<![CDATA[New Image Analysis Model Could Advance Research in Obesity, Related Health Issues]]> 27511  

Current limitations in imaging and analysis of the lipid droplets in the worm have stunted the potential for growth, exploration, and attainable knowledge in the lipid droplet realm of research, says co-principal investigator Xiaoming Huo in ISyE. Current methods used by the team enable them to obtain only one set of 3D images every ten seconds. A comprehensive study on the relationship between food composition and the resulting lipid analysis requires the ability to identify and classify the characteristics of hundreds of thousands of images. Researchers say that such high throughput is only manageable if the image processing and consequent prediction is automated.  The proposed research has direct applications in other problems in biology, such as neural development, stem cells, cancer diagnosis, and drug discovery. It is also potentially applicable in other areas such as contemporary manufacturing of advanced nanomaterial, where a core problem is predicting the properties of produced nanomaterial. “The research is potentially transformative because the proposed approach will develop a new technique for quantitative imaging, high-throughput experimentation, and analysis of lipid distribution and protein function in C. elegans, in pursuit of determining the unknown genetic contribution to fat storage and distribution,” says co-principal investigator Hang Lu in ChBE. Part of the process involves microfluidics, sometimes called “Lab-on-a-Chip” and is used in the project for imaging, manipulating and sorting the animals. Combined with the statistical image analysis methods funded through the IDH seed grant proposal, the researchers aspire to move the frontier of genetic research to the next level. Written by: Joshua Preston, Communications Officer in IDH at Georgia Tech's College of Computing]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1366906889 2013-04-25 16:21:29 1653584976 2022-05-26 17:09:36 0 0 news 2013-04-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-25 00:00:00 Industrial and Systems Engineering

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209171 209171 image <![CDATA[Xiaoming Huo]]> image/jpeg 1449180001 2015-12-03 22:00:01 1475894869 2016-10-08 02:47:49
<![CDATA[Jim Dai Appointed Chandler Family Chair]]> 27511 Professor Jiangang (Jim) Dai was appointed the Chandler Family Chair in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) beginning August 15, 2013. The Chandler Family Chair is designed to enhance ISyE’s ability to “identify and employ a senior professor of international eminence in the fields associated with the missions of the School. The appointee will be an individual with a distinguished research record as evidenced by a significant record of publications in outstanding journals. Other evidence of high esteem among academic peers which would be valued are prize paper awards, editorships of high quality journals, and elected positions in national professional organizations."

Dai received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from Nanjing University in China. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University in applied probability and joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1990. His research interests are focused on performance analysis and scheduling of queueing networks that originate from computer communications and manufacturing systems. He serves as an associate editor for Queueing Systems, Mathematics of Operations Research, Operations Research, and Management Science. Dai is also a member of the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS), the Applied Probability Society of INFORMS, and the Institute of Mathematics Statistics (IMS).

Dai is currently serving as a visiting professor in the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering at Cornell University.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1373533540 2013-07-11 09:05:40 1653584976 2022-05-26 17:09:36 0 0 news Jim Dai was appointed the Chandler Family Chair in ISyE beginning August, 15, 2013.

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2013-07-11T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-11T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-11 00:00:00 Industrial and Systems Engineering

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50149 50149 image <![CDATA[Professor Jim Dai]]> image/jpeg 1449175428 2015-12-03 20:43:48 1475894468 2016-10-08 02:41:08
<![CDATA[Retired ISyE Professor Jerry Thuesen Reflects on Tenure with ISyE]]> 27868 It has been over 40 years since Jerry Thuesen first stepped foot on the Georgia Tech campus as an associate professor in what is today the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE). In 1968, with just 16 faculty members, industrial engineering at Georgia Tech had grown to become the largest academic program of its kind in the United States.

At that time, industrial engineering was housed in the A. French Building, located behind Tech Tower.  To get to any of the three floors, one could use the button-controlled freight elevator that was enclosed with wooden slats, or take the stairs (which was preferred by faculty).There was only one restroom in the A. French Building, which had stalls, but lacked doors. The whistle from the nearby power plant, which sounded five minutes to the hour, alerting students it was time to change classes, “made your head swivel,” Thuesen recalls. Though the building lacked in modern conveniences, it was impressive in those days that an industrial engineering school simply had a building of its own.

Hired by Bob Lehrer, ISyE School chair from 1966 to1978, Thuesen came to Georgia Tech to teach engineering economics, an area of expertise he shared with Lehrer. During his career, he taught four courses within the engineering economics discipline to both undergraduate and graduate students in ISyE, as well as those in other engineering schools on campus. Class sizes ranged from 25 to 35 students in the ISyE classes and up to200 students in classes from other departments.

In 1971, Thuesen revised and released the 4th editionof Engineering Economy, originally written by his father, H.G. Thuesen, a pioneering IE professor at Oklahoma State University. That same year, Thuesen received notice of tenure via “a handwritten note slid under his office door,” and later in 1977 he was promoted to full professor in ISyE.  During his career, he served on the American Society for Engineering Education Board of Directors and the IIE Board of Trustees, and he was the editor of The Engineering Economist.

Aside from his research, Thuesen spent much of his career giving back to the School, by contributing his time as well as through financial support.  In 1983, the same year ISyE moved across campus to the Groseclose Building, Thuesen worked with a group of faculty and staff to start the Evelyn Pennington Endowment, the first endowment fund in ISyE.  The fund was created in memory of Evelyn Pennington, who worked as an academic advisor and secretary in the chair’s office and continues to support student activities in ISyE today.

“To have a high level of expertise, you must have outside funding.  Philanthropic donations allow the School to be competitive and maintain a group of faculty that are respected around the world,” said Thuesen. “Georgia Tech has a strong loyalty from alumni, which is the very basis of being successful at fundraising.”

While at Stanford undergrad, Thuesen played varsity basketball for three years. To this day, he still holds the free throw career percentage record. With his sports background, it comes as no surprise that Thuesen was actively involved in athletics at Georgia Tech.  He organized an industrial engineering intramural volleyball team, comprised of faculty members and undergraduate students. The team played so well together they reigned as the School champions from 1970 to 1980. He also played on the Georgia Tech ISyE intramural basketball team and served on the Georgia Tech Athletic Board.

Thuesen retired from Georgia Tech in 1996 after nearly 30 years of service. He continues to support the School through contributions to various funds, and encourages faculty to become active in fundraising efforts on campus.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387186092 2013-12-16 09:28:12 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news It has been over 40 years since Jerry Thuesen first stepped foot on the Georgia Tech campus as an associate professor in what is today the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE). In 1968, with just 16 faculty members, industrial engineering at Georgia Tech had grown to become the largest academic program of its kind in the United States.

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2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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261081 261081 image <![CDATA[Jerry Thuesen]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05
<![CDATA[Leaders in the Making: IE SGA Presidents]]> 27868 Graduates of ISyE are known for making an extraordinary mark in the world as leaders in the field. However, many students in ISyE begin making an impact as leaders long before graduation, serving in various roles across campus.  Dan Blitch, IE 1953, Carey Brown, IE 1969, Tiffany Massey, IE 2003, and Eran Mordel, IE 2013, all served as president of the Student Government Association (SGA) during their time at Georgia Tech.  They recently took a moment to reminisce about their individual experiences in this role and how it shaped their futures.

