<![CDATA[ImmunoEngineering Research Days]]> 27195 Presentations will be made by Georgia Tech and Emory faculty with the purpose of learning what we are working on with a view towards developing ideas and faculty teams for submission of multi-investigator research proposals. 

These research days are open to Georgia Tech and Emory faculty doing research in ImmunoEngineering.  

RSVP Required

Presenting Faculty:
Costas Arvanitis, Ph.D.
Steven Bosinger, Ph.D.
Madhav Dhodapkar, M.D.
Tobey MacDonald, M.D.
Jason Fangusare, M.D.
M.G. Finn, Ph.D.
Jyothi Rengarajan, Ph.D.
Shuichi Takayama, Ph.D.
Rabin Tirouranziam, Ph.D.

Lunch provided.

Sponsored by Georgia Tech's Center for ImmunoEngineering and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1543252418 2018-11-26 17:13:38 1543252445 2018-11-26 17:14:05 0 0 event 2018-12-07T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07T13:30:00-05:00 2018-12-07T13:30:00-05:00 2018-12-07 16:00:00 2018-12-07 18:30:00 2018-12-07 18:30:00 2018-12-07T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07T13:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-12-07 11:00:00 2018-12-07 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Julia Babensee, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Center for ImmunoEngineering at Georgia Tech]]>
<![CDATA[ImmunoEngineering Research Days]]> 27195 Presentations will be made by Emory faculty with the purpose of learning what we are working on with a view towards developing ideas and faculty teams for submission of multi-investigator research proposals. 

These research days are open to Georgia Tech and Emory faculty doing research in ImmunoEngineering.  

RSVP Required

Presenting Faculty:
John Altman, Ph.D.
James Dahlman, Ph.D.
Greg Gibson, Ph.D.
Eliver Ghosn, Ph.D.
Kelly Goldsmith, M.D.
Curtis Henry, Ph.D.
Paul Johnson, M.D.
Gabe Kwong, Ph.D.
Chris Porter, M.D.
Mark Prausnitz, Ph.D.
Khalid Salaita, Ph.D.
Periasamy Selvaraj, Ph.D.
Trent Spencer, Ph.D.
Todd Sulchek, Ph.D.
Jens Wrammert, Ph.D.
Levi Wood, Ph.D.

Lunch provided.

Sponsored by Georgia Tech's Center for ImmunoEngineering and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1538484573 2018-10-02 12:49:33 1543252121 2018-11-26 17:08:41 0 0 event 2018-11-27T09:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27T13:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27T13:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27 14:00:00 2018-11-27 18:00:00 2018-11-27 18:00:00 2018-11-27T09:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-27 09:00:00 2018-11-27 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Julia Babensee, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[ImmunoEngineering Research Days]]> 27195 Presentations will be made by Georgia Tech faculty with the purpose of learning what we are working on with a view towards developing ideas and faculty teams for submission of multi-investigator research proposals. 

RSVP Required

AGENDA

12:45 – 1:10 p.m.    Pick up lunch before talks start

1:10 - 1:15 p.m.    Introductory comments, Julia Babensee, Susan Thomas, Rafi Ahmed 

1:15 – 1:30 p.m.    Ravi Kane, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech

1:30 – 1:45 p.m.    Julie Champion, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech

1:45 – 2:00 p.m.    Krish Roy, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

2:00– 2:15 p.m.    Phil Santangelo, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

2:15 – 2:30 p.m.    Mehul Suthar, Emory Vaccine Center

2:30 – 2:45 p.m.    Break

2:45 – 3:00 p.m.     Susan Thomas, School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:00 – 3:15 p.m.    Erik Dreaden, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:15 – 3:30 p.m.    Peng Qui, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:30 – 3:45 p.m.    Julie Babensee, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:45 – 4:00 p.m.    Cheng Zhu, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

These research days are open to Emory and Georgia Tech faculty doing research in ImmunoEngineering.  

Lunch provided.

