stuttgart, EMIL visited an ANZAG Pharmaceutical distribution center. With healthcare being a high priority in the lives of all people, experiencing the logistics of this DC became a shared interest among all of the students. In Europe, pharmacies do not hold medicines in stock. A customer will visit the pharmacy with a prescription and then will be told to come back in two hours. The pharmacy then places an order to its distribution facility that makes several runs a day to the store with the most current orders. It is a mammoth operation that functions within a very short timeframe, and the system has a 97% accuracy rating in its ordering, pulling, and shipping. Healthcare is managed through the German government; therefore, the distribution center is a government subsidized facility.

The class's favorite corporate visit overall was Daimler Service Parts Distribution for Mercedes-Benz. The distribution facility has implemented every aspect of Six Sigma and Lean Logistics, making it the most efficient warehouse any of the students had ever visited. The facility is so large that it does not have any air conditioning or heat. It takes three days for the outside temperature to affect the inside of the building. Conversely, the building just shifts with the natural weather patterns.

The next destination for the EMIL class was Krakow, Poland. Professor Andreas Staab met the class for a second time to respond to questions that had arisen during the course of the European residence and to address issues unique to Central and Eastern Europe. The class also visited United Technology Corporation in Rzeszow, Poland. The class spent the day learning about how this facility transformed from a government run MIG engine factory during the Cold War to a private enterprise that manufactures engine parts for Pratt and Whitney. The dedication and determination of the company owners to work through communism-controlled operations to a private entity emerging during a terrible depression was very moving. Despite being a large corporation, UTC is tied to the local community and has hopes to grow that region of Poland into an "Aviation Valley," which they anticipate will help the economic situation turn around in the coming years.

Paris was the last stop during the European residence and another first-time visit for the EMIL program. While in Paris, the class heard from Owen Darbishire, Rhodes Trust University Lecturer in Management Studies at Oxford University. His focus was on discussing various strategic advantages of different labor models around the world and how to manage effectively under constraints on labor.

The class also heard from Pascuale Pettoruto, Europe Region Brokerage & Customs Affairs Manager for UPS. He provided an overview of how customs operates in Europe, introduced the 27 different Customs administrations that implement the Customs Union, and discussed the challenges for both the Customs administrations and international trade. The class explored some of the differences that naturally arise among the different administrations of any such system.

And finally, the class sat in a discussion with Michiel Doorn from Arcadis Environmental Company, a consultant firm that provides engineering and management services in infrastructure, environment, and buildings to enhance mobility, sustainability and quality of life. His discussion focused on developments and trends in Environmental and Sustainability policy, especially highlighting how European companies are adapting their supply chain management needs. It was a high note to end the residence with ideas of environmental sustainability. These are challenges all corporations are faced with and are consistently looking for creative solutions. The class left this residence feeling empowered and ready to implement many of their lessons learned within their own corporate supply chains.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1255910400 2009-10-19 00:00:00 1475895971 2016-10-08 03:06:11 0 0 news 2009-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[SCL Collaborates with Industry on Warehousing Research]]> 27279 The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), a unit of the Stewart School of ISyE, has focused much research in the areas of warehousing and distribution over the past semester. Listed are some of the highlights of SCL's recent research activities and industry collaborations.

Visiting Scholars at SCL
Both the research activities and the social lives of SCL were enriched considerably by the extended stays of two visiting scholars. Johan Lundin, Fulbright Scholar from the University of Lund in Sweden, just completed a year's stay during which he extended his work on cash supply chains. Johan has already written a book on the topic and has served as a consultant to the government of Sweden. Filippo Bindi, a Ph.D. student from the University of Bologna, continued his work developing software to analyze sales histories with the goal of achieving efficiencies by careful product placements within the warehouse.

New Edition of Warehouse & Distribution Science
SCL has released the latest edition of the book Warehouse & Distribution Science, which is freely available online. The text is used in programs across the U.S. and throughout 32 countries worldwide. It is a rigorous development of mathematical and computer models of warehouse layout and processes.

IDI, SCL to Collaborate on Supply Chain White Papers
Industrial Developments International (IDI) , a firm that specializes in development, investment management, and leasing throughout North America, will collaborate with SCL faculty to produce a series of white papers on issues in supply chain management and logistics. These will be broad examinations of trends and their implications, especially as they might relate to investment decisions.

SCL Project With CAT Logistics
Under the guidance of Dr. John Bartholdi, Manhattan Associates Chair in Supply Chain Management, and Mr. Pete Viehweg, Executive-in-Residence at SCL, the fall class in Warehousing and Distribution will work with CAT Logistics to design a new layout that accounts for projected growth in its Atlanta area service parts distribution center. The graduate students will data-mine sales histories and product dimensions to compute a highly space-efficient storage strategy. Is your company interested in sponsoring a project? See here for more information.

SCL Completes Warehousing Project for Walgreens
The spring class in Warehousing and Distribution completed a project for a Walgreens distribution center in Anderson, SC, to help improve order-picking. The team of graduate students visited the facility, picked orders to learn the processes, and performed detailed computer simulations based on historical record of product flow. They then designed an order-picking protocol and provided adjustments to the product layout to support the protocol.

New Developments in Automation
John Bartholdi and Pete Viehweg led a group of Ph.D. students to visit Kiva Systems, developers of order-picking systems based on flocks of autonomous robots. Previously, Peter Blair, Director of Marketing and Communications at Kiva Systems, has lectured at Georgia Tech.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1251763200 2009-09-01 00:00:00 1475895848 2016-10-08 03:04:08 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) has focused much research in the areas of warehousing and distribution over the past semester. Listed are some of the highlights of SCL's recent research activities and industry collaborations.

]]>
2009-09-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49046 49046 image <![CDATA[Bins in a warehouse]]> image/jpeg 1449175421 2015-12-03 20:43:41 1475894466 2016-10-08 02:41:06
<![CDATA[ISyE's Advisory Board Addresses International Activities of the School]]> 27328 The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering hosted its fall Advisory Board meeting on October 23, 2009. Stewart School Chair Chelsea C. White III and Advisory Board Chair Christopher B. Lofgren led the meeting, which focused on international activities and outreach within the School.

Following Lofgren's welcome and opening remarks, White reviewed the Stewart School's vision of being the preeminent academic program of its kind in the world and of having an impact beyond our academic community by addressing important societal and economic challenges. Presenting an update about the Stewart School and its strengths, White highlighted the quality of ISyE faculty at both the senior and junior levels; excellent students at undergraduate and graduate level; large, loyal, engaged, and active alumni base; strong industry ties, and current and growing international presence. In addition, White cited a recent external review, which concluded that the Stewart School is the dominant IE/OR academic unit nationally and internationally, that it is the flagship unit for industrial engineering, and that it has a high likelihood of continued dominance.

White identified three challenges for the Stewart School:
* Greater impact on problems of significant real-world importance, specifically health, energy, and economic strength through trade
* Use economic downturn as an opportunity, specifically to exit the downturn stronger than we entered it relative to our peers
* Continuously improve faculty, student, and curricula quality

Included in his update to the Board, White spoke about the Stewart School's potential initiatives in Singapore and Abu Dhabi, UAE. Speaking about the later, White shared the UAE's move from an oil-based to a knowledge-based economy and the need for an enabling educational infrastructure. The Stewart School is working cooperatively with Khalifa University of Science, Technology, and Research, and is in discussions with Khalifa to potentially help establish a new IE department, from which the Stewart School would exit in two years, as well as a new Supply Chain & Logistics Research Center for long-term partnership.

The Stewart School plans to open a Campus for Research Excellence and Technological Enterprise and Trade, Innovation & Productivity (CREATE TIP) Center in Singapore. Working cooperatively with local institutions, the Center would include among its major activities its function as a data repository; business incubator; forum for industry and academic collaborations; and a center for research, education and residency.

Nancy Sandlin, ISyE Director of Development, followed White with a presentation on fundraising activities to date.

Donald Ratliff, UPS and Regents' Professor of Industrial and Systems Engineering and executive director of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) and the Trade, Innovation & Productivity (TIP) Center in Costa Rica, brought the Board up to date on the Stewart School's Latin American Initiatives, citing the successful opening of the TIP Center in Costa Rica on August 20, 2009.

The new TIP Center in Costa Rica is the latest in a network of centers Georgia Tech has established around the world that utilize research, innovation, and education to increase trade across borders and make existing trade more productive. The Center is a joint development of SCL, the Stewart School of ISyE, and the College of Management at Georgia Tech in partnership with the Foreign Trade Corporation (PROCOMER) and the Chamber of Industries in Costa Rica.

Ratliff also discussed the ten-plus year history of the TLI Asia Pacific Institute, located in Singapore and modeled after SCL. TLI Asia Pacific is a collaboration between the National University of Singapore and Georgia Tech for research and educational programs in global logistics. The entire Georgia Tech and SCL leadership team values its relationship and looks forward to future opportunities to expand its presence in Singapore.

Next on the agenda was Professor John Bartholdi, Manhattan Associates Chair in Supply Chain Management and director of SCL's research program, who updated the Board on temperature controlled supply chains, the project he and Ratliff started in 2007. SCL is collaborating with researchers world-wide to measure and document the variability of temperature within cartons along international supply chains. Their first project involved working on the wine supply chain. Starting with wine was a natural first step as this supply chain is fairly simple compared to fresh fruit. Colleagues from around the world, from major wine-producing regions to centers of consumption, are aiding in data gathering by inserting temperature recording devices, "i-buttons" in cartons of wine at points of production. The "i-button" wakes up every two hours and records data then goes back to sleep. The full effects of seasonality are observed as the product is tracked through wineries, shipping lanes, importers, distributors, and the final customer. Bartholdi and Ratliff plan on broadening the scope of their work to include the transportation of fresh fruit and fish.

Harvey Donaldson, SCL managing director and associate chair of Industry and International Programs, introduced the newly created master's in Supply Chain Engineering. Donaldson stated that the new master's, focused on global supply chains and oriented to professional practice, will enhance Tech's reputation in "applied industry practices," attract more U.S. students, expand the existing ISyE/NUS Dual Master's program, build relationships with U.S. and global enterprises, develop new approaches for ISyE master's-level education, and provide new opportunities for ISyE faculty. Aggressively recruiting the best U.S. and international students, private and public global enterprises, and prestigious partner universities, Donaldson said that they expect to enroll the first class in August 2010. Donaldson highlighted the innovative curriculum, which is adaptable to dual degree programs with foreign universities and offers new courses, a Capstone Industry Project and study abroad opportunities.

The 2010 Spring Board meeting is scheduled for April 22 and 23, 2010, and the Fall Board meeting is scheduled for October 21 and October 22, 2010.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1257901200 2009-11-11 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news 2009-11-11T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-11T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49756 49757 49756 image <![CDATA[Chip White, Chris Lofgren, Nancy Sandlin]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49757 image <![CDATA[Havey Donaldosn, John Bartholdi and Don Ratliff]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[2010 EMIL-SCS Class Completes Latin American Residence]]> 27328 The 2010 class in the Executive Master's in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) Program completed its fourth and much anticipated Latin American residence in early September, spending two weeks studying in Costa Rica, Panama and Brazil. With an in-depth look at distribution facilities, infrastructure, intermodal transportation, government and finance, the 2010 EMIL-SCS class experienced a first-hand exploration into the regional supply chains throughout Latin America and the role of that region in the global supply chain.

Beginning its residency in Costa Rica's capital city of San Jose, the class received a rich introduction to Latin America and a geopolitical and economic overview of the region from Patrice Franko, Grossman Professor of Economics and International Studies at Colby College in Waterville, Maine.

While in San Jose, the class made a site visit to Intel Corporation, where they learned about Intel's economic footprint in Costa Rica and its motivation for manufacturing there, site competitiveness, and logistics challenges faced over the ten years in Costa Rica and progress made during the same timeframe. Additionally the students toured the Intel Innovation Center, an opportunity very few outsiders have the privilege to experience.

John Bartholdi, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, lectured on warehouse distribution facilities and presented a case study on Dos Pinos, a production, processing, and distribution company of dairy products headquartered in San Jose. The students were challenged with providing direct feedback and input to Dos Pinos for improving their processes of matching supply to demand. The class visited the Dos Pinos distribution center to observe the operational issues within the facility and joined the Dos Pinos logistics management team for a discussion on enterprise resource planning and SAP. The site visit ended with a sampling of Dos Pinos ice cream.

The class ended the Costa Rican segment of its residency meeting with Costa Rica Investment and Development (CINDE). A private, nonprofit apolitical organization, CINDE endeavors to advance the country's social and economic development by promoting foreign direct investment into the country.

From Costa Rica, the class proceeded to Panama City, Panama. The focus of the intense two-day trip to Panama was to visit and tour the Manzanillo International Terminal and Logistics Park in Colon, Panama; meet with the Colon Import & Export company, a third-party warehouse service provider located in the Colon Free Trade Zone; and visit and tour the Panama Canal Authority. While at the Panama Canal, the students learned the history of building the Panama Canal, future plans to expand the canal, and the supply chain challenges the canal faces on a daily basis due to increased manufacturing in Mexico, GDP growth in South America, and partnerships with steamship lines. Although the program has visited the Panama Canal many times, the 2010 class was the first to have the experience of crossing the canal on foot by walking across the Miraflores Locks.

Leaving Panama, the class moved on to Porto Alegre, Brazil. Beginning its visit with a Brazilian soccer game, the class resumed its curriculum with a corporate visit to Springer/Carrier, a United Technologies Company. The class met with the supply chain team and discussed the flow of raw materials into Brazil, specifically focusing on the distribution of finished goods in support of Brazil's domestic demand, distribution of goods exported to South and Central America, navigating through the Brazilian tax structure, and security issues in transporting Carrier products.

Following its visit to Springer/Carrier, the class toured the largest General Motors subsidiary in South America and the third largest in the world. Class discussions focused on the differences between United States and South American plants utilizing VMI and sub-assemblies in the manufacturing process over traditional automotive assembly. From General Motors, the class made its last stop in Porto Alegre at John Deere Montenegro. The discussion there centered on John Deere's supply chain network and South American strategy, highlighting its carbon footprint reduction within an ECO-friendly manufacturing plant.

Winding down its Latin American residence, the class made its last stop in Campinas, Brazil. An alumnus of the 2009 EMIL-SCS class hosted the program at Dell Hortolandia for a site visit and discussion of Dell's logistics issues and opportunities working with customs in Brazil, outbound shipping to other countries within Latin America and to non-Latin American regions, and ocean/air inbound and outbound shipments.

Following the Dell tour and presentation, the class met with Dr. Lars Sanchez, professor in Transportation Engineering at UNICAMP and INSPER in Brazil. Dr. Sanchez's presentation dove deep into the overall logistical challenges throughout Brazil. The day concluded with Baxter Healthcare, which reviewed lessons and case studies about tax strategies in Brazil.

The class concluded its 2010 Latin American residence with both a lecture and site visit. Maria Rey, founder and executive director of the Atlanta-based Center for Emerging Logistics and Supply Chains and adjunct faculty in the EMIL-SCS program, spoke to the class about logistics and supply chain management in Latin America, with a specific focus on infrastructure needs and understanding the Latin American consumer. Following Rey's lecture, the class toured Viracopos/Campinas Airport Infraero, a customs bonded import-export facility. As a major hub, Viracopos utilizes express lanes for courier traffic, which are exceptionally quick and less-bureaucratic for Brazilian standards.

The fifth and final residence for the 2010 EMIL-SCS class beings February 28, 2010, in Monterrey, Mexico, and runs through March 12, 2010, wrapping up in Atlanta. Applications for the 2011 class are being accepted through January 4, 2010.

For more information on EMIL-SCS, visit:
http://www.emil.gatech.edu/

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1258592400 2009-11-19 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news 2009-11-19T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-19T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49752 49753 49754 49752 image <![CDATA[Dos Pinos]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55 49753 image <![CDATA[Panama]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55 49754 image <![CDATA[Brazil]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55
<![CDATA[Ming Yuan Awarded NSF CAREER Award]]> 27328 Ming Yuan, assistant professor for the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), has been named winner of the 2008-2009 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER Award. Yuan received this award for his exemplary work in sparse modeling and estimation with high-dimensional data.

The NSF offers this prestigious award as part of the Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Program in support of junior faculty who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education, and the integration of education and research within the context of the mission of their organizations.

"Ming is one of the best statisticians of his generation," said Jeff Wu, Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics at ISyE. "He is among the few who can do deep theoretical work and significant scientific applications."

Professor Ming Yuan is the third NSF CAREER Award winner in the statistics/quality group at the Stewart School of ISyE in the last three years. He joins the ranks of Professor Roshan Vengazhiyil, who received the award in 2006, and Professor Nagi Gebraeel, who received the award in 2007.

Yuan was also named as a Distinguished Cancer Scholar from the Georgia Cancer Coalition in 2007. He is using statistical methods with new technologies to decipher useful information that is often hidden in the variation of the data. In the study of breast cancer, he is developing novel computation and mathematical approaches using a wide variety of data sources in order to stratify breast cancer into biologically distinct types and correlate them with outcome and therapy response. Yuan has developed revolutionary bioinformatics techniques to successfully address questions related to aging and diabetes.

He also received the John van Rysin Award in 2004 from the International Biometrics Society in addition to numerous noteworthy publications. His research interests include data mining and machine learning, bioinformatics and computation biology, nonparametric and semi-parametric statistical methods, Bayesian and empirical Bayes methods, and econometrics and financial statistics.

Yuan holds a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and Information Science and an M.S. in Probability and Statistics and Computer Science; he earned his Ph.D. in Statistics at University of Wisconsin.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1259715600 2009-12-02 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news 2009-12-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49750 49750 image <![CDATA[Ming Yuan]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55
<![CDATA[Chris Lofgren: Challenges and Trends in Freight Transportation]]> 27328 Christopher "Chris" Lofgren (PhD IE 1986) is president and chief executive officer at Schnieder National, Inc., a premier provider of transporation and logistics services. In this interview, he discusses current challenges and trends in freight transporation.

ISyE: What is the biggest challenge that you face in transportation logistics today?
CL: Clearly, it is that the current state of the economy has created a set of challenges that is fairly unprecedented in terms of volume downturns and pricing pressures, which ultimately require you to take cost actions and to rethink a number of the basic tenets on how you have managed in downtimes in a cyclical industry. These are things beyond what most people have experienced.

ISyE: How is the economy affecting the way you do business?
CL: We have a saying that the important thing is to keep the important thing the important thing. We have spent a significant amount of time examining ways to take cost out of the business without changing the ability to serve the customer safely and in a sustainable way. Right now, everybody understands that there is massive pricing pressure. With that, you also have to be selective about what things you can continue to do and the people for whom you can continue to do them. Essentially, you either have to do more with less or simply do less.

ISyE: Are there other challenges that you face now?
CL: Regulations were very favorable for the industry twenty years ago, but they are starting to challenge productivity. For example, regulations on the hours of service of drivers ***regardless of whether they were right or wrong***have fundamentally taken productivity out of the industry. The changes that are being made to the engines to meet new regulations on emissions have also driven significant cost back into the industry. In return, we benefited from lower emissions of both particulates and nitrous oxide. The benefits, though, came at a pretty significant cost and were inflationary to the industry at a time when it has been difficult to recover increasing costs in terms of price.

Another emerging issue is that of compaction. For example, when Procter & Gamble takes water out of its detergents and is able to put the same number of washes in a smaller package, the total number of shipments required goes down, which reduces volume in the industry. New lightweight flat-screen TVs are another example. Essentially, product reconfiguration due to technological advancement is taking volume out of the industry. This is not going to be a high-growth industry in the near future. Actually, volumes may shrink in terms of consumer non-durables and the retail supply chain.

One last thing is that there is a de-leveraging of the American consumer. We've undergone a radical change in terms of saving rates for the average U.S. household. What are the consumption patterns going to be in the future? They probably aren***t going to be what we saw three years ago, so what does that mean for volumes of freight and the number of different packaging alternatives? I've said that freight transportation and logistics is the "power train" of our country's physical economy. That power train demands less horsepower right now, and our industry will be impacted as U.S. citizens reconfigure their demands.

ISyE: What has been the most important technological innovation in your industry recently?
CL: We had to develop new engine capabilities in response to the emissions requirements, and that's been a pretty significant change and will continue to be one. We had to reduce emissions dramatically, and this really required a significant change in the design of the engine and the supporting components. I think we're going to continue to face challenges here as we receive further requirements for emissions reduction, but the next hurdle hasn't been placed out there in front of us yet.

Technologically, I think it's more about winning little battles. The tire manufacturers continue to work to achieve both longer wear and better miles per gallon (mpg) performance out of the tires. The tractor manufacturers continue to look for ways to figure out how to take out weight while adding strength, stability, wear resistance, and improved aerodynamics to the design. I think we're at a place now where we're not looking at big breakthroughs. I do think there is a lot of work being done today to figure out how to create technologies that promote safety. There are a whole series of things under investigation, such as looking at blinking patterns of eyeballs of drivers within the cab to try to identify fatigue.

ISyE: Are there any other green or sustainable efforts besides the lowering of the emissions that are going on in your industry?
CL: I think both the industry and our company have done a phenomenal job in terms of that. I'm a little bit jaded on some of this green stuff; I think in some cases it has been somewhat faddish for people who have chosen to do it. I think good companies in many different industries have done it because, number one, it's the right thing, and number two, there are ways to do it such that it doesn***t come as a negative impact to your financials. For example, we've long had a policy of giving drivers bonuses for improving their mpg performance. So, don't accelerate too fast. Don't idle your tractor when you don't have to because idling is the least fuel-efficient and the highest pollution cycle in the engine. We've made investments in a heat sync to allow the sleeper berth in the tractor to stay warm without requiring the use of the engine. Now, we're trying to figure out a technology to do that on the cooling cycle because you always want to ensure that a driver receives good rest.

In some cases, I don't think the industry has gotten the credit it deserves. After you add these technologies to the tractor, you face a higher cost for which you then have to pay a higher federal excise tax, and you lose some payload because it adds weight to the tractor. I've always been of the mindset that this ought to be an industry in which the government looks to incentivize and encourage, rather than to regulate and tax. A lot of things happen not because somebody made the industry do them, but because the industry was committed to doing the right things. We as a company have been committed to doing the right thing, but how do you get credit for it? It's the "carrot and stick" dilemma in some regards. I think it would be more interesting if we spent more time thinking about how to create more carrots rather than grabbing another stick.

ISyE: You are, and have been, a strong supporter of the Stewart School. You have supported the School in a variety of capacities, including being the chair of the School's Advisory Board. What do you find most rewarding about your work with Georgia Tech?
CL: Well first off, Georgia Tech has been very good to me. Clearly, the wonderful opportunity to be there and to learn there has been very instrumental in the kinds of opportunities I ended up having in my career. I continue to grow more grateful for all that I've been able to have because of my experience at Tech. It is a special place. It is a place that combines the highest standards in academics and research, but it does so with a spirit that is incredibly human. I think the warmth of its people and the aspects of the heart and the mind are what make Tech unique. We may have some strong competitors in terms of training people with the mind, but the students and faculty members who have the opportunity to be a part of Georgia Tech also become enriched in the heart. And that enriching of the heart is just as important as the enriching of the head.

This interview first appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine of the Stewart School of ISyE.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1260320400 2009-12-09 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news The biggest challenge facing transportation logistics today is that the economy has created a set of challenges that is fairly unprecedented in terms of volume downturns and pricing pressures.

]]>
2009-12-09T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-09T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49746 49746 image <![CDATA[Chris Lofgren]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55
<![CDATA[Optimizing the Linehaul Network of LTL Carriers]]> 27328 Less-than-truckload (LTL) carriers collect freight from various shippers and consolidate that freight to fill trailers for travel to common destinations. LTL carriers run high-volume operations, often spending millions of dollars in transportation and handling costs in a single week.

An LTL motor carrier transports shipments that
typically occupy only 5 to 10 percent of trailer capacity. As a result, LTL carriers collect and consolidate freight from various shippers to increase trailer utilization, referred to as the load factor. Consolidation does come with a cost; by transferring freight between trailers, the carrier incurs a handling cost and increases the total time and distance a shipment requires to reach its destination. Supporting these operations is a system of terminals, tractors, trailers, dockworkers, and drivers***collectively called the linehaul network. As competition increases and shippers raise their expectations for service, LTL carriers must optimize their linehaul networks to remain viable.

Researchers in the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) have been working together with two major U.S. less-than-truckload carriers, Saia and YRC Worldwide, for a number of years on developing a suite of decision support tools to optimize the linehaul network. The suite of decision-support tools contains, among other modules:

*An optimization model that determines the appropriate role of a terminal in the network, i.e., should a terminal be used as an entry and exit point for freight into the system "end-of-line terminal" or should it be used as a major consolidation point where freight from various end-of**-lines is cross-docked "breakbulk (hub) terminal"

*An optimization model that determines optimal freight paths for all origin-destination combinations, i.e., a set of freight paths respecting service commitments leading to the highest utilization of trailer capacity

*An optimization model that determines the minimum number of tractors required to ensure that all freight moves through the linehaul system on time

*An optimization model that schedules the drivers to move freight through the network, respecting hours-of-**service regulations and company policies

*An optimization model that determines driver domiciles, i.e., terminals where drivers should be located to most cost-effectively move freight through the network

One of the most critical decisions in operating a linehaul network is how to route freight from origin to destination as it directly impacts consolidation opportunities. Shipments are quoted a service standard from origin to destination in business days. Historically these standards were long enough (often five business days) that service only loosely constrained how a carrier chose to route a shipment from origin to destination. In today's environment, service standards of one, two, and three days are common, and service must play a significant role in a shipment's path. At the same time, shorter service standards reduce consolidation opportunities due to the handling time and circuity that consolidation requires. As a result, carriers need optimization techniques for designing load plans that accurately model how short service standards constrain freight routing and the consolidation opportunities that exist. An integer programming heuristic has been developed that constructs high-quality, service-feasible load plans.

To be able to compete on price, carriers have to find ways to increase the utilization of their current infrastructure. One possible way to do so is to relax some of the self-imposed rules that constrain how freight flows through the system. For example, a traditional load plan assumes the same freight routing decisions are made every day. However, a load plan that accounts for predictable daily freight variations by allowing for different freight routing decisions on different days may substantially increase utilization. In general, as information technology infrastructure improves, a carrier can consider different rules of operation. Yet without load plan design technology that is adaptable to changing operational constraints, it is difficult for a carrier to quantify how changing or relaxing these operational constraints will affect business. An analysis reveals that savings of up to 4 percent can be achieved by allowing day-differentiated load plans.

One of the most complex decision problems faced by an LTL carrier is scheduling its drivers. This is due to the various rules governing the feasibility of driver duties. Hours-of-service regulations imposed by the Department of Transportation to ensure the safety of drivers and others on the roads, for example, specify that drivers cannot drive more than eleven hours and cannot work more than fourteen hours before a mandatory rest of at least ten hours is required. LTL driver scheduling is further complicated by the fact that trucking moves are not pre-scheduled. The decision technology developed for LTL carriers combines greedy search with enumeration of time-feasible driver duties and is capable of generating in a matter of minutes cost-effective driver schedules covering 15,000 to 20,000 loads satisfying a variety of real-life driver constraints. A comparison with real-world dispatch data indicates that the technology produces driver schedules of very high quality.

The driver scheduling technology is embedded in an iterative scheme to determine the best possible home locations, or domiciles, of truck drivers for an LTL carrier. Domiciling decisions are complex, in part due to regulations and union rules restricting driver schedules, but have a significant impact on the operating costs of LTL carriers. In each iteration of our scheme drivers are allocated to terminals, and drivers' bids are determined so as to satisfy union requirements. An analysis of the resulting driver schedules is used to guide the next iteration. Computational experiments demonstrate the value of the iterative scheme and also quantify the impact of union rules on the number of drivers required (and thus on operating costs).

The LTL industry is essential for our economy, and the research conducted at SCL aims to increase the industry's efficiency and effectiveness. The research of Professors Alan Erera and Martin Savelsbergh has involved a number of PhD students, several of whom have written their PhD theses focusing on optimization problems in linehaul networks.

This article was written by Alan Erera and Martin Savelsbergh and first appeared in the Fall 2009 issue of Industrial and Systems Engineering, the alumni magazine of the Stewart School of ISyE.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1260320400 2009-12-09 01:00:00 1475895844 2016-10-08 03:04:04 0 0 news Less-than-truckload (LTL) carriers collect freight from various shippers and consolidate that freight to fill trailers for travel to common destinations.

]]>
2009-12-09T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-09T00:00:00-05:00 2009-12-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49748 49748 image <![CDATA[SAIA Parked Truck]]> image/jpeg 1449175379 2015-12-03 20:42:59 1475894455 2016-10-08 02:40:55
<![CDATA[Dr. Larry Wein Speaks At 2009 Distinguished Lecture]]> 27279 Dr. Lawrence "Larry" Wein's expertise in operations research and homeland security was the topic of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering's Second Annual Distinguished Lecture.