Dan Blitch, IE 1953

I served four years on the SGA and in 1953 I was elected president by the SGA officers. Back then, the environment at Georgia Tech was a lot different than it is today.  ROTC was very active on campus, with many cadets leaving after graduation to serve their country. In the fall of 1953, Georgia Tech welcomed its first female students, after a close Student Council vote the previous year.

As president, one of my responsibilities was leading the student government in tasks such as distributing student fees across campus, most of which went to football and sports. I was responsible for setting up committees who worked to improve relations among Georgia Tech students and students at other universities, including Auburn and the University of Georgia.  While serving as president, I also helped collect money for the original Alexander Memorial Coliseum (now the Hank McCamish Pavilion).  I remember going from classroom to classroom speaking to students about the coliseum and taking up spare change they contributed to the project.

The interaction with other students, particularly those on student council, was a wonderful experience that helped me develop my leadership skills.  One of the greatest benefits of serving as SGA president was having the opportunity to get to know outstanding men, such as Bobby Dodd and Dean George C. Griffin, dean of students from 1946 until his retirement in 1964. I also felt that my involvement in student government was a key factor in having the opportunity to go to Harvard Business School after graduating.

-Dan Blitch, IE 1953

 

Carey Hall Brown, IE 1969

I was elected student body president in the fall of 1967.  Dean Jim Dull worked closely with me and the Student Government. He was very much a hands-pn dean of students as well as a supportive, wonderful, caring man. The SGA controlled all the student activity fees: Athletic Seating, Student Parking, Concerts, Freshman Camp at Rock Eagle (with the YMCA), Honor Board, and Ramblin’ Reck Club. Anything that had to do with student life and affairs was controlled and run by the SGA committees with direction from the Dean of Students office.

Once elected, I immediately engaged Dean Dull and stated I wanted to make a difference while in office. He handed me several copies of his recent annual reports to the president.  The theme he repeated every year was there were ashamedly few facilities for students to exercise and participate in intermural sports athletics. What followed were plans for the SAC ’70 (Student Athletic Complex), which was born believing we could convince Governor Lester Maddox’s office to authorize the funds for building such a facility on campus by 1970.  We had previously gained authorization from the School of Architecture to assign 5th year student Bo Powell to create a design for SAC.  Bo and I traveled to several schools at our own expense to view other student athletic facilities. Bo had created such a wonderful design and a presentation that when we visited with Maddox, he immediately stated he would ask Georgia Tech President Edwin Harrison to place the capital request for the building at the top of his list.  In the years that followed, successive student leadership, which included John Hayes, Chris Bagby, Bruce Milligan, and others kept the dream alive. SAC ’70 finally became a reality. For me, getting the Student Athletic Complex project off the ground was definitely a highlight during my time as SGA President.

-Carey Hall Brown, IE 1969


Eran Mordel, IE 2013

My tenure as student body president was the busiest, sometimes most frustrating, and most rewarding time during my years at Georgia Tech. Seeing the results of our efforts unfold over the year, working with students from every background imaginable, traveling, and many other opportunities were incredibly rewarding. Beyond the time and crisis management, and people skills that I learned, the biggest takeaway was appreciating being a student at Georgia Tech. Even the simplest thing – a football game -- has endless politics, balance sheets, and countless miscellaneous responsibilities behind scenes that make the experience a reality. This behind the scenes action sealed my appreciation for Georgia Tech and made me proud to be a Yellow Jacket.

During my time as president, I worked to revamp commencement policy with the President’s Office to increase ticketing; released Course Critique 2.0 under a more stable platform with many added features, which has seen over 153,000 page views from over 5,900 visitors in one month; hosted the inaugural

“Friday Buzz” stress-relief pep rally event with over 500 attendees; implemented the inaugural “Buzzinga” competition, encouraging team-styled campus improvement competition with $10,000 of funding/support for implementation; hosted the first-ever “GT Wreck the Vote” campaign with 300+ first-time registrants and 700+ attendees over a few events; secured approximately $500,000 in additional Student Activity Fee funds through the Budget Office; and advocated and lobbied against Sequestration (fiscal cliff), for the Higher Education Opportunities Act, Student Center expansion and renovation, and more.

While my classes have prepared me to do my future job, it’s the students here that have taught me how to make a difference in the world. The true value of college isn’t only the traditional learning, but also the process of maturing and growing as a person. Becoming involved outside the classroom and taking advantage of every opportunity is the most beneficial experience for any career. There are two qualities in IEs that coincide with leadership. First, the fast-paced, difficult curriculum pushes IEs to critically think, work hard, and be resourceful. Second, the program at Georgia Tech emphasizes working with others while being individually productive. Approaching the professor during office hours, forming study groups, Senior Design, are all experiences that teach us to work well with others. Still, we must be valuable members of the team. The IE program fosters a challenging curriculum and a collaborative environment that lends itself to the qualities of leaders.

One story really captures my approach to the role and the type of people and environment we had at Georgia Tech. Two weeks after being sworn in, Dr. Paul Kohn, the vice provost for enrollment services, invited Amit, the vice president of SGA, and me for lunch. Towards the end of the hour, I gracefully managed to launch ketchup all over Dr. Kohn’s shirt and tie. To make things better, Dr. Kohn was on his way to Georgia Tech President G.P. “Bud” Peterson’s office with other Georgia Tech executive leadership. Needless to say, Amit’s and my time in office started off on an interesting foot! Amid the humor, I took away a few lessons from the experience: not to take ourselves too seriously, the students, administrators, and faculty are all a pleasure to work with, and remember to focus on what is important.

 

Tiffany Massey, IE 2003

“During my time as student body president, Georgia Tech was in the midst of the transformation. It was a great time to be engaged with the continual improvement mindset we ISyEs share. I remember meetings with institute leadership examining existing processes — whether it was the stinger schedule or process class registration. We would collaboratively explore ways to improve the experience for all Georgia Tech students. This was spot on in my ISyE wheelhouse and it definitely felt very rewarding to be a part of creating a better Georgia Tech for students to come.”

 

Past IE SGA Presidents

Dan Blitch, IE 1953

Patrick Edward Bolger, IE 1957

Hazard Earl Reeves, IE 1958

William J. Vanlandingham, IE 1959

Oscar Newton Persons, IE 1960

Ronald D. Stallings, IE 1965

Carey Hall Brown, IE 1969

Greg Williams, IE 1974

Ross Mason, IE 1992

Susan Sutherland Pina, IE 1993

Jim Mason, IE 1997

Chris Kavanaugh, IE 2002

Tiffany Massey, IE 2003

Nick Wellkamp, IE 2009

Alina Staskevicius, IE 2010

Eran Mordel, IE 2013

 

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387186408 2013-12-16 09:33:28 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news Graduates of ISyE are known for making an extraordinary mark in the world as leaders in the field. However, many students in ISyE begin making an impact as leaders long before graduation, serving in various roles across campus.  Four IE presidents of the Student Government Association recently took a moment to reminisce about their individual experiences in this role and how it shaped their futures.