Sponsored by the Emory Vaccine Center, Georgia Tech's Center for ImmunoEngineering and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1538485068 2018-10-02 12:57:48 1539108548 2018-10-09 18:09:08 0 0 event 2018-10-10T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10 18:00:00 2018-10-10 21:00:00 2018-10-10 21:00:00 2018-10-10T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-10 02:00:00 2018-10-10 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Julia Babensee, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Immunoengineering Seminar ]]> 27349 "Supramolecular Immunotherapies"

Joel Collier, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Duke University

Successful immunotherapies must raise both the correct strength and phenotype of an immune response. To treat a particular disease via the immune system, it can be challenging to discover what the optimally protective immune response may be and then reliably achieve it. In part the challenge arises from the fact that the overall phenotype of an immune response includes contributions from many different cell subsets, including T cells, B cells, and antigen presenting cells, all of which interact complexly to generate an integrated response. We have been developing supramolecular materials, primarily comprised of peptides and proteins, which serve as modular platforms for discovering and eliciting clinically important immune responses by engaging and modulating this cellular diversity. In this seminar, several different self-assembling components will be described, including synthetic fibrillizing peptides, expressed proteins that can be induced to self-assemble after purification, and coiled coil nanofibers displaying immune epitopes. This class of materials has surprising self-adjuvanting properties, which we have recently exploited towards several clinical goals. In one example, we are developing novel treatments for chronic inflammation by creating biomaterials that can raise therapeutic levels of TNF-neutralizing antibodies. In this system, the strength and phenotype of the immune response can be modulated and optimized by systematically varying the epitope composition, a task that is greatly facilitated by the materials’ non-covalent construction.

This presentation can be seen via videoconference using BlueJeans: https://bluejeans.com/979003372

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1500652522 2017-07-21 15:55:22 1525187922 2018-05-01 15:18:42 0 0 event 2018-05-15T11:00:00-04:00 2018-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15 15:00:00 2018-05-16 04:00:00 2018-05-16 04:00:00 2018-05-15T11:00:00-04:00 2018-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-05-15 11:00:00 2018-05-16 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Andrés García, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Immunoengineering Center]]> <![CDATA[Collier profile]]>
<![CDATA[Cell Manufacturing and Immunoengineering Seminar]]> 27561 "Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells: Clinical Development, FDA Approval, and What’s Coming Next"

Bruce Levine, Ph.D.
Barbara and Edward Netter Professor in Cancer Gene Therapy
University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

Since the 1990’s, we have conducted clinical trials of gene modified T cells. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting CD19 on B cells leukemias and lymphomas have induced durable complete responses in patients who are relapsed or refractory to all other available treatments. 

This synthetic biology technology has now undergone global multi-center clinical trials and recently received FDA approval (KymriahTM, Novartis) in relapsed/refractory acute lymphoid leukemia in children and young adults. CAR T cells targeting new targets in hematologic malignancies and in solid tumors are underway and provide demonstration that it is possible to design immunity at will for therapeutic application.  

]]> Angela Ayers 1 1507744938 2017-10-11 18:02:18 1507833857 2017-10-12 18:44:17 0 0 event 2017-12-08T11:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08T12:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08T12:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08 16:00:00 2017-12-08 17:00:00 2017-12-08 17:00:00 2017-12-08T11:00:00-05:00 2017-12-08T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-12-08 11:00:00 2017-12-08 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27959 "Biomechanics of Primary Blast Injury to the Human Eye"

