<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 RESCHEDULED DATE!

"DNA Barcoded Nanotechnology for High Throughput in vivo Nanoparticle Analysis"

James Dahlman, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech


James Dahlman is a chemical and bioengineer whose work lies at the interface of nanotechnology, genomics, and gene editing. He studied in vivo gene editing at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT; he received his Ph.D. from MIT and Harvard Medical School. Dahlman is interested in drug delivery, targeted in vivo gene editing, and using genomics to improve biomaterial design. He has designed and synthesized nanoparticles that efficiently deliver RNAs to the lung and heart. These nanoparticles can deliver multiple RNAs at once, and can simultaneously knockdown five genes concurrently in vivo. They have been used by over ten labs across the United States to study cancer, atherosclerosis, inflammation, emphysema, and pulmonary hypertension, and are being evaluated for clinical trials.

The Petit Institute Breakfast Club seminar series was started with the spirit of the Institute's interdisciplinary mission in mind and started to feature local Petit Institute faculty member's research in a seminar format. Faculty are often asked to speak at other universities and conferences, but rarely present at their home institution, this seminar series is an attempt to close that gap. The Petit Institute Breakfast Club is open to anyone in the bio-community.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1490380767 2017-03-24 18:39:27 1509973709 2017-11-06 13:08:29 0 0 event 2017-11-28T08:30:00-05:00 2017-11-28T09:30:00-05:00 2017-11-28T09:30:00-05:00 2017-11-28 13:30:00 2017-11-28 14:30:00 2017-11-28 14:30:00 2017-11-28T08:30:00-05:00 2017-11-28T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-11-28 08:30:00 2017-11-28 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

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595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[Dahlman lab website]]> <![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar series schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Neural Crest Migration and Possible Implications in Cancer Metastasis"

Shuyi Nie, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Biological Sciences
Georgia Tech


The neural crest is a unique population of cells in vertebrate. Induced at the neural plate border, neural crest cells detach from the neuroepithelium and migrate extensively to different parts of the embryo and give rise to multiple tissue and organs including neurons and glia, bones and cartilage, and pigment cells. Both the behavior of neural crest cells and signaling molecules in neural crest development are similar to that of metastatic cancer. In fact, dysregulation of neural crest development results in multiple cancer, including neuroblastoma, glioblastoma, and melanoma. Through studying the molecular and cellular mechanisms of neural crest cell EMT and migration, we hope to gain insights into cancer metastasis. 

Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1506514437 2017-09-27 12:13:57 1509384788 2017-10-30 17:33:08 0 0 event 2017-10-31T17:00:00-04:00 2017-10-31T18:00:00-04:00 2017-10-31T18:00:00-04:00 2017-10-31 21:00:00 2017-10-31 22:00:00 2017-10-31 22:00:00 2017-10-31T17:00:00-04:00 2017-10-31T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-10-31 05:00:00 2017-10-31 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

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361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Nie lab website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC website]]>
<![CDATA[11th International Conference on Bioinformatics]]> 27349 Welcome to the 11th Georgia Tech and Emory University's International Conference on Bioinformatics: "Microbiomes and Metagenomes"!

In 2017, Georgia Tech and Emory University continue the tradition of biennial International Conferences in Bioinformatics, inviting leading scientists to present the latest advances at the forefront of genomics and bioinformatics.

The conference features the prestigious Margaret O. Dayhoff lecture, the fifth since its inauguration in 2009.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1505311619 2017-09-13 14:06:59 1505311794 2017-09-13 14:09:54 0 0 event 2017-11-03T09:00:00-04:00 2017-11-04T17:00:00-04:00 2017-11-04T17:00:00-04:00 2017-11-03 13:00:00 2017-11-04 21:00:00 2017-11-04 21:00:00 2017-11-03T09:00:00-04:00 2017-11-04T17:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-11-03 09:00:00 2017-11-04 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]>
  • Mark Borodovsky, Georgia Tech, Emory University and CDC
  • ]]>
    <![CDATA[Bioinformatics Conference Website]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27349 "Resveratrol Contrast Cancer Cell Invasion through Induction of Autophagy: Mechanisms and Pathways"

    Ciro Isidoro, M.D., Ph.D.
    Associate Professor
    Department of General Pathology
    Università del Piemonte Orientale

    Resveratrol is a naturally occurring polyphenol with the potential to inhibit cancer cell migration. Here we show that Resveratrol counteracts the cell migration and invasion stimulatory effects of IL-6 (a cytokine released by cancer associated fibroblasts) and of Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a small phospholipid released by cancer cells), both known to promote ovarian cancer metastasis. Transcriptomic and microRNomic analyses showed that Resveratrol and IL-6 regulated in an opposite manner the expression of RNA messengers and of microRNAs involved in cell locomotion and extracellular matrix remodeling associated with the invasive properties of ovarian cancer cells. Further, Resveratrol and LPA regulated in an opposite manner the expression of Bmi-1, a polycomb protein of the HedgeHog pathway involved in cancer cell stemness and metastasis. We show that the pathways triggered by Resveratrol converge in the activation of autophagy in cancer cells and that this process is sufficient to inhibit cancer cell migration and invasion.

    ]]> Floyd Wood 1 1490641416 2017-03-27 19:03:36 1492117934 2017-04-13 21:12:14 0 0 event 2017-04-14T12:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14 16:00:00 2017-04-14 17:00:00 2017-04-14 17:00:00 2017-04-14T12:00:00-04:00 2017-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-04-14 12:00:00 2017-04-14 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald - faculty host

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> <![CDATA[Isidoro lab]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Symposium]]> 27349 "Recent Advances in Cancer Nanotechnology: From Diagnostics to Therapeutics"

    April 13, 2017
    Engineered Biosystems Building (EBB), Rm. 1005
    Georgia Tech

    We are at a truly exciting crossroads in the history of cancer research where molecular biology, the computational sciences, engineering and nanotechnology are joining together in a unified effort to develop more effective cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The benefits of this integrated approach are only beginning to be realized. The number of new technologies and devices arising from the fields of biomedical engineering and nanotechnology that have potential application to the area of cancer biology is unprecedented. The second annual ICRC mini-symposium at Georgia Tech will showcase recent advances in cancer nanotechnology by national and international experts in the field. Pre-registration is not required but space is limited. Please come early and participate in discussions with leaders in the field.

    Speakers:

    James Heath, Ph.D.
    Elizabeth W. Gilloon 
    Professor of Chemistry, California Institute of Technology
    Professor of Molecular Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA

    Shana Kelley, Ph.D.
    Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chemistry, Biochemistry,
    Institute for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering
    University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada

    Adriana Haimovitz-Friedman, Ph.D.
    Attending Radiation Biologist
    Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

    Susan Thomas, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Department of Biomedical Engineering
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

    Todd Sulchek, Ph.D.
    Professor
    The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering 
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

    A. Fatih Sarioglu, Ph.D
    Assistant Professor
    School of Electrical and Computer Engineering 
    Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA

    Symposium Agenda

    ]]> Floyd Wood 1 1490968018 2017-03-31 13:46:58 1492117931 2017-04-13 21:12:11 0 0 event 2017-04-13T09:15:00-04:00 2017-04-13T16:30:00-04:00 2017-04-13T16:30:00-04:00 2017-04-13 13:15:00 2017-04-13 20:30:00 2017-04-13 20:30:00 2017-04-13T09:15:00-04:00 2017-04-13T16:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-04-13 09:15:00 2017-04-13 04:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald - faculty host

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]>
    <![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 Nicholas Boulis, M.D.
    Associate Professor
    Department of Neurosurgery
    Emory University School of Medicine

    "Gene Based Neuromodulation"


    Nicholas Boulis, M.D. is a Functional Neurosurgeon with significant expertise in the field of gene transfer to the nervous system. Dr. Boulis' Gene and Cell Therapy Translational Laboratory pursues advanced biological treatments for neurological disorders, including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) and Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA).

    Over the last two decades, growing knowledge about the underlying causes of these diseases, as well as the protective effects of special proteins, has given rise to hope for the development of therapies. Dr. Boulis' laboratory specializes in the therapeutic application of the genes for these proteins.

    Within the Boulis laboratory, the genes for neural growth factors and anti-apoptotic intracellular proteins are inserted into the DNA of genetically engineered viruses. These viruses, which have been rendered safe through the removal of their native genes, can be used to transfer therapeutic genes into diseased tissue. A variety of vectors are currently being tested in both neuronal cell cultures and in animal models for MND.

    In parallel, the Boulis laboratory has focused on the development of tissue-specific targeting strategies. These approaches are designed to deliver molecular therapeutics to an anatomically defined site of interest. Much of this effort has concentrated on motor neuron-specific gene delivery.

    Finally, Dr. Boulis has focused on the development of techniques for safe and accurate injection of stem cells into the human spinal cord.

    Research in the Boulis laboratory tests basic principles while providing tools for clinical translation. Techniques/assays applied in the lab include: neuronal cell cultures, rodent transgenic colonies, surgery in rodents (mice and rats), locomotor behavior assays in rodents, surgery in large animals (pigs and monkeys), histology, etc.

    With proof-of-principle in the laboratory and Dr. Boulis' expertise in neurosurgery, the laboratory creates a unique resource for the development and clinical translation of these concepts.