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2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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261111 261121 261131 261141 261111 image <![CDATA[Dan Blitch, IE 1953]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261121 image <![CDATA[Carey Hall Brown, IE 1969]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261131 image <![CDATA[Eran Mordel, IE 2013]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261141 image <![CDATA[Tiffany Massey, IE 2003]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05
<![CDATA[Surviving Drownproofing 101]]> 27868 If you wanted to learn how to survive in the water, Georgia Tech had just the course for you.  From 1940 until 1987, drownproofing, a method for surviving in the water for long periods of time, was a required course for Georgia Tech students.  Coach Freddy Lanoue, who taught the class until the mid-1960s, developed the drownproofing technique in response to events happening in the world at that time.  He indicated that more navy sailors had drowned during World War II than were killed by artillery fire because they could not survive in the water for long periods of time if their ship was sunk.

The objective of the course was for the student to be able to float in deep water for as long as he could stay awake. For most, this could be well over 24 hours.  The key to survival is to be able to vertically lie in the water with only the top of your head exposed.  It’s possible to float this way because most individuals’ body density is 98% water. The process is to take a deep breath, let your body go limp while 98% of it is submerged, let out about a third of your breath, and allow yourself to “hang” in the water. When you are ready for another breath, exhale, and move one arm or leg enough so that you can lift your head out of the water and take another deep breath. Again, let your head submerge with only the top back part of it above the water line.  By repeating this procedure, you can float in the water as long as you can stay awake.

Throughout the course, we had several tests, including the first test which was to tie your hands behind your back and your feet at your ankles, drop into the deep end of the pool, and float for one hour. We all felt that if we could pass that test, we could not only pass any swimming test, but we could pass any test in any school at Georgia Tech! Each student had a partner when we took the tests.  The partner would jump into the pool and pull us out of the water if our heads went under and we were not able to make it back up to the top.  This kept us from drowning!

My partner was a heavyset boy who was a football running back in high school. His body was denser than water; therefore, when he went limp, his body would sink! The first time he did the first test with his hands and feet tied, he sank nine times in a row and I had to go in and pull his head up and out of the water to keep him from drowning. Coach Lanoue would not let me go in until my partner was almost out of breath. After attempting the first test, I recall my partner yelling as he came out of the water, “Where the ‘H’ were you?  I almost drowned!”

With his heavy body density, he had to fight through every test. When he completed the course, Coach Lanoue gave him a good grade because he kept fighting and never gave up.  Over the years, I have found that life is a lot like that swimming course. 

Written by: Paul Flood, IE 1958, chairman and CEO of Chattahoochee Health Resources. His clients include hospitals, state hospital associations, and large physician practice groups. Flood continues to stay in touch with Georgia Tech, and has served on the ISyE Advisory Board since 2012.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387195115 2013-12-16 11:58:35 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news If you wanted to learn how to survive in the water, Georgia Tech had just the course for you.  From 1940 until 1987, drownproofing, a method for surviving in the water for long periods of time, was a required course for Georgia Tech students.  

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2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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261191 261201 261191 image <![CDATA[Paul Flood, IE 1958]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261201 image <![CDATA[Drownproofing 101]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05
<![CDATA[Meet ISyE’s Newest Advisory Board Members]]> 27868 This year, six new faces have joined the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering’s (ISyE) Advisory Board for the 2013–2017 term. Don Greene, IE 1980, Joaquín González Varela, Neca Holley, IE 1986, Andrew Ibbotson, IE 1998, Charlie Murrah, IE 1984, and Jocelyn Stargel, IE 1982, MS 1986, were inducted during the annual spring meeting held in May. Existing board member, Lou Fouts, IE 1990, will now serve as the board’s chair.

“ISyE’s advisory board is an important piece of the ISyE puzzle,” said ISyE School Chair Jane Ammons. “The board is made up of distinguished professionals and community leaders, with each member bringing extensive industry knowledge and unique expertise to the board. We are delighted to welcome our newest members.”

This summer, we asked them to share some memories of Georgia Tech and ISyE.

 

What is your fondest memory at Georgia Tech?

Stargel: I have so many fond memories at Georgia Tech that it is hard to pick one. At the core of all of my fond memories are the bonds and friendships formed as we all worked hard to earn that engineering degree.  Many of my lifelong friends are fellow Tech graduates.  Including my husband!

Murrah: I would say my fondest Georgia Tech memory is taking a winter weeknight study break to watch Bobby Cremins and the Yellow Jackets create the “Thriller Dome.”

Ibbotson: One of my fondest memories from my time at Tech was doing “triple play” one hot summer night, which involved climbing Tech Tower, the stadium lights and the coliseum, followed by a quick dip in the president’s swimming pool to cool off after all that physical exertion.  I hear that would probably get you kicked out these days!

Fouts: There are too many to count.  One of the most memorable would have to be the thrilling 41-38 Georgia Tech victory over Virginia at Virginia when they were ranked No. 1.  My brother, Nick Fouts, CE 1992, and I drove all night to Charlottesville to watch the game.

Holley: My fondest memory of Georgia Tech would be all the friendships I

made while there. And Saturday morning football games.

Greene: Although our teams weren’t great during my years on campus, there’s just nothing that would beat a fall afternoon at Grant Field. And the time

spent before and after the games with friends at MJ Pippin and Spiro’s made

Saturdays in the fall perfect days on campus.

 

What is your fondest memory of ISyE?

Ibbotson: The most fun I had as an ISyE student was senior design. My team worked with the Atlanta Track Club to redesign the finish of the Peachtree Road Race.  We built a model to simulate 55,000 runners crossing the finish line and overlaid our simulation on a map of Piedmont Park to demonstrate various scenarios and sell the Track Club on what we felt was the optimal layout for the new finish area in front of Park Tavern.  Getting to put some of what we had learned into practice, and then getting to run the Peachtree and experience the result firsthand was very rewarding.

Greene: In a wage and salary administration course, we were assigned to design a wage and salary system for a real company. My group gained permission

from The Varsity.  So, we went behind the scenes and rated various job factors for cooks, onion peelers, counter workers, and everybody else who worked there.  Talk about an interesting assignment!  There’s a skill to shouting “What’ll you have!”  Plus, we ate a lot of free chili dogs.

Murrah: My fondest ISyE memory is Nelson Rogers dispensing classroom advice in the old French building. Another good memory is a Quality Control and Statistics class I had under Dr. Jane Ammons. I think this was probably one of the first classes she taught!

Fouts: My fondest memory of ISyE would be my senior design team and how much fun we all had working together.

Stargel: My fondest memory of ISyE is of a business case oriented class that I took as a senior. I cannot recall the formal course name but it was taught by Professor Callahan in the old ISyE building.  I took the class at the end of my senior year and enjoyed it because it reinforced many of the concepts I had learned in the ISyE program.