Vicky Nguyen, Ph.D.
Whiting School of Engineering
Johns Hopkins University

Primary blast injury is caused by the impact and propagation of the blast wave through the body producing damage to the internal organs and tissues. The incidence and severity of primary blast injuries have increased because of the increasing use and effectiveness of explosive weapons in military operations and terrorist attacks. In Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom, blast from munitions and IDEs were responsible for 80% of ocular injuries [1,2].  Studies have shown that the majority of blast injuries to the eye are caused by high-velocity fragments and by blunt force trauma from being hit by large propelled objects or from being thrown by the blast wave [1,2]. Current protective eye equipment, which includes spectacles and goggles, made from transparent ballistic materials, are designed to protect mainly against high velocity projectiles.  The blast wave is also thought to contribute significantly to blast injuries to the eye. However, the mechanisms and risk factors of primary blast injuries to the eye remain poorly understood. Also poorly understood is the effectiveness the current eye armor in mitigating primary blast injuries.  This is because primary blast injuries to the eye rarely occur in isolation and are difficult to separate from injuries caused by blunt force trauma and penetrating fragments.  Moreover, experiments in animal models are limited because the dynamics of the blast wave are strongly influenced by facial structures, which are inherently different in animal models than in humans
In this presentation, she will describe their efforts to develop a computational approach to investigate the biomechanics of primary blast injury to the eye. They have developed a fluid-structure interaction method that solves for the development of the blast wave, deformation of the soft tissues of the eye, and the energy transfer between the fluid and solid mediums.  They applied the model to evaluate the blast pressure loading to the face of a representative 21 year-old male from different blast angles and locations. Results showed that the blast wave focused on the eye, generating the highest pressure loading on the face, because of reflections from surrounding facial features. The blast loading on the eye was asymmetrical, which caused large shear stresses on the sclera where it attaches to the extra-orbital tissues. Blast wave propagation through the eye resulted in the highest tensile stresses at the macula and optic nerve head.   They next evaluated the effectiveness of spectacles and goggles in mitigating the pressure loading on the eye. Their results corroborated free field blast experimental measurements showing that the goggles were more effective than spectacles in reducing the peak blast pressure loading on the eye. However, the goggles trapped the blast wave in a small region in the front of the eye and produced a sustained higher pressure loading after the passing of the blast wave.  These findings identify vulnerable locations in the eye to direct experimental studies of blast injuries and guide the design of new eye amor.   
1.Weichel ED, Colyer MH, Ludlow SE, Bower KS, Eiseman AS. Ophthalmology 2008;115:2235-2245.
2.Mader TH, Carroll RD, Clifton SS, George RK, Ritchey P, Neville P. Ophthalmology 2006;113:97-104.
3.Ritenour AE, Toney WB. Primary blast injury: Update on diagnosis and treatment. Crit. Care. Med. 2008. 36:S311-S317.

]]> Karen Ethier 1 1430498604 2015-05-01 16:43:24 1492118362 2017-04-13 21:19:22 0 0 event The Bioengineering Seminar Series is a joint seminar series between the Petit Institute and the Biomedical Engineering department. Seminars are held on Tuesdays or Thursdays between 11am-12pm in Petit Institute, Room 1128, unless otherwise indicated.

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2015-11-10T10:00:00-05:00 2015-11-10T11:00:00-05:00 2015-11-10T11:00:00-05:00 2015-11-10 15:00:00 2015-11-10 16:00:00 2015-11-10 16:00:00 2015-11-10T10:00:00-05:00 2015-11-10T11:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-11-10 10:00:00 2015-11-10 11:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Faculty host:  Ross Ethier

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<![CDATA[Nguyen lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27959 "Mechanobiology of Membrane: from Mechanosensitive Channels to Artificial Cells"
Allen P Liu, Ph.D.

University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Biological membranes are involved in a large number of cellular processes
including cell migration, membrane trafficking, and cell signaling.
A significant amount of work has elucidated the molecular machineries that
regulate dynamic membrane-based processes. In parallel, there are growing
interests in recent years in trying to understand how the mechanical state of
the cells are utilized as a regulatory input to control cellular
processes. The Liu Lab is interested in studying the mechanochemical responses
of biological systems. In this talk, he will present two projects related
to this theme. On the cellular level, they have reconstituted the function
of a bacterial mechanosensitive channel MscL in mammalian cells. Using
this system, they investigated the role of actin cytoskeleton in mediating
local membrane tension that activates MscL. On the
synthetic level, they are building artificial systems that can sense
mechanical input and transduce a biochemical response. To that end, they are
attempting to build artificial platelets that mimic the functionalities of
natural platelets. He will discuss several modular platforms that they have
developed that together will integrate into functional artificial cells.
Together, their work will provide basic understanding of cellular
mechanotransduction and potential applications of force-activated
synthetic biology.

]]> Karen Ethier 1 1430499170 2015-05-01 16:52:50 1492118362 2017-04-13 21:19:22 0 0 event The Bioengineering Seminar Series is a joint seminar series between the Petit Institute and the Biomedical Engineering department. Seminars are held on Tuesdays or Thursdays between 11am-12pm in Petit Institute, Room 1128, unless otherwise indicated.