    The Petit Institute Breakfast Club seminar series was started with the spirit of the Institute's interdisciplinary mission in mind and started to feature local Petit Institute faculty member's research in a seminar format. Faculty are often asked to speak at other universities and conferences, but rarely present at their home institution, this seminar series is an attempt to close that gap. The Petit Institute Breakfast Club is open to anyone in the bio-community.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1481035241 2016-12-06 14:40:41 1492118023 2017-04-13 21:13:43 0 0 event 2017-03-14T09:30:00-04:00 2017-03-14T10:30:00-04:00 2017-03-14T10:30:00-04:00 2017-03-14 13:30:00 2017-03-14 14:30:00 2017-03-14 14:30:00 2017-03-14T09:30:00-04:00 2017-03-14T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-03-14 09:30:00 2017-03-14 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

    ]]>
    70917 70917 image <![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449177328 2015-12-03 21:15:28 1475894625 2016-10-08 02:43:45 <![CDATA[Boulis profile]]>
    <![CDATA[Darwin's Warm Little Pond: Searching for the Chemical Origins of Life]]> 30678 Frontiers in Science Lecture

    Nicholas Hud
    Regents Professor
    Professor, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry
    Director, Center for Chemical Evolution

    LECTURE PREVIEW

    Charles Darwin once speculated that biological molecules might spontaneously form in a “warm little pond.” Then he concluded that it was “mere rubbish” to think about the origin of life during his time.

    Now, 150 years later, tremendous advances In biology and chemistry have made it possible to explore—using model reactions and genomic data—the chemical origins and early evolution of life. 

    This combination of bottom-up (chemical) and top-down (biological) approaches to uncovering the origins of life is helping to write the “missing first chapter” of Darwin’s book, On the Origin of Species.

    ABOUT THE SPEAKER

    Nicholas Hud has devoted much of his research to elucidating the fundamental principles of RNA and DNA assembly. His lab examines how the physical properties of nucleic acids govern biological functions in contemporary life and how these same properties provide clues to the origin and early evolution of life. 

    ABOUT FRONTIERS IN SCIENCE LECTURES

    Lectures in this series are intended to inform, engage, and inspire students, faculty, staff, and the public on developments, breakthroughs, and topics of general interest in the sciences and mathematics. Lecturers their talks for nonexpert audiences.

    Light refreshments will be served.

    Parking is available in the Visitors Lot on the south side of North Avenue, across Tech Tower.

    ]]> A. Maureen Rouhi 1 1488293405 2017-02-28 14:50:05 1492117955 2017-04-13 21:12:35 0 0 event Regents Professor Nicholas Hud, a leading researcher in the origins-of-life field, will discuss how scientists are helping to write the "missing first chapter" of Darwin's book, On the Origin of Species.

    ]]>
    2017-04-20T20:30:00-04:00 2017-04-20T21:30:00-04:00 2017-04-20T21:30:00-04:00 2017-04-21 00:30:00 2017-04-21 01:30:00 2017-04-21 01:30:00 2017-04-20T20:30:00-04:00 2017-04-20T21:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-04-20 08:30:00 2017-04-20 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> A. Maureen Rouhi, Ph.D.
    Director of Communications
    College of Sciences
    404.385.5207

    ]]>
    588326 588093 588326 image <![CDATA[Nick Hud]]> image/jpeg 1488820287 2017-03-06 17:11:27 1488820287 2017-03-06 17:11:27 588093 image <![CDATA[Frontiers in Science Lecture: Darwin's Warm Little Pond - Searching for the Chemical Origins of Life]]> image/png 1488293561 2017-02-28 14:52:41 1488308253 2017-02-28 18:57:33
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27349 "The Early Cancer Detection Problem: Challenges and Opportunities"

    Gabe Kwong, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
    Georgia Tech

    The discovery of cancer at an early stage dramatically improves treatment outcomes, yet our current suite of blood-based diagnostics lack sensitivity and cannot reveal the presence of small, nascent tumors. The challenges are multifaceted and fundamental; recent mathematical studies showed that tumors may remain undetectable for an entire decade following tumorigenesis, reaching 1–2.5 centimeters in diameter. Here I will describe a new diagnostic framework based on the design and use of activity-based synthetic biomarkers for ultrasensitive and predictive monitoring of disease. Synthetic biomarkers target dysregulated protease activity to amplify detection signals into host urine, and have the capacity to discriminate tumors as small as a few millimeters in diameter—a threshold sensitivity that is otherwise challenging for medical imaging and blood biomarkers to achieve. Moreover, the number of clinical applications that are addressable with synthetic biomarkers is dramatically expanded by leveraging chemical encoding strategies. These include predicting disease progression and regression, monitoring patient response to drugs, and low-cost diagnostics for use in resource-limited environments. In the future, we envision synthetic biomarkers will significantly improve clinical decision making, accelerate clinical trials, and lower healthcare costs.

    ]]> Floyd Wood 1 1487606495 2017-02-20 16:01:35 1492117966 2017-04-13 21:12:46 0 0 event 2017-02-28T16:00:00-05:00 2017-02-28T17:00:00-05:00 2017-02-28T17:00:00-05:00 2017-02-28 21:00:00 2017-02-28 22:00:00 2017-02-28 22:00:00 2017-02-28T16:00:00-05:00 2017-02-28T17:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2017-02-28 04:00:00 2017-02-28 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald - faculty host

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> <![CDATA[Kwong profile]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27349 "Evolutionary Genomics of Prostate Cancer in African Men"

    Joseph Lachance, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    School of Biological Sciences
    Georgia Tech

     

    To determine why African men are more likely to suffer from prostate cancer (CaP), we integrated GWAS results and scans of selection with allele frequency data from 64 global populations.  Despite substantial overlap in genetic risk scores across populations, we find that predicted CaP risk is highest in West Africans and that a small number of loci drive these differences in risk.  There is a strong concordance between genetic risk scores and clinical estimates of CaP mortality.  Although most CaP-associated loci are evolving neutrally, we find multiple instances where alleles have hitchhiked to high frequencies with linked locally adaptive alleles.

    ]]> Floyd Wood 0 1472821723 2016-09-02 13:08:43 1492118089 2017-04-13 21:14:49 0 0 event 2016-10-04T17:00:00-04:00 2016-10-04T18:00:00-04:00 2016-10-04T18:00:00-04:00 2016-10-04 21:00:00 2016-10-04 22:00:00 2016-10-04 22:00:00 2016-10-04T17:00:00-04:00 2016-10-04T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2016-10-04 05:00:00 2016-10-04 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D. - faculty host

    ]]>
    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Lachance website]]> <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center website]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Targeting Protein-protein Interactions for New Cancer Therapeutics"

    Shaomeng Wang, Ph.D.
    Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor in Medicine
    Professor of Medicine
    Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry
    Director, Michiha Center for Therapeutics Innovation
    University of Michigan

    Biography
    Shaomeng Wang, Ph.D., obtained his B.S. degree from Peking University and his Ph.D. degree from Case Western Reserve University. His postdoctoral training was at National Institutes of Health. He is currently the Warner-Lambert/Parke-Davis Professor in Medicine at Michigan and Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. Dr. Wang has published 260 peer-reviewed papers, is an inventor of 40 issued patents. Dr. Wang has co-founded several biotech companies and has advanced 6 novel anticacner drugs into clinical development. Dr. Wang won the 2014 University of Michigan Distinguished Innovator Award and was elected as a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (U.S.A.). 


    Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC)
    Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.



    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1459350015 2016-03-30 15:00:15 1492118168 2017-04-13 21:16:08 0 0 event 2016-04-19T17:00:00-04:00 2016-04-19T18:00:00-04:00 2016-04-19T18:00:00-04:00 2016-04-19 21:00:00 2016-04-19 22:00:00 2016-04-19 22:00:00 2016-04-19T17:00:00-04:00 2016-04-19T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2016-04-19 05:00:00 2016-04-19 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonad, Ph.D. - faculty organizer

    ]]>
    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Wang website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series Schedule]]>
    <![CDATA[BBUGS & BGA Industry Seminar]]> 27349 "My Non-random Walk from Ph.D. to C.E.O. in Digital Health"

    Deborah Kilpatrick, Ph.D. 
    Chief Executive Officer
    Evidation Health

    Deborah Kilpatrick, Ph.D., is the C.E.O. of Evidation Health, a digital health company. Evidation Health is focused on creating digital health product value through clinical and economic outcomes and predictive analytics that help providers deploy the most effective interventions for the right patients at the right time. Prior to her role at Evidation Health, Deborah was the Chief Commercial Officer of the genomic diagnostics company CardioDx, whose Corus CAD product was named in the Wall Street Journal Technology Innovation Awards, TIME Magazine's Top 10 Medical Breakthroughs, and the Edison Awards. Earlier in her career, Deborah held multiple leadership roles at Guidant Corporation, including Research Fellow, Director of R&D, and Director of New Ventures in the Vascular Intervention Division. She serves on the Georgia Tech Advisory Board and the Board of Directors for the Dystonia Medical Research Foundation and is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. Deborah is a co-founder of the MedtechVision Conference now held annually in Silicon Valley, and in 2013 she was named to FierceBiotech’s list of the Top Women in Biotech as well as Silicon Valley Business Journal’s 100 Women of Influence list. She holds B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering with a bioengineering focus from Georgia Tech. 

    This seminar is hosted by the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS) Industry Committee and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

    ]]> Floyd Wood 1 1458645706 2016-03-22 11:21:46 1492118174 2017-04-13 21:16:14 0 0 event 2016-04-14T17:00:00-04:00 2016-04-14T18:00:00-04:00 2016-04-14T18:00:00-04:00 2016-04-14 21:00:00 2016-04-14 22:00:00 2016-04-14 22:00:00 2016-04-14T17:00:00-04:00 2016-04-14T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2016-04-14 05:00:00 2016-04-14 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Alexandra Atalis - BBUGS Industry Chair

    ]]>
    68922 68922 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering & Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS)]]> image/png 1449177214 2015-12-03 21:13:34 1475894599 2016-10-08 02:43:19 <![CDATA[Kilpatrick profile]]> <![CDATA[BBUGS website]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Putting Gold Nanomaterials to Work for Cancer Theranostics"

    Younan Xia, Ph.D.