I remember that we were required to get a subscription to the Wall Street Journal in that class and encouraged to keep up with business related news and developments.

I received a different view of how my skills fit into the workplace in that class and still subscribe to The Wall Street Journal today.

Holley: I loved Ergonomics class.

 

What motivated you to serve on the ISyE Advisory Board?

Greene: As CEO for the Institute of Industrial Engineers, I see the differences industrial engineers are making.  I am passionate about our profession. I am proud of my alma mater as the top-ranked ISyE department, and appreciate that my degree has enabled me to make a living doing something that I love. If I can help the department in any way, thereby enabling them to provide similar opportunities to today’s students, I am honored to have that chance.

Varela: The ISyE program at Georgia Tech has a recognized leadership position in its field, but the bar continues to be raised every year.  I’m hopeful that my professional experience both here in the United States and in Latin America will help ISyE remain in the top ranks of educational institutions worldwide. And I’m also hopeful that my day-to-day work in the retail environment will allow me to share insights into new dynamics that will keep ISyE graduates among the most qualified and employable as they enter the workplace.

Ibbotson: Surrounding yourself with a team of highly motivated and capable people is critically important when starting a new business. Georgia Tech and ISyE have played a key role in the success of my last two technology companies by providing easy access to a never-ending pool of exceptional talent.  I’ve had the pleasure and privilege of working with dozens of Tech ISyEs over the past decade – from co-ops and interns to members of my senior executive team.  One of the lead investors in my last two companies is also a GT ISyE.  So when I was asked to serve on the ISyE advisory board, I jumped at the opportunity to give back to the school in a small way.  So far, it’s been a great opportunity to reconnect with the school and get to know more really impressive students and alumni.

Holley: Giving back to Georgia Tech is important since being a graduate has provided me with so many

opportunities.

Murrah: I am interested in sitting on the ISyE Advisory Board because it gives me the opportunity to stay plugged in and give back to the school I love so much.

Fouts: I enjoy serving on the ISyE Advisory Board because it allows me to stay connected to the School and to participate in some small way to the continuing development of the next generation of student engineers and leaders.

Stargel: I am incredibly proud of my ISyE degrees from Georgia Tech. Serving on the ISyE Advisory Board is an opportunity to give back to the program and school that equipped me so well and to participate in the future success of our students and faculty.

 

Don Greene is the CEO and executive director of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE). Prior to becoming Executive Director, Greene served as managing director of the International Gas Turbine Institute. He has also been the director of member services and operations for Polaris International. Earlier in his career, Greene worked at IIE for ten years in a variety of positions including staff industrial engineer, product development manager, and membership manager. He got additional experience from his employment at Scientific Atlanta, where he worked as an industrial engineer. Greene became a registered Professional Engineer in 1988 and is also a Certified Association Executive. He is a member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, American Society of Association Executives, Georgia Society of Association Executives, and the Council of Engineering and Scientific Society Executives.

Joaquín González Varela is executive vice president of Walmart and president of Walmart Stores, Inc.’s East Business Unit, representing nearly 1,600 stores in four divisions spanning from Maine to Puerto Rico. He is responsible for establishing the strategic direction of all growth opportunities including execution of store innovation, supply chain, real estate and people development. Before joining Walmart’s U.S. operations, González held a variety of positions with Walmart de México, in which he has worked across some of the company’s most important divisions including operations, merchandising, logistics, and finance. His efforts in Mexico led to a handful of important milestones and achievements, including the development of a new store format, Bodega Express, which today is one of the main growing vehicles for Walmart de México. He implemented a cold supply chain network for all fresh merchandise — the first of its class in Latin America — including operations standards, procedures and the grand opening of the first distribution center in Mexico.

Neca Holley is an area manager with Outside Plant Engineering and Planning Design where she manages the central and western parts of Georgia for AT&T. Her group designs and implements facilities to supply high speed data and Ethernet services, which allows AT&T to meet bandwidth needs for cellular and U verse customers. She has been with AT&T/BellSouth/Southern Bell for 27 years and started her career as an outside plant engineer designing copper cable, fiber optic, and digital systems. During her career she has served in various capacities, from managing budgets to staffing the Cooperative Education Program for the BellSouth region where she recruited students from diverse schools around the country. Holley has a Professional Engineering License, is a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers, and The Institute of Industrial Engineers. She attended Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s course in quality, productivity and competitive position, which was taught by Dr. Deming himself.

Andrew Ibbotson is the founder and CEO of Digital Assent, a healthcare technology company that helps physicians and brands more effectively engage patients at the point of care. Under his leadership, Digital Assent has earned significant recognition. Highlights include being selected by Forbes Magazine as a finalist for its list of “America’s Most Promising Companies” and winning the Cool Technology of the Year award presented by TechAmerica and the Technology Association of Georgia.  Digital Assent’s rapidly growing PatientPad® Network now spans every major metropolitan market in the country. Andrew was named 2012 Business Person of the Year by the Metro Atlanta Chamber, Entrepreneur of the Year at TiECON Southeast, and Mobile Marketer of the Year at the 2012 Tech Marketing Awards. He was also recognized as one of Atlanta’s “40 Under 40″ business leaders by the Atlanta Business Chronicle. Ibbotson is an active member of the Atlanta technology community. He sits on the Board of Directors for Venture Atlanta, serves as a mentor to first-time entrepreneurs, and regularly speaks at events throughout the country to promote innovation and entrepreneurship.

Charlie Murrah is executive vice president and president of Southwire’s Energy Division, which serves customers in the electrical utility industry primarily in the United States. Murrah began his career with Southwire in 1984 as an industrial engineer in the Carrollton Utility Products Plant. He subsequently held numerous engineering and management positions in Southwire’s energy cable and copper operations, serving most recently as the company’s vice president of supply chain. Murrah is a Georgia registered Professional Engineer and a certified production and inventory manager. In 1996, he was inducted into the Council of Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni of Georgia Tech.

Jocelyn Stargel is the manager of business assurance at Southern Company Services. With 4.4 million customers and nearly 46,000 megawatts of generating capacity, Atlanta-based Southern

Company is the premier energy company serving the Southeast through its subsidiaries — Georgia Power, Alabama Power, Mississippi Power, Gulf Power, Southern Power, Southern Nuclear, Southern Telecom and SouthernLINC Wireless. In her role, Stargel oversees the Southern Company program focused on minimizing or eliminating the impact of events that have the potential to disrupt critical business operations, functions, or services. Stargel currently serves on the board of the Georgia Tech Women’s Alumni Network, and the Finance Committee of CHRIS Kids, Inc. She has also served on the Board of Directors of CHRIS Kids, Inc, the marketing committee of Heating Energy Assistance Team, and on the Board of Directors for the Spruill Center for the Arts.