If you were not able to attend this captivating presentation, you now have the opportunity to view a video of the presentation at
http://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/27459.

Dr. Wein, professor at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University and a Philip McCord Morse Lecturer, addressed topics related to his research in public health and homeland security including:
* preparedness and response to bio-terror anthrax attacks and to bio-terror attacks on food supply chains;
* routes of transmission and infection control for pandemic influenza; and
* biometrics (e.g. fingerprint matching) to prevent terrorists from entering the country.
The 2009 lecture took place on March 5th to a room full of faculty, students, and alumni.

The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering's annual Distinguished Lecture Series is designed to bring in highly prominent speakers who have made a significant contribution to society through research areas of interest to ISyE faculty and students and to provide a forum for the students, faculty, staff and alumni from the Georgia Tech community to interact with the distinguished lecturer.

Started in 2008, the inception of the Distinguished Lecture event featured Dr. William
"Bill" Pulleyblank, Vice President of the Center for Business Optimization at IBM Global Business Services. The premier address, entitled Computing, Business, and Operations Research: The Next Challenges, focused on the numerous opportunities and challenges in computing, business, and operations research. Dr. Pulleyblank's presentation can be viewed at: http://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/21229

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1239580800 2009-04-13 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2009-04-13T00:00:00-04:00 2009-04-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49839 49839 image <![CDATA[Dr. Larry Wein]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[2009 INFORMS Honors ISyE Students and Faculty]]> 27328 Several faculty and students of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) were honored this year at the 2009 Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) annual meeting held in October in San Diego.

Evren Ozkaya received an Honorable Mention, George B. Dantzig Dissertation Award. Advisors: Pinar Keskinocak and John Vande Vate.

Jiheng Zhang received an Honorable Mention, Nicholson Student Paper Competition. Zhang is the former student of Jim Dai and Bert Zwart.

F. Engineer received an Honorable Mention, Doing Good with Good OR Student Paper Competition with "Catch-up Scheduling for Childhood Immunization." Co-authors: P. Keskinocak and L. Pickering.

Lulu Kang won the Best Student Paper Award from the Quality, Statistics, and Reliability section of INFORMS. Advisor: Roshan Vengazhiyil.

Rensheng Zhou was among the four finalists for the Best Student Paper Award from the Quality, Statistics, and Reliability section of INFORMS. Advisor: Nagi Gabriel.

Gizem Keysan won the Dissertation Prize of the Aviations Applications Section of INFORMS. Advisors: Martin Savelsbergh and George Nemhauser.

Gizem Keysan was the runner-up in the 2009 AGIFORS Anna Valicek Medal. Co-authors: Martin Savelsbergh and George Nemhauser.

O. Ergun, J. Heier Stamm, P. Keskinocak, J. Swann, first runner-up, 2009 Best Teaching Case Award with "Lessons in Disaster Supply Chain Management from Waffle House Restaurants" from INFORMS Forum on Education.

Ali Ekici, finalist, 2009 Manufacturing and Service Operations Management (MSOM) Society Student Paper Competition with ``Modeling Influenza Pandemic, Intervention Strategies, and Food Distribution.'' Co-authors: Pinar Keskinocak and Julie Swann.

INFORMS is the largest professional society in the world for professionals in the field of operation research. Established in 1995, INFORMS serves the scientific and professional needs of O.R. educators, investigators, scientists, students, managers, and consultants, as well as the organizations they serve. The society organizes national and international conferences for academics and professionals, as well as members of the society;s special interest groups, permitting them to communicate and reach out to other professional societies and the varied clientele of the profession's research and practice. For more about information about INFORMS, visit www.informs.org

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1256688000 2009-10-28 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Micajah McGarity Selected for Fulbright Fellowship]]> 27279 Micajah McGarity, a senior studying at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has been awarded the Fulbright Award in the Student Category in Poland.

The Fulbright Scholarship, founded in 1946 through the efforts of Arkansas Senator J. William Fulbright, has fostered "mutual understanding between the people of the United States and the people of other countries of the world through the exchange of persons, knowledge, and skills." The Fulbright Program is a highly prestigious awards program that provides funding for students, scholars, and professionals to undertake graduate studies, research opportunities, and teaching programs in over 140 countries worldwide.

Selected nationally as one of ten Fulbright Fellows to Poland for the 2009-2010 academic year, McGarity has been awarded a nine-month grant to study at the Krakow University of Technology. While overseas, McGarity plans to apply his background in systems engineering and programming toward improving the sewer system in Krakow, Poland.

"The quality and workmanship that went into the sewers in the 1980s was rushed and poor," McGarity said, "That's why it was a good area for statistics and systems engineering to come into play."

McGarity's project proposal entitled "Prioritization of Sewer Network Repairs in Krakow Poland" incorporates stochastic models of failure rates for leaky and aging pipes and aims to generate intervention strategies that compare the cost-of-failure to the cost-of-repair. His research into the preventative maintenance of the sewer system could prove valuable, considering factors such as location, cost, and impact.

McGarity cited his experience in studying systems engineering at Georgia Tech and his senior design project with Children's Healthcare of Atlanta as factors that have given him the confidence to model existing situations and to present project proposals. "ISyE has given me a lot of tools that I will use," the senior said, "such as modeling tools and also ways to think about things from the large systems perspective." In particular, McGarity thanked faculty member Jiangang (Jim) Dai for challenging him in the classroom and for advising his undergraduate research in the area of advanced stochastic modeling.

"I am interested in reestablishing the link between environmental engineering and public health," he said, hoping to "model real world systems and improve upon optimization models" that might be used to reduce the impact of disease on civilization, mentioning the work he has previously done with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

McGarity, a senior expecting to graduate in August after participating on the Georgia Tech Beijing-Singapore Summer Program, said he will have a month in between trips abroad to take immersive Polish language classes. McGarity has lived in Poland before with his family and father, a two-time recipient himself of the Fulbright Fellowship in Poland. After completing his fellowship in Poland, McGarity will again follow in his father's footsteps as he enters graduate school at the Johns Hopkins University, working toward a Masters of Public Health and a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering.

McGarity is one of six students representing Georgia Tech abroad as a Fulbright Fellow for the 2009-2010 academic year. Josh Krisinger (INTA/GRMN) is performing an English teaching assistantship in Poland. John Akin (INTA/ECON) and Carrie Freshour (HTS) are traveling to Indonesia on teaching assistantships. Jennifer Munson, a Ph.D. student in Bioengineering, is conducting research in Switzerland; and Kathryn Stucki (INTA/ECON) is the recipient of a Fulbright Binational Business Grant to Mexico.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1240358400 2009-04-22 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-04-22T00:00:00-04:00 2009-04-22T00:00:00-04:00 2009-04-22 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49837 49837 image <![CDATA[Micajah McGarity]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[009 INFORMS Honors ISyE Students and Faculty]]> 27328 009 INFORMS Honors ISyE Students and Faculty

Several faculty and students of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) were honored this year at the 2009 Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) annual meeting held in October in San Diego.

Evren Ozkaya received an Honorable Mention, George B. Dantzig Dissertation Award. Advisors: Pinar Keskinocak and John Vande Vate.

Jiheng Zhang received an Honorable Mention, Nicholson Student Paper Competition. Zhang is the former student of Jim Dai and Bert Zwart.

F. Engineer received an Honorable Mention, Doing Good with Good OR Student Paper Competition with "Catch-up Scheduling for Childhood Immunization." Co-authors: P. Keskinocak and L. Pickering.

Lulu Kang won the Best Student Paper Award from the Quality, Statistics, and Reliability section of INFORMS. Advisor: Roshan Vengazhiyil.

Rensheng Zhou was among the four finalists for the Best Student Paper Award from the Quality, Statistics, and Reliability section of INFORMS. Advisor: Nagi Gabriel.

Gizem Keysan won the Dissertation Prize of the Aviations Applications Section of INFORMS. Advisors: Martin Savelsbergh and George Nemhauser.

Gizem Keysan was the runner-up in the 2009 AGIFORS Anna Valicek Medal. Co-authors: Martin Savelsbergh and George Nemhauser.

O. Ergun, J. Heier Stamm, P. Keskinocak, J. Swann, first runner-up, 2009 Best Teaching Case Award with "Lessons in Disaster Supply Chain Management from Waffle House Restaurants" from INFORMS Forum on Education.

Ali Ekici, finalist, 2009 Manufacturing and Service Operations Management (MSOM) Society Student Paper Competition with ``Modeling Influenza Pandemic, Intervention Strategies, and Food Distribution.'' Co-authors: Pinar Keskinocak and Julie Swann.

INFORMS is the largest professional society in the world for professionals in the field of operation research. Established in 1995, INFORMS serves the scientific and professional needs of O.R. educators, investigators, scientists, students, managers, and consultants, as well as the organizations they serve. The society organizes national and international conferences for academics and professionals, as well as members of the society;s special interest groups, permitting them to communicate and reach out to other professional societies and the varied clientele of the profession's research and practice. For more about information about INFORMS, visit www.informs.org

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1256688000 2009-10-28 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[SCEF Focuses on Leading Supply Chains Through Uncertainty]]> 27279 In response to the continuing global economic recession, the Spring 2009 Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF) focused on an issue that is at the forefront of most of our minds: How do we mitigate uncertainly during times of recession, and develop strategies and practices to facilitate reemergence going forward?

Held on April 22nd and 23rd and hosted by the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), the biannual Forum unites executives from manufacturers, suppliers, retailers, transportation providers, third-party logistics providers, and IT firms to foster supply chain integration and to respond to current supply chain challenges such as this one.

Dr. C. John Langley, Director of Supply Chain Executive Forum and SCL Professor of Supply Chain Management, welcomed the group to campus and encouraged the participants to consider these six key questions during the day long discussions:

* What types of "uncertainty" are being faced by supply chain managers today?
* What are the leadership needs and challenges that relate to the management of supply chain uncertainty?
* Of what importance is "flexibility" to understanding and solving supply chain problems?
* How can supply chain flexibility be measured and valued?
* Once appropriate initiatives have been identified to help lead supply chains through uncertainty, what barriers or challenges do you see gaining support from companies in getting started with a recovery agenda?
* To what extent should supply chain management be viewed as a key resource to mitigating or eliminating major types of uncertainty faced by business organizations?

Dr. James Tompkins, President and CEO of the consulting firm Tompkins Associates, provided the opening keynote on "Transforming Economic Adversity to Opportunity." In his discussion of "How Companies Should Prepare for the Return to Profitable Growth," Tompkins celebrated the Great Recession as the "foundation for the Great Comeback." He reminded the audience of the cyclical nature of the economy and urged companies to retain their talent and to develop their comeback plans in preparation for the forthcoming period of regrowth.

Dr. David Simchi-Levi, Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Chief Science Officer of the IBM Company ILOG, discussed "Managing Uncertainty through Increased Supply Chain Flexibility." Simchi-Levi introduced flexibility as the solution to rising energy costs, rising labor costs, and rising customer expectations. He enumerated methods to achieve flexibility by standardizing product parts, by training a flexible work force, by employing Lean manufacturing techniques, and by designing for capacity redundancy.

The Forum then divided into smaller groups for executive break-out sessions that sought to target specific areas of supply chain uncertainty with strategies of integration and flexibility. Panels examined the difficulty of quantifying flexibility and the ability to overcome organizational barriers. The executive panels reported back to the group anticipated obstacles and proposed solutions to incorporating early recovery agendas.

Bringing in an international perspective, the SCEF concluded with a presentation about the Georgia Tech Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) Program's 2009 residence in the Asia-Pacific region. Dr. John Vande Vate, Professor and Faculty Director of EMIL, and Mr. Greg Andrews, EMIL Managing Director, conveyed the "Impact on Current Economic Turmoil on Supply Chains." Their observations examined the role of China as an emerging world power as the country continues to invest aggressively abroad and as the RMB becomes an increasingly dominant regional currency. The EMIL directors reinforced Dr. Tompkins' message, contrasting short-term responses to recession to long-term strategies that are "careful not to sacrifice long-term viability at the alter of short-term profitability."

The Spring 2009 Supply Chain Executive Forum marked the second year in a row that SCL and the SCEF cosponsored the event with the Atlanta Chapter of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP). The jointly-sponsored portion of the meeting was held on the first day of the SCEF, concentrating on the issue of "Getting Green from Green: Bottom Line Results and the Sustainable Supply Chain."

On the first day, Dr. Peter Klaus, Professor at Fraunhofer Institute in Nurnberg, Germany, dictated the "Greening Logistics in Europe: A 30-Years Tale of Success and Failures." Lang Herndon, Vice President of Allied Waste, then introduced the idea of "The Triple Bottom Line: Economics/Environment/Corporate Responsibility."

Janet Flores, Senior Vice President of NFI Industries, spoke of "Inside the Box: How Green Buildings and Operations Are Transforming the Supply Chain."

Also, an insightful executive panel session included Jim Butts from C.H. Robinson, Dennis Flynn fromCoca-Cola North America, Tom Sanderson of Transplace, and Ben Cubitt of Rock-Tenn. Finally, Elizabeth Fretheim, Director of Business Strategy and Sustainability for Logistics at Wal-Mart Stores, discussed "Supply Chain Efficiencies and Sustainability - It's Not Just the Right Thing to Do."

The next meeting of the Supply Chain Executive Forum is scheduled for October 7-8, 2009. For more information on how to become a member and participate in the Supply Chain Executive Forum, please call the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute at 404-894-2343, or visit http://www.scl.gatech.edu/scef/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1241481600 2009-05-05 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-05T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-05T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49833 49834 49835 49833 image <![CDATA[Supply Chain Executive Forum Keynote Speakers]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49834 image <![CDATA[Executive break sessions reporting on findings.]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49835 image <![CDATA[For the second time, CSCMP and SCEF co-joined thei]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[2009 INFORMS Honors ISyE Students and Faculty]]> 27328 Several faculty and students of the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) were honored this year at the 2009 Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) annual meeting held in October in San Diego.

Evren Ozkaya received an Honorable Mention, George B. Dantzig Dissertation Award. Advisors: Pinar Keskinocak and John Vande Vate.

Jiheng Zhang received an Honorable Mention, Nicholson Student Paper Competition. Zhang is the former student of Jim Dai and Bert Zwart.

F. Engineer received an Honorable Mention, Doing Good with Good OR Student Paper Competition with "Catch-up Scheduling for Childhood Immunization." Co-authors: P. Keskinocak and L. Pickering.

Lulu Kang won the Best Student Paper Award from the Quality, Statistics, and Reliability section of INFORMS. Advisor: Roshan Vengazhiyil.

Rensheng Zhou was among the four finalists for the Best Student Paper Award from the Quality, Statistics, and Reliability section of INFORMS. Advisor: Nagi Gabriel.

Gizem Keysan won the Dissertation Prize of the Aviations Applications Section of INFORMS. Advisors: Martin Savelsbergh and George Nemhauser.

Gizem Keysan was the runner-up in the 2009 AGIFORS Anna Valicek Medal. Co-authors: Martin Savelsbergh and George Nemhauser.

O. Ergun, J. Heier Stamm, P. Keskinocak, J. Swann, first runner-up, 2009 Best Teaching Case Award with "Lessons in Disaster Supply Chain Management from Waffle House Restaurants" from INFORMS Forum on Education.

Ali Ekici, finalist, 2009 Manufacturing and Service Operations Management (MSOM) Society Student Paper Competition with ``Modeling Influenza Pandemic, Intervention Strategies, and Food Distribution.'' Co-authors: Pinar Keskinocak and Julie Swann.

INFORMS is the largest professional society in the world for professionals in the field of operation research. Established in 1995, INFORMS serves the scientific and professional needs of O.R. educators, investigators, scientists, students, managers, and consultants, as well as the organizations they serve. The society organizes national and international conferences for academics and professionals, as well as members of the society's special interest groups, permitting them to communicate and reach out to other professional societies and the varied clientele of the profession's research and practice. For more about information about INFORMS, visit www.informs.org

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1256688000 2009-10-28 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[ISyE\'s Advisory Board Addresses Current Economic Times]]> 27279 The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering hosted its spring Advisory Board meeting on April 24, 2009. Led by Stewart School Chair Chelsea C. White III and by Advisory Board Chair Christopher B. Lofgren, the Board concentrated on the current economic times and Georgia Tech's reach into international programs.

White updated the Board on the Stewart School's continuing successes and upcoming challenges as the nation's largest and highest ranked industrial engineering program. White cited the School's growing alumni base, its partnerships with industry, and its increasing international presence as measures of progress. He spoke of the emerging applications of ISyE to fields such as medical operations research, humanitarian logistics, sustainability, finance, and security. He also discussed using the economic downturn as an opportunity: How do we exit the downturn stronger than when we entered it?

Nancy Sandlin, ISyE Director of Development, gave an update on the fundraising successes to date.

Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems, and Ed Rogers, Board Member and UPS Strategic Planning Manager, gave an update on their collaborations since the last Board meeting by reporting on the leadership role ISyE can play in the initiative for solutions in energy and sustainability. "We want to make a difference not just at Georgia Tech but nationally and locally," said Thomas, whose leadership has created an undergraduate-level Energy and Environmental Analysis class. She announced the need to develop more courses and a potential concentration in sustainability for students so that the Stewart School of ISyE might gain experience and emerge as an innovator in the field.

Professor Bill Rouse, Executive Director, The Tennenbaum Institute, gave an update on the Tennenbaum Institute. His discussion focused on complex organization systems - how they change, don't change, and how we can help people succeed. Associate Professor Shijee Deng gave an update on the Quantitative & Computational Finance Program and how IE's can play a role in the current environment.

Steven McLaughlin, Professor in Georgia Tech's School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Vice Provost for International Initiatives, then turned the focus toward Georgia Tech's international programs: "We have to go global," McLaughlin insisted, "Our students, faculty, and cohorts are demanding it. The things we do abroad have to complement what we do here."

Recently, the Stewart School of ISyE has developed academic partnerships with the National University of Singapore (NUS), has installed residences in Brazil, France, and Hong Kong as part of the Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) Program, has launched the Sino-U.S. Global Logistics Institute in Shanghai, and has developed a new international initiative in Costa Rica.

Following McLaughlin's presentation, a panel of six undergraduate industrial engineering students shared their study abroad and work abroad experiences with the Board. Andrew Garfrerick spoke of his collaboration with students from the National University of Singapore and from Tsinghua University while on the Beijing-Singapore Summer Study Abroad. Hannah Bennett's participation in the Oxford Program and Natasha Jain's stay at GT Lorraine provided them with additional course credit and a unique view at the sustainable lifestyle of Europe. Renee Desing, Andrew Myers, and Jameel Khan spoke of the challenges and rewards of taking classes in another language as participants in the Spanish and German Language for Business and Technology (LBAT) Programs.

The ISyE Advisory Board also welcomed five new members for the 2009-2013 term. Joseph C. Mello (IE '80) and R. Jamie Spriggs (IE '90) each bring over a decade of experience in the healthcare industry to the Board. The manufacturing background of Timothy L. Waldee (ME '89) as a General Manager for GE Energy proves timely in today's market. Maria Rey is a 2002 graduate and adjunct faculty member of the EMIL Program. David Riviere (IE '87) rounds out the new Advisory Board members with over 20 years of consulting experience.

The next Board meeting will be held on October 23, 2009.

After the meeting adjourned, a smaller group of female ISyE PhD students, alumnae, and faculty convened for a Women's Tea in the faculty lounge. The event provided an informal setting for female industrial engineers to share their experiences and ideas regarding their roles in industry and academia.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242172800 2009-05-13 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-13T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-13T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49829 49830 49831 49829 image <![CDATA[Stewart School Chair Chelsea C. White III]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49830 image <![CDATA[Valerie Thomas and Ed Rogers]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49831 image <![CDATA[A panel of undergraduate industrial engineering st]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[SCL Offers LEAN Supply Chain Professional Certificate]]> 27279 Beginning in February 2010, the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Logistics Institute (SCL) will offer a lean supply chain professional certificate. This three-course series is the first certificate program of its kind. With a focus on building the lean supply chain professional, this program will change how supply chain professionals think, act, and lead by teaching them to develop and implement strategic and tactical elements of lean principles in the supply chain.

"Embracing lean thinking in the supply chain is no longer an option," said Robert Martichenko, senior lecturer at the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute and Director of the Lean Series. "It is a necessity in the new economy." Mr. Martichenko also is CEO of LeanCor, a 3PL dedicated to the application of lean principles throughout the supply chain.

According to Martichenko, successful organizations going forward will be those that focus on the customer, eliminate all non-value added activities, reduce lead times and inventories and build leaders that can navigate the supply chain from a cross-functional perspective. Organizations that are not focused on process disciplines may not survive in the new economy. And this is where lean thinking comes into play. When lean is successfully implemented in the supply chain, revenue will go up and costs will go down. This is the model of margin management and cash flow improvement required for today's success.

Lean professionals are focused on problem identification and problem solutions at the root case, as well as building a culture of continuous improvement into their organizations. To drive lean in the supply chain, the supply chain professional must have access to the tools and education; and this is the primary purpose of the Supply Chain Professional Certificate Program. The course material is applicable to all professionals responsible for supply chain, logistics, and materials function.

"We are committed to building individuals into serious, results-based lean supply chain professionals," said Martichenko. "Our deliverable is to successfully execute lean in the supply chain and achieve quantum results."

As a result-based program, this certificate will center on measurable areas. Some of the measurable areas include:

The professional certificate series consists of three courses: Building the Lean Supply Chain Problem Solver, Building the Lean Supply Chain Professional, and Building the Lean Supply Chain Leader. Each course builds on the next and is designed be taken in order. Over a three-month period, participants will meet for three days per month to complete the certificate. In addition to the classes, participants will complete application projects in between courses to leverage understanding of learned concepts and to produce tangible results for their organization.

The course focus areas include:

Course 1: Building the Lean Supply Chain Problem Solver
This first course will introduce students to lean thinking and critical lean concepts. Lean problem solvers utilize skills such as waste identification and use of fundamental problem solving tools to eliminate excesses at the root cause. This course will aim to challenge current mental models and business paradigms to help participants look at operations from a new perspective. Upon ending this course, students will be able to pinpoint areas of excess in their organizations and thus solve problems by eliminating waste at the root cause.

Course 2: Building the Lean Supply Chain Professional
The purpose of the second course is to connect supply chain management with lean principles. The overarching theme of the course is "systems thinking," where participants will understand how "pull and one piece flow" will lead to reductions to "total cost" of the supply chain. Mental models such as "economies to scale" will be challenged and replaced with "economies of time," encouraging participants to connect lean and waste reduction to supply chain functions. Having completed the second course, participants will not only be lean problem solvers, they will understand how to connect lean and waste reduction to supply chain functions.

Course 3: Building the Lean Supply Chain Leader
Guiding an organization from traditional thinking to lean thinking requires leadership, so the final course focuses on building a lean supply chain leader who can sustain the organization's journey. In this course, participants will complete a deep dive of the concept of "House of Lean." They will explore the main aspects of lean leadership, focusing on topics such as "go see" management, "A3 thinking," and "leader as teacher."

If you are interested in taking your supply chain education and learning to the next level, this is a program you do not want to miss.

For more information on the times and dates of the courses or to register, visit:
www.scl.gatech.edu/lean

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1256688000 2009-10-28 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Beginning in February 2010, the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Logistics Institute (SCL) will offer a lean supply chain professional certificate. This three-course series is the first certificate program of its kind. With a focus on building the lean supply chain professional, this program will change how supply chain professionals think, act, and lead by teaching them to develop and implement strategic and tactical elements of lean principles in the supply chain.

]]>
2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49776 49776 image <![CDATA[Robert Martichenko]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[(Postponed) SCL Offers Free Online Transportation Webinar]]> 27279 Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) is offering a free, one-hour webinar on Friday, May 29th, 11:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. Eastern time.

The webinar will consist of an online self-assessment presentation, conducted by Edward H. Frazelle, Ph.D.

Dr. Frazelle will lead you through an assessment of your transportation operation, comparing your transportation practices to world-class standards and revealing opportunities for cost, labor and space savings.

To register for this event, visit:
http://www.scl.gatech.edu/webinar

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242259200 2009-05-14 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-14T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-14T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49827 49827 image <![CDATA[Dr. Ed Frazelle]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[SCEF: Looking for the Future of Supply Chain Management]]> 27279 Considering the significant changes that most organizations have had to make in response to new realities in the global economic environment, the fall 2009 meeting of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF) focused on exploring the future of supply chain management.

The recent meeting of this biannual forum provided member executives with new global insights as they continued their dialogue on ways to improve the design and functioning of their supply chain by looking to the future for innovative ways to stay competitive and create smarter supply chains.

"We have come here to learn and to figure out together how we are going to stay competitive," said Dr. Chris Norek, founding partner of Chain Connectors. "Often times, what's being written about supply chains and what's being done are different, and dialogues like these are crucial if we are to have a future."

Dr. C. John Langley, director of the Supply Chain Executive Forum and SCL professor of Supply Chain Management, opened the forum by welcoming the group to campus and encouraging them to consider these six questions as they discussed and listened to the various presentations:

* What are supply chain executives doing to deal with the unprecedented challenges being faced throughout the world today?
* What can and should be done to reinvent supply chains and to move overall to "smarter" supply chains?
* What can we do to drive supply chain integration and visibility?
* Considering the changes that have been seen to date and those that will become apparent in the future, how is this impacting what we expect of supply chain management? To what extent will this translate into a "New Supply Chain Normal?"
* What areas should be foremost on the minds of supply chain executives as they try to deal with the wide range of changes that are occurring at present and in the future?
* How can supply chain executives think outside their area s of expertise, and beyond their familiar planning parameters?

Sanjeev Nagrath, Global Supply Chain Management Leader at IBM Global Business, delivered the opening keynote address which focused on the inaugural edition of The Smarter Supply Chain of the Future, a study conducted by IBM Global Chief Supply Chain Office that included conversations with 400 supply chain executives on their challenges and aspirations. The study suggests that it is no longer enough to build supply chains that are efficient, demand-driven or event transparent; they much also be smart. They must be instrumented, interconnected, and intelligent.

To reinforce and assimilate the content of the keynote, the second day began with a panel discussion to reflect and react to the findings in The Smarter Supply Chain of the Future. Dr. Chris Norek, founding partner of Chain Connectors, moderated the discussion. Panel members included Brad Grimsley, Limited Logistics; Jim Bowes, Peach State Technologies; Dennis Flynn, Coca-Cola Supply; and Gene Ochi, UTi Worldwide, Inc.

Dan Gilmore, editor of Supply Chain Digest, discussed the world of the future and the ten most important and likely supply chain changes by 2015 in a compelling presentation, with Gene Tyndall of Tompkins Associates providing selected commentary. Gilmore emphasized the importance of conducting a variety of scenario analyses within your organization. He encouraged the group to take the time to play out pot:ential issues. For example, what would you do if there is a terrorist attack at a port? How would that impact your global sourcing? Gilmore suggest that playing out these scenarios is an important way to laying a strategic grounding for the survival of your organization.

Erik Peterson, an expert in global change and senior vice president of the Center for Strategic and International Studies, identified and analyzed seven key policy challenges that policymakers, business figures, and other leaders will face out to the year 2025 in an exciting, fast-paced, multimedia presentation. Called the "Seven Revolutions," Peterson discussed each of these seven forces that embody both opportunity and risk in the years to come and the implications across society. In brief, they included:
(1) Population: Expect dramatic changes in the population and changes in the nature of the human family.
(2) Resource management and environmental stewardship: What is the carrying capacity of the Earth in terms of food, water, and energy?
(3) Technology innovation and diffusion: Technology is moving at breathtaking rates. What new technologies are on the horizon?
(4) Information and knowledge management: Who can stay current with this massive amount of change and information?
(5) Economic integration: How can organizations achieve integration across global geographies and experience the benefits of working together for mutual benefit?
(6) The nature and mode of conflict: Will this world be a better world or a more tumultuous world?
(7) The challenge of governance: How to organize and deal with complexity and uncertainty?

The forum concluded with an executive break-out session where participants took the "Seven Revolutions" to further investigate how they relate specifically to the supply chain.

For more on the Supply Chain Executive Form and how you can become a member, visit:
www.scl.gatech.edu/scef.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1256688000 2009-10-28 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49778 49779 49780 49778 image <![CDATA[Keynote speakers]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49779 image <![CDATA[Panel]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49780 image <![CDATA[Supply Chain Executive Forum]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[McGinnis Receives Courtesy Appointment in ME]]> 27279 Leon McGinnis, Eugene Gwaltney Chair in Manufacturing Systems and Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has received a courtesy appointment in the George Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering (ME).

For many years, McGinnis has collaborated with ME faculty in research and education projects and has served on the committees of MS and PhD students. This appointment now enables him to supervise ME students directly, and recognizes his contributions to the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering.