    Brock Family Chair
    Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Nanomedicine
    Professor, Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
    Joint appointments in School of Chemistry & Biomechemistry, School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

    Abstract
    Although gold is not a biomaterial per se, its nanomaterials have found widespread use in a variety of biomedical applications owning to their unique properties, including bio-inertness, tunable photoluminescence, radioactivity (for 198Au and 199Au), and strong scattering and absorption of light in the near-infrared region. Over the past decade, numerous methods have been developed for producing gold nanomaterials in the quality, quantity, and reproducibility required for a systematic study of their properties as a function of size, shape, and structure, as well as for the full exploration of their applications in biological studies and nanomedicine. In this talk, I will briefly discuss some of the new developments, with a focus on the rational design and controlled synthesis of gold nanomaterials for optical bioimaging, drug delivery, and cancer theranostics. 

    References 1. Yang, X.; Yang, M.; Pang, B.; Xia, Y. “Gold nanomaterials at work in biomedicine”, Chem. Rev. 2015, 105, 10410-10486 (invited review article). 2. Xia, Y.; Li, W.; Cobley, C. M.; Chen, J.; Xia, X.; Zhang, Q.; Yang, M.; Cho, E. C.; Brown, P. K. “Gold nanocages: From synthesis to theranostic applications”, Acc. Chem. Res. 2011, 44, 914-924 (invited review article).

    Research
    Disruptive technologies enabled by nanoscale materials and devices will define our future in the same way that microtechnology has done over the past several decades. Our current research centers on the design and synthesis of novel nanomaterials for a broad range of applications, including nanomedicine, regenerative medicine, cancer theranostics, tissue engineering, controlled release, catalysis, and fuel cell technology.


    The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 17 research centers, more than 170 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1439280329 2015-08-11 08:05:29 1492118333 2017-04-13 21:18:53 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2016-01-12T15:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12T16:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12T16:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12 20:00:00 2016-01-12 21:00:00 2016-01-12 21:00:00 2016-01-12T15:00:00-05:00 2016-01-12T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2016-01-12 03:00:00 2016-01-12 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

    ]]>
    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Xia lab website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series Schedule]]>
    <![CDATA[Pedro Beltrao, European Molecular Biology Laboratory at the European Bioinformatics Institute]]> 27964 Evolution and Function of Protein Phosphorylation Networks

    ]]> Jasmine Martin 1 1438257471 2015-07-30 11:57:51 1492118339 2017-04-13 21:18:59 0 0 event Abstract:

    Cells need to constantly adapt to changes in conditions and use different mechanisms to transfer information from sensors to the effectors of cellular responses. One of the fastest mechanisms is the reversible post-translational modification of proteins such as protein phosphorylation. Advances in mass-spectrometry now allow us to identify phosphosites in large scale and quantify their changes across different conditions. However, little is know about how the thousands of recently discovered phosphosites evolve, how they modulate protein function or how they act in coordinate fashion to dictate a cellular response. I will describe recent progress from our group in addressing these issues. We are developing methods to infer the most likely age of phosphosites by combining phosphorylation data from multiple species, protein sequences and phylogenetic trees. We have observed that only a small fraction of phosphosites are ancient in origin and that these are more likely to cause deleterious consequences when mutated. In parallel we are analysing changes in phosphosite abundances under different conditions. We have compiled a dataset of 150 perturbations in human cell lines where we can estimate the activities of approximately 200 kinases. These data allows to characterize cell signalling states across conditions and to infer associations between kinase activities and the phosphorylation levels of protein complexes.

    ]]>
    2015-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2015-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2015-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2015-10-29 16:00:00 2015-10-29 16:00:00 2015-10-29 16:00:00 2015-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2015-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-10-29 12:00:00 2015-10-29 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> If you have questions about logistics or would like to set up an appointment with the speaker, please contact the School of Biology's administrative office at bio-admin@biology.gatech.edu.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Comprehensive Prediction of Drug-protein Interactions and Side Effects for the Human Proteome"

    Jeffrey Skolnick, Ph.D.
    Director, Center for the Study of Systems Biology
    Mary and Maisie Gibson Chair & GRA Eminent Scholar in Computational Systems Biology
    Director, Integrative BioSystems Institute
    Professor, School of Biology
    Georgia Tech

    Identifying unexpected drug-protein interactions is crucial for drug repurposing. We develop a comprehensive proteome scale approach that predicts human protein targets and side effect of drugs. For drug-protein interaction prediction, FINDSITEcomb, whose average precision is ~30% and recall ~27%, is employed. For side effect prediction, a new method is developed with a precision of ~57% and a recall of ~24%. Our predictions show that drugs are quite promiscuous, with the average (median) number of human targets per drug  of 329 (38), while a given protein interacts with 57 drugs. The result implies that drug side effects are inevitable and existing drugs may be useful for repurposing, with only ~1,000 human proteins likely causing serious side effects. A killing index derived from serious side effects has a strong correlation with FDA approved drugs being withdrawn. Therefore, it provides a pre-filter for new drug development. The methodology is free to the academic community on the DR. PRODIS (DRugome, PROteome, and DISeasome) webserver. DR. PRODIS provides protein targets of drugs, drugs for a given protein target, associated diseases and side effects of drugs, as well as an interface for the virtual target screening of new compounds.  Successful applications of the methodology to treat Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, to identify novel antibiotic leads and promising anti-seizure drugs are described.

     

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1439198465 2015-08-10 09:21:05 1492118333 2017-04-13 21:18:53 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2015-10-20T17:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20T18:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20T18:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20 21:00:00 2015-10-20 22:00:00 2015-10-20 22:00:00 2015-10-20T17:00:00-04:00 2015-10-20T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-10-20 05:00:00 2015-10-20 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

    ]]>
    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Center for the Study of Sytems Biology]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series Schedule]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Capturing Cells that Kill: Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cell Clusters from Patient Blood using a Microfluidic Chip"

    Fatih Sarioglu, Ph.D.

    Assistant Professor
    Microelectronics/Microsystems & Bioengineering
    Georgia Tech

    ABSTRACT
    Cancer is the result of a cascade of multi-scale events originating from anomalies at the cellular and molecular level. As such, analysis at the cellular and molecular level offers exciting opportunities for detecting cancer while it is still manageable and for gaining biological insight to develop effective therapies. Well matched in size, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) are ideally suited for this purpose and they offer unique capabilities from highly localized and deterministic sample manipulation to precise quantitative measurements. Leveraging these capabilities, biomedical microsystems hold great promise to revolutionize the way we research, detect and treat cancer. In my talk, I will introduce a microfluidic chip technology to specifically isolate circulating tumor cell-clusters (CTC-clusters), a highly metastatic precursor population within CTCs, from unprocessed patient blood. This device enables non-destructive, antigen-independent isolation of CTC-clusters with high sensitivity and purity as well as viable retrieval of CTC-clusters in solution (off the chip) allowing downstream molecular assays. I will describe the design and operation of the device and share results from clinical studies on patients with metastatic melanoma, breast and prostate cancers.


    SARIOGLU RESEARCH
    Motivated by healthcare and biomedical research needs, our lab is developing technologies for investigating and manipulating biological systems on the micro and nanoscale. Using advanced fabrication techniques, we build devices that utilize microfluidics, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), optics, electronics and signal processing. Through multidisciplinary collaborations, we use these technologies as clinical microdevices for disease detection and monitoring and as bioanalytical instruments for high-throughput molecular and cellular analysis.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1439197848 2015-08-10 09:10:48 1492118333 2017-04-13 21:18:53 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2015-09-29T17:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29T18:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29T18:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29 21:00:00 2015-09-29 22:00:00 2015-09-29 22:00:00 2015-09-29T17:00:00-04:00 2015-09-29T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-09-29 05:00:00 2015-09-29 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

    ]]>
    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Biomedical Microsystems Laboratory]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series Schedule]]>
    <![CDATA[The Business of Regenerative Medicine: Cells at Work]]> 27195 3 day comprehensive and informative course on the business of regenerative medicine that will include lectures, panel discussions, case studies, networking and more. 

    This 8th annual course focusing on the business and economic issues associated with the field of Regenerative Medicine intended for business executives, financial market managers and analysts, technology transfer and development personnel, senior and junior scholars, managers in government, academia and business sector-involved corporations.

    The 2015 event is co-organized by the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience at Georgia Tech, the Harvard Stem Cell Institute, the Toronto Center for the Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine, and the Stem Cell Institute at Case Western Reserve University. 

    For complete course information, including registration:
    Business of Regenerative Medicine website

     

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1421920817 2015-01-22 10:00:17 1492118434 2017-04-13 21:20:34 0 0 event 8th annual course focusing on the business and economic issues associated with the field of Regenerative Medicine. Intended for business executives, financial market managers and analysts, technology transfer and development personnel, senior and junior scholars, managers in government, academia and business sector-involved corporations.