Lou Fouts is a partner at Water Street Capital, a large Jacksonville-based hedge fund, that manages money for leading endowments, institutions, and family offices. Fouts heads up Water Street’s initiatives in the commodity, energy, transportation, and automotive industries. Water Street is known for taking large stakes in under-appreciated growth opportunities such as Apple Computer in 2003 and commodities (fertilizer, crude oil, coking coal) from 2004-2008. Upon graduation from Georgia Tech, Fouts went to work for SysteCon, a logistics and distribution consultancy founded by Georgia Tech’s Dean of Engineering, John White, where he specialized in supply-chain restructuring. After two years at SysteCon, Fouts joined The Boston Consulting Group’s Russian office in 1993 and participated in the restructuring of the Russian agricultural logistics network. In 1998, Fouts was recruited to New York City to help develop the private equity initiatives of Caxton Corporation, one of the largest hedge funds in the world at that time. Fouts joined Water Street in 2002 and became the firm’s youngest partner in 2004.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387195382 2013-12-16 12:03:02 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news This year, six new faces have joined the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering’s (ISyE) Advisory Board for the 2013–2017 term. Don Greene, IE 1980, Joaquín González Varela, Neca Holley, IE 1986, Andrew Ibbotson, IE 1998, Charlie Murrah, IE 1984, and Jocelyn Stargel, IE 1982, MS 1986, were inducted during the annual spring meeting held in May. Existing board member, Lou Fouts, IE 1990, will now serve as the board’s chair.

]]>
2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
261301 261251 261231 261241 261281 261291 261271 261301 image <![CDATA[Joaquín González Varela]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261251 image <![CDATA[Jocelyn Stargel]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261231 image <![CDATA[Lou Fouts]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261241 image <![CDATA[Neca Holley]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261281 image <![CDATA[Andrew Ibbotson]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261291 image <![CDATA[Charlie Murrah]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261271 image <![CDATA[Don Greene]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05
<![CDATA[All in the Family: ISyE Students of Yesterday and Today Share Ties]]> 27868 Over the past few decades, the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering has seen sweeping changes.

It got a name, for one thing. (Thanks again to H. Milton Stewart Jr., a 1961 alumnus.) Its students and faculty embraced the promises of technology, which has become a constant presence in education. And, of course, the Stewart School itself has grown into a global force that serves business and humanitarian needs alike.

But a few things have remained remarkably consistent — and we’re not just talking about high rankings.

One of the defining experiences for industrial and systems engineering (ISyE) alumni of all backgrounds is still the senior design course. A milestone in the IE curriculum, this class offers both real world project experience and realworld stresses.

“You go through a lot of pain,” said Chris Anderson, B.S. IE 2008. Still, he added, “it teaches you a lot in terms of working and meeting deadlines.” His father, Mike Anderson, graduated from ISyE nearly three decades earlier. But his senior design work still stands out to him too, and he cites it as one of the key courses in his Georgia Tech career.

Memories of that class came up time and time again in interviews with ISyE alumni, students and professors. As the Stewart School continues to grow in size and scope, some changes are inevitable, and its stakeholders are optimistic about the future. But they also know that some things remain steadfast. The core principles that defined ISyE decades ago are still very much alive today.

To explore the ties between the ISyEof yesteryear and the one of today, we spoke to some of its alumni, students and professors — many with ISyE family connections.

EXPERIENCING ISyE

Like countless students before and after him, Ed Rogers grew up loving Georgia Tech. His father,

ISyE alumnus and professor emeritus Nelson Rogers (recently deceased), had been taking him to Yellow Jacket football games since he was a boy. Once he was a Tech student, he decided to study industrial engineering partly as a function of his personality, which is driven to create order out of chaos.

“Frankly, I’d always preferred to be in situations that are run efficiently,” he said. “That’s just the way I’m wired.”

Rogers, now a director of global strategy at UPS, received his bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering in 1982. (Twenty years later, he was among the graduates of Tech’s very first Executive Master’s in International Logistics program.)

He shares his alma mater with his son, Matlock, and he knows their experiences in ISyE share some common themes.

“Georgia Tech undergraduate engineering is by nature rigorous and demanding,” he said. “It always has

been and it always will be; my son Matlock tells me it’s certainly still the case.” Matlock Rogers, who got his bachelor’s from ISyE in 2011, said he’s grateful for the rigor.

Although he stresses that “the coursework was challenging,” he appreciates the depth at which he was expected to understand material. Early in his college career, his classes focused mostly on theory, but as he advanced in the curriculum, Rogers found himself applying his theoretical knowledge to complex, real-world situations.

ISyE professor Julie Swann (who earned her own industrial engineering B.S. from Tech in 1996) enjoys teaching the undergraduate senior design course for that very reason.

“What I like is that students join together to work on projects, and it’s real-world experience,” she said.

Matlock Rogers, meanwhile, now works for Anheuser-Busch as a project manager. His years as an ISyE student, he said, “gave me the right tools and the right exposure to industry.”

 

FROM CLASSROOMS TO THE WORKPLACE

As chief executive officer of GameStop, Paul Raines leads a busy life. But something he likes to make time for outside the workplace is Georgia Tech, and specifically the ISyE program.

A 1985 ISyE graduate himself, Raines sometimes meets with high school students to discuss the benefits of a Tech education, and he explains the advantages of studying industrial engineering.

So far, he’s had a lot of success with his strategies. Four kids who spoke with him went on to attend Tech. (His daughter, Victoria, is a current ISyE student, and she reports her dad “was ecstatic” about her decision to attend his alma mater.)

Raines laughs when he calls himself a Georgia Tech “closer,” but he’s serious about the value of industrial engineering.

“ISyE is fantastic, because it is a very broad background,” he said. “It’s certainly technical, but there is an element of systems thinking and integration that is forced on you.”

ISyE’s programs emphasize intellectual rigor, but they’re also known for grounding students in real-life problems to ready them for the workplace. That initiation can start right at the beginning of students’ academic careers.

Last year, Victoria Raines enrolled in an industrial engineering-based section of GT 1000, the Institute’s freshman seminar. The class taught her more about what kinds of companies hire ISyE graduates, and several program alumni spoke about their experiences.

Paul Raines, meanwhile, still vividly remembers the challenges of a course from later in his Tech career: senior design. Back then, Georgia Tech ran on a quarter system, which meant his class was split into two parts. After spring break, Raines said, he returned to school to find the company he was working for had restructured.

“It was pretty scary, when you’re about to graduate, to have that happen,” he said. But it was also a key learning experience, giving him and his classmates a taste of the last-minute crises that can impact projects in the workplace.

Though his daughter is still in the early phase of her ISyE career, she said she already knows the program will prove “challenging but rewarding.” She’s eyeing jobs that combine engineering and business – much like her dad.

Some of ISyE’s newer offerings are specifically tailored to reflect the modern working world. For example, the Executive Master’s in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy Program, which leads to an MS in International Logistics, is designed for leaders in an increasingly globalized workplace.

Participants spend time on four continents over the course of 18 months, meeting for classes in each location about regional influences on logistics.