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2015-10-22T12:00:00-04:00 2015-10-22T13:00:00-04:00 2015-10-22T13:00:00-04:00 2015-10-22 16:00:00 2015-10-22 17:00:00 2015-10-22 17:00:00 2015-10-22T12:00:00-04:00 2015-10-22T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-10-22 12:00:00 2015-10-22 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Faculty hosts:  Todd Sulchek & Wilbur Lam

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<![CDATA[Liu lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27959 "Multiscale Patient-specific Systems Biology"

Scott L. Diamond, Ph.D.
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Institute for Medicine and Engineering
University of Pennsylvania

Predicting tissue function based upon an individual’s unique cells requires a multiscale Systems Biology approach to understand the coupling of intracellular signaling with spatiotemporal gradients of extracellular biochemicals.  Hundreds of spatiotemporal reactions proceed within activating platelets and the polymerizing plasma when blood clots under flow.  Clinically, excessive bleeding and clotting represent the two extremes of blood function that often concern patients and their doctors. Using high throughput experimentation, they obtained a large set of platelet responses to combinatorial activators in order to train a neural network (NN) model of platelet activation for several individuals. Each NN model was then embedded into a kinetic Monte Carlo/finite element/lattice Boltzmann simulation of stochastic platelet deposition under flow.  In silico representations of an individual’s platelet phenotype allowed prediction of blood function under flow (as measured using microfluidics), essential to prioritizing patient-specific cardiovascular risk and drug response or to identify unsuspected gene mutations.

]]> Karen Ethier 1 1431689975 2015-05-15 11:39:35 1492118358 2017-04-13 21:19:18 0 0 event The Bioengineering Seminar Series is a joint seminar series between the Petit Institute and the Biomedical Engineering department. Seminars are held on Tuesdays or Thursdays between 11am-12pm in Petit Institute, Room 1128, unless otherwise indicated.

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2015-09-03T12:00:00-04:00 2015-09-03T13:00:00-04:00 2015-09-03T13:00:00-04:00 2015-09-03 16:00:00 2015-09-03 17:00:00 2015-09-03 17:00:00 2015-09-03T12:00:00-04:00 2015-09-03T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-09-03 12:00:00 2015-09-03 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Faculty host:  Hang Lu

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<![CDATA[Diamond lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27959 “Optogenetic Tools for Engineering Biological Circuits”

Brian Chow, Ph.D.
Bioengineering
University of Pennsylvania

Optogenetics permits myriad events in cell signaling, excitability, and gene transcription to be optically perturbed and sensed, thereby providing a set of input/output interfaces to biological circuits with the biochemical precision of pharmacological agents and the spatiotemporal resolution of optoelectronic devices. The rapidly expanding toolbox is ultimately comprised of proteins that induce or report physiological changes in response to light.  This talk will focus on the creation of novel optogenetic tools with enhanced biochemical functions and spectral range, which have been gained through genomic discovery of novel photoreceptors, structure-guided protein engineering, and/or artificial protein design from first principles. Applications of these tools in decoding the computational principles of biological circuits in context of therapeutic interventions will also be discussed.

]]> Karen Ethier 1 1431697498 2015-05-15 13:44:58 1492118358 2017-04-13 21:19:18 0 0 event The Bioengineering Seminar Series is a joint seminar series between the Petit Institute and the Biomedical Engineering department. Seminars are held on Tuesdays or Thursdays between 11am-12pm in Petit Institute, Room 1128, unless otherwise indicated.

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2015-11-05T10:00:00-05:00 2015-11-05T11:00:00-05:00 2015-11-05T11:00:00-05:00 2015-11-05 15:00:00 2015-11-05 16:00:00 2015-11-05 16:00:00 2015-11-05T10:00:00-05:00 2015-11-05T11:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-11-05 10:00:00 2015-11-05 11:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Faculty host:  Craig Forest

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<![CDATA[Chow lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27959 "Nano- and Microfabricated Hydrogels for Regenerative Engineering"

Ali Khademhosseini, Ph.D.
Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology
Harvard Medical School
Brigham & Women's Hospital

Engineered materials that integrate advances in polymer chemistry, nanotechnology, and biological sciences have the potential to create powerful medical therapies. Their group aims to engineer tissue regenerative therapies using water-containing polymer networks called hydrogels that can regulate cell behavior. Specifically, They have developed photocrosslinkable hybrid hydrogels that combine natural biomolecules with nanoparticles to regulate the chemical, biological, mechanical and electrical properties of gels. These functional scaffolds induce the differentiation of stem cells to desired cell types and direct the formation of vascularized heart or bone tissues. Since tissue function is highly dependent on architecture, they have also used microfabrication methods, such as microfluidics, photolithography, bioprinting, and molding, to regulate the architecture of these materials. They have employed these strategies to generate miniaturized tissues. To create tissue complexity, they have also developed directed assembly techniques to compile small tissue modules into larger constructs. It is anticipated that such approaches will lead to the development of next-generation regenerative therapeutics and biomedical devices.