    ]]>
    2015-07-20T09:00:00-04:00 2015-07-22T18:00:00-04:00 2015-07-22T18:00:00-04:00 2015-07-20 13:00:00 2015-07-22 22:00:00 2015-07-22 22:00:00 2015-07-20T09:00:00-04:00 2015-07-22T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-07-20 09:00:00 2015-07-22 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Colly Mitchell

    ]]>
    366721 366721 image <![CDATA[The Business of Regenerative Medicine: Cells at Work]]> image/png 1449245817 2015-12-04 16:16:57 1475895103 2016-10-08 02:51:43
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Polymeric Micelles – A Transformative Technology at the Clinical Stage"

    Alexander Kabanov, PhD, DrSci
    Director, Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery
    Mescal S. Ferguson Distinguished Professor
    Codirector, Carolina Institute for Nanomedicine
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


    Polymeric micelle drug carriers were invented a quarter of century ago.1 Today this technology has reached a clinical stage. Nearly a dozen of drug candidates based on polymeric micelles undergo clinical trials and one product, Genexol-PM, a polymeric micelle paclitaxel, was approved for cancer therapy in South Korea.2 The value proposition of currently developed polymeric micelle drugs include increased drug solubility, increased extravasation and targeting to disease sites (e.g. tumors) as well as increased drug activity with respect to multidrug resistant cancers and cancer stem cells (CSC). One class of polymeric micelles is small aggregates (10 to 100 nm) formed by amphiphilic block copolymers. Hydrophobic drug molecules incorporate in polymeric micelles through cleavable covalent bonds or non-covalent interactions. Latest developments in this field include poly(2-oxazoline)-based polymeric micelles that can carry unprecedented high loading of hydrophobic drugs, such as paclitaxel, as well as blends of several insoluble drugs.3 Such formulations have much lower toxicity compared to conventional formulations, which use high amounts of unsafe excipients to dissolve poorly soluble drugs. Consequently, novel polymeric micelle formulations can be administered at much greater doses and are more efficient in killing cancer cells. Another class of polymeric micelles incorporates charged drug molecules and macromolecules by forming electrostatic complex with ionic block copolymers. In this format the incorporated molecules entrap into the polyion complex cores of micelles where they are protected from the biological environment by non-ionic water-soluble polymeric micelle shell. Upon reaching the target destination the micelles disintegrate and released their payload. This technology originally developed for antisense oligonucleotides,4 is now being used with chemotherapeutic agents, pDNA, siRNA and proteins. For example, extensive studies focus on the use of such systems for delivery of therapeutic enzymes (nanozymes) to the brain and other disease sites. In selected cases the nanozymes or are loaded into macrophages, which safely transport them, release at the sites of inflammation during disease.5 Moreover, the macrophages were shown to transduce the nanozyme particles as well as deliver genes into the host cells at the disease site.6 The proof of the principle has been obtained using animal models of stroke, hypertension, Parkinson’s disease, eye inflammation, influenza virus infection, spinal cord injury, and other diseases. Recent work was supported by NIH (U01 CA151806, R01CA184088, R01 CA89225, R01 NS051334, P20 RR021937), NC TraCS (4DR11404), DoD (W81XWH-09-1-0386, W81XWH-10-1-0806, W81XWH-11-1-0700), Rettsyndrome.org (HeART Award #3112) and Ministry of Education and Science of Russian Federation (11.G34.31.0004).

    References:
    1 H. Bader et al. Angew. Macromol. Chem. 1984, 123/124:457; A. Kabanov et al. FEBS Lett. 1989, 258:343; M. Yokoyama et al. Cancer Res. 1990, 50:1693.
    2 M. Yokoyama et. al. J. Exp. Clin. Med. 2011, 3:8.
    3 R. Luxenhofer et al. Biomaterials 2010, 31:4972; Y. Han et al. Mol. Pharmaceutics 2012, 9:2302; A. Schulz, et al. ACS Nano 2014, 8 (3), 2686–96.
    4 A. Kabanov et al. Bioconj. Chem. 1995, 6: 639; A. Harada and K. Kataoka, Macromolecules 1995, 28: 5294.
    5 A.M. Brynskikh et al., Nanomedicine 2010, 5:379-96; M.J. Haney, et al. Nanomedicine 2011, 6:1215.
    6 M.J. Haney, et al., PLoS ONE 2013, 8(4): e61852; Y. Zhao, et al. PLoS One 2014, 9(9):e106867.


    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1420732827 2015-01-08 16:00:27 1492118444 2017-04-13 21:20:44 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2015-04-28T17:00:00-04:00 2015-04-28T18:00:00-04:00 2015-04-28T18:00:00-04:00 2015-04-28 21:00:00 2015-04-28 22:00:00 2015-04-28 22:00:00 2015-04-28T17:00:00-04:00 2015-04-28T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-04-28 05:00:00 2015-04-28 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

    ]]>
    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Kabanov profile]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series schedule]]>
    <![CDATA[Liz Cirulli, Duke University]]> 27964 Exploring the genetics of normal human cognitive variation

    ]]> Jasmine Martin 1 1421833294 2015-01-21 09:41:34 1492118434 2017-04-13 21:20:34 0 0 event Exploring the genetics of normal human cognitive variation

    While extensive efforts continue to be made to understand the genetics of human diseases, there has been much less serious effort dedicated to understanding the genetic bases of traits comprising everyday differences among healthy individuals, many of which are of great interest biologically and have the potential to further our understanding of diseases. We have administered a standard cognitive battery to more than 2,200 healthy volunteers and assessed more than 600 participants for their night visual acuity, face recognition ability, time perception, contagious yawn susceptibility, and auditory pitch discrimination; these are all traits that are relevant to disease, fairly easy to measure and involve neuronal processes. We are exploring different genetic methods to identify variants influencing these traits, including GWAS, targeted genotyping and sequencing, and complete genome and exome sequencing. Our work provides a novel viewpoint into the biology underlying human diseases and the genetic architecture of human traits.

    ]]>
    2015-03-05T10:00:00-05:00 2015-03-05T10:00:00-05:00 2015-03-05T10:00:00-05:00 2015-03-05 15:00:00 2015-03-05 15:00:00 2015-03-05 15:00:00 2015-03-05T10:00:00-05:00 2015-03-05T10:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-03-05 10:00:00 2015-03-05 10:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> If you have questions about logistics or would like to set up an appointment with the speaker, please contact the School of Biology's administrative office at bio-admin@biology.gatech.edu.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Linker Histones in Stem Cells and Cancer"

    Yuhong Fan, PhD

    Associate Professor and Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Scholar
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    Chromatin and epigenetic regulation contribute fundamentally to all cellular processes in normal and disease states.  However, the role of higher order chromatin compaction in these processes has not been well explored.  H1 linker histones are major chromatin architectural proteins that facilitate the folding of chromatin into higher order structures.  Using molecular, cellular, genomic, and mouse genetics approaches, we identify critical roles of linker histone H1 in regulating embryonic stem cell (ESC) pluripotency and differentiation. Through high-resolution mapping, we integrate the localization of H1 variants into the ESC epigenome and uncover novel roles of H1 in pericentric heterochromatin and genome organization in ESCs.  On the other hand, by analyzing H1 variants in ovarian cancer cells and H1 mutants present in follicular lymphomas, we establish H1 variants as biomarkers for ovarian cancer, identify H1.3 as a specific and potent repressor for the non-coding oncogenic RNA H19 in ovarian cancer cells, and characterize the H1 mutants in follicular lymphomas as most likely loss-of-function mutants.  Taken together, our work elucidates the function and regulatory mechanisms of H1 in stem cells and cancer and suggests modulating H1 variants as a potential new strategy for stem cell therapeutics and cancer treatments.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1420732575 2015-01-08 15:56:15 1492118444 2017-04-13 21:20:44 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2015-02-24T15:00:00-05:00 2015-02-24T16:00:00-05:00 2015-02-24T16:00:00-05:00 2015-02-24 20:00:00 2015-02-24 21:00:00 2015-02-24 21:00:00 2015-02-24T15:00:00-05:00 2015-02-24T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-02-24 03:00:00 2015-02-24 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

    ]]>
    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Fan profile]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series schedule]]>
    <![CDATA[Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology & Technology]]> 27349 A Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology and Technology is open to all interested in exploring novel ideas about cancer and its detection and treatment.

    On display will be posters showing cancer research by scientists and engineers at Georgia Tech and other local institutions as well as summaries of recent publications that have been chosen for display and discussion from Cancer Biology and Technology students.

    A list of the titles and other information about the Festival can be obtained by contacting Al Merrill.

    This event is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience.

     

     

     

    ]]> Floyd Wood 1 1410968439 2014-09-17 15:40:39 1492118500 2017-04-13 21:21:40 0 0 event Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology & Technology - Poster fair to see and discuss cancer research with local experts and students

    ]]>
    2014-11-20T16:00:00-05:00 2014-11-20T18:00:00-05:00 2014-11-20T18:00:00-05:00 2014-11-20 21:00:00 2014-11-20 23:00:00 2014-11-20 23:00:00 2014-11-20T16:00:00-05:00 2014-11-20T18:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-11-20 04:00:00 2014-11-20 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Al Merrill, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
    <![CDATA[Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology & Technology]]> 27195 This poster fair is open to anyone in the Georgia Tech community who is interested in seeing and discussing cancer research with local experts and students in Cancer Biology and Technology (BIOL4015 & 8802 and ISyE 8813A).  The students will present information from recent publications on novel cancer technologies. 

    For more information, contact Al Merrill, PhD

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1383827772 2013-11-07 12:36:12 1492118635 2017-04-13 21:23:55 0 0 event Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology & Technology - Poster fair to see and discuss cancer research with local experts and students

    ]]>
    2013-11-14T16:00:00-05:00 2013-11-14T18:00:00-05:00 2013-11-14T18:00:00-05:00 2013-11-14 21:00:00 2013-11-14 23:00:00 2013-11-14 23:00:00 2013-11-14T16:00:00-05:00 2013-11-14T18:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-11-14 04:00:00 2013-11-14 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Al Merrill, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 “Understanding Cancer in its Full Complexity through Mining Cancer Tissue Omic Data”

    Ying Xu, PhD
    Regents' Professor and Chair
    GRA Eminent Scholar
    Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

    Institute of Bioinformatics
    University of Georgia

    A vast majority of the published cancer studies in the past few decades was conducted on cancer cells rather than cancer tissues. Knowing that the microenvironment plays key roles in cancer initiation, development and metastasis, we must reassess the true relevance of many of these published results to cancer. We have recently developed a new framework for cancer studies by treating cancer as a survival process under increasingly more challenging stresses, which evolve as a cancer evolves. Our main hypothesis is that cell proliferation is a sustained and common pathway to survival under all major cancer-associated stresses. The availability of large-scale cancer tissue omic data enables us to systematically identify various stress types present in each tissue and how each cancer tumor responds to the encountered stresses, ultimately validating, refining or rejecting this fundamentally novel hypothesis. In this presentation, I will discuss (1) how data mining can be used to identify such stresses and their responses, leading to substantially improved understanding about cancer evolution from its onset; and (2) how data mining-based discoveries can be integrated with cell-based experimental findings, leading to more comprehensive understanding about the key drivers and facilitators of cancer evolution, hence potentially leading to much improved treatment paradigms for challenging cancer cases.