McGinnis is a leader in interdisciplinary education efforts. He serves as the Director of the Manufacturing Logistics Center of Focused Research within the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute. He is also the founding Director of the Keck Virtual Factory Lab, serves as Associate Director of the Manufacturing Research Center (MARC), and Research Director of the Tennenbaum Institute. In his administrative duties, he oversees the integration of computer modeling techniques with manufacturing technologies. McGinnis also teaches a "Systems Modeling with SysML" course jointly with Chris Paredis, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, that introduces a model-driven approach to systems engineering.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242345600 2009-05-15 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Professor Leon McGinnis has received a courtesy appointment in the George Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering (ME).

]]>
2009-05-15T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-15T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-15 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[Student Spotlight: Undergrad Senior James Wade]]> 27328 James Wade, a senior majoring in industrial engineering, recently returned from Charlotte, North Carolina, where he won the men's National Championship in whitewater kayaking. This achievement puts Wade closer to his dream of securing the coveted single spot for his event on the U.S. Olympic Team and representing the United States at the 2012 summer games in London.

From rafting trips with his family, Wade developed an interest in kayaking around age fourteen or fifteen, and in his freshman year in high school, left his home in Boise, Idaho, to attend a kayaking school in Vermont. As part of their education and training, the students would spend cold-weather months in countries with warmer climates (for example, Costa Rica in the winter and New Zealand and Australia in the spring). It was here that Wade began competing and developed the goal of joining the Junior National Team, which he did in 2002, followed by the National Team in 2006. When asked the significance of representing his country, Wade shared that "international success in this system is a statement of the American mentality: dedication and determination to reach the highest of goals."

ISyE: Why kayaking?

JW: Training in kayaking is fun and highly technical. Quite a lot of the training involves improving your technique, and I like that a lot. I like things that are technical. My style is a more technical style, more precise. It's also a pretty creative sport. You can do things a lot of different ways. You have to be in touch with the feel of the water. All of the best guys have this sort of feeling, but not everyone uses it the same amount. There are guys who are really strong and go toward the being powerful side. Then you have the people who use the feeling more to get their speed.

ISyE: Where do you fit in?

JW: I'm in the later category, but I am definitely strong. I have a body type that lends itself to being stronger. Still, I go toward the feeling side. Hopefully, the two will come together and I can find the happy medium that will pay off. People tell me they like watching me, which is always a compliment. One of my goals is to be both fast and pleasing to watch.

ISyE: What is unique for you during competition?

JW: In competition, the hard part is not thinking. During a race, the best runs you don't know what's going on. You're not consciously processing anything. Everything is just kind of happening, and you're feeling what's happening, and you see what's happening, and you know what is happening, but you're not consciously seeing it, you're not consciously thinking about it, you're not consciously feeling. You're just reacting. It doesn't even feel like you're reacting, though you are, because it's so fast. You're just doing what is supposed to be done. Really good runs, personally, I don't even remember anything very specific about them. I remember what it felt like, but don't remember very specifically what I did in terms of how.

ISyE: Can you see being able to translate that kind of experience out of the water, in the present moment?

JW: I definitely want to be present. In life, you can't do everything in the here and now, but staying present is vey good, and staying balanced. Between sports and academics, being balanced is important. If you do all one or all the other, it doesn't go as well all the time.

ISyE: Have you found that balance?

JW: It's a dynamic system. I do okay, I think, most of the time. It gets hard to switch back and forth. You get in one mode, then it's like having a hill to get over to get back into the other one, but I seem to be able to do it, more or less.

ISyE: You say that competition is a process of self-discovery. How?

JW: You learn about how you work and the things you need to do to perform. It's like an inward self-discovery. If you're willing to look, you get a very clear picture: Am I what I think I am? It's like a looking glass. You go around saying that you can beat everybody. I'm good at this; I'm fast. But, in the start gate, I'm asking, "Can I prove it? Am I really who I say I am?" You***re testing yourself.

ISyE: Is every start gate new?

JW: Yes. You change every time. Every race is important, but the biggest races have more implications and more challenges. There's more pressure, more competition. More people are watching. More things are going on that you have to be able to cope and deal with. I don't know if it's easier to learn about yourself then or you learn more about yourself because there's more things going on that you have to deal with.

ISyE: How is this similar to academics?

JW: They're both tests of "What are you really?" Are you actually what you think you are? Are you as smart? Are you as good as you think you are? Are you what you say you are?

ISyE: Has there been a competitive kayaking experience that stands out as being transformational?

JW: The 2007 U.S. Team Trials, which is the race that determines the national team. Basically how selections work is that you take your best two out of three days. After two days, I wasn't in the top three, which is required to make the National Team. I could still do it, but I had to win or be close to winning, and I had to beat one other guy by quite a lot. There was a lot of pressure on me, and not so much on him. After the second run, I ended up being second place, but very close to winning, and I beat him by enough that I made the team. The thing about National Team selection is that it is pretty much the highest pressure race there is. That was the first time I really stepped up to the pressure in a big race like that. Obviously I'm much better now than I was then, so all of that coming together was pretty cool. I wouldn't say magical, but it was definitely an empowering feeling.

ISyE: How do competition and academics mix?

JW: Training and school are definitely not easy to do. When you're training full time and going to school full time, you really don't have any time for other things.

ISyE: Your Senior Design Project focused on the World Food Programme. What impact has working on that project had on you?

JW: It was the first big project I worked on, and I definitely learned a lot. For me, Senior Design is the difference between Tech and a lot of other programs. You learn so much, and we challenged ourselves significantly with the project. You learn things scholastically. You learn how to write reports. You have to interact with people. You have to do public speaking. Since then I've had to give more presentations, and I've definitely gotten a lot better.

ISyE: Who has been your most inspiring teacher?

JW: My dad. He's teaching me how to grow up, how to be a man. Honestly, if I could do as well as he has done in life, I'd be more than happy. If I can raise my kids as well as my parents have done, I'd be very happy. I understand enough to know it's not a simple or easy thing. He's a good individual; he's instilled a lot of good values in me.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1256774400 2009-10-29 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49764 49765 49764 image <![CDATA[James Wade]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49765 image <![CDATA[James Wade]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[ISyE Leads 2010 U.S. News Graduate Rankings]]> 27279 The H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) has maintained its position as the number one graduate program for industrial/manufacturing engineering for the nineteenth year in a row, according to U.S. & News World Report.

Each year, the publication collects data from educational institutions and ranks the nation's top programs in each discipline using indicators such as program size, external reputation, student selectivity, faculty honors, and research activity. 2010 marks the nineteenth consecutive year that the Stewart School has ranked as the foremost program of its kind in the nation.

Chelsea C. White III, ISyE School Chair, is pleased to see the School continue to receive this prestigious ranking, "ISyE continues to excel in the U. S. News & World Report rankings, reflecting a lot of hard work on the part of the faculty and staff this past year and in years past. I take pride in the fact that our effort and dedication to excellence in education and research are being recognized."

Released late last month, the report honored Georgia Tech's College of Engineering as the nation's fourth-ranked graduate program overall for engineering. Ten of the eleven programs within the College of Engineering placed among the top 10 in their respective disciplines. In addition to housing the nation's top industrial engineering program, Georgia Tech was also recognized for its biomedical (2nd), aerospace (4th), environmental (5th), civil (6th), electrical (6th), mechanical (6th), computer (7th), nuclear (8th), and materials science (8th) engineering programs.

Particularly of note, Georgia Tech's environmental, mechanical, and nuclear engineering programs all rose in the rankings by one place from 2009 to 2010. Additionally, the College of Management ascended seven spots to No. 22 and is now tied with Emory University as U.S. News's top-ranked MBA program within the state of Georgia.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242604800 2009-05-18 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news U.S. & News World Report.]]> 2009-05-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49823 49824 49823 image <![CDATA[tge76943.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49824 image <![CDATA[US News & World Report 2010 Graduate Rankings]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Shi Delivers Two Keynote Speeches]]> 27328 Jianjun Shi, the Carolyn J. Stewart Chair at the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and core faculty member in the newly formed System Informatics and Control group, was invited to give two keynote addresses - one in Beijing and one in the UK.

Addressing the First International Conference on the Interface Between Statistics and Engineering in Beijing in July, Professor Shi delivered a keynote speech on "System Informatics and Control for Manufacturing Systems." The Conference on the Interface Between Statistics and Engineering focused on innovative creation, development, and dissemination of collaborative interface between statistics and engineering for the support of complex system design and operation, quality and reliability improvement, and optimal proactive decision making.

In September, Professor Shi delivered a keynote speech on "Stream of Variation Theory for
Multistage Systems" at the 7th International Conference on Manufacturing Research (ICMR) in Warwick, UK. For over two decades, ICMR has been the main manufacturing research conference organized within the UK, successfully bringing researchers, academics and industrialists together to share their knowledge and experiences. The conference is organized by the Consortium of UK Manufacturing Engineering Heads, an independent body established in 1978 with the main aim of promoting manufacturing engineering education, training and research.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1256774400 2009-10-29 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49767 49767 image <![CDATA[Jianjun Shi]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Spring 2009: AJC Senior Design Team Wins First Place]]> 27279 This spring, the Senior Design team who worked on a project sponsored by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution (AJC) snagged the much sought after first place in the end-of-semester Senior Design Competition.

The AJC project team consisted of Megan Babb, Jonathan Baggett, Corey Barthelemy, Katie Dickenson, Amanda Hughes, and Katie Rogovin, working alongside advisor Anton Kleywegt. The team's project, entitled Creating Software to Compute the Optimal Number of Newspapers to Deliver to Each Sales Outlet, was a complex application of the familiar 'newsvendor' problem. The team developed a software package that calculates the optimal number of newspapers for each of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution's 7,500 sales outlets on a daily basis. The team's optimization model accounts for each outlet's distinct sales revenues, printing costs, recycling revenues, advertising revenues, and the possibilities of theft and shrinkage.

"We are extremely thrilled to have won senior design and would especially like to thank our faculty advisor, Dr. Anton Kleywegt for his support and guidance throughout the semester," said Dickenson. "We would also like to thank our client advisor at the AJC, Mike Burlingame, for all of his help and enthusiasm as well."

Three other teams were honored as runners-up in the competition. In alphabetical order by organization, the three finalists honored include:
* Cooper Lighting, advised by Anton Kleywegt;
* GE Energy Airfoils, advised by Shabbir Ahmed; and
* UPS Mail Innovations, advised by Christos Alexopoulos.

The Cooper Lighting team was comprised of Melissa Gegenheimer, Tessa Hilterbrandt, Russell Kohler, Matthew Nelson, Stephanie Robbins, and Matthew Sheffield with advisor Anton Kleywegt. Their project was entitled Cooper Lighting Sales Forecasting. In 2008, Cooper Lighting experienced a 28% error in its sales forecast for one of its most popular models. To remedy this, the student team analyzed historic sales and seasonal trends to develop a sales forecasting model that incorporates both internal company data and external economic factors. The team's forecasting models and inventory management recommendations could save Cooper Lighting over $100,000 each year.

The GE Energy Airfoils team included Michael Chan, Tareq Dowla, Myles Lefkovitz, Tanzil Manawar, Lance Sun, and Brian Tsang with advisor Shabbir Ahmed. Their project, entitled Improving Quality Audits for GE Energy Airfoils, employed correlation studies to reduce inspection times in the company's manufacturing processes. The team also designed an automated database to provide higher visibility for quality levels and performed a linear regression to estimate more accurate in-process tolerance levels. The project found a potential for GE Energy Airfoils to reduce defect, capital, and purchasing costs by $825,000 annually.

The UPS Mail Innovations (UPSMI) team consisted of Patrick Brown, Ricardo Corrales, Kathryn Currier, Ahmet Emre Eser, Helen Reichardt, and Jennifer Smith with advisor Christos Alexopoulos. Their project, titled UPS Mail Innovations Facility Expansion Design, investigated the infrastructure upgrade UPS would need to undergo to extend its Mail Innovations service to parcels that weigh up to 10 pounds. The team used Automod simulation software to design the layouts for manual and automated mail-sorting facilities. The team's recommendations will help UPSMI expand into the small package market and capture a significant market share estimated at $1.7 billion per year.

For more information on the senior design program, or if you are interested in sponsoring a student team, please visit http://www.isye.gatech.edu/seniordesign/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242691200 2009-05-19 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49816 49817 49816 image <![CDATA[First Place Winners in the Spring 2009 Senior Desi]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49817 image <![CDATA[A room full of faculty, students, parents, and pro]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[In Memory: Cecil Gray Johnson, ISyE Professor Emeritus]]> 27328 Cecil Gray Johnson, ISYE Professor Emeritus, died peacefully on Sunday, October 25, 2009, and was buried with military honors on Friday, October 30, 2009, at Arlington Memorial Park.

Professor Johnson was born in Nanafalia, Alabama, as the youngest of six children. During World War II, he served in the Eighth Air Force. Based in Norwich, England, he completed twenty combat missions and served as a lead B-24 pilot. He received degrees from Georgia Tech in 1948, 1949, and 1957. During his time as a student, Professor Johnson served as editor of the Tech newspaper, the Technique, and was president of the Kappa Sigma fraternity. He joined the faculty at Georgia Tech in 1955 as an instructor and was promoted from associate professor to professor in 1967. He served as editor-in-chief of the Journal of Industrial Engineering for ten years, on the Board of Directors of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, and received the IIE Distinguished Service Award. Professor Johnson served on research projects at UCLA, Stanford, University of Georgia, and Georgia Industries for the Blind, as well as Georgia Tech. He was an industrial consultant to many organizations including Delta Air Lines where he served from 1960 to 1995. He has been an active member of Executive Round Table at Georgia Tech from 1957 until recently and served on its board several times. He was a member of the following honor societies: Alpha Pi Mu, Order of Omega, ANAK, and ODK. In 1992 Professor Johnson received the Albert G. Holzman Distinguished Educator Award. A Presidential Scholarship was established in his name at Georgia Tech the same year.

At the time of his official retirement in 1992, Professor Johnson had taught over 10,000 students. After he retired, Professor Johnson continued to research, write, and teach in the role of Professor Emeritus and taught most recently at Worcester College of Oxford University in 2001. Professor Johnson was a rotating Sunday school teacher at the Northside Bible Class at Northside United Methodist Church for over forty years.

Professor Johnson is preceded in death by his loving wife of 49 years, Mary Johnson and son, Mark Johnson. Professor Johnson is survived by his son, Gray Johnson; daughter-in-law, Kim; daughter, Celia; son-in-law, Clyde; and grandchildren Julie, Alan, Brittany, and Mark. Expressions of sympathy can be sent to the family in care of Gray Johnson, 1810 Baldwin Farms Drive, Atlanta, Georgia, 30068.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1256774400 2009-10-29 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-29T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49769 49769 image <![CDATA[Cecil Gray Johnson]]> 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[The Stewart School of ISyE Welcomes New Advisory Board Members]]> 27279 Joseph C. Mello (B1E 1980), Maria Rey (MS 2002), David Riviere (B IE 1987), R. Jamie Spriggs (B IE 1990), and Timothy L. Waldee (B ME 1989) recently joined the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering Advisory Board for the 2009 - 2013 term.

The Board, comprised of distinguished professionals and community leaders, serves as a sounding board for the School Chair in an advisory capacity as well as assists with the School's development goals. Each member brings extensive industry knowledge and unique expertise to this role and will serve a five year term.

Joseph C. Mello and R. Jamie Spriggs each bring over a decade of experience in the healthcare industry to the Board. The manufacturing background of Timothy L. Waldee as a General Manager for GE Energy proves timely in today's market. Maria Rey is a 2002 graduate and adjunct faculty member of the EMIL Program. David rounds out the new Advisory Board members with over 20 years of consulting experience.

"We are delighted to welcome our newest members to the ISyE Advisory Board. Their commitment and dedication to the Stewart School is extremely valuable to ISyE's continued success," said Chelsea C. White, III, ISyE School Chair.

More about the new Advisory Board Members:

Joseph C. Mello, B 1E 1980, is Chief Operating Officer of DaVita since June, 2000. Mello will retire from the company on Dec. 31, 2009. He joined DaVita in the very early stages of a significant financial and operational turnaround. Mello will retire from the company on Dec. 31, 2009. DaVita Inc., a FORTUNE 500(R) company, is a leading provider of kidney care in the United States, providing dialysis services and education for patients with chronic kidney failure and end stage renal disease. DaVita manages more than 1,400 outpatient facilities and acute units in more than 700 hospitals located in 43 states and the District of Columbia, serving approximately 110,000 patients.

As COO, Joe had responsibility for all Operating Units, IT, Nursing Services & Recruitment, Clinical Operations, Acutes & PD Services, Compliance Operations, Reengineering/Self Care Programs, Reimbursement Operations, Insurance Management & Patient Assistance. He currently is responsible for the Company***s Billing and Collections Operations, DaVita University (our in-house management and leadership development programs), and executive coaching.

Prior to DaVita, Joe was President and CEO of Vivra Asthma & Allergy, the nation's largest single specialty PPM focused on chronic respiratory disease. In addition, Joe held various management positions with MedPartners (through its acquisition of Caremark) including senior vice president/chief operating officer - southeastern region. Prior thereto, he was a partner in the healthcare consulting practice of KPMG for ten years.

Joe currently is on the board of Kool Smiles LLC, a provider of Medicaid dental services.
Joe holds an MBA in Finance from Golden Gate University and a Bachelor of Science in Health Systems from Georgia Tech. He resides in La Quinta, California.

Maria Rey, MS 2002, a recognized expert in the fields of corporate performance management and the design of global and emerging supply chain strategies, is an educator and consultant on supply chain management and logistics strategies for emerging economies. She is founder and Executive Director of the Atlanta-based Center for Emerging Logistics and Supply Chains, which conducts over 100 logistics courses in 16 countries in the Americas and other emerging economies such as Turkey, Russia and Poland. She is also an adjunct faculty at Georgia Tech in the Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) and Cranfield University where she teaches International Operations, Latin American logistics and design of performance management systems.

As supply chain management advisor, Rey has a strong practice focused on advising senior executives in the areas of supply systems strategy and high performing organizations. Her clients span many industries including government, manufacturers, distributors, financial service companies, and logistics service providers.

Rey is a regular speaker at The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP), The Supply Chain and Logistics Institute, WERC, and ExpoLogistica Panama, Peru and Mexico. She has also keynoted numerous corporate conferences including, The Logistics Congress of the Americas, the Humanitarian Logistics Conference, the Hewlett Packard Summer Executive Series, the Coca-Cola Annual Supply-Chain Conference, and the Brazilian Association of Material and Logistics Managers (ABML). She is fluent, and lectures in English, Spanish, and Portuguese.

She is an Economist from Universidad del Rosario in Colombia, with a MSc in International Logistics and Operations from the Georgia Institute of Technology and currently conducting her doctoral research at Cranfield University in England.

David Riviere, B IE 1987, is the Managing Director with Alvarez & Marsal Business Consulting, leading the firm's Southeast Region consulting practice from Atlanta. With more than 20 years of experience, Riviere has a proven track record for developing and leading high-performance teams to define and implement change. He has advised numerous Global 1000 companies across a variety of industries, including aviation, manufacturing, industrial and consumer products, and retail. His consistent focus has been on helping clients to streamline and optimize their supply chain processes and enabling them with technology. He has served companies such as Kroger, LL Bean, Ace Hardware, Cabelas, The Home Depot, Federated, Hallmark, and many of their suppliers.

Riviere has a wide range of functional and technical implementation experience, including operational strategy, business process engineering, supply chain management, lean manufacturing, activity-based cost management, and information technology strategy. He has worked on assignments in Europe, North America and Asia/Pacific, giving him a broad perspective in driving complex global solutions.

Prior to joining A&M, Riviere led the Technology Enablement practice of Kurt Salmon Associates. Previously, he was a Managing Director with Perot Systems. Earlier, he was a Partner with Andersen Business Consulting, where he led the Southeast Supply Chain practice and served on the cross discipline leadership team for the Global Products Industry.

R. Jamie Spriggs, B IE 1990, is the Founder, President, and COO of ConnectYourCare, a pioneering venture in the Consumer-Directed Healthcare (CDH) industry that provides businesses and individuals a platform to enjoy greater consumer choice and tax-advantaged accounts. His vision for health care has turned the primary decision-making power over to the consumer and has provided the first carrier-independent portal for the delivery of CDH.
Formerly, Spriggs founded RewardsPlus and served as its Chief Information Officer and Executive Vice President for eight years.

While at RewardsPlus, Spriggs drew on his four years of experience as IT Manager for the Zurich Insurance Group to orchestrate the world's first Web-based benefits platform capable of communicating, managing, and billing an employers' entire benefits package. His strong business model and his eagerness to tap into the frontier market of online benefits have generated a multimillion dollar entrepreneurial endeavor and recognition as one of PC Computing's "Most Wired Companies" of 1999. He has partnered with The Purdential Insurance Company of America and customized Web sites for corporations such as AT&T Corp. and Lucent Technologies Inc.

Timothy L. Waldee, B ME 1989, is a General Manager for GE Energy's Energy Services & Controls Manufacturing Group, comprising 27 factories located in 8 countries with annual production output of $3.5B. He has spoken on the theory of Long Tail marketing and its potential impact on manufacturing. His talks have focused on the changing dynamics of consumerism and the margin between Lean Enterprise and the Long Tail, suggesting that corporations could respond to individual demand with a mass-customization rather than mass-market approach.

He lives in Guilderland, NY with his wife, Candace and three children: Carolyn (12), Ben (10), and Grace (7).

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242691200 2009-05-19 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49819 49820 49821 49819 image <![CDATA[Joseph C. Mello and Maria Rey]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49820 image <![CDATA[R. Jamie Spriggs and David Riviere]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49821 image <![CDATA[Timothy L. Waldee]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Student Team Takes 2nd at CICMHE Competition]]> 27328 Three students from the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering received second place honors in the 2008 **" 2009 Material Handling Student Design Competition sponsored by the College Industry Council on Material Handling Education (CICMHE) and Keogh Consulting.

The team comprised ISyE seniors Natasha Jain and Matt Knepper, as well as visiting graduate student Chang Peng Shen. Chen Zhou, associate professor and associate chair for undergraduate studies, advised the student team. The team shares the second place prize of $1000, with an additional $500 prize going to the Stewart School.

Each year, the Material Handling Student Design Competition provides student teams with the opportunity to design a manufacturing or distribution facility to support the objectives of a fictional company (case content is drawn from real-world implementations). This year's case study focused on a facility design project assigned to the engineering team of the fictional Dollar Value Supplies (DV$), a major wholesale Third Party Logistics (3PL) company. DV$ is challenged with the goal of designing a distribution center to service new business by utilizing an existing facility that is ready for final fit-out by the builder/developer. The information contained in this case study has been developed to provide students with a real-world situation in regards to designing a functional and efficient distribution center layout and understanding the 3PL business.

Three academic and three industry judges evaluated the entries according to the criteria of product flow, equipment utilization, space utilization, operational plan, overall integration, and economic justification. Additionally, the judges were asked to evaluate writing quality, analysis and presentation.

The judges cited the ISyE team for the "thoroughness of its report, depth of the analysis, and excellence of the results."

CICMHE sponsors the annual material handling student design competition for teams of students interested in the analysis and design of material handling systems. Since the first design competition was offered during the 1994-1995 academic year, student design teams have developed material handling system designs for a variety of manufacturing and warehousing operations. Design problems are typically drawn from the case files of designers and manufacturers of material handling equipment and their end users.

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1257123600 2009-11-02 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-11-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-11-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Student Spotlight: Juan Pablo Vielma]]> 27279 Juan Pablo Vielma, Ph.D. student in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, stands poised to earn his doctorate degree this summer. Over the past few years at Georgia Tech, Vielma has studied operations research at the graduate level, has taught undergraduate optimization courses, and has conducted research with faculty advisors Dr. Shabbir Ahmed and Dr. George Nemhauser. Recently, Vielma was awarded the 2009 Herman Goldstine Postdoctoral Fellowship in Mathematical Sciences for his research, lauded by Dr. Ahmed as "significant contributions to problems that lie in the intersection of two difficult areas **" discrete and nonlinear optimization." Vielma holds a Bachelor in Mathematical Engineering from the University of Chile.

On May 1, 2009, Joshua Wilkinson, ISyE undergraduate, interviewed Vielma on his life at Georgia Tech.

What motivated you to come to Georgia Tech from Chile?
I knew of the school's rankings, and I also knew some friends who were studying here. They told me what it was like here, and I liked it. I already had an idea of what the classes were going to be, what kind of research is done here, and who the professors are.

How have your Ph.D. studies differed from your undergraduate experience?
The main difference is that courses are not the central part of the program; I haven't actually taken a course in a couple years. After the first year, it's mostly about what research you do. You have a lot of freedom, but you have to figure out what it is that you want to do. There is more of a creative aspect at the graduate level.

On what topic is your research most focused?
It's mostly focused in the theoretical aspects of integer programming. In integer programming, you have requirements on the variables to be integers. For example, you might have to route cars, and they are not something you can divide infinitely, like water. That's actually what makes the problems difficult.

Is your research motivated more by a love of mathematics or a desire to apply your understanding to real-world problems?
I would say the interaction between them. I like the math, but I find that most interesting math problems come from applications, and it's also fun to use math to solve real-world problems. I've looked at applications involving transportation logistics, natural resource management, and chemical process engineering.

Finish the sentence: Few people know that...
...integer programming is not solvable by simply throwing it into a computer program. It requires a certain human understanding of the problem, the inputs, and the model. Knowing about the problem and changing it a little bit might make it much easier to solve, and giving the model to the computer in the correct way is important, too.

How does receiving the Goldstine Fellowship affect your future plans?
It postpones my appointment as an Assistant Professor with the University of Pittsburgh for one year so that I can attend the Fellowship. I will be located in the IBM Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York, and I will have the opportunity to work with very smart people and to apply what I know to different research areas.

When do you hope to complete your Ph.D. at the Stewart School of ISyE?
I have to graduate by July of this year, so I'm defending my dissertation entitled "Mixed Integer Programming Techniques for Solving Non-Linear and Stochastic Problems" on July 2nd.

Is teaching a long-term career goal of yours?
I consider research dear to my heart, but I also like university life. Teaching actually helps you to understand problems much better. Oftentimes, students will raise questions that you haven't thought about, and that will definitely deepen your understanding. It's also nice to pass the knowledge to people who will continue to perform research.

What hobbies are you passionate about in your free time?
I enjoy scuba diving in Florida, but I haven't had a chance to do it much lately. I like rock climbing, and I also used to like photography. But in the last couple of years, I find that my interests have shifted. I find research fun, so I dedicate more time to it. I consider maybe half of my research to be work, and the other half to be hobby.

What advice do you have for students of ISyE?
When you're approaching a problem, don't try to do it mechanically. If you do it mechanically, then you only learn to solve that problem. Try to develop the ability to understand and to solve problems rather than memorizing formulas for solving very specific sets of problems. Then, you should be able to solve problems that weren't expected, and those are the interesting problems that you're likely to face in the real world. They're not going to be the problems from the book; they're going to be problems you've never seen before, and you're going to have to look in your toolbox and to adapt your knowledge.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242864000 2009-05-21 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-21T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-21T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-21 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49812 49812 image <![CDATA[Shabbir Ahmed, George Nemhauser, and Juan Pablo Vi]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Former ISyE Faculty Member Walks in Space]]> 27279 For the second time in his career, Dr. Michael Massimino - Mike, or as he is affectionately known, "Mass" - is going boldly where no Georgia Tech faculty member has gone before - - outer space.

Massimino is one of seven astronauts on STS-125, the fifth and final servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The seven astronauts departed Kennedy Space Center on May 11th aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis and plan to return to earth on May 22nd after eleven days in orbit.

As a mission specialist aboard STS-125, Massimino is performing two space walks that will provide repairs and upgrades to the twenty-year-old HST. The crew is carrying several new instruments to the HST including a ultraviolet spectrograph, a new thermal blanket, and a set of gyroscopes and batteries that will allow the Hubble to remain operational until at least 2014 when its successor, the James Webb Space Telescope, is due for launch.

"Mass," was the first to "tweet" from space. He has been chronicling the events of STS-125 by posting to his Twitter feed from orbit. For instance, an entry dated Monday, May 18, reads: "Just flew over the US, Baja to Miami in about 10 minutes! Beautiful Day!!" He can be followed at Astro_Mike on Twitter. Massimino's first flight into space was in 2002 when he flew aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on a similar eleven-day mission to administer repairs the HST,

Massimino originally joined the Georgia Tech community in 1995 as an assistant professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, but left the faculty when he was selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA one year later. Since 1998, Massimino has enjoyed an adjunct assistant professor position in the Stewart School of ISyE, and he is a Member Emeritus of the ISyE Advisory Board. A former systems engineer with IBM, Massimino received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from MIT in 1992.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1242864000 2009-05-21 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-21T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-21T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-21 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49814 49814 image <![CDATA[Astronaut Michael J. Massimino]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[ISyE Faculty Named Inaugural SIAM Fellows]]> 27279 The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering is honored to have Drs. William Cook, Ellis Johnson, and George Nemhauser named as inaugural Fellows of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM).