]]> Karen Ethier 1 1431700565 2015-05-15 14:36:05 1492118358 2017-04-13 21:19:18 0 0 event The Bioengineering Seminar Series is a joint seminar series between the Petit Institute and the Biomedical Engineering department. Seminars are held on Tuesdays or Thursdays between 11am-12pm in Petit Institute, Room 1128, unless otherwise indicated.

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2015-09-22T12:00:00-04:00 2015-09-22T13:00:00-04:00 2015-09-22T13:00:00-04:00 2015-09-22 16:00:00 2015-09-22 17:00:00 2015-09-22 17:00:00 2015-09-22T12:00:00-04:00 2015-09-22T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-09-22 12:00:00 2015-09-22 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Faculty host:  Luke Brewster

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<![CDATA[Khademhosseini lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Capturing Cells that Kill: Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cell Clusters from Patient Blood using a Microfluidic Chip"

Fatih Sarioglu, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor
Microelectronics/Microsystems & Bioengineering
Georgia Tech

ABSTRACT
Cancer is the result of a cascade of multi-scale events originating from anomalies at the cellular and molecular level. As such, analysis at the cellular and molecular level offers exciting opportunities for detecting cancer while it is still manageable and for gaining biological insight to develop effective therapies. Well matched in size, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are ideally suited for this purpose and they offer unique capabilities from highly localized and deterministic sample manipulation to precise quantitative measurements. Leveraging these capabilities, biomedical microsystems hold great promise to revolutionize the way we research, detect and treat cancer. In my talk, I will introduce a microfluidic chip technology to specifically isolate circulating tumor cell-clusters (CTC-clusters), a highly metastatic precursor population within CTCs, from unprocessed patient blood. This device enables non-destructive, antigen-independent isolation of CTC-clusters with high sensitivity and purity as well as viable retrieval of CTC-clusters in solution (off the chip) allowing downstream molecular assays. I will describe the design and operation of the device and share results from clinical studies on patients with metastatic melanoma, breast and prostate cancers.


SARIOGLU RESEARCH
Motivated by healthcare and biomedical research needs, our lab is developing technologies for investigating and manipulating biological systems on the micro and nanoscale. Using advanced fabrication techniques, we build devices that utilize microfluidics, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), optics, electronics and signal processing. Through multidisciplinary collaborations, we use these technologies as clinical microdevices for disease detection and monitoring and as bioanalytical instruments for high-throughput molecular and cellular analysis.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1439197848 2015-08-10 09:10:48 1492118333 2017-04-13 21:18:53 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

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2015-09-29T17:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29T18:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29T18:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29 21:00:00 2015-09-29 22:00:00 2015-09-29 22:00:00 2015-09-29T17:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-09-29 05:00:00 2015-09-29 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

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361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Biomedical Microsystems Laboratory]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Comprehensive Prediction of Drug-protein Interactions and Side Effects for the Human Proteome"

Jeffrey Skolnick, Ph.D.
Director, Center for the Study of Systems Biology
Mary and Maisie Gibson Chair & GRA Eminent Scholar in Computational Systems Biology
Director, Integrative BioSystems Institute
Professor, School of Biology
Georgia Tech

Identifying unexpected drug-protein interactions is crucial for drug repurposing. We develop a comprehensive proteome scale approach that predicts human protein targets and side effect of drugs. For drug-protein interaction prediction, FINDSITEcomb, whose average precision is ~30% and recall ~27%, is employed. For side effect prediction, a new method is developed with a precision of ~57% and a recall of ~24%. Our predictions show that drugs are quite promiscuous, with the average (median) number of human targets per drug  of 329 (38), while a given protein interacts with 57 drugs. The result implies that drug side effects are inevitable and existing drugs may be useful for repurposing, with only ~1,000 human proteins likely causing serious side effects. A killing index derived from serious side effects has a strong correlation with FDA approved drugs being withdrawn. Therefore, it provides a pre-filter for new drug development. The methodology is free to the academic community on the DR. PRODIS (DRugome, PROteome, and DISeasome) webserver. DR. PRODIS provides protein targets of drugs, drugs for a given protein target, associated diseases and side effects of drugs, as well as an interface for the virtual target screening of new compounds.  Successful applications of the methodology to treat Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, to identify novel antibiotic leads and promising anti-seizure drugs are described.