    Reference: Ying Xu, Juan Cui, Dave Puett, Cancer Bioinformatics, Springer 2014.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1409674327 2014-09-02 16:12:07 1492118513 2017-04-13 21:21:53 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2014-11-11T15:00:00-05:00 2014-11-11T16:00:00-05:00 2014-11-11T16:00:00-05:00 2014-11-11 20:00:00 2014-11-11 21:00:00 2014-11-11 21:00:00 2014-11-11T15:00:00-05:00 2014-11-11T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-11-11 03:00:00 2014-11-11 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Computational Systems Biology Lab]]> <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center website]]>
    <![CDATA[Karsten Zengler, University of California, San Diego]]> 27964 Systems approaches to unravel interspecies interactions in microbial communities

    ]]> Jasmine Martin 1 1407318745 2014-08-06 09:52:25 1492118532 2017-04-13 21:22:12 0 0 event Systems approaches to unravel interspecies interactions in microbial communities

    Microorganisms form diverse communities that have a profound impact on the environment and on human health. These partnerships often involve consumption of carbon compounds that cannot be used by any individual organism, but yield sufficient energy for growth when paired organisms couple their metabolic capabilities. These associations are critical to carbon decomposition processes and are particularly important in oxygen-limited environments such as wetlands and sediments, but also in parts of the human microbiome. We developed a novel genome-scale, multi-omics based modeling approach to investigate the systems biology of syntrophic microbial partnerships to shed new light on a poorly understood aspect of carbon cycle processes. We determined the multidimensional interactions that define the composition of microbial communities and thus control carbon and energy flux through the system while simultaneously contributing overall community robustness. The work represents a significant advance in our ability to extend genome-scale systems biology modeling approaches to multispecies microbial consortia.

    ]]>
    2014-10-09T12:00:00-04:00 2014-10-09T12:00:00-04:00 2014-10-09T12:00:00-04:00 2014-10-09 16:00:00 2014-10-09 16:00:00 2014-10-09 16:00:00 2014-10-09T12:00:00-04:00 2014-10-09T12:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-10-09 12:00:00 2014-10-09 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> If you have questions about logistics or would like to set up an appointment with the speaker, please contact the School of Biology's administrative office at bio-admin@biology.gatech.edu.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[BBUGS Fall Picnic]]> 27469 The Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS) is the largest, most diverse, graduate student group on the Georgia Tech campus.

    Come meet the new BBUGS leadership and learn how you can become involved in education and outreach, industry, policy, professional development, research, service, or social activities. This carnival-style picnic will feature game booths, popcorn and cotton candy and even the opportunity to pie a professor. 

    ]]> Kristen Bailey 1 1406541172 2014-07-28 09:52:52 1492118534 2017-04-13 21:22:14 0 0 event The Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS) is the largest, most diverse, graduate student group on the Georgia Tech campus.

    ]]>
    2014-08-21T17:30:00-04:00 2014-08-21T19:30:00-04:00 2014-08-21T19:30:00-04:00 2014-08-21 21:30:00 2014-08-21 23:30:00 2014-08-21 23:30:00 2014-08-21T17:30:00-04:00 2014-08-21T19:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-08-21 05:30:00 2014-08-21 07:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> <![CDATA[BBUGS website]]>
    <![CDATA[Genomics of Infectious Diseases Workshop]]> 27195 High throughput laboratory technologies, and in particular next generation sequencing, are rapidly and fundamentally changing the practice of public health and clinical microbiology. Cost-effective whole genome sequencing and comparative genomic analyses of microbes and microbial ecosystems is enabling researchers to understand pathogenesis and disease transmission with unprecedented levels of detail. However, it also presents new challenges and requires new skills and algorithmic approaches as data volumes and complexities continue to grow exponentially.

    This four-day workshop is intended to help bridge these skills and domains for a multidisciplinary audience, and will include both lectures and hands-on workshop training in microbiology and molecular epidemiology, bioinformatics, high-performance computing, algorithm development and optimization. Enrollment is limited.

    Workshop Info and Registration

    The workshop is being organized by commercial organizing partner, Intel, federal co-sponsor, The Centers for Disease Control, and Georgia Tech.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1401955461 2014-06-05 08:04:21 1492118549 2017-04-13 21:22:29 0 0 event The workshop is being organized by commercial organizing partner, Intel, federal co-sponsor, The Centers for Disease Control, and Georgia Tech.

    ]]>
    2014-07-14T10:00:00-04:00 2014-07-17T18:00:00-04:00 2014-07-17T18:00:00-04:00 2014-07-14 14:00:00 2014-07-17 22:00:00 2014-07-17 22:00:00 2014-07-14T10:00:00-04:00 2014-07-17T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-07-14 10:00:00 2014-07-17 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Lisa Redding
    Academic Program Coordinator II

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Genomics of Infectious Diseases Workshop]]> <![CDATA[GT Bioinformatics Interdisciplinary Graduate Program]]>
    <![CDATA[Atlanta BEST Program Information Session]]> 27349 Atlanta BEST Program Information Session. Find out if the joining the BEST program is right for you. Call for applications are open until July 1.

    ]]> Floyd Wood 1 1401453701 2014-05-30 12:41:41 1492118550 2017-04-13 21:22:30 0 0 event Atlanta BEST Program Information Session. Find out if the joining the BEST program is right for you.

    ]]>
    2014-06-12T14:00:00-04:00 2014-06-14T15:00:00-04:00 2014-06-14T15:00:00-04:00 2014-06-12 18:00:00 2014-06-14 19:00:00 2014-06-14 19:00:00 2014-06-12T14:00:00-04:00 2014-06-14T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-06-12 02:00:00 2014-06-14 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]>
    <![CDATA[Pharmaceutical Development: From Drug Lead to Drug Product]]> 27195 Two-week short-course on pharmaceutical development this summer May 27 – June 9, 2014 for graduate students and postdocs from Georgia Tech and other Atlanta-area universities (Emory, Mercer, Georgia State).

    This course was first offered in 2012, read about it here.

    Instructors:
    Mark Prausnitz and Andy Bommarius with co-instructors and guest lecturers from Atlanta-area companies and universities


    Course Description
    Doctoral students from biochemistry, bioengineering, pharmacology, pharmacy, and other fields will work as part of interdisciplinary teams to simulate the drug development process starting with a druggable lead and ending with a report to “upper management” giving the scientific and business plan for development into an approved drug product. The course will follow an intensive, all-day, short-course format for ten consecutive weekdays with faculty lectures and student project teamwork. The goal of the course is to teach students the multifaceted process needed to bring a drug from concept to market in the context of open-ended, student-driven, collaborative projects addressing real-world problems in pharmaceutical development. 

    Course syllabus

    May 27 - Introduction to class and pharmaceutical development, Project teamwork and communication

    May 28 - From drug lead to drug molecule

    May 29 - Target indication, patient population

    May 30 - Drug manufacturing scale up and GMP

    June 2 - Formulation, route of administration, drug delivery systems

    June 3 - Design of IND-enabling studies: CMC, PK/PD and toxicology

    June 4 - Clinical trial design

    June 5 - Pharmaceutical marketing

    June 6 - Oral presentations and reports / business plan

    June 9 - Final presentations


    Please contact Mark Prausnitz for a registration permit or for more information.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1400235330 2014-05-16 10:15:30 1492118553 2017-04-13 21:22:33 0 0 event 2 week short course on pharmaceutical development

    ]]>
    2014-05-27T14:00:00-04:00 2014-06-09T22:00:00-04:00 2014-06-09T22:00:00-04:00 2014-05-27 18:00:00 2014-06-10 02:00:00 2014-06-10 02:00:00 2014-05-27T14:00:00-04:00 2014-06-09T22:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-05-27 02:00:00 2014-06-09 10:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Mark Prausnitz, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[CD4 website]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Recurrent Fusion Genes in Ovarian Cancer"

    Laising Yen, PhD
    Assistant Professor
    Department of Pathology & Immunology
    Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology
    Baylor College of Medicine

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in women. Almost 70% of ovarian cancer deaths are due to the high-grade serous subtype, which is typically detected only after it has metastasized. Characterization of high-grade serous cancer is further complicated by the significant heterogeneity and genome instability displayed by this cancer. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing of seven patient samples combined with experimental validation at DNA, RNA and protein levels, we identified several cancer-specific fusion genes. Among them, CDKN2D-WDFY2 occurs at a frequency of 20% among sixty high-grade serous cancer samples but is absent in non-cancerous ovary and fallopian tube samples. This is the most frequent recombinant event identified so far in high-grade serous cancer implying a major cellular lineage in this highly heterogeneous cancer. The parental gene, CDKN2D, is a cell-cycle modulator that is also involved in DNA repair, while WDFY2 is known to modulate AKT interactions with its substrates. Transfection of cloned fusion construct led to a gain of a short WDFY2 protein isoform that is presumably under the control of the CDKN2D promoter. The expression of short WDFY2 protein in transfected cells appears to alter the PI3K/AKT pathway that is known to play a role in oncogenesis. Thus CDKN2D-WDFY2 could very well represent a major cellular lineage important for detecting and classifying heterogenous ovarian carcinomas, and could provide insight into the underlying mechanism of this deadly disease. This is critical, given that ovarian cancer kills 140,200 women worldwide each year, and few ovarian cancer-specific molecular alterations are currently available for targeting and screening.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1395134462 2014-03-18 09:21:02 1492118575 2017-04-13 21:22:55 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2014-05-13T21:00:00-04:00 2014-05-13T22:00:00-04:00 2014-05-13T22:00:00-04:00 2014-05-14 01:00:00 2014-05-14 02:00:00 2014-05-14 02:00:00 2014-05-13T21:00:00-04:00 2014-05-13T22:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-05-13 09:00:00 2014-05-13 10:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Yen lab website]]>
    <![CDATA[GT Alumni Career Fair]]> 27688 Need a job?