Founded in 1951, SIAM encourages the development of mathematical and computational methodologies in manufacturing, research, consulting, and governmental organizations through the promulgation of annual journals, books, and conferences. Each year, SIAM designates approximately 0.4% of its 12,000 members as Fellows in recognition of their outstanding contributions in the application of mathematics to industry.

To be considered for admission into the SIAM Fellows Program, an individual must have been a SIAM member for at least five years and must have possessed a doctorate degree for at least fifteen years. The SIAM Awards Committee then evaluates nominees based on their curriculum vitae, their affiliation with prominent national academies, and their major academic awards.

Dr. Cook, Professor and Chandler Family Chair in ISyE since 2002, was honored "for contributions to the Traveling Salesman Problem and other combinatorial optimization problems." Previously, he was a Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics at Princeton University and at Rice University. Additionally, Cook held a professorship in the Research Institute for Discrete Mathematics at the University of Bonn, Germany, from 1994 to 1995.

His editorial experience with the Mathematical Programming Society (MPS) dates back twenty years, and he served as the editor-in-chief of Mathematical Programming between 1999 and 2007. He is currently the editor of Mathematical Programming Computation. Cook was honored with the 2007 Lanchester Prize for his research on the Traveling Salesman Problem. Previously, he was awarded the 2003 I.E. Block Community Lecturer Prize by SIAM and the 2000 Beale-Orchard-Hays Prize by MPS.

Dr. Johnson, Coca-Cola Chair and Professor in the Stewart School, was recognized for "contributions to combinatorial optimization and its application to logistical problems." Johnson joined the ISyE faculty in 1995, co-founding and co-directing the Logistics Engineering Center with Dr. Nemhauser. Prior to this, he worked for over 20 years at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center, and he was named an IBM Corporate Fellow in 1990 for founding and managing the Optimization Center. He has also taught at the University of Bonn, Germany, as a recipient of the Alexander Von Humboldt Senior Scientist Award.

Johnson has been the recipient of numerous honors throughout his professional career. He was awarded the Dantzig Prize from SIAM in 1985 for his research in the field of mathematical programming. He received the Lanchester Prize in 1986 and the John Von Neumann Theory Prize in 2000 from the Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences (INFORMS), and he was admitted into the inaugural class of INFORMS Fellows in 2002. Furthermore, Johnson has been an elected member of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) since 1988.

Dr. Nemhauser, A. Russell Chandler III Chair and Institute Professor, was praised "for contributions to scheduling methodology and large-scale combinatorial optimization problems." Since 1985, he has held the A. Russell Chandler Chaired Professorship in ISyE. Formerly, he was a professor in operations research and industrial engineering at Cornell University, where he also served as a school director from 1977 to 1983. He has held faculty positions at Johns Hopkins University, the University of Leeds, U.K., and the University of Louvain, Belgium.

Nemhauser's leadership in the field of operations research includes his co-directorship of Georgia Tech's Logistics Engineering Center, his chairmanship of the Mathematical Programming Society, and his editorship of Operations Research Letters and of Handbooks of Operations Research and Management Science. Furthermore, Nemhauser has served the Operations Research Society of America as council member, president, and editor of Operations Research. He was inducted into the NAE in 1986, and he is a recipient of the 1988 Kimball Medal and a two-time recipient of the Lanchester Prize.

The Class of 2009 SIAM Fellows also included Dr. Prasad Tetali, Professor in the School of Mathematics, "for contributions to discrete mathematics and algorithms." For more information about the SIAM Fellows Program, please visit www.siam.org.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1243296000 2009-05-26 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-05-26T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-26T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49808 49809 49810 49808 image <![CDATA[Dr. Cook]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49809 image <![CDATA[Dr. Johnson]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49810 image <![CDATA[Dr. Nemhauser]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Alumni Spotlight: Tracy Hawkins & the Ceramic Supply Chain]]> 27279 After taking a three-week volunteer vacation to Tanzania in 2005, Tracy Hawkins (B IE 1985) was afforded a unique opportunity to combine her background in systems engineering and her passion for pottery.

Formerly a project manager in the corporate world, she began working to establish a pottery school in northern Tanzania. When her research into pottery methods uncovered the technique of ceramic water filtration, Hawkins saw the chance to serve humanity by updating old technology with new distribution methods. Aiming to stop the spread of disease through contaminated drinking water in Tanzania, Hawkins organized a staff and developed Safe Water Ceramics of East Africa (SWCEA).

Since 2007, Tracy and her Tanzanian-based organization have collaborated with Lisa Ballantine of AguaPure, a company located in the Dominican Republic with similar goals. Hawkins has traveled to the island nation to stay with the Ballantines and to tour their manufacturing and distribution facilities. The partnership has fostered the creation of an international non-profit organization focused on solving the problem of contaminated drinking water world-wide, FilterPure Inc.

FilterPure, now operating distribution centers in both Tanzania and the Dominican Republic, provides ceramic water filters and safe drinking water to the people of developing nations across the world. The commercial production of this technique dates back two centuries in England when it was used to combat the spread of cholera. At the cost of about $30, a ceramic pot nestled in a five-gallon plastic bucket is able to filter contaminated river water into clean drinking water for a family for five years.

Nancy Sandlin, Director of Development for the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, recently learned of FilterPure and invited Hawkins to return to Georgia Tech to meet with ISyE's Humanitarian Logistics research team. As a result, Pinar Keskinocak, Associate Professor in the Stewart School and Co-Director of the Research Center for Humanitarian Logistics, and Amanda Meija, Ph.D. student in ISyE, have begun working to analyze various aspects of the ceramic filter supply chain. "Our goal is to help FilterPure in any way we can," says Dr. Keskinocak, "to see an increased use of ceramic filters and to make a positive impact on the developing communities in various parts of the world through the adoption of safe and clean water."

First, the team will focus on refining the company's business plan as FilterPure hopes to obtain funding for new manufacturing locations in additional countries. The team will next perform a cost analysis of current operations and a competitive analysis against other water treatment products. They will then investigate alternative distribution models that might empower FilterPure to provide clean drinking water to more people as a result of reduced supply chain costs.

"My industrial engineering background has been key in helping me to support this humanitarian project because I have been exposed to so many sciences," Hawkins admits, "It's a perfect fit; I am learning something new every day and incorporating it into our plans. The project management aspect and the creative problem solving are the two main skills that I use in my work.

"We used to operate within our own country's non-governmental organizations," Hawkins says, referring to the time before her collaboration with AguaPure in the Dominican Republic, "but we decided to take our knowledge and package it to help others start these filter programs in countries all over the world. With FilterPure, we are building an infrastructure to provide that support. That's where Georgia Tech is really helping us, with some of the complicated challenges that we now have to be overcome."

Hawkins is a 1985 graduate of the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. Her professional experience includes fifteen years in the corporate world as an efficiency expert and project manager at Equifax Inc. and IBM Corporation. As Vice President of FilterPure, she now lives in the Atlanta area and performs much of her work long-distance, assisting with technical writing and business administration. She will return to Tanzania for a two-week stay in July, her first visit to the nation since the summer of 2007.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1243382400 2009-05-27 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news After taking a three-week volunteer vacation to Tanzania in 2005, Tracy Hawkins (B IE 1985) was afforded a unique opportunity to combine her background in systems engineering and her passion for pottery. "My industrial engineering background has been key in helping me to support this humanitarian project...The project management aspect and the creative problem solving are the two main skills that I use in my work."

]]>
2009-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-05-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49804 49805 49806 49804 image <![CDATA[Tracy Hawkins]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49805 image <![CDATA[Technicians proudly display their work.]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49806 image <![CDATA[Young girl with water filter.]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Ortiz Appears on CareerTV]]> 27279 Ana Ortiz, a fourth year undergraduate at Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) made her TV debut this week on CareerTV. She was highlighted as an ambitious Yellow Jacket balancing her industrial engineering course load, homework, a social life, and her duties as a student ambassador.

Ortiz's segment was sent out to 355 college campuses and will be aired on Fox Business in April. CareerTV, a national syndicated television program, is the first global television programmer and interactive website designed to help college students and young professionals develop long-lasting, successful careers.

CareerTV Producer Melissa Uhniat, who found out that ISyE held the #1 ranking in the U.S. News and World Reports for best industrial engineering programs, called interested in highlighting one of ISyE's undergraduates. Ortiz received the honor because of her active community involvement and rigorous class schedule.

To watch the Ortiz's episode on CareerTV, visit: http://www.careertv.com/v2/CareerTVShow.aspx?searchcategory=ByCareerTVShow&searchitem=Top%20Internship%20Programs&eidparam=12&vidparam=1350

Also, Ana was interviewed for a student spotlight piece for ISyE. Click here to see the interview and article: http://www.isye.gatech.edu/news-events/news/release.php?id=2421

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1233536400 2009-02-02 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[ISyE Alum Mike Duke Named Wal-Mart's President and CEO]]> 27279 Michael T. Duke, ISyE 1971, has been named president and chief executive officer of Wal-Mart Stores, Inc, effective February 1, 2009. Duke was also elected to the company's board of directors, effective November 21, 2008.

Duke has served as vice chairman, leading Wal-Mart International, since 2005. Under his leadership, the company's international business has become a fast-growing part of Wal-Mart's overall operations with over 3,200 stores and 620,000 associates in 14 markets outside the continental United States. Duke joined Wal-Mart in 1995. Since then, he gained broad experience throughout the company, leading the Logistics, Distribution and Administration Divisions as well as U.S. Operations. As Vice Chairman, Duke has been actively involved in developing and executing corporate strategy. Prior to joining the company, Duke had 23 years of experience in retailing with Federated Department Stores and May Department Stores.

He serves on the Board of Directors of the US-China Business Council as well as CIES-The Food Business Forum, and is on the Executive Board of Conservation International's Center for Environmental Leadership in Business.

While at Georgia Tech, Duke excelled at academics in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. His involvement is ongoing with his fraternity, Delta Sigma Phi. His ISyE background contributed to his expertise in Logistics, Distribution, and Administrative Divisions. Giving the grand opening address at Technology Square, Duke says, "Georgia Tech has played a critical role in the past. I would never be in the job that I am in today were it not for the training and discipline received along with the sacrifice made while here at Georgia Tech*.

Mike Duke was also named to NEWSWEEK Magazine's Top 50 of the Global Elite. Coming in at number 26, Duke beat out such notable names as Steve Jobs, Michael Bloomberg, and Pope Benedict VVI. He has also been consistently ranked in the top 20 of Forbes Global 2000 for the past five years.

Duke and his wife, Susan have three children, a son and two daughters.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1233709200 2009-02-04 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-02-04T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-04T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49880 49880 image <![CDATA[Mike Duke]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Barry C. Smith Continues As Edenfield Executive-in-Residence]]> 27279 The H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering welcomes back Dr. Barry C. Smith as Edenfield Executive-in-Residence for the 2009-2010 year. Smith, whose appointment began in 2008, will continue working on a project for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to redesign the National Airspace System (NAS).

Jointly sponsored by the Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering, the project anticipates necessary updates to the NAS as new types of aircraft are developed over the next decade. Dr. Smith conducts research with Dr. Ellis Johnson, Coca Cola Chair and ISyE Professor, to determine the impact of advancements in aircraft technology on the NAS.

"Our job is to estimate the impact of new aircraft on future air transportation schedules and travel patterns," Smith said, "these results will be used to determine how air traffic control should evolve in order to provide the necessary levels of capacity, performance and safety for the air transportation industry."

As Edenfield Executive-in-Residence, Smith also provides lectures for Dr. Johnson's Airline Operations Research and Computational Methods classes. The Edenfield Executive-in-Residence program was created by James C. Edenfield, 1957 graduate of the Stewart School of ISyE and president of American Software Inc., to bring experienced and proven executives to campus each year, sharing research and education knowledge from industry.

Smith brings to ISyE thirty years of experience in the areas of pricing, revenue management and airline scheduling. He founded his own consulting firm, following retirement from Sabre Holdings, where he was Chief Scientist and Senior Vice President for research. Smith led the Sabre Research Group supporting the Sabre's travel distribution business and development of the company's decision support products in the areas of airline scheduling, revenue management, and operations. Smith began his career at American Airlines in 1979 where he pioneered the development of revenue management. His contributions to the industry have been recognized by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) as an Edelman Prize winner for airline revenue management and as an Edelman finalist for his work in on-line retail marketing.

Dr. Smith holds a Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from the Stewart School of ISyE. Smith completed his undergraduate education at Georgia Tech, earning a B.S. in Aerospace Engineering in 1976.

 

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1243814400 2009-06-01 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news The H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering welcomes back Dr. Barry C. Smith as Edenfield Executive-in-Residence for the 2009-2010 year.Smith, whose appointment began in 2008, will continue working on a project for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to redesign the National Airspace System (NAS).

]]>
2009-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49802 49802 image <![CDATA[Dr. Barry C. Smith]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[First American Enrolls in Dual Masters Program]]> 27279 Historically, the Dual Masters program between Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and the National University of Singapore (NUS) is generally populated by Asian students. In fact, of the eight classes of students so far, not one has been from the United States. Kevin Keene, BS ISyE 2006, broke the mold being not only the first American in the program, but the first Georgia Tech graduate too.

Keene's involvement is surely the first of a movement of Georgia Tech's students to get involved with this international program. "It demonstrates that U.S. college students, particularly those who attend Georgia Tech, have a global view and desire a graduate education experience with a strong international flavor,* said Harvey Donaldson, Director of the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute and Associate Chair for International Programs at ISyE.

When Keene graduates from the Dual Masters Program in December of 2009 he will acquire a Master of Science in Logistics and Supply Chain Management from NUS and a Master of Science in Industrial Engineering from ISyE. "The Dual Masters program is one of many masters degree programs that seamlessly integrate a Georgia Tech degree with international study and travel opportunities,* said Donaldson.

On being the first American student to enroll, Keene says, "It's fun and an adventure*. I enjoy being a trailblazer.* Following the traditional course, Keene just completed his first semester in Singapore at NUS taking six classes. The rigorous education he received during his undergraduate tenure helped prepare him for the course load. However, one glaring difference between the educational systems of the two cultures is the importance of tests versus homework. Keene emphasizes that at NUS, the courses generally had one project and a final; this is in contrast to Georgia Tech, and the general consensus in many American studies, where grades depend on multiple tests, continuous homework, and projects throughout the semester.

In addition to the transition between educational styles, Keene has also had to adapt to cultural and geographic changes as well. Because of his study abroad in Hong Kong during undergraduate education, Keene felt prepared for the shift to Asian cultures. Also, Keene noted that Singapore is a westernized city where English is commonly spoken and public transportation is a cinch. He says, "They are so international with all the cultures that they have gotten used to accommodating non-natives.* One tough adjustment for Keene: the weather. While used to the temperate climate of Atlanta, Georgia, Keene struggled to get used to the consistently 90˚ weather with 90% humidity all year round. On the bright side, Keene says, "I got a little tired of sweating everyday, but I never had to look at a weather forecast.*

After a challenging spring semester (6 ISyE courses, seminars, projects, tours) and short summer term (two courses) at Georgia Tech, Keene will return to Singapore to participate in an internship, completing his Dual Masters degree in a year and a half in December. He is currently looking for that crucial internship, using contacts at NUS. Because the internship will be conducted in Singapore, Keene hopes it will open doors to the international supply chain industry. His sights are currently set on working with the Port Authority in Singapore. This internship will hopefully serve as a launching point for his career. Keene hopes that this internship abroad will provide him with a testing ground to see if he likes living and working in Asia. "The big opportunity of the [Dual Masters Program] is the internship,* raves Keene.

After living as a Singaporean and maintaining the excellence required by both academic institutions, several words come to mind to describe Keene: academic drive, professional excellence, international ambitions, and trailblazing mindset. The combination of these and other traits perfectly suited Keene to be the first American to enroll in the Dual Masters Program. Some lasting advice from Keene on the value of the program, "I don't know of any other program where you can get two masters in a year and a half. With only one year of classes; you get work experience, work experience in Asia, and an excuse to go and live in Singapore for a year. That's a 'win win win' for me!*

Since its inception in 1998, the Dual Masters Program has graduated students from Singapore, China, India, Pakistan, Norway and the ASEAN countries. After 8 intakes of students, the U.S. can now be added to that list. The Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering works in conjunction with The National University of Singapore's logistics department, The Logistics Institute-Asia Pacific,and the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute.

Drawing on the academic standing of both NUS and GT, the Dual Master Program (DMP) is tailored to train logistics professionals for strategic and management roles in their respective organizations. The DMP is a one-and-a-half-year (full-time) or two-year (part-time) program with a single intake commencing every August. Students spend the first semester at the National University of Singapore and proceed to full-time study for the Fall and Summer terms in Atlanta, U.S.A. from January to June, before returning to complete the program at the National University of Singapore.

For more information go to http://www.isye.gatech.edu/academics/graduate/dual-masters/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1233795600 2009-02-05 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Historically, the Dual Masters program between Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the National University of Singapore is generally populated by Asian students. In fact, of the eight classes of students so far, not one has been from the United States. Kevin Keene, BS ISyE 2006, broke the mold being not only the first American in the program, but the first Georgia Tech graduate too.

]]>
2009-02-05T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-05T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49876 49877 49878 49876 image <![CDATA[Kevin Keene in front of Singapore\'s Esplanade - T]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49877 image <![CDATA[Keene and fellow NUS exchange students]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49878 image <![CDATA[Keene with the Singapore Flyer and Marina Bay]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Ten Logistical Challenges During A Disaster]]> 27279 Recognizing and Address the Main Challenges

Ozlem Ergun, Pinar Keskinocak, Julie Swann, and Monica Villarreal
Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology

Disasters are wreaking havoc on human lives and nations' economies at an alarming * and rising - rate. According to the World Economic Forum, more than 180,000 deaths and more than $200 USD billion in economic losses occurred in 2005 alone. Whether it's a tsunami in the Pacific or a national event such as Hurricane Katrina, governments, non-profit organizations and private industries need to be better prepared to respond and recover from disasters, offering timely and necessary aid to those in need through efficient humanitarian supply chains.

Supply chain management and operations research recognize this, modeling a systems approach with the use of analytical tools such as forecasting, simulation, optimization, game theory, etc.

In order to achieve this, we must recognize and address the main challenges of humanitarian logistics:

1. High uncertainty in demand - Two earthquakes of similar magnitude may have entirely different outcomes if one hits a high population density area in a developing country, and the other hits a better-prepared city in a developed country. Relief demand is unknown both in size and type, and it is affected by dynamic and hard-to-measure factors such as disaster characteristics, local economy and infrastructure, social and political conditions, etc.

2. High uncertainty in timing - In general, it is difficult to predict exactly when a disaster is going to strike. This time frame could be relatively delimited as in a hurricane season or hardly predictable as in an earthquake. Therefore, one needs to be in a constant state of readiness and to plan during an uncertain time, which requires additional flexibility.

3.High uncertainty in location - We may know where the fault lines are, but we cannot predict either when or where an earthquake will happen. For other disasters such as hurricanes, we may have more information based on historical data and models that help us predict the path after it starts, but even a specific storm can change paths. Affected locations might also be dynamic as in the case of a Pandemic Influenza, so planning should account for this. Location uncertainty imposes additional challenges to preparedness activities such as relief supplies and equipment pre-positioning, infrastructure investment, etc.

4. High uncertainty and challenges in supply - Donations may be variable or restricted in their use by donors, while in-kind donations may also be inadequate and unmatched with the demand. Building up relationships with local vendors, usually in a very short period of time, may be a difficult task as well.

5. Challenges in collaboration among the multiple players and decision makers in a humanitarian supply chain - Each of the responders (governments, military, local authorities, etc.) may compete for limited resources to achieve their own goals, such as when many organizations needed the limited resources of the airports during the 2004 tsunami. Organizations and governments may also have different incentives that impair the effectiveness of collaborations.

6. The impact of the political, cultural and socioeconomic conditions of the region - Unawareness of specific local issues may cause even the best standalone plan to fail or become impractical. For example, genetically modified food is prohibited in some Southern African nations such as Zambia, restricting food aid programs. The human factor is also crucial in humanitarian operations, which includes language, customs, political views, etc.

7. The strong dependency of last mile operations on the location and disaster severity - Transportation infrastructure might be disrupted and required equipment may not be locally available, affecting the supply chain responsiveness. This can be aggravated by a limited location access or poor construction. This was the case of the 2005 earthquake in Pakistan, where people lived in mountainous regions and had limited aid access because of obstructed roads.

8. Limited telecommunications and information infrastructure - The Internet is still not widely available in some developing countries. Land-based phones and cellular phone communication towers might be down as a result of a disaster, as was the case after Hurricane Katrina hit. Also, since there might be more than one organization collecting data, it is common to find inconsistencies in the after-math reports.

9. Long-term impact of the many activities carried out during humanitarian operations - This happens as cities are rebuilt, people are relocated, new products and vendors introduced to the local market, etc. This is the case of the food aid monetization from the U.S. government, which starts with a donation of food to NGOs around the world, and then NGOs get funds for other aid programs by selling the in-kind donations in the local markets.

10. The success of humanitarian operations is hard to measure - Economic success is the standard performance measure in the pro-profit world. For non-profit organizations this evaluation is more complex, considering difficult-to-formulate elements such as unmet need fulfilled and more tractable ones like cash flow.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1234314000 2009-02-11 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Disasters are wreaking havoc on human lives and nations' economies at an alarming and rising rate. Whether it's a tsunami in the Pacific or a national event such as Hurricane Katrina, governments, non-profit organizations and private industries need to be better prepared to respond and recover from disasters, offering timely and necessary aid to those in need through efficient humanitarian supply chains.

]]>
2009-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[SCL and ISyE Renews Alliance with German Partners]]> 27279 To continue their international cooperation in the area of research and graduate education, representatives from the State of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) and the Technical University of Dortmund convened on the Georgia Tech campus in May to renew a longstanding partnership with the Georgia Institute of Technology - specifically the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) and the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE).

The visit celebrated the extension of the efforts between the two universities to promote international academic and research collaboration, to strengthen cultural ties, and to broaden students experience and horizons. As a part of the agreement, they will continue to exchange professors, research scholars, and students, as well as conduct joint research together.

The group began their visit in Atlanta with a tour of the new baggage handling and scanning systems at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport. After arriving on campus, they convened for a briefing that preceded the agreement signing. During the briefing, Harvey Donaldson, SCL Managing Director, welcomed the guests to campus and outlined SCL's research, outreach, and executive education programs. Chelsea White, ISyE School Chair, provided an overview of the Stewart School's recent progress and service.

ISyE Professor Leon McGinnis, Gwaltney Chair in Manufacturing Systems, discussed his research in manufacturing systems. "We seek to provide a scientific basis and engineering tools for evaluating, designing, and operating contemporary warehouses," said McGinnis. "Partnerships, like the one between Georgia Tech, TU-Dortmund, and the Fraunhofer IML, are a key factor in our shared success."

Christian Rast, CEO of BrainNet Supply Management Counsulting, gave an overview of the new Supply Chain School being established by the European Businesss School and Fraunhofer Institue.

Three exchange students from Dortmund, Benedikt, Konrad Alexander Regener, and Bastian Himmeroeder, shared their experiences as graduate students at Georgia Tech, discussing how both educational approaches complement each other and how the program has offered them a valuable cultural and professional experience. Konrad, Regener, and Himmeroeder all concluded that the time spent at Georgia Tech was "time well spent and most beneficial."

ISyE Associate Professor Gunter Sharp, who initiated the exchange program in 1987, gave a brief overview of the history of the collaboration.

After a thirty-minute tour of campus that included Technology Square and the new Marcus Nanotechnology Building, the visitors returned to the ISyE Faculty Lounge for the agreement signing ceremony. Steve McLaughlin, Vice Provost of International Initiatives, and Gary Schuster, Provost and Executive Vice President, provided the opening remarks of the afternoon. Andreas Pinkwart, Minister of Innovation, Science, Research and Technology of the State of NRW, addressed the audience next. Dortmund representative Uwe Clausen, Co-Director of the Fraunhofer Institute for Material Flow and Logistics (IML), also spoke. In the signing ceremony, Clausen was joined by fellow IML Co-Director Michael ten Hompel. The German delegates signed the Memorandum of Understanding & Cooperative Agreement with Provost Schuster, concluding the meeting.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1244073600 2009-06-04 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news To continue their international cooperation in the area of research and graduate education, representatives from the State of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW) and the Technical University of Dortmund convened on the Georgia Tech campus in May to renew a longstanding partnership with the Georgia Institute of Technology - specifically the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) and the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE).

]]>
2009-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-04T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49798 49799 49800 49798 image <![CDATA[Three exchange students from Dortmund shared their]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49799 image <![CDATA[Signing of the agreement]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49800 image <![CDATA[Witnessing the agreement]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Valerie Thomas Testifies Before Congress on Managing E-Waste]]> 27279 Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems at Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and Professor in the School of Public Policy, testified before the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on Science and Technology on February 11, 2009.

In an effort to craft legislation to reduce the environmental impact of electronics, and to support the incorporation of environmental considerations in engineering curricula, the Science and Technology Committee sought testimony from five witnesses regarding the draft legislation entitled "The Electronic Waste Research and Development Act of 2009.*

According to Thomas, "Today, recycling programs for electronics and other consumer products have low recycling rates both because collection programs are difficult for consumers to use and because the products are difficult to recycle. To achieve high recycling rates, products need to be designed for recycling, and collection programs need to be designed to be very easy, almost automatic, regardless of the complexity of the product. Currently, consumers are mainly responsible for managing the recycling or disposal of their products. In some locations there have been efforts to make producers responsible for managing the recycling or disposal of their products. A third approach might work better: improve both product design and collection systems so that products can increasing manage their own entry into the collection and recycling system. Rather than having to continue to work so hard to educate consumers about how to recycle each and every one of their purchases, consumer products could, almost, manage themselves (Saar and Thomas 2002; Thomas 2003).*

Thomas and the other witnesses discussed innovative ways to deal with electronic waste and how research and development can help address the challenge of managing the disposal of electronic products in the United States.

Five witnesses, representing perspectives from academia, a non-profit electronics producer, and electronics recyclers, offered testimony. They included:

Dr. Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and School of Public Policy. Dr. Thomas discussed her research on innovative methods to manage electronic waste and the challenges facing the recycling and re-use of electronic products.

Read Dr. Thomas' testimony: http://www.isye.gatech.edu/thomastestimony

Video of hearing (click on webcast):
http://science.house.gov/publications/hearings_markups_details.aspx?NewsID=2348

Dr. Paul Anastas, Teresa and H. John Heinz III Professor in the Practice of Chemistry for the Environment and Director, Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering, Yale University, School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Dr. Anastas discussed the applicability of research in green chemistry and engineering to the electronics sector.

Mr. Philip J. Bond, President, Information Technology Association of America.
Mr. Bond discussed ways in which innovation through R&D could help electronics manufacturers address the challenge of electronic waste. He will also give his views on promoting collaboration between industry and non-industry researchers to encourage the transfer of successful research into products.

Mr. Jeff Omelchuck, Executive Director, Green Electronics Council, Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT). Mr. Omelchuck discussed the development and utility of EPEAT, challenges to making existing electronic products more environmentally friendly, and ways in which R&D could address these challenges.

Mr. Willie Cade, Founder and Chief Executive Officer, PC Rebuilders and Recyclers, Home of the Computers for Schools Program. Mr. Cade discussed the challenges faced by electronic refurbishes and recyclers, as well as ways to promote collaboration between academic researchers and the recycling and refurbishing business.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1234314000 2009-02-11 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-11T00:00:00-05:00 2009-02-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49873 49874 49873 image <![CDATA[Valerie Thomas]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49874 image <![CDATA[Thomas and the other witnesses discussed innovativ]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[ISyE Students Participate in National Engineering Week]]> 27279 In celebration of National Engineering Week, ISyE students served as volunteers in Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day and Engineers Day.

Lesley-Anne Harris and Ginny MacGowen, ISyE undergraduate students, served as mentors to more than 200 middle school girls in Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day organized by Women in Engineering.Chosen because of their social and engaging nature, both women stood out while counseling these young girls on what engineering is all about.

The day started out with a series of workshops and hands-on demonstrations by companies (including IBM) and students. Activities included creating a roller coaster out of insulation foam and structures out of gum drops and toothpicks. After settling down for lunch, Harris and MacGowen spoke to the girls about engineering, highlighting their experience in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering.

The Institute of Industrial Engineers GT chapter (IIE) participated in a fun-filled day on Feb. 19, on Skiles Walkway. In conjunction with other engineering societies, IIE celebrated National Engineering Week with a day of free, fun festivities, food, games, prizes, and give-aways. There was an all-day competition between different engineering organizations showcasing their engineering discipline with hilarious and entertaining demonstrations.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1236042000 2009-03-03 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-03-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-02T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49866 49866 image <![CDATA[tgs11204.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Global Response to Humanitarian Logistics Conference 2009]]> 27279 More than 180 participants converged on the Georgia Tech Conference Center on February 19th and 20th, all with the common goal of enhancing humanitarian logistics. Stewart School of ISyE Professors Ozlem Ergun, Pinar Keskinocak, and Julie Swann organized the 2009 Humanitarian Logistics Conference that addressed pressing challenges in humanitarian relief and development, and inspired new ideas and practices towards positive change.