Ed Rogers, who earned that master’s degree in 2002, said it “was the perfect program in order to get a global, more strategic understanding in challenges and opportunities in logistics.”

The ISyE school at large is committed not only to logistics in the corporate world, but in humanitarian work as well. In her research, Julie Swann focuses on humanitarian supply chains and health issues in Georgia and across the world.

“Our current graduates need to be globally savvy,” she said, “because even if they take a job in Georgia, their companies may have interactions with suppliers all over the world.”

 

LOOKING TO TOMORROW

 n a field that’s constantly evolving, the future can be tough to predict. But ISyE alumni and current students alike all pointed to similar ideas in their visions for the program’s future.

They said that international experience, which wasn’t heavily emphasized at Tech during the college careers of some older alumni, is now very important – and it’s only becoming more so.

Chris Anderson noted that in a world dependent on global logistics, ISyE leaders are smart to encourage study- and work-abroad experiences. And, when students get those experiences early, they gain an advantage for the working world.

“We can work anywhere we want based on our skill set,” he said.

Julie Swann also sees a more international bent in the student body itself. Since her days as a student, she said, Tech has become more diverse in languages spoken and nationalities represented.

Another change highlighted by alumni was the very type of humanitarian work Swann is involved in. Mike Anderson, for example, envisions future graduates becoming more involved with nonprofits, and he’s looking forward to seeing the impacts today’s ISyE students will make in that realm.

“I see IE doing that on a state, region, national and worldwide level — and being able to provide some solutions,” he said.

Then, of course, there’s the wildcard: technology. Chris Anderson pointed out that technology has shifted in innumerable ways since his own father was in school, and that more changes will bring more opportunities to ISyE students.

Back when Paul Raines was in school, there was a brand-new program at ISyE: PC rental. Students could sign up to rent one themselves, which Raines found amazing.

“I thought, ‘Man, this is the future!’” he said.

Times have changed, but Raines is pleased to see ISyE keeping up with technology and growing to meet the modern world’s demands.

“It’s just such a comprehensive program,” he said.

 

THE ZALESKYS

Charlene and Zola Zalesky are your typical Yellow Jackets, but they’re also a million miles from average.

In their family of four, everyone is a Georgia Tech graduate or a current student. But Charlene and Zola also share an ISyE connection: Charlene earned a bachelor’s in health systems in 1977, and Zola, her daughter, is now an ISyE student herself.

“Recognizing my mom’s career success across four different industries is what initially sparked my interest in industrial engineering. I saw how the IE degree led to a wide variety of career opportunities,” Zola said.

Although they share many of the same ideas about and passions for ISyE, the generational divide between them underlines the changes the school is making to face its future.

When Charlene was a student, computations were done on slide rules, and computers took up whole buildings. These days, personal laptops rule the classroom.

And, when she began at Georgia Tech in 1973, there was just one female student for every 20 male students. By the time she graduated, the ratio was 1:12, and now that Zola is a student, it’s 1:3.

These days, there are new chances for students to learn outside the classroom too.

“We didn’t have the internship or international opportunities they have today,” Charlene said, noting that these opportunities help students “recognize what they don’t want to spend a career doing as much as what they do want to do.”

Zola, for example, has already studied abroad in Germany. Fluent in German, she hopes to return to the country for an internship.

As the fourth member of her family to attend Georgia Tech, Zola is proud to be part of the ISyE program. But she’s also excited to carve her own path at Georgia Tech — and beyond.

“Industrial engineering, more than some of the others I’ve noticed, is more influenced by women,” she said.

As Zola grew up, Charlene said, she made it a priority to show her “the role of women” in the field. Her daughter was inspired and encouraged by meeting female engineers. Teachers often discouraged her from pursuing a career in math or hard science because she excelled in social sciences, but Charlene introduced her to professionals in various fields and made sure Zola knew that engineering was an option for her too.

Now she’s at Tech all on her own, Zola is eager to make ISyE her own.

“This is my IE degree,” she said, “my Georgia Tech experience and my path to an exciting career in medicine or logistics or finance or what dream I decide to pursue.”

 

Written by: Lyndsey Lewis

This article first appeared in the ISyE Alumni Magazine

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387207440 2013-12-16 15:24:00 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news Over the past few decades, the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering has seen sweeping changes. But a few things have remained remarkably consistent — and we’re not just talking about high rankings.

]]>
2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
261321 261351 261361 261331 261341 261371 261381 261321 image <![CDATA[Matlock, IE 2011, and Ed Rogers, IE 1982, MS IL 2002, enjoying a Georgia Tech football game in 2012. Ed is a director of Global Strategy at UPS and Matlock works for Anheuser-Bush as a project manager.]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261351 image <![CDATA[Mike Anderson, IE 1979, president and CEO of Georgia Power Foundation, Inc., cites his Senior Design experience as one of the key courses in his Georgia Tech career.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261361 image <![CDATA[Chris Anderson, IE 2008, senior analyst at Consolidated Edison, notes that IEs can work anywhere based on the set of skills they learn.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261331 image <![CDATA[Paul Raines, IE 1985, CEO of GameStop, enjoys meeting with high school students to discuss benefits of attending Tech and especially studying industrial engineering.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261341 image <![CDATA[Victoria Raines, a current undergraduate student, said her father “was ecstatic” about her decision to attend his alma mater.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261371 image <![CDATA[Julie Swann, IE 1996, is now the Harold R. and Mary Anne Nash Associate Professor at ISyE. She enjoys teaching Senior Design because it offers students a real-world experience.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 261381 image <![CDATA[When Charlene Zalesky, IE HS 1977, was a student, computations were done on a slide rule. For Zola, a current undergraduate student, computers are the standard.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05
<![CDATA[Beyond the Classroom with Valerie Thomas]]> 27868 In the classroom, Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems, and her students investigate energy and materials efficiency, sustainability measures, and industrial ecology. At home, she and her family apply sustainability science to everyday life by experimenting with a unique approach to cooking. If you were to visit Thomas for a weekend meal, you might find her in the backyard next to an odd cooking contraption, a stove that looks like something the Jetsons would have used. In fact, it’s a parabolic stove that uses the energy of the sun as fuel.

What motivated you to begin cooking on a parabolic stove?

I’ve been cooking with a solar oven for several years now. The solar oven works great, but I wanted to be able do stove-top type cooking, so I got a parabolic stove.

What kinds of things do you cook or not cook on it?

We boil water for tea and coffee. I cook hamburgers, sausages, eggs, and vegetables. Basically it’s exactly like a gas burner on a gas stove.  However, mine is a bit harder to manage than my gas stove. Generally, I end up having the hot spot a bit more on one side rather than exactly in the middle. Also, it is a bit over-focused so to get even cooking I need to swivel the pan back and forth a little. I don’t use it for gentle, slow simmering.

One limitation is that the sun has to be up. Even in the summer, if I wanted to rely on it for morning tea, I would usually have to wait until 10 a.m. or so.

How often do you use the stove?