    Want to increase your salary?

    Looking to move up?

    Make things happen in your career! Join us at the Georgia Tech Alumni Association Career Fair where you can connect with 100+ companies, build your network, and access over 400 open jobs!

    See Who’s Recruiting

    Register now for the Alumni Association's 32nd Annual Alumni Career Fair. 
    $10 Per Person*

    11:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.  Career Fair Check-In

    1:00 – 2:00 p.m.         Professional Development Workshop

    2:00 – 6 p.m.               Career Fair – open to all attendees

    5:30 – 7:30 p.m.                   Networking Meet and Greet at Buckhead Pizza Company in the Galleria Mall – hosted by the Marietta Network and sponsored by Hunter Technical Resources

    For more information on this alumni career fair, please visit: http://gtalumni.org/careerfairalumni

    ]]> Jessica Piechota 1 1393325454 2014-02-25 10:50:54 1475892416 2016-10-08 02:06:56 0 0 event For more information on this alumni career fair, please visit: gtalumni.org/careerfair.alumni

    ]]>
    2015-04-14T16:30:00-04:00 2015-04-15T00:30:00-04:00 2015-04-15T00:30:00-04:00 2015-04-14 20:30:00 2015-04-15 04:30:00 2015-04-15 04:30:00 2015-04-14T16:30:00-04:00 2015-04-15T00:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2015-04-14 04:30:00 2015-04-15 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> For Additional Information
    For registration questions, please contact Nicole Ikeda or by phone at 404-894-0783.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Understanding and Improving Platinum Anticancer Drugs"

    Stephen J. Lippard, PhD

    Arthur Amos Noyes Professor
    Chemistry Department
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    Platinum compounds are a mainstay of cancer therapy, with more than half of all patients receiving an infusion of one of three FDA approved drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin, and oxaliplatin). The biological action of cisplatin was discovered by serendipity in the late 1960s. Our laboratory has subsequently established the chemical nature of events leading up to the binding of platinum anticancer drugs to DNA, their principal target in the nucleus of cancer cells. The major adducts are cross-links between two adjacent nucleotides on one strand of the double helix, which bend and distort the duplex, interrupting cellular processing by RNA and DNA polymerases. We discovered more recently that related platinum compounds, capable of forming only a single link to DNA, are also extremely active against cancer cells, leading to exciting new strategies and candidates for drug development. Details of how these 'monofunctional' compounds work will be described. From the chemical principles learned in the process have emerged a much larger family of anticancer drug candidates, including those based on osmium and rhenium in addition to platinum.


    Stephen J. Lippard, whose research spans the fields of biological and inorganic chemistry, is the Arthur Amos Noyes Professor of Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    Lippard studies biological interactions involving metal ions, focusing on reactions and physical and structural properties of metal complexes. Such complexes can be useful as cancer drugs and as models for the active sites of metalloproteins. Metal ions also promote key biological reactions in enzymes and metal complexes can be employed to sense biological signaling agents.

    This is event is jointly sponsored by the Integrated Cancer Research Center and Georgia Tech's School of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1374571584 2013-07-23 09:26:24 1492118641 2017-04-13 21:24:01 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.  

    This event is jointly sponsored with Georgia Tech's School of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

    ]]>
    2014-04-22T17:00:00-04:00 2014-04-22T18:00:00-04:00 2014-04-22T18:00:00-04:00 2014-04-22 21:00:00 2014-04-22 22:00:00 2014-04-22 22:00:00 2014-04-22T17:00:00-04:00 2014-04-22T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-04-22 05:00:00 2014-04-22 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series schedule]]> <![CDATA[Lippard lab website]]>
    <![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Ancestry, Admixture and Selection in Colombian Genomes"

    King Jordan, PhD

    Associate Professor
    School of Biology
    Georgia Institute of Technology

    King Jordan's Computational Biology and Bioinformatics laboratory conducts research in:  

    Transposable Elements, Epigenomics & Gene Regulation - the influence of transposable elements (TEs) on the structure, function and evolution of eukaryotic genomes. Understanding the relationship between TEs, chromatin structure and gene expression dynamics.

    Computational Genomics for Public Health - the development and application of computational tools for the analysis of microbial genome sequences. Creation of web-enabled programs for molecular epidemiology and comparative genomics.

    Our bioinformatics research efforts sometimes entail algorithm development for functional genomic applications based on next-generation sequence data, e.g. genome assembly, ChIP-seq, RNA-seq. Jordan also works on the development of local bioinformatics capacity in Latin American countries, Colombia in particular. He is the co-founder of the PanAmerican Bioinformatics Institute (PABI), a network of academics and researchers in Colombia and the United States. PABI's mission is to facilitate public health and economic development throughout the Americas via education, research and outreach activities in genomics and bioinformatics.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1383924221 2013-11-08 15:23:41 1492118635 2017-04-13 21:23:55 0 0 event The Petit Institute Breakfast Club seminar series was started with the spirit of the Institute's interdisciplinary mission in mind and started to feature local Petit Institute faculty member's research in a seminar format. Faculty are often asked to speak at other universities and conferences, but rarely present at their home institution, this seminar series is an attempt to close that gap. The Petit Institute Breakfast Club is open to anyone in the bio-community.

    ]]>
    2014-04-08T09:30:00-04:00 2014-04-08T10:30:00-04:00 2014-04-08T10:30:00-04:00 2014-04-08 13:30:00 2014-04-08 14:30:00 2014-04-08 14:30:00 2014-04-08T09:30:00-04:00 2014-04-08T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-04-08 09:30:00 2014-04-08 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Colly Mitchell

    ]]>
    70917 70917 image <![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449177328 2015-12-03 21:15:28 1475894625 2016-10-08 02:43:45 <![CDATA[Jordan lab]]> <![CDATA[IBB Breakfast Club]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Regulating Energy and Lipid Metabolism through Pluripotent Transcriptional Networks"

    Martin J. Walsh, PhD

    Associate Professor, Structural and Chemical Biology
    Associate Professor, Pediatrics, Hepatology
    Associate Professor, Genetics and Genomic Sciences
    Mt. Sinai School of Medicine

    Glycolysis and lipid biosynthesis are crucial to stem cell behavior, but we know little about the transcriptional regulation of factors driving metabolism in concert with stem cell fate. We demonstrate through use of selective BET-bromodomain inhibitors, and comprehensive RNA-seq and ChIP-seq analysis in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), that Brd4, a master chromatin reader, governs transcription of the core pluripotency network and genes required for lipogenesis. Our studies now show that Brd4 governs glycolysis and lipogenesis at the core of the pluripotency framework of genes and that Brd4 regulates critical nodes of metabolism leading to the production of co-factors needed for modifying the epigenome.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1378205433 2013-09-03 10:50:33 1492118641 2017-04-13 21:24:01 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2014-03-25T17:00:00-04:00 2014-03-25T18:00:00-04:00 2014-03-25T18:00:00-04:00 2014-03-25 21:00:00 2014-03-25 22:00:00 2014-03-25 22:00:00 2014-03-25T17:00:00-04:00 2014-03-25T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-03-25 05:00:00 2014-03-25 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Walsh lab website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series schedule]]> <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center website]]>
    <![CDATA[The Graduate Career Symposium]]> 27714 Register Now…Limited Space  http://sga.gatech.edu/graduate/careersymp

     

    Refreshments Served

    Attend all or one session

     

    SESSION 1 9:34-10:30

    Opening session: "How to Connect, Convince, and Create Collaborative Relationships"

    Target Audience-All Students

     

    SESSION 2 10:45-12:00

    Table Top Discussions

    TARGET AUDIENCE-ALL STUDENTS

    Topics: Transitioning from the Lab, Consulting, Transferable Skills, How to Secure a Post Doc, Research Resources, Degree Marketability, Law School and Engineering, Patient Agents, Working for the Federal Government, Authentic Networking etc.

     Select 4 Table Top Discussions topics and rotate every 15 minutes.

     

    SESSION 3-12:20-12:25

     Job Options-Keeping Options Open (12:20-1:25) Panel 1

    Panel members: Alums/grad students who changed directions and or followed the original path-advice about discovering or selecting a career path.

    Target audience-Early graduate students 1st-3rd year.)

    Advice: What can you do with a graduate degree besides work at a research institution?

    Industry, Consulting, Government-what do these mean and how do academic, research skills convert to industry skills and or a career path? Must one decide on a career path within the first three years?” What can students do to keep options open and/or learn about career choices that are innovative, engaging, and challenging? Do coops and internships help and or matter?

     

    Academic Job Search (12:20-1:25) Panel 2

    All aspects of the Academic Job Search-Teaching Research

    Target Audience-All seeking careers with Colleges and Universities

    Advice: When and how do I begin my job search. Hiring cycles

     

    Choosing a Career Path (12:20-1:25) Panel 3

    Panel members: Alums in all areas who can discuss how they made their career choice-traditional or non-traditional path

    Target Audience Advanced Students-1-2 years from completion, Masters students

    Advice: Degree completion is near, so many career options! How are GT graduates utilizing education, transferable skills, interest, and strengths on the job? How did they find the job and how did they determine it was the “right” career path?

     

    SESSION 4 1:34-2:45

     

    Making the Right Impression and Details Matter? (1:35-2:45) Panel 4

    Panel members: Recruiters, managers’ decision makers discuss what details matter.