Participants came from across the globe representing a variety of organizations interested in disaster relief including academia, NGO's, UN, government, private organizations, and military. The conference opened dialog among the various humanitarian efforts and contributed towards new collaborations and synergies across many different organizations represented by the attendees.

The conference consisted of several keynote and panel speakers on disaster preparedness and response, long-term development and humanitarian aid, and intra- and inter-organizational collaboration in disaster planning and long term humanitarian aid. Amer Daoudi of the World Food Programme issued these words of wisdom to the attendees, "we cannot continue business as usual. We have to change; we have to adapt."

Day 2 of the conference consisted of two workshops: managing performance in humanitarian logistics, and pre-planning and response to large-scale domestic events.

Given the complexity of the problems faced and the lives at stake, the Humanitarian Logistics Conference 2009 articulated the opportunities and challenges in preparing and responding to disasters or addressing long term problems, both from a humanitarian and a corporate/economic perspective; it identified important research issues, creating academic awareness for the research opportunities and establishing priorities for non-government organizations (NGOs), corporations, and the government in terms of their strategies, policies, and investments.

Daoudi of the World Food Programme summarized the underlying theme of the conference, "today the humanitarian communities are talking to each other. We are getting better at complementing rather than competing, and there are areas where we ask other agencies to go on our behalf and vice versa. That is working. Are we there yet? No. But at least we've started."

To learn more about the Conference presentations and workshops, visit: http://www2.isye.gatech.edu/dpr09/.

To learn more about ISyE's work in humanitarian logistics, visit:
http://www.scl.gatech.edu/research/humanitarian/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1236042000 2009-03-03 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news The conference opened dialog among the various humanitarian efforts and contributed towards new collaborations and synergies across many different organizations represented by the attendees.

]]>
2009-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-03T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49868 49869 49870 49868 image <![CDATA[Amer Daoudi]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49869 image <![CDATA[Working lunch]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49870 image <![CDATA[Poster sessions]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Supply Chain Executive Forum: Reaches for Superior Performance]]> 27279 The fall 2008 meeting of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF) met in October to highlight and discuss the work and experience from industry professionals and faculty on the theme of "Reaching for Superior Performance: Strategies and Tools for Continuous Supply Chain Improvement.*

The recent meeting continued the mission of providing supply chain executives with the opportunity to improve the design and functioning of their supply chains. The theme allowed time to be spent on focusing on examples of how companies better measure and improve supply chain performance. In addition, robotics and materials handling innovations were highlighted as well as their role in helping to create the needed improvement in supply chains.

Dr. John Langley, Director of the Supply Chain Executive Programs, welcomed the group to campus and reviewed the following key questions and issues for discussion.
*What challenges are being faced by supply chain executives with regard to the need for continuous supply chain improvement?
*How do we best assess the performance of today's supply chains?
*In what ways can "lean* help to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of supply chains?
*What innovative strategies and tools are being used by companies to achieve continuous supply chain improvements?
*What important strategies and tools are being used by companies to achieve continuous supply chain improvements?
*What important roles can robotics and materials handling provide to help achieve continuous supply chain improvements?
*What are some success stories that help to understand effectiveness that may be gained from robotics and materials handling?
*In what ways can information technology help to achieve continuous supply chain improvements?

Dr. Ed Frazelle, Founding Director of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute and President and CEO of Logistics Resources International, provided the opening keynote speaking on "Assessing Performance of Today's Supply Chains.* Frazelle focused his discussion on moving from the "wrong* supply chain to the "right* supply chain. Starting with first things first, Frazell stated that "everything develops much faster when you speak the same language; if you speak the same language, you can do almost anything.*

Charles Barrentine, Chief Operating System Officer and Vice President at Eastman Kodak, discussed "Lean Thinking- A Key to Supply Chain Productivity at Eastman Kodak.* CB encouraged the group to look at ways to give better customer service. When looking at ways to do more with less, he recommended looking at the entire business, not just a component. In this way, he said, you can make better decisions on how to implement the principles of lean thinking.

Bruce Tompkins, Principal at Tompkins Associates, provided insight into "Supply Chain Benchmarking and Best Prices.* Bruce identified the following as the best ways to conduct benchmarking: "having strong industry leadership, world-class collection and analysis tools, right participants, subscriber centric processes, a wide range of output methods, and excellence in leader network.*

In a collaborative effort, David DuBose (AVP, Limited Logistics Services), Tom Escott (President of Schneider Logistics, Inc), and Mark Holifield (SVP Supply Chain for The Home Depot), provided case studies as to what their organizations do with respect to "Strategies and Tools for Continuous Supply Chain Improvement.*

Concluding the seminar, the following speakers discussed how robotics and materials handling innovations help achieve continuous supply chain improvement: Dr. Christian Wurll (AVP, Manager Robotics Competence Center, KUKA Robotics), Paul Moore (Director Systems Sales, FKI Logistics), Juup Willemse (Team Leader, Swisslog AG), Mark Kidwell (VP Strategic Services, Peach State Integrated Technologies)

Achieving its goal once again, The Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum provided resources and facilitation for its members and their companies to enhance their supply chains. Executives identified, discussed, debated, and resolved critical supply chain issues improving decision making in a "continually-changing and increasingly-challenging business environment.*

For more information on the Supply Chain Executive Forum, visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/professional-education/scef/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1236128400 2009-03-04 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news The fall 2008 meeting of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain Executive Forum (SCEF) met in October to highlight and discuss the work and experience from industry professionals and faculty on the theme of "Reaching for Superior Performance: Strategies and Tools for Continuous Supply Chain Improvement.*

]]>
2009-03-04T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-04T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49860 49861 49862 49860 image <![CDATA[Drs. Ed Frazelle and John Langley]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49861 image <![CDATA[ter97575.jpg]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49862 image <![CDATA[Panel participants]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Heather Rocker Receives Outstanding Young Alumna Award]]> 27279 Heather Rocker, IE 98, is the executive director of the Atlanta nonprofit organization Women in Technology. She was named the Outstanding Young Alumna in part because of her volunteer work as a North Metro Georgia Tech Club Board member, a Young Alumni Council advisor and a President's Scholarship Program interviewer.

What does the Gold & White award mean to you?
This is an honor that truly touches my heart. To be singled out among such a high-caliber group of fellow alumni is incredible.

What is your most memorable experience at Tech?
My time serving as a cabinet member for the FASET orientation program provided the best summer of my life. I'll never be able to recreate the number of friendships forged and leadership skills learned during that experience.

What was your hardest class?
Thermodynamics- both times.

If you could relive your student career, what would you do differently?
I would take advantage of the study abroad programs.

What did you drive during college?

A 1987 Chevy Blazer- an ugly, ugly brown with no air conditioning.

What was your favorite place near campus for a night out?
Dancing with friends in "old school* Buckhead: CJ's Landing and Lulu's Bair Shack were among the favorites. Late night cravings were handled thanks to Zesto.

What is your favorite piece of Tech memorabilia?
My diploma!

What is the most surprising way Tech has impacted your life?
As a student, I thought my relationship with Tech would end upon graduation. I underestimated the power of the Tech alumni network and the prestige of the Tech affiliation throughout the world. One of my goals through participation in the Young Alumni Council is to help other alumni stay connected through the many Alumni Association programs and to understand the value of that ongoing relationship with Ma Tech.

What is the best advice you've ever received?
If you get a degree in engineering, you'll have the foundation to do just about anything you want in the work world. Indeed, my education foundation in engineering has been invaluable in my career.

What book is on your nightstand?
Eat, Pray Love by Elizabeth Gilbert

This article was first published in the Spring 2009 issue of Tech Topics.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1236128400 2009-03-04 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-03-04T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-04T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49864 49864 image <![CDATA[Heather Rocker]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[<em>U.S. News & World Report</em>: ISyE Remains Number One]]> 27279 The H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) continued its unparalleled run of excellence in the annual U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges issue and U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate School guide, again obtaining the number one ranking in the nation.

"We are pleased to report that the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) is ranked first in industrial and manufacturing engineering in the annual U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges issue and U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate School guide," said Chelsea C. White III, ISyE School Chair. "Although we are aware of the issues surrounding such rankings, we take pride in the fact that our hard work and dedication to excellence in education and research continues to be recognized by our peers."

For the nineteenth consecutive year, the Stewart School maintained its position as the number one graduate program for industrial engineering according to the U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate School guide. Also ranked among the top ten in their fields were Georgia Tech's biomedical (#2), aerospace (#4), environmental ((#5), civil (#6), electrical (#6), mechanical (#6), computer (#7), nuclear (#8), and materials science (#8) engineering programs.

U.S. News & World Report released its America's Best Colleges rankings in August 2009. This issue marks the fifteenth year that the Stewart School has ranked as the foremost program of its kind in the nation at the undergraduate level within the industrial/manufacturing engineering category.

The report recognized Georgia Tech as the #7 public university in the nation and as having the #5 engineering program in the nation. The Institute's College of Engineering, the largest in the nation, had seven of its schools ranked among the top five in their respective disciplines. In addition to housing the nation's top industrial engineering program, Georgia Tech was recognized for its aerospace (#2), biomedical (#3), civil (#3), mechanical (#4), electrical (#5), environmental (#5), computer (#6), materials science (#7), and chemical (#9) engineering programs. The College of Management also rose from #35 last year to #31 in the rankings this year.

Each year, the publication collects data from educational institutions and ranks the nation's top programs in each discipline using indicators such as program size, external reputation, student selectivity, faculty honors, and research activity.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1252368000 2009-09-08 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 U.S. News & World Report: ISyE Remains Number One]]> news U.S. News & World Report: ISyE Remains Number One]]> U.S. News & World Report Best Colleges issue and U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate School guide, again obtaining the number one ranking in the nation.]]> 2009-09-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49795 49796 49795 image <![CDATA[U.S. News & World Report Best Graduate School]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49796 image <![CDATA[U.S. News & World Report America\'s Best Colle]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[The Science of Bracketology]]> 27279 The Science of Bracketology, by Andrew Simonelli, was published in the March/April issue of Contingencies, the magazine of the actuarial profession.

The article discusses the computerized ranking system of three professors at Georgia Tech's H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and how it could keep you from taking a bath in your annual March Madness office pool.

Read the full article at:
http://www.contingencies.org/marapr09/bracketology.pdf


To learn more about Contingencies, visit:
http://www.contingencies.org/marapr09/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1236301200 2009-03-06 01:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-06T00:00:00-05:00 2009-03-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[SCL Offers Free Online Supply Chain Strategy Assessment Webinar]]> 27279 The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute is hosting a free Supply Chain Strategy Assessment webinar on Friday, October 2, 2009, from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Eastern time. The webinar will consist of an online self-assessment presentation, conducted by Edward H. Frazelle, Ph.D.

Dr. Frazelle will lead participants through an assessment of their supply chain, comparing their supply chain to world-class standards and revealing opportunities for cost, labor and space savings.

To register for this event, visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/webinar

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1252454400 2009-09-09 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-09-09T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-09T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49793 49793 image <![CDATA[Dr. Ed Frazelle]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[ISyE Students Finding Ways to Fight World Hunger]]> 27279 Six Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) students recently completed a senior design project that may help fight hunger in the world. For these six students having the World Food Programme as the focus of their project meant saving dollars in order to put precious resources where they matter.

Advised by Professor Ozlem Ergun, these Georgia Tech engineering students * Elhadj Bah from Guinea; Alvaro Morales from Guatemala; Manuel Jimenez from Costa Rica; Santiago Aviles from Ecuador; James Wade and Lawrence Li from the United States, not only put their own international spin on their group but came together to try to make a significant impact on a humanitarian organization.

At the beginning of the senior design project, these ISyE students decided that they wanted to focus on humanitarian logistics.

"We really felt that we could make a difference with our education so we started contacting organizations,* said Alvaro Morales.

One of the first organizations to respond to the students was the World Food Programme, the arm of the United Nations responsible for food aid. In choosing this organization to work with, the students began looking at how they could assist the organization in their supply chain and inventory management systems.

"Our goal was to redesign their supply chain with the goal to maximize the number of people they can feed given their financial resources," said James Wade.

With nearly 3 billion dollars of direct expenditures, the World Food Programme reached almost 100 million people in 2008.

The ISyE students contacted the World Food Programme in the summer of 2008. Each member of the student design project team traveled to Rome, Italy during the fall semester to meet with representatives of the World Food Programme. "We had the complete cooperation of the World Food Programme and their representatives,* said Santiago Aviles. "From the highest level, they provided input and information so that we could work on this project."

The ISyE students built an operational tool for inventory management and a mathematical supply chain model to analyze the impact of their proposed strategic changes. "For us it meant not just saving dollars, but saving lives,* said Manuel Jimenez. "The World Food Programme is the frontline agency in the fight against hunger. Our project helped make changes that will lower costs while improving their ability to warehouse and transport food."

The students recently presented a poster at the 2009 Humanitarian Logistics Conference at Georgia Tech. These ISyE students wanted to make a difference and, as they stated, "Our metrics were not dollars; they were human lives. Money saved for the World Food Programme means more food for more people," said Elhadj Bah.

This unique group of students all decided to come to Tech based on the strength of the ISyE program at Tech. "We all knew that Georgia Tech had the number one ISyE program in the country," said Wade. This national ranking is also well known in Central and South America. "A degree in Industrial Engineering is extremely valuable in the countries where several of us are from," said Aviles, who ran a watermelon plantation in Ecuador before coming to Tech. "We wanted not only the best education we could get but the opportunities that coming to Tech provided."

This article first appeared on the College of Engineering web site: http://www.coe.gatech.edu/feature/13_ISyE-WFP.php

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1236556800 2009-03-09 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Six Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) students recently completed a senior design project that may help fight hunger in the world. For these six students having the World Food Programme as the focus of their project meant saving dollars in order to put precious resources where they matter.

]]>
2009-03-09T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-09T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49857 49857 image <![CDATA[World Food Programme Senior Design team]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[SCL Offers Free Online Inventory Assessment Webinar]]> 27279 The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute is hosting a free Inventory Self-Assessment webinar on Friday, March 20, 2009 from 11 AM to 12 PM. The webinar will consist of an online self-assessment presentation.

Ed Frazelle, PhD, known by his students for putting "logic back into logistics," has trained more than 20,0000 professionals in the principles of world-class logistics and is the instructor for this webinar.

Dr. Frazelle will lead participants through an assessment of their inventory management and planning operations, comparing their inventory methods to world-class standards and revealing opportunities for cost, labor and space savings.

Focusing on world-class inventory planning and management, a variety of professionals would benefit form this course: executives and managers of supply chain, logistics, and distribution; warehouse and distribution managers/directors; material handling and material management personnel; industrial engineers; operations and facility managers; key personnel committed to improving order picking; and systems analysts, among others.

To register for this event, visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/webinar

 

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1236729600 2009-03-11 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute is hosting a free Inventory Self-Assessment webinar on Friday, March 20 from 11 AM to 12 PM. The webinar will consist of an online self-assessment presentation, conducted by Edward H. Frazelle, Ph.D.

]]>
2009-03-11T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-11T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49855 49855 image <![CDATA[Dr. Ed Frazelle]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Bartholdi Presents Keynote at ORSSA]]> 27279 Professor John J. Bartholdi, III, Manhattan Associates Chair in Supply Chain Management at the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), was invited to present the opening and closing keynote addresses at Operations Research Society of South Africa (ORSSA) Conference in September. During both presentations, Bartholdi discussed the applications of operations research within the warehouse to increase efficiency.

The 38th Annual ORSSA Conference was held on the main campus of University of Stellenbosch in South Africa. ORSSA exists primarily to further the interests of those engaged in, or interested in, operations research activities. For more information on the conference visit: http://www.orssa.org.za

Professor Bartholdi teaches supply chain issues, primarily warehousing, at the graduate level at ISyE. He also directs the Warehousing and Distribution Center at Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute. His research, which centers on problems in warehousing and distribution, has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Defense Logistics Agency, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, among others.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1254700800 2009-10-05 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Professor John J. Bartholdi, III, Manhattan Associates Chair in Supply Chain Management at the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), was invited to present the opening and closing keynote addresses at Operations Research Society of South Africa (ORSSA) Conference in September.

]]>
2009-10-05T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-05T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49791 49791 image <![CDATA[John J. Bartholdi, III]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[EMIL Expands Name to EMIL-SCS]]> 27279 In the fall of 2009, the Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) through the support and guidance of its Advisory Board, alumni, and staff elected to expand its name to the Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS). This expanded name more appropriately and accurately reflects the comprehensive education provided by EMIL-SCS to senior executives working within the many principles of supply chain management.

For more than 10 years EMIL-SCS, through the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has provided an extensive curriculum focused on international logistics, business management and supply chain strategy. By adding supply chain strategy to the program name we are more clearly representing the core teaching of EMIL-SCS and differentiating the program in the eyes and minds of the experienced supply chain professional.

The EMIL-SCS Program is a unique 18-month masters program designed to fit the busy work schedules of executives, allowing the company to keep key employees on the job while they participate in five (5) two-week residences. The academic curriculum is designed to cover the extended supply chain and regional differences across Europe, Asia, Latin America, and the United States. EMIL-SCS provides participants with the analytical skills and intellectual framework needed to succeed in designing and implementing creative supply chain strategies and global logistics solutions necessary to compete in today's global markets.

The EMIL-SCS Program is offered through the # 1 nationally ranked Industrial and Systems engineering school at Georgia Tech. Please visit our website at http://www.emil.gatech.edu/ for more detailed information.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1254787200 2009-10-06 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-06T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-06T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49789 49789 image <![CDATA[EMIL-SCS logo]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[ISyE's Annual Great Package Race is Underway]]> 27279 You may have been to Alabama, but what about Opp, Alabama (population 6,000)? How about Ulan Bator, the capital city of Mongolia? These two diverse locations are the destinations chosen for the 2009 Great Package Race, which began when packages were shipped from the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) in early October.

This annual undergraduate exercise, begun by Professor John Bartholdi in 2003, tracks packages shipped from SCL to locations around the world via different parcel carriers (UPS, FedEx, DHL, and USPS). The purpose of the event, undertaken in an environments that is fun as well as educational, is to give students an opportunity to track how packages actually get from sender to consignee, analyze the freight network taken, and determine which carrier can get a package to its final destination first and in the best condition.

The destinations these packages travel differ from year to year. Each location is chosen to, in some way, challenge the business processes of the package carriers, resulting in both dramatic lapses and dramatic finishes. Bartholdi cites the time one package crossed the Atlantic Ocean nine times before delivery, while during another race two carriers arrived at the door simultaneously even though the packages had taken completely different routes to get there.

"It's remarkable," Bartholdi notes, "that most packages eventually reach their destinations." These destinations have included Khartoum, Sudan (where the White and Blue Niles meet), Tikrit (center of the Sunni insurgency in Iraq), Punta Arenas (in Chilean Patagonia and southernmost city in the western hemisphere), and Lome (capital of Togo).

Bartholdi and his students are quick to remind everyone that the outcome of the race is not a reliable basis for choosing a carrier. The annual package race is not a careful business experiment, but rather an event designed to stimulate student interest.

Does this sound like something in which you would like to participate? Well you can, sort of. Bartholdi and his students welcome suggestions for subsequent locations. In the next race, they will be sending Georgia Tech baseball caps, t-shirts, and other paraphernalia somewhere in the world. If you have family or friends who would be overjoyed to receive such a package, contact Professor Bartholdi at john.bartholdi@isye.gatech.edu.

He and his students ask only that the recipient document the delivery, preferably by sending a digital photo. Regrettably, he adds, they cannot choose every suggested destination.

To follow this year's package race, visit:
http://www2.isye.gatech.edu/~jjb/wh/package-race/package-race.html

 

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1255305600 2009-10-12 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news You may have been to Alabama, but what about Opp, Alabama (population 6,000)? How about Ulan Bator, the capital city of Mongolia? These two diverse locations are the destinations chosen for the 2009 Great Package Race, which began when packages were shipped from the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) in early October.

]]>
2009-10-12T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-12T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-12 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49787 49787 image <![CDATA[Packing boxes]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Team Contributes to Atlanta Emission Reduction Plan]]> 27279 On March 17, 2009, Mayor Shirley Franklin released Atlanta city government's first report on greenhouse gas emissions as the first step towards the goal of reducing emissions in the city seven percent by 2012. Also known as the "carbon footprint,* the figure was calculated with the help of a student-faculty team from Georgia Tech and establishes a baseline to measure progress in Atlanta's sustainability efforts. The Georgia Tech team was comprised of Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), along with PhD students Seth Borin, ISyE, and Joy Wang, Public Policy.

Thomas, Wang, and Borin worked with the Office of Sustainability of the City of Atlanta and Sustainable Atlanta to evaluate the total greenhouse gas emissions from the operations of the City of Atlanta government. This includes City electricity and natural gas use, transportation fuel use by City vehicles, as well as emissions of other greenhouse gases.

"The City of Atlanta's greenhouse gas emissions in 2007 came to 540 thousand metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent, which is equivalent to emissions from the household energy use of about 150,000 people or the annual energy use of about 100,000 passenger vehicles,* said Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems at Georgia Tech and primary author of the report. "Having conducted an inventory and committed to reducing emissions makes the City of Atlanta a leader in the state and region and well ahead of federal action on climate change.*

"We know that the opportunities to reduce our emissions are great, particularly now with the federal administration's focus on green job creation and green energy,* said Mayor Franklin. "With funding from the recently-passed American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, Atlanta's sustainability efforts will focus on energy efficiency and renewable energy initiatives which will create jobs, save money and protect our environment,* she said.

Determining Atlanta city government's carbon footprint coincides with the release of the inaugural sustainability report for Atlanta. Produced by Sustainable Atlanta (a non-governmental partner to the city's Office of Sustainability), the report compiles readily available data to create benchmarks for measuring Atlanta's sustainability efforts, including the city's carbon footprint. The report * available at www.sustainableatlanta.org * also provides best practices, context, proposed strategies and action in the areas of water; energy and climate change; parks and greenspace; and recycling and materials management.

"The Sustainability Report for Atlanta is both a map and milepost,* said Lynnette Young, executive director of Sustainable Atlanta. "It is a snapshot of Atlanta's current status as it relates to sustainability and a context for future measurement and opportunity, determining what we can do together to help the city advance sustainable lifestyles for everyone.*

Launched in 2008 with support from the Kendeda Fund, the Atlanta Office of Sustainability is working across city departments to "green* operations and at the same time, maximize efficiencies. Sustainable practices implemented at City Hall are already generating a 20 percent drop in electricity use, with a forecast of nearly $135,000 in annual operations cost savings.

With the municipal carbon footprint established, the next step will be to develop the Atlanta Climate Action Plan. "The Climate Action Plan will be our blueprint to guide all city departments so that current initiatives and near-term objectives are aligned with achieving the 2012 emissions reduction goal," said Mandy Schmitt, Atlanta's Director of Sustainability. "This strategic effort to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions supports the ultimate goal of making Atlanta a community that lives within the self-perpetuating limits of its environment, while maintaining high standards for economic growth, environmental integrity, and social justice."

According to Schmitt, near-term goals for Atlanta city government to achieve by the end of 2009 include:
1. 10 percent drop in energy use in general fund* facilities through low/no-cost conservation measures yielding $300,000 to $500,000 in annual savings
2. Five percent drop in water use in general fund facilities
3. At least two renewable energy demonstration projects
4. Three percent drop in fossil fuels used by municipal fleet yielding $267,000 in annual savings
5. 10 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in general fund facilities

Atlanta's greenhouse gas inventory was guided by a protocol developed by ICLEI-Local Governments for Sustainability. Atlanta is one of more than 1,057 cities, towns and counties worldwide that are members of ICLEI and that have made a commitment to sustainable development. Atlanta also hosts ICLEI's Southeast Regional Office, and city staff shares office space with ICLEI representatives to maximize the organization's resources in developing performance-based, results-oriented campaigns and programs.

*General fund facilities do not include facilities in Enterprise Fund Departments, such as Watershed and Airport, whose funds come directly from user fees.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1237334400 2009-03-18 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-03-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49849 49850 49851 49849 image <![CDATA[City of Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin, ISyE Profe]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49850 image <![CDATA[Mayor Shirley Franklin announces plans to reduce g]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49851 image <![CDATA[ISyE Professor Valerie Thomas discusses the total]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[ISyE Faculty Forms System Informatics & Control Group]]> 27279 Several faculty members have recently assembled to form a System Informatics and Control (SIAC) group within the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. The aim of the SIAC group is to develop research and education programs that will provide a new scientific base for the design, analysis and control of complex manufacturing and service systems, anchored upon the effective and seamless integration of physical and analytical models with empirical data-driven methodologies.

This group brings together researchers who share a common interest in the development of quantitative models unified with data extraction and engineering knowledge integration capabilities and the employment of these models in the analysis, and control of complex manufacturing and service systems.

The key members of the SIAC group include:
* Jianjun (Jan) Shi, Carolyn J. Stewart Chair
* Nagi Gebraeel, Assistant Professor
* Jye-Chyi (JC) Lu, Professor
* Spiridon Reveliotis, Associate Professor
* Kwok-Leung Tsui, Professor
* Roshan Joseph Vengazhiyil, Associate Professor

Shi, Gabraeel, Lu, Reveliotis, Tsui, and Vengazhiyil bring a diverse set of experiences to the group with each providing a different background related to manufacturing and service systems, quality and reliability engineering, diagnostics and prognostics, industrial statistics and data mining, automation and control.

A new Ph.D. specialization on SIAC in ISyE has been approved by the Graduate Committee of Georgia Tech. The group has been actively developing new curricula with three core courses for SIAC Ph.D. specialization (e.g. ISyE 6810: System Monitoring and Prognostics, ISyE 7201: Production Systems Engineering, ISyE 7204: Informatics in Production and Service Systems), recruiting Ph.D. students (6 Ph.D. students have joined the new specialization at this time), and securing research grants.

Since July, 2009, they been awarded five National Science Foundation (NSF) grants that include:

GOALI: Causation-Based Quality Control - A new paradigm to achieve effective monitoring, diagnosis, and control for complex manufacturing systems: Focusing on "causation-based" quality control methodologies, this project will advance the state of the art in modeling and control of complex systems by contributing new concepts, criteria, and algorithms to the information-processing capabilities for quality improvement. The implementation of the resulting methodologies is expected to generate broad economic impacts.

Optimized Scheduling of Complex Resource Allocation Systems through Approximate Dynamic Programming: This project's focus is the development of a novel framework for managing the complex resource allocation that takes place in contemporary production and service systems. The results of this research will bring closer the existing developments in scheduling theory to the field practice.

Collaborative Research: Adaptive Maintenance Planning Based on Evolving Residual Life Distributions: The focus of this project is the development of broadly applicable analytical and statistical tools that determine adaptive maintenance policies for complex systems that deteriorate over time. This research can improve the way that firms translate vast quantities of condition monitoring data into maintenance decisions. Performing the right type of maintenance activity at the right time will reduce maintenance costs while improving safety.

Collaborative Research: Validation, Calibration, and Prediction of Computer Models with Functional Output: The proposed research focuses on Bayesian approach for calibration, validation, prediction, and experimental design of computer models with functional output. The major impact of the proposed research is to improve the effectiveness of computer model developers (model analysts) and users (scientists and engineering designers) in scientific understanding, as well as in design and manufacturing in various important scientific and engineering applications.

Robust optimization of nanoparticle synthesis in a supercritical CO2 process for energy
applications
: Recognizing that systematic methods are needed to quantify uncertainty in nanomanufacturing processes, and subsequently to design processes that are robust to these uncertainties, the proposed work presents a comprehensive methodology for robust optimization of a batch process, using various sources of information integrated by a rigorous Bayesian method. The current disconnect between the fields of robust design in statistics and mechanistic modeling in engineering will be bridged by the proposed methodology. Focusing on the synthesis of metal nanoparticles, which are used in a wide range of applications from energy to medicine, this unique modeling approach for mean and variance of process variables is required to derive the recipe for a robust optimal process.

For more information about SIAC, visit http://www2.isye.gatech.edu/siac/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1255910400 2009-10-19 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49785 49785 image <![CDATA[SIAC group]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Lofgren, IE PhD, 1986, Elected to National Academy of Engineering]]> 27279 Christopher "Chris" Lofgren, IE PhD 1986, was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering on February 6, 2009 along with 64 others and nine foreign associates. This brings the total U.S. membership to 2,246 and the number of foreign associates to 197.

Election to the National Academy of Engineering is among the highest professional distinctions accorded to an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contribution to ***engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature,*** and to the ***pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing and implementing innovative approaches to engineering education.***

Lofgren is president and chief executive officer of Schneider National Inc. in Green Bay, WI, where he develops and implements supply-chain engineering concepts, software and technology for truck transportation and third-party logistics. Prior to being appointed CEO, Lofgren served as Chief Operating Officer from 2000 to 2002, and Chief Information Officer from 1996 to 2002.