I only use it about one day a week, on the weekends, because most days I’m not there much before sundown. It would work in the winter, but I don’t use it then because it involves going in and out of the house a lot. I use it like other people use an outdoor grill. It’s a fun way to cook.\

How is cooking on this different/similar to cooking on a regular stove?

Since I’m relying on the sun, I really do have to strike while the iron is hot. Using a solar stove leads me more toward cooking food in the middle of the day, and being mindful of how late it is in the afternoon and how much sun is left.

Describe the process from set up to shut down for cooking one of your favorite recipes.

The first step is to get the stove into the sun and pointed at the right angle. That could involve picking it up and moving it to a sunny spot. Then I tilt the parabola back and forth until the heat is focused on the cooking ring. Once I get the angle to the sun about right, I wave my hand through to feel where the heat is to see if I need to make some adjustments to the angle. Next I put the pan on the cooking ring and look underneath to see exactly where the bright sunny spot is on the bottom of the pan. I continue to make small tilts and turns to get the bright spot to be in the middle of the pan. Then, I proceed as usual. Let’s say I’m making a stir fry.  I’ll pour some oil in the pan, wait a bit, tilt the pan around to cover the bottom of the pan with oil, add some spices, stir a bit with a spatula, add some onions and garlic, add the other ingredients, stir around a bit more, and it’s done. To shut down, I just swivel the parabola a bit to the side.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387209563 2013-12-16 15:59:23 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news In the classroom, Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems, and her students investigate energy and materials efficiency, sustainability measures, and industrial ecology. At home, she and her family apply sustainability science to everyday life by experimenting with a unique approach to cooking. 

]]>
2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
261401 261401 image <![CDATA[Valerie Thomas using her parabolic stove that uses the energy of the sun as fuel.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894948 2016-10-08 02:49:08
<![CDATA[ISyE Freshmen Make Impact in Georgia Tech’s New Grand Challenges Program]]> 27868 This past year, Georgia Tech introduced the Grand Challenges Living Learning Community, a new program for incoming freshman that offers students the opportunity to participate in a unique, multidisciplinary learning lab. The program formed a fun and innovative community for these students.  They lived together in Howell Hall and worked in cross-disciplinary teams on different projects to solve some of the grand challenges facing society, specifically on the relationship between food, water, energy, and healthcare. Out of the 110 students who participated, seven were industrial engineering students.

During the program, Dima Nazzal, ISyE director of student services, presented a session on the types of projects the Georgia Tech Health and Humanitarian Logistics Center,a unit of ISyE, have been working on with their partnering humanitarian and relief agencies.

“We hope to instill a passion in these students as we help to develop the skills needed to integrate engineering tools and methods with sustainable practices early on in their education so that when they graduate, they will be prepared to make a real difference in this world.” said Nazzal.

 

Shifting Perspectives through Freshman Grand Challenges

By Ethan Smith

Freshmen year could have been daunting, but the Grand Challenges program made my freshmen year more interesting. I got to know such passionate and driven students, and now I’ll have many great friends during the rest of my time at Georgia Tech.

Back in high school, I imagined college would mean a lot of independent work and studying by yourself. But Grand Challenges changed that belief. Through the program,

I’ve learned that many things in my future will be a group effort. For example, I didn’t realize the benefits of studying with my classmates but it has helped me tremendously during my first year at Tech. If I had problems under- standing a concept, I had a support system to help me, and if I understood a topic, I was there for others who needed help. Future industrial engineering classes will be no different, and I’ll continue this tradition of teamwork.

It’s interesting but I feel like Grand Challenges made me a much more agreeable person. In high school, I was very headstrong and opinionated. I always took charge in group projects and made sure everything went my way. However, many people in Grand Challenges are just the same way. Everyone wants to succeed and voice their ideas. So I realized that it’s not important that I get my way; it’s more important that everyone is heard and satisfied. When everyone agrees, things run much more smoothly. With seven other people on our Grand Challenges team, it was a struggle at first to figure out how to work together effectively, but after a while, it was easy because I work with such talented and hard-working people.

For our project, we are designing an energy recovery system that collects grey water and rainwater. Using gravity, the water will spin turbines to generate electrical power. We hope to find a way to make this concept not only energy efficient, but also cost effective. If the idea is feasible, we plan on installing these machines across Georgia Tech’s campus and beyond. The members of my team are Brandon Byers (EE), Edwin Goh (AE), Jacqui Green (ME), Sarah Jones (CE), Colin Kelsall (ME), and Zac Zachow (ME).

My favorite memory was the Grand Challenges banquet where Rob Butera, Wes Wynens, and Kari White, the Grand Challenges leaders, announced that our project would get funding. It was memorable because I got to reflect on all the hard work our group put in to this project. This project has certainly been stressful and took a high level of dedication, but it was definitely worth it, and it was great to celebrate our group’s progress at the banquet.

 

Freshman Grand Challenges: Solving Problems with No Simple Answers

By Misha Desai

The project my group worked on during Freshmen Grand Challenges was titled Georgia Tech Encouraging Childhood Health. This project enhanced my freshman experience because it gave me the opportunity to work with other students from a variety of disciplines to solve problems with no known solution. At first, we came into this program expecting ourselves to come up with unquestionable, concrete, and simple solutions to some really difficult world problems.  The open-endedness of the program became a very big challenge for many students, including myself, to overcome. Throughout this project, I learned how to analyze information and adapt ideas to fit real world limitations. Because we knew that this project had the potential to be funded, we had to be conscious of setting feasible goals and ensuring that all our objectives were backed up with data and facts. Over time, it became clear that many of the problems that the groups were tackling did not have one specific and simple answer. Instead, we learned that the very essence of solving some of society’s problems were in multi-faceted solutions that not only addressed the core issue, but also potential problems that could arise.

The goal of this project is to reduce the prevalence of childhood obesity by using elementary schools as a vehicle to promote healthy lifestyles.

Our program is based on two main concepts: an interactive school play that encourages active learning and an interactive website and pedometer tool that allow students to demonstrate their knowledge and learn more about fitness. Our program targets early elementary school children through use of the arts to teach the importance of proper dietary choices and exercise habits. The program will also use interactive media to promote healthy lifestyles because computers and interactive programs have been shown to be an effective tool for student education. If successful, the implementation of the solution would result in students and parents who are more knowledgeable about healthy dietary choices and physical fitness, and are better prepared for healthier lifestyles.

My favorite memory from last year was when my group was awarded the Best Proposal during the Grand Challenges Banquet and also found out that our project would be funded. It was great to see how our hard work and persistence during the semester paid off. As a group, we encountered a lot of challenges and frustrations during the second semester. However, we made sure to keep our progress moving and we were persistent in making sure that we produced quality work. Now, our project is finally coming to fruition. This year, we added a web developer to our team to help us complete the development of the website. We have also been working with the mayor of Duluth, a vice principal, two teachers, and two physical education teachers to implement our program in the spring. Over the course of fall semester, we will be working on developing lesson plans, addressing website challenges, attending various conferences, and looking into how to make the program more sustainable through new partnerships and collaborative efforts.