    Target audience: Early graduate students 1st-3rd year

    Advice: Do you think about the details of your interactions with potential employers?  What do employers notice during interactions at company info sessions, career fairs, conferences, or while candidates wait in the lobby for the interview? Do recruiters remember students and or  make  judgments make based on  emails, demeanor, dress, and etiquette?  What questions should be asked (and to whom) prior to an interview? How do you recover if you make a mistake? Get inside information scoop from recruiters and decision makers.

     

    Preparing for Success-Transition from Student to Professional-First Year on the Job-(1:35-2:45) Panel 5

    Panel members: Alums with 1+ years’ experiencing success provide advice and HR professionals

    Target Audience Advanced Students-1-2 years from completion

    Advice: What can you do now to help you succeed in your first job?  How to should you prepare to be part of an established group/team? What should you expect in terms of work place politics? How should you learn about and adapt to the culture of a workplace? How can you establish important relationships? Recent alumni will discuss what they have done to thrive in their non-academic positions.

     

    Little Things Matter-What Matters in the Academic Job Search (1:35-2:45) Panel 6

    Panel members: Academics with Hiring Committee Experience

    Target Audience Advanced Students-1-2 years from completion

    Advice: Degree completion is near, so many career options! How are GT graduates utilizing education, transferable skills, interest, and strengths on the job? How did they find the job and how did they determine it was the “right” career path?

     

    SESSION 5 3:00-4:25

     

    Start-up Challenges-Common Misconceptions (3:00-4:25Panel 7 

    Panel member’s entrepreneursGT alums with within the first 5 years of Start-up

    Target Audience Future Entrepreneurs

    Advice: What do first time entrepreneurs typically overlook when starting a business?  What are common misconceptions about startups?  What can one do to prepare for the challenges? How long before a company is profitable? Does being an entrepreneur mean freedom from a schedule?

     

    Negotiation the Industry Offer-What is Negotiable? (3:00-4:25) Panel 8

    Panel members: Recruiters, Human Resources, Managers, successful negotiators

    Target Audience-All students

    Advice: What can you negotiate in a non-academic job? How does the negotiation process work? Can an organization be rescind an offer? Do employers expect graduate students to negotiate? Can other offers leverage a better salary? When should negotiation take place? Can I negotiate via email? How much time between initial offer and deadline for acceptance? Can a student ask for more time? Do recruiters share information?

     

    Negotiating in Academic (3:00-4:25) Panel 9

    Panel members:  Faculty who negotiated packages and or Academic negotiators

    Target Audience Advanced Students-1-2 years from completion,

    Advice: What can I negotiate? How much do I request? Resources for Deterring Salary, Research Assistants, Lab, Graduate and Undergraduate Assistants, Course Load etc.

    ]]> Kyle James 1 1393931454 2014-03-04 11:10:54 1492118583 2017-04-13 21:23:03 0 0 event The Graduate Career Symposium 2014

    ]]>
    2014-03-13T14:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13T21:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13T21:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13 18:30:00 2014-03-14 01:30:00 2014-03-14 01:30:00 2014-03-13T14:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13T21:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-03-13 02:30:00 2014-03-13 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> 280271 280271 image <![CDATA[Speakers and Panelists Icon]]> image/jpeg 1449244184 2015-12-04 15:49:44 1475894973 2016-10-08 02:49:33
    <![CDATA[Graduate Career Symposium]]> 27801 Register now for the Graduate Career Symposium…space is limited! The symposium will be March 13 from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the GT Student Center on the third floor. Sessions will prepare graduate students to seek jobs in both industry and education and give advice on searching for jobs after graduate school.

    Topics include: Transitioning from the Lab, Consulting, Transferable Skills, How to Secure a Post Doc, Research Resources, Degree Marketability, Law School and Engineering, Patient Agents, Working for the Federal Government, Authentic Networking etc.

    Find detailed descriptions of each panel and register on the Graduate Career Symposium website at http://sga.gatech.edu/graduate/careersymp

    ]]> Krista Patel 1 1393330118 2014-02-25 12:08:38 1492118584 2017-04-13 21:23:04 0 0 event Graduate Career Symposium sponsored by Center for Career Discovery & Development, Graduate SGA, and Center of the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning.

    ]]>
    2014-03-13T14:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13T21:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13T21:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13 18:30:00 2014-03-14 01:30:00 2014-03-14 01:30:00 2014-03-13T14:30:00-04:00 2014-03-13T21:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-03-13 02:30:00 2014-03-13 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> robbie.ouzts@success.gatech.edu

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Register Online]]>
    <![CDATA[Info Session on Open Science Data Cloud PIRE Summer Fellowships]]> 27195 Travel abroad while researching the latest technologies in cloud computing with NSF funded OSDC-PIRE fellowship.

    The Open Science Data Cloud PIRE project provides international research and education experiences through training and study at universities and research institutes around the world with leading scientists in computing. Increase your expertise in managing and analyzing data.

    OSDC PIRE Supported International Research Experience:

    6-8-week summer funded fellowships at collaborator sites for graduate students to participate in sophisticated international □ research collaborations. Teams will be developing and doing research in cloud-based services & applications.

    OSDC Foreign Partners:
    School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom Science, Informatics Institute, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Universidade de São Paulo (USP), Brazil Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Japan.

    You must be a US Resident or Citizen in order to participate.

    Submit application

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1392918663 2014-02-20 17:51:03 1492118587 2017-04-13 21:23:07 0 0 event International research and education experiences through training and study with leading scientists in computing

    ]]>
    2014-02-27T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-27T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-27T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-27 20:00:00 2014-02-27 21:00:00 2014-02-27 21:00:00 2014-02-27T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-27T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-02-27 03:00:00 2014-02-27 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Lisa Redding

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Submit application]]> <![CDATA[PIRE Open Science Date Cloud]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Dysregulation of Autophagy and Malignant Behavior in Ovarian Cancer"

    Ciro Isidoro, MD, PhD
    Professor of Cell and Molecular Pathology
    School of Sciences and School of Biotechnology
    Adjunct Professor of Environmental Medicine
    School of Medicine
    Università del Piemonte Orientale "A. Avogadro"

    Autophagy is a cellular process of lysosomal degradation of aged, redundant or abnormal self molecules or organelles. In normal cells, autophagy runs at low basal level to allow macromolecules turnover, and it prevents cell transformation through the constant elimination of pro-oxidant molecules. Autophagy has been implicated in various malignant aspects of cancer, including the resistance of cancer cells to depletion of nutrients, as it occurs in fast growing and insufficiently vascularized tumours, and to chemotherapeutics. Autophagy has also been implicated in cell migration and tumour invasion. Autophagy is regulated by a certain group of oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes and by several microRNAs. Here I present our experimental data supporting the involvement of Autophagy in cell migration and resistance to chemotherapeutic in ovarian cancer, and the role of genetic and epigenetic factors in (dys)-regulation of Autophagy.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1389280058 2014-01-09 15:07:38 1492118613 2017-04-13 21:23:33 0 0 event Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]>
    2014-02-13T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-13T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-13T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-13 20:00:00 2014-02-13 21:00:00 2014-02-13 21:00:00 2014-02-13T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-13T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-02-13 03:00:00 2014-02-13 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

     

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Isodoro lab website]]> <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series schedule]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Revealing Tumor Heterogeneity between and within Tumors"

    Dana Pe'er, PhD

    Assistant Professor
    Department of Biological Science
    Columbia University

    Our lab endeavors to understand the organization, function and evolution of molecular networks. The molecular network needs to sense multiple signals from the environment, robustly process an appropriate cellular response and orchestrate the regulation of hundreds of genes and proteins to execute this response. This remarkable functionality occurs through diverse mechanisms including regulation of transcription, epigenetic changes, translation, degradation, post-translational signaling, and localization The advent of high throughput genomic and proteomic technologies is providing biology with an explosion of new experimental data, quantitatively measuring the molecular workings of the cell at a genome-wide scale.

    High throughput datasets are rapidly being produced, probing the diverse facets of the cell’s activity on a genome wide scale.Microarrays provide a global snap shot of gene expression and factor binding under different environmental conditions and stimuli.SNP arrays read up to 500,000 nucleotide polymorphisms in an individual’s genome.Flow cytometry combined with florescent antibodes measure the level and activities of proteins in thousands of individual cells.Small interfering RNA and synthetic biology techniques facilitate the perturbation of the molecular network in a variety of sophisticated ways. Our lab combines high-throughput experimentation along with the development of novel algorithms and computational learning methods to integrate diverse high throughput data and unravel from these the workings of the cell. The computational methodology is used to reconstruct models of the molecular network and these models are then used to elucidate properties of molecular networks, the design principles by which they function, and the forces that drove their evolution.

    The type of question we ask is “How does a mutation at one point in the network, propagate through the network and influence signal processing at a more global scale?” A population contains many genetic sequence polymorphisms that lead to variability in the complex web of regulatory interactions between individuals.We study how genetic variation perturbs the regulatory network, leading to changes gene expression and manifesting in phenotypic diversity. We use this approach to ask questions such as: How do changes in the molecular network influence fitness under different environmental conditions? How do changes in the network lead to dysfunctional signal processing, causing human disease such as cancer and autoimmunity?