"Chris has done a tremendous job in leveraging the knowledge he gained while getting his PhD at Georgia Tech to advance the use of information and decision technology at Schneider National,*** said Don Ratliff, Regents and USP professor at the Stewart School of ISyE and executive director of the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute at Georgia Tech. ***His leadership as COO and now CEO has made Schneider the leader in its industry. His accomplishments in advancing engineering technology in the trucking industry make him a very deserving recipient of this honor."

Lofgren serves as the chairman of Georgia Tech***s Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) Advisory Board. He also serves as a board member of the Green Bay, Wisconsin Boys & Girls Club, the Executive Committee and the Board of Directors of the American Trucking Associations, Inc. ("ATA") and the Board of Directors of the American Transportation Research Institute, a research trust affiliated with the ATA.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1237334400 2009-03-18 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-03-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49853 49853 image <![CDATA[Christopher Lofgren]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[ISyE\'s Vielma Awarded Prestigious Goldstine Fellowship]]> 27279 Juan Pablo Vielma, PhD student at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE), was awarded the 2009 Herman Goldstine Postdoctoral Fellowship in Mathematical Sciences. While the Georgia Tech community of students and faculty are continually recognized for their academic excellence, Vielma's achievement particularly stands out due to its prestige.

The Herman Goldstine Fellowship provides scientists of outstanding ability an opportunity to advance their scholarship as resident members of the Mathematical Sciences Department at the IBM Thomas.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Recipients of this fellowship conduct research in pure and applied mathematics, as well as theoretical and exploratory computer science.

Vielma is the second student from the Stewart School of ISyE to receive this honor. His advisors are Drs. Shabbir Ahmed and George Nemhauser.

"Vielma has made some very significant contributions to problems that lie in the intersection of two difficult areas - discrete and nonlinear optimization. The Goldstine award is a strong testament to Vielma's talent and enormous research potential," said Ahmed.

Past and present activities of fellowship holders include work on sequential and parallel algorithms, cryptography, numerical analysis, differential equations, logic design, computer music, dynamic systems and approximation theory. The fellowship lasts for one to two years, and is awarded following a world-wide competition; the only restriction is that candidates must be within five years from their PhD.

Vielma joins the ranks of others in the Georgia Tech community honored with the Goldstine Fellowship. In fact, the past two winners have been associated with Tech:
2008- Ricardo Fukasawa, IE PhD 2008, for his work in integer programming.
2007- Ton Dieker, assistant professor at the Stewart School of ISyE, for his work on stochastic systems.

Vielma obtained his Bachelor in Mathematical Engineering and a Mathematical Engineering Professional Title from the Department of Mathematical Engineering at the University of Chile. His research interests at ISyE include theory and methodology for mixed integer programming and applications in finance and many areas of engineering.

Vielma's other notable achievements include winning the INFORMS Optimization Society Student Paper Prize, FOR the paper entitled "A Lifted Linear Programming Branch-and-Bound Algorithm for Mixed Integer Conic Quadratic Programs". In addition, Vielma has published his research in a variety of journals including: INFORMS Journal on Computing, Discrete Optimization, Operations Research Letters, and European Journal of Operational Research.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1237420800 2009-03-19 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49845 49845 image <![CDATA[Juan Pablo Vielma with advisors]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Ekici Wins 2009 SHS Student Paper Competition]]> 27279 Ph.D. student Ali Ekici won the 2009 Society for Health Systems (SHS) Graduate Student Paper Competition with his paper titled Modeling Influenza Pandemic, Intervention Strategies, and Food Distribution. The paper, which is also co-authored by Professors Julie Swann and Pinar Keskinocak, will be presented by Mr. Ekici at the 2009 Society for Health Systems Conference in Chicago.

The SHS Student Paper Competition is designed to recognize outstanding work that demonstrates the use of Industrial Engineering skills in improving healthcare related products, processes or services. The paper submissions were judged on originality and soundness, applicability, methodology, organization and quality of the paper. An oral presentation was also a required part of the judging.

The paper summarized the threat of a pandemic flu to aid in the development of a food distribution plan and other intervention strategies. The authors identified the potential problems as being: interruption in services due to infection, infected individuals may not be able to obtain food, and the logistical problems of delivering food to ill people. Their findings model the spread of pandemic flu geographically and over time, evaluates the effectiveness of intervention strategies, and develops a facility location and resource allocation model for food distribution.

The researchers investigated the effects of voluntary quarantine on disease spread, as well as the best time to begin the quarantine and how long it should last. "These results are important because during a pandemic, communities have limited resources, including food and volunteers to distribute the food," notes Swann.

The researchers also compared the two interventions: quarantine and school closure. The results showed that closing schools reduced the number of infected with the virus. "While we hope that a pandemic never occurs, our models will help Georgia and other states across the United States prepare response plans for the potential [outbreak]," Keskinocak commented.

For more information on the conference, which is April 1-4 in Chicago, IL, go to http://www.iienet2.org/SHS/Conference/default.aspx

For more information on their pandemic influenza planning research http://www.isye.gatech.edu/news-events/news/release.php?id=2195

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1237420800 2009-03-19 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Ph.D. student Ali Ekici won the 2009 Society for Health Systems (SHS) Graduate Student Paper Competition with his paper titled Modeling Influenza Pandemic, Intervention Strategies, and Food Distribution. The paper, which is also co-authored by Professors Julie Swann and Pinar Keskinocak, will be presented by Mr. Ekici at the 2009 Society for Health Systems Conference in Chicago.

]]>
2009-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-19T00:00:00-04:00 2009-03-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49847 49847 image <![CDATA[Ali Ekici (far right) with professors]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[3PL Study Examines Global Market for Shippers and Logistics Providers]]> 27279 Georgia Institute of Technology, in corporation with Capgemini, Oracle, and logistics provider, Panalpina, recently released an in-depth study examining the current global market for logistics outsourcing.

Based on responses from both shippers and logistics service providers in North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America, the Fourteenth Annual Third-Party Logistics (3PL) study explores some of the key issues affecting the industry. Key findings include:

* The economic downturn has created significant challenges for both shippers and third-party logistics providers (3PLs) - 82 percent of shippers are employing cost-cutting tactics and 60 percent are rethinking their supply chains and relationships with 3PLs as a result

* 88 percent of shippers feel that IT-based logistics services are important, but only 42 percent are satisfied with the capabilities of their provider - as a result of this IT capability gap, shipper respondents reported a lack of the key performance indicators, alerts and visibility required for an adaptive supply chain and 3PLs reported similar difficulties in getting the data and commitment they need from shippers

* There are significant differences between how 3PLs evaluate their role in the supply chain and how they are viewed by shippers - only 59 percent of shippers feel their use of 3PLs has a positive effect on customer service compared to 88 percent of 3PL respondents

Shipper respondents devote an average of between 47 percent (in North America) and 66 percent (in Europe) of their total logistics expenditures to outsourcing and this is expected to increase in the next five years.

"Shipper-3PL relationships are being impacted significantly by the prevailing uncertainty and economic volatility in global markets," said Dr. C. John Langley Jr., Professor of Supply Chain Management, Georgia Institute of Technology. "It is very important for 3PLs to mitigate or reduce any financial risk or service level impact that this may cause."

Economic uncertainty and the use of 3PLs
Economic volatility has challenged shippers and 3PLs alike to contend with factors such as unpredictable demand, instability in fuel costs and currency valuation, and excess inventory. In response, not only are shippers attempting to cut costs, they are also seeking to improve forecasting and inventory management (77 percent).

Cost reduction and improved reliability in services are the main factors likely to increase shipper respondents' use of 3PLs. This includes converting fixed to variable costs (59 percent), expanding to new markets or offering new products (56 percent), and restructuring the supply chain network to improve financial performance (48 percent).

"Companies worldwide are still dealing with the effects of the economic downturn," said Jim Morton, Senior Manager within Capgemini Consulting's Supply Chain practice. "But shippers should embrace the opportunity to rethink their supply chains and the role that 3PLs can play in helping to attain business goals."

Supply chain orchestration
The study shows that while shippers continue to outsource logistics services that are more operational and repetitive, they outsource less frequently those that are more strategic, customer facing and IT intensive. However, economic volatility presents an opportunity for shippers to assess their supply chains and make changes designed to increase agility and responsiveness, reduce costs and reconsider their relationships with 3PLs to drive them deeper. Overall, 75 percent of shipper respondents agree that more strategic 3PL relationships would help them reduce costs.

In order to achieve a more strategic shipper-3PL relationship, shippers want to see 3PLs investing in enhancing their regional and vertical expertise to better understand their particular business. Shipper respondents will also need to be more forthcoming with their data and be willing to team with 3PLs to re-engineer business processes.

"As a provider of outsourced logistics services, we know that openness, transparency and good communication, flexibility and the ability to achieve cost and service objectives are key to the success of our customer relationships," said Kai Peters, Head of Supply Chain Development, Panalpina. "But in order to be an effective partner for our customers, it is also increasingly important for us to understand the entire business, not just logistics."

The IT capability gap
IT is viewed as central to the overall performance of 3PL-customer relationships. However, lack of IT integration within 3PLs leads the list of shipper respondent issues (55 percent) with 3PL IT capabilities. Shippers and 3PLs seek IT that is responsive, delivers valued information such as order, shipment and inventory.

Visibility, builds on existing investments and allows for innovation. However, widespread use of manual practices and variations in standards make it difficult for shippers and 3PLs to exchange data reliably and connect workflows. Real-time interfaces to shipper order management systems (63 percent) and timely demand forecasts (54 percent) are the most desired IT capabilities 3PLs need from shippers.

"When shippers outsource logistics functions to a 3PL, IT is an essential part of the relationship," said Jon Chorley, Vice President, SCM Product Strategy, Oracle. "3PLs and shippers need to leverage integrated IT platforms that deliver visibility across the entire logistics network in order to keep productivity and customer service levels high."

Other problems cited by shippers with 3PL services include a lack of continuous, ongoing improvements and achievements in service offerings and unrealized service level commitments (both 46 percent).

3PLs' role in logistics success
Interestingly, while there is significant agreement between shippers and 3PLs on critical issues, 3PLs generally have a more positive view of relationship success than shippers and have lower awareness about potential problems. This suggests that 3PLs still have some way to go before they fully meet the expectations of their customers. For example, 82 percent of 3PLs believe they provide new and innovative ways to improve logistics effectiveness, compared with only 50 percent of shipper respondents who feel they receive services of this nature. Similarly, only 54 percent of shippers reported improvements in service levels compared with 71 percent of 3PLs.

About the 2009 Third Party Logistics Study
Over 1,000 logistics executives from both 3PL users and providers in North America, Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America participated in the web-based survey. A small number of executives in other areas such as South America and the Middle East also responded although there was no in-depth analysis of these geographies. This was the first year that 3PLs, in addition to shippers, were invited to share their views. The findings were then supplemented with the results from in-depth 'focus interviews.' Interviews were conducted with industry observers and experts, primarily relating to the special topics identified in this year's report. The Capgemini Accelerated Solutions Environment** (ASE) was also leveraged as a brainstorming setting where participants could collaborate on shared issues.

About the Georgia Institute of Technology
The Georgia Institute of Technology, located in Atlanta, is a leader in logistics and supply chain and logistics education. Through its Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) and the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute (SCL), Georgia Tech is committed to serving logistics educational needs through its degree programs and its comprehensive professional education program. Georgia Tech also conducts a fully accredited Executive Masters in International Logistics (EMIL) program, a Supply Chain Executive Forum and a Leaders in Logistics Research Program. Global involvement is facilitated through The Logistics Institute Asia Pacific, a program in partnership with the National University of Singapore.
For more information, please visit www.isye.gatech.edu and www.scl.gatech.edu.

About Capgemini
Capgemini, one of the world's foremost providers of consulting, technology and outsourcing services, enables its clients to transform and perform through technologies. Capgemini provides its clients with insights and capabilities that boost their freedom to achieve superior results through a unique way of working, the Collaborative Business Experience. The Group relies on its global delivery model called Rightshore, which aims to get the right balance of the best talent from multiple locations, working as one team to create and deliver the optimum solution for clients. Present in more than 30 countries, Capgemini reported 2008 global revenues of EUR 8.7 billion and employs 90,000 people worldwide. More information is available at www.capgemini.com.

Capgemini Consulting is the strategy and transformation consulting division of the Capgemini Group, with a team of over 4,000 consultants worldwide. Leveraging its deep sector and business expertise, Capgemini Consulting advises and supports organizations in transforming their business, from strategy through to execution. Working side by side with its clients, Capgemini Consulting crafts innovative strategies and transformation roadmaps to deliver sustainable performance improvement. More information is available at www.capgemini.com/consulting.

About Oracle
Oracle is the world's largest business software company. For more information about Oracle, please visit our Web site at http://www.oracle.com.

About Panalpina
The Panalpina Group is one of the world's leading suppliers of forwarding and logistics services, specializing in end-to-end supply chain management solutions and intercontinental air freight and ocean freight shipments. Thanks to its in-depth industry know-how and state-of the-art IT systems, Panalpina provides globally integrated door-to-door forwarding services tailored to its customers' individual needs. The Panalpina Group operates a closeknit network with some 500 branches in over 80 countries. In a further 80 countries, it cooperates closely with partner companies. Panalpina employs about 14,000 people worldwide. For more information please visit www.panalpina.com.

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1256601600 2009-10-27 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news The Fourteenth Annual Third-Party Logistics Study from Georgia Tech, Capgemini, Oracle, and Panalpina examines global market for shippers and logistics providers.

]]>
2009-10-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49782 49783 49782 image <![CDATA[2009 Third-Party Logistics Study]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49783 image <![CDATA[Dr. C. John Langley Jr]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[Rules for Gene Silencing in Cancer Cells Identified]]> 27279 Human cancers from breast and lung have a common pattern of genes vulnerable to silencing by DNA methylation, researchers at Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology have found. The results are published in the January issue of Cancer Research.

On their way to becoming tumors, cells have to somehow inactivate several "tumor suppressor" genes that usually prevent cancer formation. Methylation is a subtle punctuation-like modification of the DNA that marks genes for silencing, meaning that they are inactive and don't make RNA or proteins.

"We've developed a set of guidelines that allow us to predict which genes have an increased risk of silencing by DNA methylation," says senior author Paula Vertino, PhD, associate professor of radiation oncology at Emory University School of Medicine and Emory Winship Cancer Institute. "That vulnerability could make those genes good markers for diagnosis and risk assessment in patients."

The "signature" of DNA methylation found in cancer cells came from the team's previous work analyzing cell lines that artificially overproduce an enzyme which adds methylation markers to DNA. Vertino's team calls the signature PatMAn for "pattern-based methylation analysis."

Dr. Eva Lee, associate professor and director of Center for Operations Research in Medicine and Healthcare of industrial and systems engineering at Georgia Tech developed the pattern recognition algorithm, feature selection, and predictive tools that pinpointed a small subset of DNA sequence signatures capable of classifying the methylation status.

In particular, Lee's approach identified PatMAn, which is based on seven "key words", 8-10 nucleotides long, that can predict which genes become methylated in breast and lung cancers in addition to artificial cell lines. Postdoctoral fellow Michael McCabe, PhD, took Lee's predictions and validated their status in the laboratory.

If the key words are in the DNA sequence near the promoter of the gene, it is more likely to be methylated. The promoter of a gene is the place where enzymes start making DNA into RNA.
Further analysis led to the team's realization that PatMAn overlaps with the pattern of DNA bound by a set of proteins known as the Polycomb complex in embryonic stem cells. Polycomb appears to keep genes that regulate early development turned off in embryonic stem cells.
The researchers combined PatMAn with the Polycomb binding pattern to generate SUPER-PatMAn, an improved version of PatMAn that could predict methylation-prone genes in cancers with more than 80 percent accuracy.

Vertino notes that the methylation pattern in cancer cells appears to echo Polycomb's binding in embryonic stem cells. Many of the genes affected play important roles in embryonic development.

"Many of the genes predicted by Lee's algorithms to be methylation-prone are developmental regulators," she says. "Our findings could support the idea that methylation-mediated silencing helps to lock the developmental state of tumor cells into being more stem cell-like."

Among cancer biologists, hypermethylation is now the most well characterized epigenetic change to occur in tumors. Lee's pattern recognition and classification tools offer the opportunity to classify the more than 29,000 known (but as yet unclassified) CpG islands in human chromosomes. This will provide an important resource for the identification of novel gene targets for further study as potential molecular markers that could have an impact on both cancer prevention and treatment. For aggressive cancers such as pancreatic cancer or some forms of incurable brain tumor, the ability to identify such sites offers potential new therapeutic interventions, leading to improved treatment.

The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the American Cancer Society and the Georgia Cancer Coalition.

Reference: A multi-factorial signature of DNA sequence and Polycomb binding predicts aberrant CpG island methylation. McCabe, M.T., Lee, E.K, and Vertino, P.M, Cancer Research, 69(1): 282-291, 2009.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1238544000 2009-04-01 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news Cancer Research.]]> 2009-04-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-04-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-04-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49841 49842 49843 49841 image <![CDATA[Professor Eva Lee]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49842 image <![CDATA[Two human chromosomes showing the predicted methyl]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49843 image <![CDATA[This chart shows the lung tumor methylation agains]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[C. F. Jeff Wu Selected INFORMS Fellow]]> 27328 C.F. Jeff Wu, Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics and professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, was elected INFORMS Fellow at the 2009 INFORMS conference in San Diego in mid-October. The INFORMS Fellow Award is reserved for distinguished individuals who have demonstrated outstanding and exceptional accomplishments and experience in operations research and the management sciences.

Professor Wu, who joins ten other Fellows elected this year, was selected for his work developing statistical methodologies and novel applications to engineering and for leadership making statistical methods and thinking popular in engineering.

"Being elected a fellow by INFORMS is a further testament to the quality of work produced by Professor Wu," said Chelsea C. White III, ISyE School Chair. "I and all of Professor Wu***s ISyE colleagues are very proud of this most deserved recognition."

In addition to his selection as INFORMS Fellow, Professor Wu's many honors also include membership to the National Academy of Engineering in 2004, the 2008 Shewhart Medal from the American Society for Quality; an honorary doctorate degree from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada; the American Statistical Association Quality and Productivity Research Conference Honoree; and the 2008 Pan Wen-Yuan Award.

Before joining Georgia Tech in the summer of 2003, Professor Wu was the H. C. Carver Professor of Statistics and Professor of Industrial and Operations Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; the GM/NSERC Chair in Quality and Productivity at the University of Waterloo; and a professor in the Statistics Department at the University of Wisconsin. He holds a B.S. in Mathematics from National Taiwan University and Ph.D. in Statistics from the University of California, Berkeley.

Professor Wu is known for his innovative and high-impact work in modern Design of Experiments , which has helped western manufacturing industries greatly improve quality. Over the years, his research groups from the University of Wisconsin, the University of Waterloo in Canada, the University of Michigan, and Georgia Tech have developed various methods to build a comprehensive system for running experiments, modeling data, and system optimization/robustness. This work has culminated in the publication of two books: Experiments: Planning, Analysis, and Optimization (with Hamada) 2009, John Wiley; and A Modern Theory of Factorial Designs (with Mukerjee) 2006, Springer.

Professor Wu's work is widely cited in professional journals as well as in magazines, including a feature article about his work in Canadian Business and a special issue of Newsweek on quality. He has served as editor or associate editor for several prestigious statistical journals including Annals of Statistics, Journal of American Statistical Association, Technometrics, and Statistica Sinica. Professor Wu has published more than 130 research articles in peer review journals and has supervised more than thirty Ph.D.'s, many of whom are teaching in major research departments in statistics/engineering/business in the United States, Canada and Asia.

The INFORMS Fellow Award recognizes members who have made significant contributions to the advancement of operations research and the management sciences, such contributions including service to the professional field and to INFORMS. Wu joins a prestigious list including the following eleven other Stewart School faculty members who have received this honor:
Dr. Jan Shi
Dr. John Bartholdi
Dr. Jim Dai
Dr. Augustine Esogbue
Dr. John Jarvis
Dr. Ellis Johnson
Dr. George Nemhauser
Dr. Donald Ratliff
Dr. William Rouse
Dr. Michael Thomas
Dr. Chelsea White III

]]> Edie Cohen 1 1256688000 2009-10-28 00:00:00 1475895839 2016-10-08 03:03:59 0 0 news 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28T00:00:00-04:00 2009-10-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49771 49771 image <![CDATA[C. F. Jeff Wu]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53
<![CDATA[ISyE Alumni Stir Graduates in December Commencement]]> 27279 Presidents and playwrights were quoted during the December commencement addresses. Bill George, IE 64, and Ron Johnson, MS OR 85, also both stirred Georgia Tech's newest alumni to have the courage to take chances and make a difference in the world.

Read more in the January 5, 2009 issue of Georgia Tech's Alumni Association's Buzzwords at http://gtalumni.org/buzzwords/jan09/article753.html

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1231117200 2009-01-05 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news 2009-01-05T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-05T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Rules for Gene Silencing in Cancer Cells Identified]]> 27279 Human cancers from breast and lung have a common pattern of genes vulnerable to silencing by DNA methylation, researchers at Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology have found. The results are published in the January issue of Cancer Research. Postdoctoral fellow Michael McCabe, was first author, with contributions from Eva Lee, associate professor of industrial and systems engineering at Georgia Tech.

Read more at:
http://whsc.emory.edu/home/news/releases/2009/01/rules-for-silencing-cancer-cells-identified.html

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1231808400 2009-01-13 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news 2009-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-13T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-13 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Renee Desing Recognized for Mentoring Incoming Undergrads]]> 27279 Undergraduate Senior Ren*e Desing was awarded the Most Enthusiastic Team Leader award for her contributions to the GT1000 program for the fall 2008 semester.

GT1000 is a freshmen seminar class aiming to help first year students adjust to college life. Aided by faculty, upperclassman students mentor small teams of five to six first year students to help make the academic and social transitions typical of the college life easier.

The leaders serve as a bridge between the Georgia Tech community and the first semester students. In addition to transition techniques, the mentors introduce students to career opportunities, ways to become involved in the community, and study skills. Generally guided by a mentor from their chosen major, the first-year students conclude the course with a project that hones team building and time management skills while employing fundamentals from that major. Desing was a mentor for nine new ISyE students.

Desing led her team in a final project that worked to evaluate the inter-working systems in the Student Center Food Court. Specifically, Desing aided her group in making suggestions for improvements at Rosita's Cantina, one of the food vendors in the Student Center Food Court.

Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies Chen Zhou, raves about Desing's performance, "She has been the greatest asset to the class*Her enthusiastic attitude and encouraging words attracted more and higher quality participation from her large team.*

In addition to her GT1000 work with new ISyE students, Desing has also served as a team advisor for the National Student Leadership Conference for Engineering and worked with the M&M Mentorship Program. Her skill set extends beyond leadership into the academic arena as well. Desing is an officer of Tau Beta Pi, the Engineering Honors Society, and Alpha Pi Mu, the Industrial Engineering Honors Society.

The following is an interview with Desing:

What was your favorite part of being a Team Leader?
My favorite part was meeting all of the students and getting to know the new ISyE freshmen. My favorite activity was the final project where students looked at food courts and dining halls to see how they could improve their systems. It was interesting and impressive to see the results the students had.

What was the most rewarding part of being a team leader?
The most rewarding part of being a team leader was to watch how the students interact with each other. On their final project it was amazing to see how well they managed themselves and accomplished everything.

Why did you choose ISyE at Georgia Tech?
I chose ISyE because it is the major that best fits me well and is exactly what I like doing. I chose Georgia Tech because it is a great engineering school and has the number 1 industrial engineering program in the country!

What has been your favorite ISyE class so far?
My favorite ISyE class was 4803 Regression and Forecasting. Professor Vengazhiyil was great, and the information was very interesting and very applicable, especially to my senior design project this semester!

When are you graduating?
I am graduating May 2009! Which is very scary because college has gone by so fast and I can't believe this is my last semester!

What are your plans after graduation?
After graduation, I have accepted a position with ExxonMobil as an Industrial Sales Engineer, beginning this summer.

What song is queued up on your Ipod?
I uncharacteristically do not own an Ipod, but my favorite song right now is Shattered by OAR.

Weirdest study habit?
My weirdest study habit is probably that I always eat pretzels, drink grape juice, and listen to Enya music.

Best piece of advice to fellow IE undergrads?
Learn as much as you can and make sure you enjoy what you are learning! Also, study abroad if possible, because it is an amazing, unforgettable experience!

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1231894800 2009-01-14 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news 2009-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49891 49891 image <![CDATA[Ren*e Desing]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Fall*2008 Senior Design: First Place Goes to the Manheim Seattle Team]]> 27279 During fall semester's Senior Design course, students wrapped up their undergraduate experience by spending some long, hard, intense hours producing some remarkably high quality projects with real-world implications.

"Senior Design was simultaneously one of the best and most gut-wrenching experiences I've had at Tech. I had never before been part of such a large collaborative effort; we were continually challenged and pushed to our limits. We learned to use our course work as a base and then go beyond,* said Margaret Reinhard, one of the students on the Manheim Seattle team who came in first place in the finalist presentations.

Reinhard and team (Sanin Fetic, Alejandro Gordillo, Jacques Gouws, Jorge Guzman, Lindsay Mills, and advisor Craig Tovey) worked on a project for Manheim Seattle entitled, Improving Operations at Manheim Seattle.

All projects in senior design must have some design component and provide a value-added change within an organization. For the Manheim Seattle project, the team recommended facility and operational changes for Manheim, the world's largest automobile resale company, at its Seattle site. The team also clarified the impact of short queues during auctions, and performed a pilot study of productivity comparison of 77 auction sites. The methodologies used included innovative data capture, detailed simulations, 3D facility layout models, and optimization-based productivity assessment. Because of the company-wide implications, the group has been invited to reprise the report to company executives.

Three teams were honored as runners-up in the competition. The runners-up are (in alphabetical order by organization): Emory Crawford Long Hospital, advised by Christos Alexopoulos; Platt Electric, advised by Shabbir Ahmed; and the World Food Programme, advised by Ozlem Ergun.

The Emory Crawford Long Hospital Emergency Department team included Mark Braza, Nick Grivas, Junaid Qureshi, Eileen Santo Domingo, Vivian Soler, and Ryan Williams with advisor Christos Alexopoulos. Their project titled, Application of Real-time Simulation to Improve Patient Satisfaction in the Emory Crawford Long Hospital Emergency Department, used a predictive tool for patient wait-times in Emergency Departments. The tool utilizes discrete-event simulation in combination with real-time data to generate predictions. This work will enable low-severity patients to be scheduled in off-peak hours while increasing customer satisfaction and recapturing lost revenue form patients who leave prior to completion.

The Platt Electric team included Sara Cermenaro, Jonthan Duarte, Julio V*squez, Mariana Villegas, Taylor Virgil, and Luis Willis with advisor Shabbir Ahmed. Their project titled, Distribution Center Location and Expansion Plan, provides Platt Electric with different options for the expansion of their business and the addition of 110 branches. Using demand forecasting and robust optimization modeling, the team recommended plans including when and where to locate new distribution centers, the branch opening schedule, and the branch allocation to the distribution centers over time. The team's recommendation could save Platt approximately $3.2 million per year.

The World Food Programme team included Santiago Aviles, Elhadj Bah, Manuel Jimenez, Alvara Morales, Lawrence Li, and James Wade with advisor Ozelm Ergun. Their project titled, World Food Programme Supply Chain Optimization, tackled two problems: lack of smooth operations due to variability in donations, and lack of standardized inventory management methodology. They created an inventory ordering tool ready for immediate implementation and a mathematical model of the supply chain to optimize its operations and study long- term strategic changes. After testing historic and simulated data, the team traveled to Rome, Italy, to present their findings to the World Food Programme, demonstrating significant benefits in increased service levels and decreased costs through the use of their models.

For more on the senior design program, or if you interested in sponsoring a student team, please visit http://www.isye.gatech.edu/seniordesign/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1231894800 2009-01-14 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news 2009-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-14T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-14 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49893 49894 49895 49893 image <![CDATA[First Place Winners]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49894 image <![CDATA[Professor Tovey introduces the Manheim Seattle Tea]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49895 image <![CDATA[Senior Design Coordinator Joel Sokol welcomes a ro]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[ScienceLives: Pinar Keskinocak on Being an Industrial Engineer]]> 27279 As a part of a Live Science series that puts "scientist under the microscope to find out what makes them tick," John Toon interviewed ISyE Professor Pinar Keskinocak. The series is cooperation between the National Science Foundation and LiveScience.