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1439198465 2015-08-10 09:21:05 1492118333 2017-04-13 21:18:53 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

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2015-10-20T17:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20T18:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20T18:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20 21:00:00 2015-10-20 22:00:00 2015-10-20 22:00:00 2015-10-20T17:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-10-20 05:00:00 2015-10-20 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

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361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Center for the Study of Sytems Biology]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Putting Gold Nanomaterials to Work for Cancer Theranostics"

Younan Xia, Ph.D.

Brock Family Chair
Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Nanomedicine
Professor, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Joint appointments in School of Chemistry & Biomechemistry, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Abstract
Although gold is not a biomaterial per se, its nanomaterials have found widespread use in a variety of biomedical applications owning to their unique properties, including bio-inertness, tunable photoluminescence, radioactivity (for 198Au and 199Au), and strong scattering and absorption of light in the near-infrared region. Over the past decade, numerous methods have been developed for producing gold nanomaterials in the quality, quantity, and reproducibility required for a systematic study of their properties as a function of size, shape, and structure, as well as for the full exploration of their applications in biological studies and nanomedicine. In this talk, I will briefly discuss some of the new developments, with a focus on the rational design and controlled synthesis of gold nanomaterials for optical bioimaging, drug delivery, and cancer theranostics. 

References 1. Yang, X.; Yang, M.; Pang, B.; Xia, Y. “Gold nanomaterials at work in biomedicine”, Chem. Rev. 2015, 105, 10410-10486 (invited review article). 2. Xia, Y.; Li, W.; Cobley, C. M.; Chen, J.; Xia, X.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, M.; Cho, E. C.; Brown, P. K. “Gold nanocages: From synthesis to theranostic applications”, Acc. Chem. Res. 2011, 44, 914-924 (invited review article).

Research
Disruptive technologies enabled by nanoscale materials and devices will define our future in the same way that microtechnology has done over the past several decades. Our current research centers on the design and synthesis of novel nanomaterials for a broad range of applications, including nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, cancer theranostics, tissue engineering, controlled release, catalysis, and fuel cell technology.


The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 17 research centers, more than 170 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1439280329 2015-08-11 08:05:29 1492118333 2017-04-13 21:18:53 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

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2016-01-12T15:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12T16:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12T16:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12 20:00:00 2016-01-12 21:00:00 2016-01-12 21:00:00 2016-01-12T15:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2016-01-12 03:00:00 2016-01-12 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

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361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Xia lab website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Immunoengineering Seminar]]> 27349 “Harnessing Biomaterials to Study and Engineer Lymph Node Function”

Christopher M. Jewell
Assistant Professor
Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovator
University of Maryland

Vaccines and immunotherapies have generated some of the largest impacts on human health in history, but a fundamental challenge now facing the field is how to direct the specific properties of immune responses that are elicited. This idea of tuning response is termed “immunomodulation”, and is critical in designing more efficacious and specific vaccines and immunotherapies. In this seminar I will discuss two strategies we are developing to study and exploit the interactions between biomaterials and immune cells and tissues. One approach involves direct delivery of synthetic vaccine carriers to lymph nodes, key tissues that coordinate immune response. We have combined direct lymph node injection with biomaterials to establish a platform to study the link between local lymph node function and systemic immunity by probing the roles of signal density and material properties. In addition to these ideas, we are exploiting directed delivery for therapeutic vaccination in the areas autoimmunity and cancer. The second focus area is the design of new modular materials we have created using polyionic immune signals to form stable vaccine capsules. These immune polyelectrolyte multilayers (iPEMs) are self-assembled entirely from antigens and adjuvants to allow selective activation of pro-inflammatory signaling pathways without other carrier components such as polymers or lipids. In mice, iPEMs injected along traditional vaccination routes enhance the function of dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, potently expand antigen-specific T cells against antigens used to build iPEMs, and provide protection during tumor challenge. Ultimately, these strategies could contribute to better understanding of the interactions between biomaterials and the immune system, and improve the rational design of materials that serve not only as carriers, but also as agents that actively direct immune response.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1456305871 2016-02-24 09:24:31 1492118191 2017-04-13 21:16:31 0 0 event 2016-04-07T17:00:00-04:00 2016-04-07T18:00:00-04:00 2016-04-07T18:00:00-04:00 2016-04-07 21:00:00 2016-04-07 22:00:00 2016-04-07 22:00:00 2016-04-07T17:00:00-04:00 2016-04-07T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2016-04-07 05:00:00 2016-04-07 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Claire Segar

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