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1378205020 2013-09-03 10:43:40 1492118641 2017-04-13 21:24:01 0 0 event Integrated Cancer Research Seminar Series - Dana Pe'er, PhD, Columbia University

    ]]>
    2014-02-11T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-11T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-11T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-11 20:00:00 2014-02-11 21:00:00 2014-02-11 21:00:00 2014-02-11T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-11T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-02-11 03:00:00 2014-02-11 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[Pe'er lab website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series schedule]]> <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center website]]>
    <![CDATA[John McDonald, Georgia Institute of Technology]]> 27964 Title: Genomic analysis of ovarian cancer metastasis: towards improved understanding and treatment

    Abstract:
    It is widely acknowledged that the metastatic spread of cancer cells is responsible for most cancer related deaths. This is particularly true for ovarian cancer (OC) where the prospect of favorable outcome drops precipitously once cancer cells migrate beyond the confines of the primary tumor. Our laboratory is interested in using genomic approaches to better understand the molecular processes underlying OC metastasis and to develop novel therapeutic strategies to inhibit metastasis and improve patient outcome.  Preliminary evidence suggests that OC metastases can be established from low frequency sub-clones present within the primary tumor resulting in significant genetic divergence between primary and metastatic tumors.  Additional evidence indicates that the OC metastatic process involves epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) with a concomitant reduction in the sensitivity of metastasizing cells to standard (platinum-based) chemotherapies. Ectopic over-expression of members of the miR-200 family of microRNAs is emerging as an effective strategy to reverse EMT and increase the sensitivity of metastatic OC cells to standard chemotherapies.

    ]]> Jasmine Martin 1 1390819647 2014-01-27 10:47:27 1492118601 2017-04-13 21:23:21 0 0 event Title: Genomic analysis of ovarian cancer metastasis: towards improved understanding and treatment

     

    ]]>
    2014-02-06T10:00:00-05:00 2014-02-06T11:00:00-05:00 2014-02-06T11:00:00-05:00 2014-02-06 15:00:00 2014-02-06 16:00:00 2014-02-06 16:00:00 2014-02-06T10:00:00-05:00 2014-02-06T11:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-02-06 10:00:00 2014-02-06 11:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> If you have questions about logistics or would like to set up an appointment with a speaker, please contact please contact the School of Biology's Administrative office at bio-admin@biology.gatech.edu.

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[ChBE Seminar Series–Dr. Terry Papsoutkis]]> 27741 In addition to its annual lectures, ChBE hosts a weekly seminar throughout the year with invited lecturers who are prominent in their fields. Unless otherwise noted, all seminars are held on Wednesdays in the Molecular Science and Engineering Building ("M" Building) in G011 (Cherry Logan Emerson Lecture Theater) at 4:00 p.m. Refreshments are served at 3:30 p.m. in the Emerson-Lewis Reception Salon.

    ______________

    ]]> Katie Brown 1 1385035730 2013-11-21 12:08:50 1492118628 2017-04-13 21:23:48 0 0 event 2014-02-05T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-05T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-05T16:00:00-05:00 2014-02-05 20:00:00 2014-02-05 21:00:00 2014-02-05 21:00:00 2014-02-05T15:00:00-05:00 2014-02-05T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2014-02-05 03:00:00 2014-02-05 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> ChBE Communications
    (404) 894-1838
    events@chbe.gatech.edu

    ]]>
    <![CDATA[ChBE Seminar Series]]> <![CDATA[Papoutsakis' Research Website]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Designed Multiple Ligands for Targeted Epigenetic Perturbation" -

    Yomi Oyelere, PhD
    Associate Professor, School of Chemistry & Biochemistry
    Georgia Tech

    The overarching research objective of our laboratory is to delineate the chemical basis of the molecular recognition events employed by biomolecules to drive important biological processes. We are interested in how perturbation of molecular recognition, by natural and synthetic ligands, can be used to understand the molecular basis of biological processes. In the pursuit of our research, we find inspiration in the fact that the basic molecular recognition principles in globular RNAs and proteins are one and the same. In this line of thought, one of the primary research focuses of our laboratory is the use of common molecular template to design new ligands for RNA and protein targets. Histone deacetylases and ribosomes are the current targets in this project. The ligands that have resulted from these studies have been used to probe the molecular basis of the function of their respective targets. Also, many elicit practical and desirable bioactivities including anti-tumor and anti-infective activities. Furthermore, our laboratory is involved in an interdisciplinary collaboration with the El-Sayed’s group on the design of new organic ligand conjugated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for cell selective delivery. Individual research project in our laboratory involves a unique blend of the tools of synthetic organic chemistry, computational chemistry, biochemistry and molecular biology.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1378204662 2013-09-03 10:37:42 1475892274 2016-10-08 02:04:34 0 0 event Integrated Cancer Research Seminar Series - "Designed Multiple Ligands for Targeted Epigenetic Perturbation" - Yomi Oyelere, PhD, Georgia Tech

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    2013-10-15T17:00:00-04:00 2013-10-15T18:00:00-04:00 2013-10-15T18:00:00-04:00 2013-10-15 21:00:00 2013-10-15 22:00:00 2013-10-15 22:00:00 2013-10-15T17:00:00-04:00 2013-10-15T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-10-15 05:00:00 2013-10-15 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, PhD

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    <![CDATA[Oyelere lab website]]> <![CDATA[ICRC Seminar Series schedule]]> <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center website]]>
    <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27691 "Development of Bioengineered Gene Transfer Vectors and Transgenes for the Gene Therapy Treatment of Hemophilia A"


    H. Trent Spencer, PhD
    Associate Professor
    Department of Pediatrics
    Emory University

    A major focus of the Gene Therapy Program in the Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center is the development of therapeutics for hemophilia A, which is a disease caused by insufficient levels of the blood clotting protein factor VIII (fVIII).  We are conducting late stage preclinical testing to support a gene therapy clinical trial incorporating genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) for persons with hemophilia A. In a series of recent studies, we have shown that the transplantation of genetically-engineered HSCs can restore factor VIII (fVIII) activity to curative levels in hemophilia A mice and that human HSCs are readily transduced with recombinant lentiviral vectors encoding a genetically-engineered fVIII transgene. Our gene therapy approach uses a bioengineered fVIII transgene designed at Emory University and contains critical high-expression sequences, which we have shown are necessary and sufficient to achieve therapeutic/curative fVIII expression levels. Using the bioengineered fVIII construct, designated ET-3, in preclinical murine studies we routinely observe normal fVIII activity levels in mice engrafted with only 1 – 5% genetically-modified hematopoietic cells. These engraftment levels are similar to those that have already been achieved in human HSC-based clinical gene therapy trials. We have generated extensive preclinical data using the ET-3 transgene, which demonstrate proof-of-concept that HSCs genetically engineered with ET-3-encoding lentivector, coupled with a non-myeloablative transplant regimen, can be used to treat and possibly cure hemophilia A. In addition, a favorable meeting with the FDA was held that provided the necessary guidance needed to finalize our preclinical data package and vector manufacturing. We are now preparing the necessary regulatory documents to conduct a first in man gene therapy clinical trial for hemophilia A.

    Faculty host: Ian Copland 

     

     

     

     

     

    ]]> Karen Cannon 1 1371545577 2013-06-18 08:52:57 1475892226 2016-10-08 02:03:46 0 0 event The Bioengineering Seminar Series is a joint seminar series between Petit Institute and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. Seminars are held on Tuesdays or Thursdays between 11am-12pm in Petit Institute 1128 unless otherwise indicated.

    ]]>
    2013-10-01T12:00:00-04:00 2013-10-01T13:00:00-04:00 2013-10-01T13:00:00-04:00 2013-10-01 16:00:00 2013-10-01 17:00:00 2013-10-01 17:00:00 2013-10-01T12:00:00-04:00 2013-10-01T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2013-10-01 12:00:00 2013-10-01 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Ian Copland, PhD - faculty host

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    217851 141991 217851 image <![CDATA[Spencer, Trent]]> image/jpeg 1449180130 2015-12-03 22:02:10 1475894885 2016-10-08 02:48:05 141991 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449178723 2015-12-03 21:38:43 1475894774 2016-10-08 02:46:14 <![CDATA[BIOE Seminar Series schedule]]> <![CDATA[Spencer Profile]]>
    <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar]]> 27195 "Technology for Targeted Genetic Therapies"

    James Dahlman, Ph.D.
    Assistant Professor
    Georgia Tech & Emory University


    Regardless of their biological mechanism of action, all DNA and RNA therapies are limited by one problem: drug delivery. DNA or RNA must be avoid clearance by the immune system, kidney, and spleen, access the target cell in a complex microenvironment, and enter the cytoplasm. Engineers and chemists have designed thousands of chemically distinct nanoparticles to target RNA or DNA. However, after they are synthesized, the expensive nature of animal experiments forces us to study whether the nanoparticles work in cell lines, even though drug delivery in cell culture does not recapitulate drug delivery in a living animal.

    To expand the number of nanoparticles we could study in vivo, we designed a high throughput nanoparticle / DNA barcoding platform to study many nanoparticles in a single animal. We used a high throughput microfluidic device that produces small, stable nanoparticles; each nanoparticle was formulated to carry a distinct DNA barcode. This new barcoding provides robust, linear, and repeatable results in vivo, and generates data that matches functional delivery of genetic therapies. We will describe this new in vivo screening platform, and discuss its applications to targeted anti-cancer gene therapies.

    Integrated Cancer Research Center
    Georgia Tech has been a leader in the development of collaborative approaches to both cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. The mission of the Integrated Cancer Research Center (ICRC) is to facilitate integration of the diversity of technological, computational, scientific and medical expertise at Georgia Tech and partner institutions in a coordinated effort to develop improved cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

    ]]> Colly Mitchell 0 1474294034 2016-09-19 14:07:14 1492118077 2017-04-13 21:14:37 0 0 event 2016-11-01T17:00:00-04:00 2016-11-01T18:00:00-04:00 2016-11-01T18:00:00-04:00 2016-11-01 21:00:00 2016-11-01 22:00:00 2016-11-01 22:00:00 2016-11-01T17:00:00-04:00 2016-11-01T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2016-11-01 05:00:00 2016-11-01 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, Ph.D.

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    361991 361991 image <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center]]> image/jpeg 1449245782 2015-12-04 16:16:22 1475895098 2016-10-08 02:51:38 <![CDATA[Dahlman lab website]]> <![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center website]]>