Read the interview:
http://www.livescience.com/culture/090120-science-lives-pinar-keskinocak.html

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1232413200 2009-01-20 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news 2009-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-20T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-20 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Summit Focuses on Fuel Conservation and Management]]> 27279 On September 22-23, 2008, the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) partnered with Schneider National Inc. to organize their fourth co-hosted Transportation Productivity Summit. The purpose of the summit was to respond to the volatility in fuel prices and the need to conserve.

The two-day summit brought together shippers, carriers, suppliers, and regulators in an open dialog to discuss ways to conserve fuel, improve efficiencies and build more sustainable supply chains.

"This Symposium brought together some of the best thought leaders to discuss a strategically important issue for our country and for the supply chain business community - fuel conservation and management,* said SCL Managing Director Harvey Donaldson. "I was impressed with the amount of innovation and resources that both carriers and shippers are devoting to reducing the size and weight of shipments, eliminating miles from their transportation networks and reducing fuel consumption through more efficient engines and more aerodynamic vehicles.*

Industry partnerships such as this one are an important element to SCL's and the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering's missions * to serve as a center for new knowledge and innovation in supply chain engineering and management.

"The Symposium helps our faculty and students keep up-to-date with real world issues and the challenges in the industry,* said Chelsea C. White III, Stewart School Chair of Industrial and Systems Engineering and Schneider National Chair of Transportation and Logistics at Georgia Tech. "As a result, we are better informed about the needs, forces, and trends in the freight transportation and logistics industry and are better able to identify high impact research and development topics. We are very proud of our association with Schneider and are delighted to co-host this important thought provoking event with them.*

Since 2003, the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute has partnered with Schneider National Inc. to organize four annual Summits. Previous topics have included hours of service, port congestion, fuel conservation, and sustainability. Schneider National held two additional summits in China to focus on the important role that China plays in global supply chains. The summits are led by Christopher "Chris* B. Lofgren, President and CEO of Schneider National and Chelsea C. White II, H. Milton Stewart and Carolyn J. Stewart School Chair and Schneider National Chair of Transportation and Logistics.

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1232931600 2009-01-26 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news The two-day summit brought together shippers, carriers, suppliers, and regulators in an open dialog to discuss ways to conserve fuel, improve efficiencies and build more sustainable supply chains.

]]>
2009-01-26T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-26T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49887 49888 49887 image <![CDATA[Chris Lofgren, President and CEO of Schneider Nati]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51 49888 image <![CDATA[Chelsea C. White III, Stewart School Chair of Indu]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Dieker Receives Prestigious Gijs de Leve Prize]]> 27279 ISyE Professor Antonius "Ton* Bernardus Dieker was awarded the prestigious Gijs de Leve Prize for the best Dutch PhD dissertation for the years of 2006, 2007, and 2008 in the field of mathematics of operations research during the 34th Conference on the Mathematics of Operations Research in Lunteren, The Netherlands on January 14, 2009. The jury for the prize was "deeply impressed with Dieker's achievements.*

Dieker's thesis, "Extremes and fluid queues,* focuses on fluid queues through a connection with record values ('extremes') of random processes.

"Queueing theory is a set of mathematical techniques positioned to understand fluctuations in business and service systems, aimed at controlling disturbance and improving efficiency,* said Dieker. "In some applications of queueing theory, such as modern communication networks, the items being queued up are so small that they can hardly be distinguished. The resulting queueing models are called fluid queues.*

Dieker's other research interests include queueing models, fluid and diffusion approximations, Gaussian processes and fractional Brownian motion, heavy tails, large deviations, L*vy processes, rare event simulation, and enumerative combinatorics. His academic career is populated with many notable achievements and accolades as well as a myriad of published articles from his research. The most recent awards are the Stieltjes prize for best Dutch math PhD thesis of 2006, IBM Goldstine Memorial Postdoctoral Fellowship (August 2007), and Applied Probability Trust Award (March 2006).

In addition to Dieker's ongoing research and assistant professorship at the Stewart School of ISyE, he also conducted postdoctoral research with IBM Research and the University College Cork, Ireland. His educational background includes a PhD in Mathematics from the University of Amsterdam and a Masters of Science in Operations Research at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.

Receiving this prize was "a great honor* for Dieker as he refers to Gijs de Leve, a famed mathematician from the University of Amsterdam who had made many contributions to OR in The Netherlands, as "his scientific great-grandfather.*

Landelijk Netwerk Mathematische Besliskunde (LNMB), the Board of the Dutch Network on the Mathematics of Operations Research, oversees the Gijs de Leve Prize.
Previous recipients of this prestigious award are:
Sem Borst (1994-1996)
Jos Sturm (1997-1999)
Bert Zwart (2000-2002)
Rene Sitters (2003-2005)

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1233018000 2009-01-27 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news 2009-01-27T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-27T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
49885 49885 image <![CDATA[Antonius "Ton* Dieker]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[SCL Offers Free Online Warehousing Assessment Webinar]]> 27279 The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute is hosting a free Warehousing Self-Assessment webinar on Friday, February 6 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. The webinar will consist of an online self-assessment presentation, conducted by Edward H. Frazelle, Ph.D.

Dr. Frazelle will lead participants through an assessment of their warehouse operation, comparing their warehouse to world-class standards and revealing opportunities for cost, labor and space savings.

Focusing on world-class warehousing and material handling, a variety of professionals would benefit form this course: executives and managers of supply chain, logistics, and distribution; warehouse and distribution managers/directors; material handling and material management personnel; industrial engineers; operations and facility managers; key personnel committed to improving order picking; and systems analysts, among others.

To register for this event, visit: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/webinar

 

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1233104400 2009-01-28 01:00:00 1475895836 2016-10-08 03:03:56 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute is hosting a free Warehousing Self-Assessment webinar on Friday, February 6 from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Dr. Ed Frazelle will lead participants through an assessment of their warehouse operation, comparing their warehouse to world-class standards and revealing opportunities for cost, labor and space savings.

]]>
2009-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-28T00:00:00-05:00 2009-01-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
49883 49883 image <![CDATA[Dr. Ed Frazelle, known by his students for putting]]> image/jpeg 1449175366 2015-12-03 20:42:46 1475894451 2016-10-08 02:40:51
<![CDATA[Rouse Publishes Second Edition of Textbook]]> 27279 Stewart School of ISyE faculty member William Rouse has published the second edition of his Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management. Originally distributed by John Wiley & Sons in 1999, Rouse co-edits the book with colleague Andrew Sage. It has been recognized by Amazon as a "bestseller in government" and has been widely adopted in a range of industries.

The handbook is written and edited to serve as a university reference handbook in systems engineering and management. It is primarily focused on systems engineering and systems management for fielding systems of all types, especially systems that are information technology and software intensive and that involve human and organizational elements. The role of these systems to produce high reliability, and quality services and products is stressed. The role of advanced information technologies in enhancing productivity and quality is also discussed. By focusing on systems engineering processes and systems management, the editors continue to produce a long lasting handbook that will make a difference in the design of systems of all types that are large in scale and/or scope.

Andrew P. Sage is a University Professor and the Founding Dean Emeritus of the School of Information Technology & Engineering at George Mason University. He is a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE).

William B. Rouse is a Professor and former School Chair of the Stewart School of ISyE. He stepped down from his duties as School Chair in 2005 to become the Founding Director of the Tennenbaum Institute. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering as well as a Fellow of IEEE, INCOSE, INFORMS, and the Human Factors & Ergonomics Society (HFES).

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1247702400 2009-07-16 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management, originally distributed by John Wiley & Sons in 1999.]]> 2009-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47620 47621 47620 image <![CDATA[Handbook of Systems Engineering and Management, Se]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47 47621 image <![CDATA[William Rouse, Ph.D]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Astronaut Kimbrough \"Touches Down\" at Tech]]> 27279 On Friday, June 26th, Army Lt. Col. Shane Kimbrough (MS OR, 1998) returned to campus to speak about his recent trip to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour. Last November's mission marked the first trip into orbit for the Atlanta native, who attended The Lovett School.

Kimbrough was in town for NASA's Hometown Heroes 2009 Campaign, a program that brings astronauts to their home states to share the exciting message of continued space exploration and scientific research represented by the ISS. Aboard the STS-126 mission, which was popularly dubbed the "Extreme Makeover: Space Station Edition," he performed two spacewalks and assisted the crew in installing upgrades and expanding the space station's capabilities. In particular, the crew installed a new toilet with a water purification system that will allow the ISS to support a crew of up to six people.

A crowd of over 200 Georgia Tech faculty, students, and guests filled the Student Center Theatre for Kimbrough's presentation on July 26. He introduced the audience to the ISS's facilities and crew, which included fellow Georgia Tech graduates Eric Boe (MS EE, 1997) and Sandra Magnus (PhD MSE, 1996). At the end of his presentation, he opened up the floor to the audience for a question-and-answer session in which he fielded inquiries about the launch sequence, his spacewalks, his typical workday in space, and his acclimation to low-gravity. Afterward, the astronaut signed autographs for the audience in attendance, many of whom were local children attending on-campus engineering summer camps.

Kimbrough's visit to Georgia Tech was hosted through the College of Engineering by the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and the Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering. A 40-minute video of the presentation has been made available through the SMARTech repository online. For more information, please see:
http://smartech.gatech.edu/handle/1853/28916

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1247702400 2009-07-16 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-16T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47623 47624 47623 image <![CDATA[Nancy Sandlin, Director of Development; Lt. Col. S]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47 47624 image <![CDATA[Kimbrough signed autographs for students, faculty,]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[ISyE Faculty & Students Win Four IIE Paper Awards]]> 27279 Several faculty and students at the Stewart School of ISyE were recognized at the recent IIE Annual Conference and Expo 2009 in Miami, Florida. This year's annual conference for the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) drew more than 1,300 representatives of industry and academia for four days of educational sessions, exhibits, and awards ceremonies.

Among ten total publication awards, IIE annually awards four Best Paper Awards for articles published in its flagship journal IIE Transactions in the categories of design & manufacturing, quality & reliability, scheduling & logistics, and operations engineering. In 2009, Stewart School faculty co-authored the award-winning papers in three of the four categories.

Professor Paul Griffin and Associate Professor Pinar Keskinocak received the IIE Transactions Best Paper Award in Scheduling and Logistics for "Coordination of Marketing and Production for Price and Leadtime Decisions," coauthored with Ph.D. student Pelin Pekgun. Their paper analyzes the inefficiencies that are due to the decentralization of price and leadtime decisions in make-to-order firms.

Associate Professor Roshan Vengazhiyil received the IIE Transactions Best Paper Award in Quality and Reliability for "Optimal Specifications for Degrading Characteristics," coauthored with I-Tang Yu of Tunghai University, Taiwan. Their paper demonstrates an alternative approach to maximizing the quality of the product when dealing with characteristics affected by degradation.

Associate Professor Chen Zhou received the IIE Transactions Best Paper Award in Design and Manufacturing for "Clusters and Filling-Curve-Based Storage Assignment in a Circuit Assembly Kitting Area," coauthored with Wei Hua of IBM (MS 1999, DR 2001). Their paper addresses the complexity of a manufacturing process that assembles circuit boards for more than 1,000 different products.

In addition to the publication awards, Ph.D. student Melike Meterelliyoz won the Pritsker Doctoral Dissertation Award and received the first-place cash prize of $1,000. Meterelliyoz was advised by Professor David Goldsman and Associate Professor Christos Alexopoulos, both of whom specialize in the field of simulation.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1248307200 2009-07-23 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-07-23T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-23T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-23 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Ray Anderson at Tech for Book Signing on Oct. 12]]> 27279 Ray C. Anderson, a prominent 1956 graduate of the Stewart School of ISyE and the founder and CEO of Interface Inc., will be at the Georgia Tech Barnes & Nobles Bookstore at 5:00pm on Monday, October 12, for a book signing to promote Confessions of a Radical Industrialist, his latest book about sustainability and environmental challenges in the 21st century.

Written by the poet-laureate of industrial ecology, Radical Industrialist is the true, wise, and open-hearted story of how one man took on the myriad environmental problems we face today and created one of the greenest companies in the world. Founded in 1973 in LaGrange, Georgia, Interface claims to be the world's largest manufacturer of modular carpet for commercial and residential applications and the first company in the United States to manufacture free-lay carpet tiles.

After reading Paul Hawken's The Ecology of Commerce, Anderson had a revelation that led him to transform his company from a polluter to a world leader on matters of sustainability and the environment. Since 1994, Interface has focused on reducing its petroleum consumption and dematerializing its product development processes through digital means. Today, Interface has completed approximately half of Anderson's extraordinary vision called "Mission Zero," a promise to eliminate any negative impact on the environment by 2020 through the redesign of processes and products, the pioneering of new technologies, the reduction and elimination of waste, and the adoption of renewable materials and sources of energy.

"This reduced footprint is reflected in every product that Interface makes anywhere on Earth, not just one here and one there," Anderson said. "This company further believes it will become restorative, putting back on balance more than it takes from earth and doing good for Earth, not just no harm."

Anderson's company has been features in the documentaries The Corporation, and The 11th Hour as well as in The New York Times, Fortune, Fast Company, and many other publications. He was named one of Time magazine's Heroes of the Environment and one of MSN.com's Top 15 Green Business Leaders in 2007, and he has received the Purpose Prize from Civic Ventures. He was also co-chair of the President's Council on Sustainable Development in addition to co-chair of the Presidential Climate Action Project. He has been brilliant as an executive, but he has been startling as a leader who has used his company's experience to teach hundreds of thousands of business people and students that we can completely re-imagine our industrial systems today and do it profitably, competitively, and without compromise.

Anderson is an also ardent contributor to the Stewart School of ISyE, and he supports Associate Professor Valerie Thomas's research in sustainability through the Anderson-Interface Chair in Natural Systems.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1248912000 2009-07-30 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news Confessions of a Radical Industrialist, his latest book about sustainability and environmental challenges in the 21st century.]]> 2009-07-30T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-30T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47616 47617 47616 image <![CDATA[Confessions of a Radical Industrialist]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47 47617 image <![CDATA[Ray Anderson (IE \'56)]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Wu Revises Textbook on the Design and Analysis of Experiments]]> 27279 C. F. Jeff Wu, the Coca-Cola Professor in Engineering Statistics at the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, has published the second edition of his textbook Experiments: Planning, Analysis, and Optimization. Wu has spent two years updating the text, originally distributed by John Wiley & Sons in 2000, with colleague Michael Hamada to reflect the major progress in the use of statistically designed experiments for product and process improvement.

Experiments, Second Edition introduces some of the newest discoveries - and sheds further light on existing ones - on the design and analysis of experiments and their applications in system optimization, robustness, and treatment comparison. The textbook is an excellent book for design of experiments courses at the upper-undergraduate and graduate levels and is also a valuable resource for practicing engineers and statisticians. In the second edition, the authors modernize accepted methodologies and refine many cutting-edge topics including robust parameter design, reliability improvement, analysis of non-normal data, analysis of experiments with complex aliasing, multilevel designs, minimum aberration designs, and orthogonal arrays.

Michael Hamada, PhD, is a Statistical Scientist at the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico. Dr. Hamada is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and the author of more than seventy published papers.

C. F. Jeff Wu, PhD, is the Coca-Cola Professor in Engineering Statistics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Wu has published more than 130 papers and is the recipient of numerous accolades, including the National Academy of Engineering membership and the COPSS Presidents' Award.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1249430400 2009-08-05 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news Experiments: Planning, Analysis, and Optimization with colleague Michael Hamada.]]> 2009-08-05T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-05T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47613 47614 47613 image <![CDATA[Experiments, Second Edition]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47 47614 image <![CDATA[C. F. Jeff Wu]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[ISyE Alumnus Becomes President of the University of Monterrey]]> 27279 Antonio Dieck-Assad (PhD IE 1984) was recently named the President of the University of Monterrey (UDEM) in Mexico. Tony Dieck succeeds Azcunaga Guerra as president of the university, who held the position from 1994 to 2009.

The University of Monterrey (UDEM) is a higher-learning Roman Catholic institution located in Monterrey, Mexico. Since 1969, UDEM has been a pioneer of liberal arts education in Mexico. It is one of only four Latin American universities to be accredited by an American regional accreditation agency. The school houses approximately 7000 undergraduates and 300 postgraduate students.

Dieck recently ascended to the title of Vice President of Higher Education at UDEM in March. Previously, he served as the Dean of the Graduate School of Business at Monterrey Tech from 2005 to 2009 and as the Director of Undergraduate and Graduate Programs at Monterrey Tech's Virtual University from 2003 to 2005. Tony Dieck and Jerry Banks, Professor Emeritus in the Stewart School of ISyE, were instrumental in securing Georgia Tech's first undergraduate dual-degree program with Monterrey Tech in 2007.

Dieck earned his Master's Degree in Systems Engineering at the Stewart School in 1979. He completed his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering in 1984.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1249516800 2009-08-06 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-08-06T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-06T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47611 47611 image <![CDATA[Tony Dieck with Azcunaga Guerra]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45
<![CDATA[ISyE Research to Prevent Breakdowns]]> 27279 Assistant Professor Nagi Gebraeel's research initiative to develop a system for predicting and preventing mechanical breakdowns was recently picked up by KPTV in Portland, Oregon. Gebraeel has designed a system called adaptive prognosis for electronics and manufacturing components that uses electronic sensors to calculate the internal wear in machine parts. His system can be used to predict mechanical failures before they occur, recommending the best economic time to replace fatiguing components. His system can improve not only safety in industries such as aviation but also save in financial and maintenance costs.

For more information, see the following video clip:
http://web11.mediavsn.com/UserSavedClips/103582c1-71f8-47af-b799-4b1c36c796e8.asx

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1249948800 2009-08-11 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-11T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-11 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Alumnus Supawanich Cycles Across the U.S. for Charity]]> 27279 Paul Supawanich, a 2006 graduate of the Stewart School of ISyE, was recently featured in the September/October issue of the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine. Supawanich, an avid cyclist who currently lives in Berkeley, CA, to study transportation issues at graduate school, pedaled away from San Francisco in late July to begin a 2,848-mile bike ride to his hometown of Gibson City, IL, to raise money for the Atlanta Bike Coalition and the Ford County Youth Soccer Club.

Supawanich said he chose to support the Fort County Youth Soccer Club in Gibson City because of his experiences as a youngster: "Playing soccer ... was an activity that really shaped me into the person I am today, not only combining the importance of fitness and teamwork but also leadership and discipline."

He hopes to raise $4,000 to support the two organizations and expects to arrive in Gibson City on approximately September 9th. His journey can be followed on his blog at http://www.supaonabike.blogspot.com, where he posts pictures and updates about his route across the United States and the progress of his fundraising. His blog also includes information on how to donate to his cause, with 75% of all donations going to the beneficiary of choice and the remainder going toward his food and supplies for the 35-day ride.

The original article published on page 72 of the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine can be viewed online in its entirety here:
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/gatech/alumni_20090910/#/72

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1250035200 2009-08-12 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine. An avid cyclist, he is pedaling 2,848 miles across the U.S. to raise money for the Atlanta Bike Coalition and the Ford County Youth Soccer Club.]]> 2009-08-12T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-12T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-12 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47608 47608 image <![CDATA[Cyclist Paul Supawanich (IE 2006)]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45
<![CDATA[SCL Completes Warehousing Project for Walgreens]]> 15436 The spring class in Warehousing and Distribution at the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) completed a project for a Walgreens distribution center in Anderson, SC, to help improve order-picking.

The team of graduate students visited the facility, picked orders to learn the processes, and then performed detailed computer simulations based on historical records of product flow. They then designed an order-picking protocol and adjustments to the product layout to support the protocol.

For more information about SCL's professional education course offerings, please see: http://www.scl.gatech.edu/professional-education/

]]> Automator 1 1250553600 2009-08-18 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-08-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Robin Thomas Wins Second Fulkerson Prize]]> 27279 Robin Thomas, Professor in the School of Mathematics with a courtesy appointment in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, and three colleagues have been awarded a 2009 Fulkerson Prize.

Administered by jointly by the American Mathematical Society (AMS) and the Mathematical Programming Society (MPS), the Fulkerson Prize was created in 1979 in honor of the late mathematician Delbert Ray Fulkerson. The Prize includes a $1500 award and recognizes outstanding papers in the field of discrete mathematics. No more than three prizes are awarded every three years.

Dr. Thomas received the award on August 23rd at MPS's 20th International Symposium of MPS alongside colleagues Maria Chudnovsky of Columbia University, Neil Robertson of the Ohio State University, and Paul Seymour of Princeton University. The research team's paper "The Strong Perfect Graph Theorem," published in the Annals of Mathematics in 2006, resolves a conjecture proposed in 1960 by Claude Berge, one of the modern founders of combinatorics and graph theory.

Gary Parker, Professor of ISyE and Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, described the Fulkerson Prize as a "very serious award" and lauded Thomas's achievement as "quite rare." In fact, Thomas is one of only four individuals to win the Fulkerson Prize multiple times, among colleagues Robertson and Seymour. The trio previously collaborated on the paper "Hadwiger's Conjecture for K6-Free Graphs" for which they won a 1994 Fulkerson Prize.

A renowned graph theorist, Robin Thomas serves as the Director of the Algorithms, Combinatorics, and Optimization (ACO) doctoral program, a multidisciplinary venture sponsored by the College of Computing, the Stewart School of ISyE, and the School of Mathematics. He received his Doctor of Natural Sciences from Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic, in 1985.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245888000 2009-06-25 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47639 47639 image <![CDATA[Dr. Robin Thomas]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Students Look at Potential Energy Savings for ISyE Complex]]> 27279 In an effort to bring home the issues of energy and sustainability, a student team from the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering analyzed electricity practices and identified potential energy savings for the ISyE complex. The team's findings prompted Georgia Tech Facilities, who provided assistance throughout the project, to enact a more sustainable nighttime lighting policy in the ISyE buildings.

Graduate students Seth Borin, Todd Levin, and Cauvery Patel performed the calculations this spring as a project for their "Quantitative Analysis of Energy and the Environment" class led by Dr. Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems. The team observed that the three buildings that comprise the ISyE complex - the Groseclose Building, the ISyE Main Building, and the Instructional Center (IC - account for almost $200,000 in annual energy expenditures. They decided to focus primarily on the electricity consumed by the buildings' lights, vending machines, and computers.

The students identified lighting as the area with the largest potential for energy savings. Their methodology divided ISyE floor space into common areas and private areas. Common areas such as hallways, lounges, and restrooms receive sporadic activity throughout all hours of the day while the use of private areas such as offices and classrooms is largely constrained to daytime hours. The team observed the lighting and traffic patterns of the ISyE complex and defined a low-activity period from 7:30pm to 7:30am during which occupancy sensors could be used to regulate the facilities' lighting.

Combining infrared and ultrasonic technology, occupancy sensors detect human activity and control luminosity accordingly. By the team's estimations, a two-thirds reduction in default lighting intensity coupled with the use of regulatory sensors could produce savings in excess of $7,000 annually, recouping the initial investment in as little as three years. In some areas, the potential energy savings are even more profound; the installation of sensors in the IC's Tennenbaum Auditorium, which consumes an estimated 25 megawatt hours (MWh) of electricity annually while not in use, could pay for itself in less than one year.

For ISyE, the students' diligence will not go unrewarded. At the end of the spring semester, Georgia Tech Facilities installed occupancy sensors in the bathrooms, hallways, and lounges on all four floors of the Groseclose and Main Buildings. In the past, no policy existed to adjust common area lighting output during the low-activity period.

In a similar fashion, the graduate students examined the viability of "smart" vending machines that make use of occupancy sensors to regulate the activity of their motors and compressors. Fitting the ISyE complex's seven vending machines with sensors could reduce the units' energy costs by 46 percent, equating to $500 in annual savings.

The team also measured the energy usage of the computers in the IC classrooms, the Undergraduate Lab, and the Graduate Lab. An average computer consumes 88 watts while in use but only 43 watts while idling with the monitor off. Furthermore, an offline computer left plugged into its power strip still draws one watt of power. The team estimates that computer utilization drops to 11 percent between the nighttime hours of 6pm and 9am, and their recommendation to shut down machines after given periods of inactivity could amount to $2,000 in annual energy savings.

Overall, the team identified the potential for the ISyE complex to decrease its yearly energy consumption by 137 megawatt hours, a five percent reduction equivalent to the annual carbon dioxide emissions of 14 households. The students' recommendation also urges Georgia Tech Facilities to meter energy consumption on a departmental basis in order to incentivize a reduction in energy usage.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1243900800 2009-06-02 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-02T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-02T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47658 47658 image <![CDATA[Cauvery Patel, Todd Levin, Seth Borin]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[EMIL Participants Visit & Study Logistics Challenges in Asia]]> 27279 Georgia Tech's Executive Master's in International Logistics (EMIL) program completed its Asian residence in March. The two-week trip provided 32 corporate students with a unique look at how companies are reacting to difficult conditions and combating negative influences on supply chains.

Created in 1999, EMIL is an 18-month program delivered in an Executive format that teaches techniques for decreasing logistics costs and improving supply chain efficiency. The program's structure allows participants to remain on-the-job while they work toward a Master's of Science in International Logistics. The program intersperses distance learning methods among five global residences, each supplying an intense two weeks of classes and site tours.

The Asia residence is designed to expose executive students to the challenges and differences that exist in the region's infrastructure for logistics, distribution, and fulfillment. The residence benchmarks manufacturing, sourcing, distribution, tax, and investment strategies employed across numerous industries in China and throughout Asia. Participants network with and learn from industry experts, government officials, trade associations, professors, and EMIL's growing alumni base.

The program's two-week trip to Asia began in Seoul, marking the first time that South Korea has hosted an EMIL residence. Professor Linda Low, Senior Fellow of the Institute of Asian Studies, gave an economic overview that focused on Asia, China, and the Middle East. She also presented material on social, political, economical, demographic, and security issues in these regions. Additionally, Low compared and contrasted the national perspectives of India, Singapore, and other Asian nations against the trade blocs of Europe, the Americas, Africa, and the Middle East. Lastly, she spoke on the impact of globalization on Asian and worldwide crises such as contagion and economic uncertainty.

While in Seoul, EMIL visited with Hanjin Shipping and CJ Global Logistics. Hanjin Shipping discussed infrastructure problems within Korea and other emerging markets throughout Asia. CJ Global Logistics discussed strategies to satisfy domestic demand and overcome barriers unfamiliar to the United States. In particular, the company highlighted customs issues that hinder the movement of goods, disadvantageous tariffs, and capacity constraints of air and water freight services. The EMIL class then toured the CJ GLS Logistics Center in Sin Duk Pyoung, South Korea.

Later in the residence, EMIL again blazed new ground by embarking on its first trip to Beijing, China. The participants learned about sourcing strategies in China from Raymond J. Chou, Managing Director of Home Depot's Asia Sourcing division. EMIL also met with Intel China and learned about the firm's migration of manufacturing to western China. Byron Ba, Greater China Logistics Manager for Intel and 2002 graduate of the EMIL program, led the discussion.

Additionally, the class experienced site visits and corporate discussions with SinoTrans Integrated Logistics. The dialogue focused on the logistics infrastructure in China, contract logistics-distribution, freight forwarding and customs clearance, and the impact of the economic recession on China. Afterward, the group adjourned for a site visit to John Deere during which the students learned about inbound logistics and protecting the "frozen zone" in Tianjin, China.

The recent Asian residence brought together two different EMIL classes for the first time in the program's existence. EMIL's Class of 2009 participated on the Asian tour in fulfillment of its fourth residence while the Class of 2010 completed its second residence. The decision to unite two classes at different stages in the program went off without a hitch, and the two groups forged new relationships and broadened both their EMIL experiences and professional networks. The Class of 2010 will depart for Europe next on June 14th, and the Class of 2009 completed its final residence in the United States in May, graduating from the EMIL program.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1243987200 2009-06-03 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-03T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-03T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47654 47655 47656 47654 image <![CDATA[EMIL Class]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47 47655 image <![CDATA[Greg Andrews and Adam Zhang]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47 47656 image <![CDATA[EMIL site tour in Hong Kong]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[University of Waterloo to Award Nemirovski Honorary Degree]]> 27279 Arkadi Nemirovski, John Hunter Chair and Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, will be awarded an Honorary Doctor of Mathematics degree from the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, during its spring convocation on June 12, 2009.

Included among university chancellors and other distinguished scientists, Nemirovski will receive one of 13 honorary doctorates granted by the University of Waterloo for his innovations in optimization theory and algorithms. A fundamental contributor to continuous optimization, Nemirovski was the first individual to have won all three of the top scholarly prizes in his field. He was awarded the Fulkerson Prize in 1982 for work leading to the ellipsoid method and contributing to the proof of polynomial-time solvability of linear programming. He received the Dantzig Prize in 1991 for investigating performance limits of convex optimization methods and developing efficient algorithms and in 2003, he accepted the John von Neumann Theory Prize for contributions to the general theory of polynomial-time interior-point methods and the development of robust optimization.

Nemirovski earned a Ph.D. in Mathematics from Moscow State University in 1973 and the Doctor of Sciences in Mathematics from the Kiev Institute of Cybernetics in 1990. Before coming to Georgia Tech in 2005, he was a chaired full professor at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and between 2000 and 2004, he also conducted research at the University of Waterloo as an Adjunct Visiting Professor. Since joining the Stewart School of ISyE, he has received a courtesy appointment in the School of Mathematics as an Adjunct Professor.

Arkadi Nemirovski is the second Stewart School faculty member to receive an honorary doctorate from the University of Waterloo in as many years. Dr. C. F. Jeff Wu, Coca-Cola Chair in Engineering Statistics and formerly a Waterloo professor, received an honorary Doctor of Mathematics degree and addressed the convocation at the commencement ceremony in June 2008.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1244592000 2009-06-10 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-10T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-10T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-10 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47648 47648 image <![CDATA[Dr. Arkadi Nemirovski]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Anonymous Bequest to Benefit ISyE Faculty & Students]]> 27279 The H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) has been the nation's top-rated ISyE program for nearly two decades. A robust record of philanthropic investment has been an important element in keeping the School at the top of the U.S. News & World Report rankings all these years. The School's namesake, H. Milton Stewart, IE 1961, and his wife Carolyn exemplify the generosity and commitment of ISyE's many devoted friends and alumni.

That tradition continues with a recent $3 million bequest provision from an anonymous alumnus. The funds will ultimately establish an endowed faculty chair in ISyE, an endowed fund for the unrestricted support of the School, and additional support for an existing endowed President's Scholarship Fund.

"This is a wonderful investment in the future of the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering," said Chelsea C. White III, the H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart School Chair and Professor. "The quality of our faculty is a key long-term component in maintaining and growing the School's overall reputation, and the establishment of this endowed chair in future years will augment those efforts significantly. In addition, the endowed fund for unrestricted support of ISyE will almost certainly play a critical role in the School's future, as it will give us much-needed flexibility to take advantage of rapidly emerging opportunities. I want to thank this generous alumnus for helping to secure the future of a vital, internationally prominent, and relevant program."

The President's Scholarship Program, Georgia Tech's premier merit-based award for undergraduates, will also benefit significantly from this estate gift. "The ongoing success of the President's Scholarship Program after nearly thirty years could never have happened without the support of so many loyal alumni and friends," said Randy McDow, IE 1995, MS PUBP 2003, director of the President's Scholarship Program and a former President's Scholar himself. "I want this alumnus - and all who have given to the program - to know how truly grateful our President's Scholars are and how hard they work to make those investments meaningful."

Originally established as a program in 1924, ISyE earned school status in 1945. The largest academic program of its kind in the United States, ISyE has sixty tenure-track faculty members and supports a broad spectrum of academic concentrations, several of which have achieved world-class rank.

To inquire about making a gift in support of Industrial and Systems Engineering, contact Director of Development Nancy J. Sandlin at 404.385.7458 or nancy.sandlin@isye.gatech.edu. To inquire about making a planned gift to Georgia Tech, contact a member of the Gift Planning team at 404.894.4678 or founderscouncil@dev.gatech.edu.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245283200 2009-06-18 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Paul Griffin to Become Penn State\'s Head of IE]]> 27279 After twenty years of service at the Stewart School of ISyE, Paul Griffin has accepted an offer to become the new department head of industrial engineering at Penn State University, effective August 15th.

With the appointment, Griffin will become the Peter and Angela Dal Pezzo Department Head Chair of the Harold and Inge Marcus Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering. He replaces Richard Koubek, who left Penn State to join the faculty of Louisiana State University as Dean of Engineering. Penn State's IE department, which celebrated its 100th anniversary earlier this year, was the first industrial engineering department in the world. The department is currently ranked among the nation's top five IE programs according to US News & World Report.

After earning his Ph.D. in industrial engineering from Texas A&M University in 1988, Griffin joined the faculty of Georgia Tech as a professor. He served as the Associate Chair of Undergraduate Studies in the Stewart School of ISyE from 2002 to 2007 before returning to a faculty full-time position. As Co-Director of SCL's Center for Health Care Logistics, his research and teaching interests have included health logistics and supply chain coordination. Recently, Griffin and two colleagues were honored with the IIE Transactions Best Paper Award in Scheduling and Logistics for their paper "Coordination of Marketing and Production for Price and Leadtime Decisions."

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245283200 2009-06-18 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47646 47646 image <![CDATA[Dr. Paul M. Griffin]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[SCL to Open Logistics Center in Costa Rica on Aug. 20]]> 27279 Donald Ratliff, UPS and Regents' Professor in ISyE and executive director of the Supply Chain & Logistics (SCL) Institute at Georgia Tech, was recently interviewed by GlobalAtlanta to discuss the opening of a new logistics center in Costa Rica.

Written by David Beasley, the article announces that Georgia Tech on August 20 will open a center in Costa Rica aimed at improving foreign trade by helping companies there get products to market faster and more efficiently. Located in the capital city of San Jose, the Trade-Chain Innovation and Productivity (TIP) Center is designed to teach graduate students and company executives how to improve supply chains and logistics. It will also serve as an important research center in those fields. "Supply chains and logistics are fundamental to trade," said Ratliff. "It would be impossible for anyone to be good at trade that doesn't have good supply chain and logistics capabilities."

For more information and to view a ten-minute interview with Dr. Ratliff, please visit:
http://www.globalatlanta.com/article/17407/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245628800 2009-06-22 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-22T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-22T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-22 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47643 47643 image <![CDATA[Donald Ratliff, executive director of Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[PhD Student Wins Award at 2009 TRANSLOG Conference]]> 27279 Oran Kitterthreeapronchai, Ph.D. student in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, received the "Best Student Paper" award at the 1st Annual International Transportation and Logistics (TRANSLOG) Conference held at McMaster University in Canada earlier this month.

Kitterthreeapronchai, whose research interests are in the areas of large-scale logistics systems, computational algorithms, and applied optimization, received the award and a cash prize for his paper "Geometric Relationships of a Single-Hub Crossdocking Network." Since obtaining his MSIE from the Stewart School in December 2002, he has worked with faculty advisor John Bartholdi III, Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management, on this and other transportation-related problems. He defended his thesis in April and will now take up a research engineer position at the National University of Singapore.

Kitterthreeapronchai studied industrial engineering at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok, Thailand, before coming to Georgia Tech in 2001. For the past several years, he has enjoyed the unique distinction of having the longest surname at Georgia Tech.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245888000 2009-06-25 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47637 47637 image <![CDATA[Oran Kitterthreeapronchai &John Bartholdi III]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[SCL to Offer Free Logistics Performance Webinar on July 10th]]> 27279 The Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL) at Georgia Tech is offering a free, one-hour webinar on Friday, July 10th, at 2:00pm EST.

The webinar will consist of an online self-assessment presentation conducted by Dr. Edward H. Frazelle, founding director of SCL and President/CEO of Logistics Resources International.

Dr. Frazelle will lead you through an assessment of your logistics performance, comparing your operations to world-class standards and revealing opportunities for cost, labor, and space savings.

To register for the event, please see the following link:
http://www.scl.gatech.edu/professional-education/webinar/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1246320000 2009-06-30 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-06-30T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-30T00:00:00-04:00 2009-06-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47635 47635 image <![CDATA[Dr. Edward Frazelle]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Santanu Dey Joins ISyE Faculty]]> 27279 Santanu S. Dey joined the faculty of the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering as an assistant professor on July 1, 2009.

Since 2007, Dey has worked as a research fellow at the Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) of the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. His research interests are in the areas of large-scale optimization, mixed integer programming, and applications of discrete optimization in logistics and computational biology.

The results of Dey's recent research, a paper entitled "Two Families of Facets for the Two-Dimensional Mixed Integer Infinite Group Problem," will be published in a forthcoming issue of Mathematics of Operations Research, a publication sponsored by the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS). In 2007, Dey was honored with First Place in the INFORMS George Nicholson Paper Competition for his paper entitled "Sequential-Merge Facets for High Dimensional Infinite Group Problems."

Dey obtained his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from Purdue University in 2007 after earning his M.S. in Industrial Engineering from the university in 2003. In 2000, Dey completed his undergraduate studies in mechanical engineering at Mumbai University, receiving Kulapati's Gold Medal for standing first among engineering students.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1245628800 2009-06-22 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-07-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-01T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-01 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47641 47641 image <![CDATA[Santanu Dey]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Gebraeel's Research to Prevent Failures in Airplanes]]> 27279 Nagi Gebraeel, assistant professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, was recently interviewed by Ivanhoe Broadcast News for Discoveries & Breakthroughs Inside Science to discuss the applications in aviation of his latest research.

Gebraeel has developed a system called adaptive prognostics for electronics and manufacturing components. The system uses internal sensors to measure use and wear in real-time, giving engineers another tool to prevent mechanical problems and part failures in airplanes.

"This system will not only say how long a given product or component is going to last; it will also give them economic insight as to when is the best economical time to replace that component," Dr. Gebraeel explained.

For more information and to view a brief news reel, please visit:
http://www.ivanhoe.com/science/story/2009/07/595a.html

 

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1246924800 2009-07-07 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news Nagi Gebraeel, assistant professor in the Stewart School of ISyE, was featured on Discoveries & Breakthroughs Inside Science to discuss the applications in aviation of his latest research.

]]>
2009-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-07 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
47631 47631 image <![CDATA[Nagi Gebraeel, Ph.D.]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Mei receives 2009 Abraham Wald Prize in Sequential Analysis]]> 27279 Yajun Mei, assistant professor in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, received the 2009 Abraham Wald Prize in Sequential Analysis for his paper entitled "Is Average Run Length to False Alarm Always an Informative Criterion?"

Mei received the award on June 16 at the second International Workshop on Sequential Methodologies (IWSM) in Troyes, France. The Abraham Wald Prize honors annually the best publication in the journal Sequential Analysis. Established in 2004, the prize bears the namesake of Abraham Wald, a Hungarian-born mathematician who founded the field of sequential analysis in response to the demand for efficient methods of industrial quality control during World War II.

"What this paper is about is to challenge the traditional thinking of how to evaluate procedures," said Professor Mei. "Normally in the field of sequential change-point detection, people use the criterion of 'average run length until false alarm' to evaluate procedures. In this paper, I try to challenge researchers to think about whether this is the appropriate way to do it."

Mei's current research interests include change-point problems, sequential methodologies, sensor networks, and their applications to engineering and biomedical sciences. Mei joined the Stewart School of ISyE in 2006 after performing postdoctorate research in biostatistics for two years at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. He holds a Ph.D. in Mathematics with a minor in Electrical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1246924800 2009-07-07 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-07T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-07 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47633 47633 image <![CDATA[Yajun Mei, Ph.D.]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Mike Duke\'s Journey from ISyE to CEO]]> 27279 Michael Duke, a 1971 graduate of the Stewart School of ISyE who in February was named president and chief executive officer of Wal-Mart Stores Inc., was recently interviewed by Tech Topics, a publication of the Georgia Tech Alumni Association.

Written by Van Jensen, the article traces Duke's journey from a small town to Georgia Tech to the top of a retail empire. To view an electronic copy of the article, please see pages 27-28 of the Summer 2009 issue of Tech Topics:
http://www.nxtbook.com/nxtbooks/gatech/techtopics-summer09/#/27

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1247011200 2009-07-08 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news 2009-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47626 47626 image <![CDATA[Mike Duke (ISyE 1971)]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Tennenbaum Institute to Collaborate with Lockheed Martin]]> 27279 The Tennenbaum Institute (TI) at Georgia Tech is conducting a 2.5-year-long research project with Lockheed Martin Aerospace to prepare for the production of the new F-35 Lightning II.

The Georgia Tech team, led by Leon McGinnis (Director of Research at TI and Gwaltney Professor of Manufacturing Systems in the Stewart School of ISyE) and by William Kessler (Director of Executive Programs at TI and Professor of the Practice of ISyE), includes investigators from the Stewart School of ISyE, the DuPree College of Management, the Georgia Tech Research Institute, Georgia State University, and the University of Texas-Austin. Working closely with Lockheed Martin Aerospace, the team will develop methods and tools to identify, analyze, and mitigate the risks associated with transitioning to a new business model for global sourcing of parts to support both production and operation of the Joint Strike Fighter.

The team has previously worked with Lockheed Martin Aerospace on a four-month study to develop an R&D roadmap for the Joint Strike Fighter Global Delivery System.

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1247011200 2009-07-08 00:00:00 1475895833 2016-10-08 03:03:53 0 0 news The Tennenbaum Institute (TI) at Georgia Tech is conducting a 2.5-year-long research project with Lockheed Martin Aerospace to prepare for the production of the new F-35 Lightning II.

]]>
2009-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-07-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
47628 47629 47628 image <![CDATA[Leon McGinnis, Ph.D.]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47 47629 image <![CDATA[William Kessler, Ph.D.]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[SCL Collaborates with Industry on Warehousing Research]]> 27279 The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), a unit of the Stewart School of ISyE, has focused much research in the areas of warehousing and distribution over the past semester. Listed are some of the highlights of SCL's recent research activities and industry collaborations.

Visiting Scholars at SCL
Both the research activities and the social lives of SCL were enriched considerably by the extended stays of two visiting scholars. Johan Lundin, Fulbright Scholar from the University of Lund in Sweden, just completed a year's stay during which he extended his work on cash supply chains. Johan has already written a book on the topic and has served as a consultant to the government of Sweden. Filippo Bindi, a Ph.D. student from the University of Bologna, continued his work developing software to analyze sales histories with the goal of achieving efficiencies by careful product placements within the warehouse.

New Edition of Warehouse & Distribution Science
SCL has released the latest edition of the book Warehouse & Distribution Science, which is freely available online. The text is used in programs across the U.S. and throughout 32 countries worldwide. It is a rigorous development of mathematical and computer models of warehouse layout and processes.

IDI, SCL to Collaborate on Supply Chain White Papers
Industrial Developments International (IDI) , a firm that specializes in development, investment management, and leasing throughout North America, will collaborate with SCL faculty to produce a series of white papers on issues in supply chain management and logistics. These will be broad examinations of trends and their implications, especially as they might relate to investment decisions.

SCL Project With CAT Logistics
Under the guidance of Dr. John Bartholdi, Manhattan Associates Chair in Supply Chain Management, and Mr. Pete Viehweg, Executive-in-Residence at SCL, the fall class in Warehousing and Distribution will work with CAT Logistics to design a new layout that accounts for projected growth in its Atlanta area service parts distribution center. The graduate students will data-mine sales histories and product dimensions to compute a highly space-efficient storage strategy. Is your company interested in sponsoring a project? See here for more information.

SCL Completes Warehousing Project for Walgreens
The spring class in Warehousing and Distribution completed a project for a Walgreens distribution center in Anderson, SC, to help improve order-picking. The team of graduate students visited the facility, picked orders to learn the processes, and performed detailed computer simulations based on historical record of product flow. They then designed an order-picking protocol and provided adjustments to the product layout to support the protocol.

New Developments in Automation
John Bartholdi and Pete Viehweg led a group of Ph.D. students to visit Kiva Systems, developers of order-picking systems based on flocks of autonomous robots. Previously, Peter Blair, Director of Marketing and Communications at Kiva Systems, has lectured at Georgia Tech.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1250553600 2009-08-18 00:00:00 1475895829 2016-10-08 03:03:49 0 0 news 2009-08-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-18T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Student Team Takes 2nd at CICMHE Competition]]> 15436 Three students from the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) were recently recognized by the College Industry Council on Material Handling Education (CICMHE) in its student design competition.

The team was comprised of ISyE seniors Natasha Jain and Matt Knepper as well as visiting graduate student Chang Peng Shen. Chen Zhou, Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies advised the student team. The team received the second place prize in the competition, winning a cash prize of $1000 in addition to a $500 prize for the Stewart School.

The students for the 2007-2008 competition tackled the problem of designing a dry grocery distribution center developed by Keogh Consulting. CICMHE sponsors the annual material handling student design competition for teams of students interested in the analysis and design of material handling systems. Since the first design competition was offered during the 1994-1995 academic year, student design teams have developed material handling system designs for a variety of manufacturing and warehousing operations. Design problems are typically drawn from the case files of designers and manufacturers of material handling equipment and their end users.

]]> Automator 1 1251158400 2009-08-25 00:00:00 1475895829 2016-10-08 03:03:49 0 0 news 2009-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-25T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
<![CDATA[Costa Rican President Praises Georgia Tech Logistics Center]]> 27279 Trevor Williams of Global Atlanta was on hand to cover the grand opening of Georgia Tech's new Trade, Innovation & Productivity (TIP) Center in San Jose, Costa Rica. His article features video interviews with President of Georgia Tech Dr. G.P. "Bud" Peterson with Marco Ruiz, Costa Rican Trade Minister.

The logistics center, a joint development of Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, Stewart School of ISyE and College of Management in conjunction with the Costa Rican Chamber of Industries and trade promotion agency PROCOMER, will conduct research, teach professionals, and develop technologies to help Costa Rican companies export more efficiently. For more information, please visit:

http://www.globalatlanta.com/articlevid/17531/543/

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1251331200 2009-08-27 00:00:00 1475895829 2016-10-08 03:03:49 0 0 news Trevor Williams of Global Atlanta was on hand to cover the grand opening of GT's new Trade, Innovation & Productivity Center in Costa Rica. His article features video interviews with G.P. "Bud" Peterson and Marco Ruiz, Costa Rican Trade Minister.

]]>
2009-08-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-27T00:00:00-04:00 2009-08-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
47600 47600 image <![CDATA[President of Costa Rica greets Donald Ratliff, SCL Executive Director]]> image/jpeg 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45
<![CDATA[EMIL-SCS Class Studies European Logistics in Europe]]> 27279 The students enrolled in the Stewart School of ISyE's Executive Masters in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS) program spent the summer trailblazing through Europe. In June, our Class of 2010 completed their third residence.

The European residence kicked off in Amsterdam, which was a first-time visit for the program. Professor Andreas Staab, Director of the European Policy Information Center and author of The European Union Explained, provided a historical overview of European integration with the objective of helping the students understand the historical, political, and cultural factors that shaped the integration and the evolution of the relationships among European countries and between the European Union and its members. While in Amsterdam, the class also visited Schiphol Airport and met with the Port of Rotterdam Council to learn about operations and future growth for one of the largest ports in the world.

From Amsterdam the class traveled by train to Stuttgart, Germany, where they became heavily engaged in a combination of theory and site visits. Bublu (Sarbani) Thakur-Weigold, Project Manager with Swiss Federal Institute of Technology and an EMIL-SCS alumna, presented the integration of Europe and the recent accession of 10 countries in Eastern Europe, differences in labor costs, changes in the ownership and structure of transportation, energy costs, and how environmental concerns have had a profound impact on the structure of European distribution networks.

The class then heard from Dr. Peter Klaus of Fraunhofer University, who presented an overview of the 3PL Industry in Europe and the world. He also discussed the impacts of structural changes like privatization, deregulation, and the participation of "national" players from postal services, rail roads, and financial organizations. He reviewed the relationship between large pan-European providers and small local companies, and presented a comparison of logistics services in Europe versus the United States.

While in Stuttgart, EMIL-SCS visited an ANZAG Pharmaceutical distribution center. With healthcare being a high priority in the lives of all people, experiencing the logistics of this DC became a shared interest among all of the students. In Europe, pharmacies do not hold medicines in stock. A customer will visit the pharmacy with a prescription and then will be told to come back in two hours. The pharmacy then places an order to its distribution facility that makes several runs a day to the store with the most current orders. It is a mammoth operation that functions within a very short timeframe, and the system has a 97% accuracy rating in its ordering, pulling, and shipping. Healthcare is managed through the German government; therefore, the distribution center is a government subsidized facility.

The class's favorite corporate visit overall was Daimler Service Parts Distribution for Mercedes-Benz. The distribution facility has implemented every aspect of Six Sigma and Lean Logistics, making it the most efficient warehouse any of the students had ever visited. The facility is so large that it does not have any air conditioning or heat. It takes three days for the outside temperature to affect the inside of the building. Conversely, the building just shifts with the natural weather patterns.

The next destination for the EMIL-SCS class was Krakow, Poland. Professor Andreas Staab met the class for a second time to respond to questions that had arisen during the course of the European residence and to address issues unique to Central and Eastern Europe. The class also visited United Technology Corporation in Rzeszow, Poland. The class spent the day learning about how this facility transformed from a government run MIG engine factory during the Cold War to a private enterprise that manufactures engine parts for Pratt and Whitney. The dedication and determination of the company owners to work through communism-controlled operations to a private entity emerging during a terrible depression was very moving. Despite being a large corporation, UTC is tied to the local community and has hopes to grow that region of Poland into an "Aviation Valley," which they anticipate will help the economic situation turn around in the coming years.

Paris was the last stop during the European residence and another first-time visit for the EMIL-SCS program. While in Paris, the class heard from Owen Darbishire, Rhodes Trust University Lecturer in Management Studies at Oxford University. His focus was on discussing various strategic advantages of different labor models around the world and how to manage effectively under constraints on labor.

The class also heard from Pascuale Pettoruto, Europe Region Brokerage & Customs Affairs Manager for UPS. He provided an overview of how customs operates in Europe, introduced the 27 different Customs administrations that implement the Customs Union, and discussed the challenges for both the Customs administrations and international trade. The class explored some of the differences that naturally arise among the different administrations of any such system.

And finally, the class sat in a discussion with Michiel Doorn from Arcadis Environmental Company, a consultant firm that provides engineering and management services in infrastructure, environment, and buildings to enhance mobility, sustainability and quality of life. His discussion focused on developments and trends in Environmental and Sustainability policy, especially highlighting how European companies are adapting their supply chain management needs. It was a high note to end the residence with ideas of environmental sustainability. These are challenges all corporations are faced with and are consistently looking for creative solutions. The class left this residence feeling empowered and ready to implement many of their lessons learned within their own corporate supply chains.

For more on the EMIL-SCS Program, contact Erin Howlette at erin.howlette@isye.gatech.edu or visit http://www.emil.gatech.edu/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1251936000 2009-09-03 00:00:00 1475895829 2016-10-08 03:03:49 0 0 news 2009-09-03T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-03T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
47595 47596 47597 47595 image <![CDATA[EMIL at Schiphol Airport in Amsterdam]]> image/jpeg 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45 47596 image <![CDATA[EMIL at ANZAG Pharmaceutical\'s distribution cente]]> image/jpeg 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45 47597 image <![CDATA[EMIL touring UTC\'s manufacturing plant in Rzeszow]]> image/jpeg 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech Opens TIP Center in Costa Rica]]> 27279 The Costa Rican trade industry will be able to increase trade across borders and make existing trade more productive thanks to a new Trade, Innovation & Productivity (TIP) Center that opened in the capital city of San Jose on August 20, 2009. The new TIP Center in Costa Rica is the latest addition to a network of centers established by Georgia Tech around the world that utilize research, innovation, and education. The Center, a member of the Productivity for Progress Institute, is a joint development of the Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, the Stewart School of ISyE, and the College of Management at Georgia Tech in partnership with the Foreign Trade Corporation (PROCOMER) and the Chamber of Industries in Costa Rica.

"We are delighted to have a presence in Costa Rica that gives our faculty and students an opportunity to participate in this exciting activity," said Georgia Tech President G. P. "Bud" Peterson. "One of Georgia Tech's strengths is working with business and industry around the world to apply scientific principles and to provide needed education to help meet business challenges. Through the Trade, Innovation & Productivity Center, we will utilize our strengths in technology research to develop innovative solutions and enhance logistical productivity, keeping business moving."

The Inauguration Ceremony was hosted by Dr. Steve Salbu, Dean of the College of Management, and featured special guest speakers Marco Vinicio Ruiz, Minister of Foreign Trade of Costa Rica, Tech President Peterson, and Dr. Oscar Arias Sanchez, President of Costa Rica.

"Today is a memorable day for the Costa Rican people. The first link of a chain that will bring prosperity and knowledge to hundreds of companies in our country is forged today... Today, as a nation, we change the course of our history by changing the course of our trade-chains," said Arias. "The TIP Center will not be just a marginal consulting or advising firm. It will be an open university, a place for our small entrepreneurs and for our big business men to train and re-train, with the speed demanded by a world where any university degree becomes outdated before the paper turns yellow."

On the second day of the inaguration ceremonies, the Center hosted an International Commerce & Logistics Seminar featuring a keynote presentation from Dr. H. Donald Ratliff, executive director of SCL and the TIP Center, on the role of innovation and technology pertaining to international supply chains.

"The TIP Center will utilize a combination of research, education, and innovation to improve logistics productivity within Costa Rica and trade productivity between Costa Rica and other countries, particularly the United States," said Ratliff. "This is a great opportunity for us to collaborate with enterprises in Costa Rica to address issues that are critical for economic growth in all of Latin America. Good supply chain and logistics capabilities are essential in order to be competitive in global markets."

Following the keynote presentation were three panel discussions on logistics challenges in Latin America and strategies that might improve productivity, international commerce expansion, and information technology.

The first panel discussion focused on defining what supply chain and logistics productivity means and issues that contribute to, and detract from, improved supply chain productivity for Costa Rica domestically, regionally, and globally. Dr. Chelsea White III, School Chair of the Stewart School of ISyE, moderated the discussion. Participants included Dr. Juan Blyde, economist, Inter-American Development Bank; Maria Alexandra Feoli, country logistics manager, Intel; and Sara Hagigh, deputy director, U.S. Department of Commerce.

The second panel discussion, moderated by Sebastian Urbina, managing director of the TIP Center, focused on international commerce expansion and Costa Rica's strategy of growth through trade. The panel examined the costs associated with expanding exports, discussed the challenges of maintaining security across the supply chain, and focused on the issue of food safety in international supply chains. Participating on this panel were Tomas Duenas, former Ambassador of Costa Rica to the U.S.; Dr. Paul Seligman, regional director, U.S. Food and Drug Administration; Emanuel Hess, general manager, PROCOMER; and Enrique Ackermann, director, Coca-Cola.

The third panel discussion, moderated by Dr. Sridhar Narasimhan, senior associate dean in the College of Management, focused on technology and productivity. The discussions focused on how IT investments lead to improvements in productivity, why technology diffusing is sometimes so slow, why the benefits of implementation are not always realized. The panelists included Marco Lizano, director, Coca-Cola; Alicia Avendañao, director, Digital Government's Technical Secretariat; Roberto Sasso, president, Costa Rica's Club for Technology Research; and Dr. Sandra Slaughter, Costley Chair & Professor of IT Management, College of Management.

The seminar concluded with an overview of activities from the TIP Center, summarizing how the Center can help to resolve some of these issues.

For more information, visit: http://www.tip.gatech.edu/newsroom/.

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1251763200 2009-09-01 00:00:00 1475895829 2016-10-08 03:03:49 0 0 news The Costa Rican trade industry will be able to increase trade across borders and make existing trade more productive thanks to a new Trade, Innovation & Productivity (TIP) Center that opened in the capital city of San Jose on August 20, 2009.

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2009-09-03T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-03T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102

]]>
47599 47600 47601 47599 image <![CDATA[G.P. Peterson and Oscar Arias Sanchez]]> image/jpeg 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45 47600 image <![CDATA[President of Costa Rica greets Donald Ratliff, SCL Executive Director]]> image/jpeg 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45 47601 image <![CDATA[Sebastian Urbina moderates a panel discussion]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45
<![CDATA[Bill George Releases New Book on Leading Through Crises]]> 27272 On August 31, 2009, alumnus Bill George (IE 1964) released a new book on leadership strategies for the competitive business world, 7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis.

In his book, he draws from his own experiences to argue that the root cause of the economic crisis was not subprime mortgages but rather subprime leadership. Drawing from his personal experiences in the business world, he discusses 7 lessons that will be helpful to leaders of all ages and all organizational levels in navigating through a range of crisis situations. In summation, George's recommendations include:

- Face reality, starting with yourself.
- Don't be Atlas; get the world off your shoulders.
- Dig deep for the root cause.
- Get ready for the long haul.
- Never waste a good crisis.
- You're in the spotlight; follow True North.
- Go on offense; focus on winning now.

Bill George is a professor of management at Harvard Business School, where he has taught leadership practices since 2004, and the former Chairman and CEO of Medtronic Inc, the world's largest medical technology company. He has been named one of PBS's "Top 25 Business Leaders of the Past 25 Years," and he is the author of three best-selling books: True North, Finding Your True North, and Authentic Leadership. He operates a brand new website at www.billgeorge.com, which features pages promoting 7 Lessons, Bill's other books, and his upcoming speaking events.

]]> Eric Huffman 1 1252368000 2009-09-08 00:00:00 1475895829 2016-10-08 03:03:49 0 0 news 7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis.]]> 2009-09-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-08T00:00:00-04:00 2009-09-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Contact Barbara Christopher
404.385.3102]]>
47592 47593 47592 image <![CDATA[7 Lessons for Leading in Crisis]]> image/gif 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45 47593 image <![CDATA[Bill George]]> image/jpeg 1449175348 2015-12-03 20:42:28 1475894445 2016-10-08 02:40:45