Overall, I learned a lot about teamwork, leadership, and problem solving through the Grand Challenges Living Learning Community. One of the greatest challenges I had to overcome was learning that there was not always a right answer to every problem. While there may not be a single correct answer, my job as a student and engineer will be to find the best one.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387209893 2013-12-16 16:04:53 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news This past year, Georgia Tech introduced the Grand Challenges Living Learning Community, a new program for incoming freshman that offers students the opportunity to participate in a unique, multidisciplinary learning lab.  Out of the 110 students who participated, seven were industrial engineering students.

]]>
2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-16 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
261411 261411 image <![CDATA[Dima Nazzal, ISyE director of student services, works with undergraduate students Misha Desai and Ethan Smith as they continue the research they began in their freshman year through the new Grand Challenges program at Georgia Tech.]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894948 2016-10-08 02:49:08
<![CDATA[Master’s Students Examine Impact of the Panama Canal Expansion on China-U.S. Transportation Networks]]> 27868 The expansion of the Panama Canal has been the focus of many logistics industry discussions for almost a decade now. The debate over the potential impact of the Canal’s considerable development plans begs the question of whether widening this heavily trafficked waterway will lead to a seismic shift in China-U.S. supply chains as some analysts predict or simply have a subtle impact.

Students from two of Georgia Tech’s Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering’s graduate programs paired up to examine this issue. They were from the Executive Master’s Program in International Logistics & Supply Chain Strategy (EMIL-SCS), which leads to a Master of Science in International Logistics, and the Master of Science in Supply Chain Engineering (MS SCE) program. Professor John Vande Vate, who teaches in both programs, pulled together students from the two programs to collaborate on this project.

“The collaboration is valuable to both sides,” said Vande Vate.  “The executive master’s students bring broader perspective and industry knowledge and the MS SCE students bring technical and modeling skills. Combining the qualitative and quantitative perspectives leads to a much stronger result, and working with the executives in the EMIL-SCS program is a valuable experience and networking opportunity for the MS SCE students.”

The students recognized early on the value of collaborating as a team. “The group dynamic was critical to the success of our Panama Canal impact modeling project and our graduate degree education as a whole,” says Jim Blaeser, publisher of American Shipper magazine and student in the EMIL-SCS program. “Each member of our group brought a unique perspective and complementary skills to the table. The value of this group exceeded the sum of its parts. As a result, our sponsor received a useful and insightful model while the team members were afforded the opportunity to learn and grow in new directions.”

 

The students were able to predict the possible impacts of the Panama Canal expansion by working with a U.S.-based, national big-box retailer and highlighting the variables that would dictate the company’s supply chain strategy in the future. Essentially their analysis suggests that a meaningful increase in domestic transportation rates — perhaps stemming from a long anticipated capacity crunch — will increase the total cost but have no impact on shipping decisions.

The team developed a model of the retailer’s network to evaluate several scenarios based on changes to key variables (e.g., transportation cost elements, transit times, and service levels). Interviews and third party research provided a picture of how the shipping lines were likelyto change their services after the Canal completed its expansion project. Adjusting the model of the retailer’s network to reflect the likely changes to ocean rates and fuel costs suggests that:

 

• Freight volumes from China to the U.S. East Coast will increase by nearly 50 percent over 2011 level,

• Volumes to the Pacific Northwest will suffer the greatest loss with nearly half of the volume moving elsewhere in the network, and

• The Western limit of territory served by ports located in the U.S. East Coast will expand from the Ohio Valley out towards the Mississippi River.

After adjusting for a 10 percent increase in domestic transportation rates, the model suggests no additional changes to the retailer’s network in terms of cargo allocations

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387269534 2013-12-17 08:38:54 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news The expansion of the Panama Canal has been the focus of many logistics industry discussions for almost a decade now. Students from two of Georgia Tech’s Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering’s graduate programs paired up to examine the issue of whether widening this heavily trafficked waterway will lead to a seismic shift in China-U.S. supply chains as some analysts predict or simply have a subtle impact.

]]>
2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
261901 261901 image <![CDATA[Master’s students examine the impact of the Panama Canal expansion on China-U.S.transportation networks]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894948 2016-10-08 02:49:08
<![CDATA[Ph.D. Concentration in System Informatics and Control Proves Advantageous for Students and Industry]]> 27868 In Nagi Gebraeel’s lab, success is measured by the ability to anticipate failure.

Gebraeel, the Chandler Family Associate Professor in ISyE, and his Ph.D. students use sensor data from a turbojet simulation to document the various scenarios that predict engine malfunction or failure. Their work will help extend engine life through improved condition-based maintenance scheduling and may also be a source for future design enhancements.

Nowadays, virtually every industrial or engineering system new or in design is embedded with dedicated microelectromechanical devices. These high-speed, highly sensitive sensors capture and transmit data in real time about dozens, sometimes hundreds, of key measures— everything from chemical interactions and energy consumption to product quality and output volume. This information helps engineers fine-tune systems so as to improve efficiency and reliability, and reduce costs.

Sorting, processing and analyzing the enormous amount of sensor output into useful, actionable data requires engineers with a high degree of expertise in a number of areas. Recognizing the growing need for these specialists, ISyE introduced a Ph.D. specialization in system informatics and control (SIAC) in 2008.

The newest of ISyE’s Ph.D. specializations, SIAC develops research and education programs that provide a scientific base for the design, analysis and control of complex manufacturing and service systems in data-rich environments, according to Jan Shi, the Carolyn J. Stewart Chair and professor in ISyE.

“The conventional methods for system modeling and analysis are either physical-driven or data-driven. However, each method has its own limitations for a complex system,” said Shi, who heads the SIAC program. “ The SIAC group emphasizes data fusion through developing engineering-driven statistical methods for system modeling and analysis, which  leads to much better performance of system monitoring, diagnosis, and control.”

Gebraeel’s failure-prediction project relies on a jet-engine simulator — a physical engine would be too expensive — with 21 sensors streaming data 24/7.

“It’s a big challenge just handling that amount of data,” he said. “We first had to develop a selection algorithm to determine which of the 21 sensors were the most informative. Not all the information you get from all 21 sensors is necessary. Bad information contaminates good information, so you want to exclude data that causes inaccuracies in the prediction.”

Next, the data is fused through a sophisticated algorithm called multivariate functional principle component analysis or MFPCA. This is a data reduction process — what

Gebraeel calls “dimensionality reduction of the information” — that does not sacrifice the information content.

The final step is to study and model the fused data such that the remaining lifetime of key engine components that are functioning in the field can be predicted accurately and in real-time.

Another applied research project, conducted by Shi and his graduate students, concerned a traditional industry: steel. This work, funded by the Department of Energy and conducted in partnership with OG Technologies of Ann Arbor, Mich., involved the use of in-line sensing devices at a U.S.-based steel mill.

“We analyzed real-time data from the production line and developed algorithms for the on-line measurement of quality in the product, which is very, very hot — a thousand degrees or more,” Shi explained. “We also provided suggestions about how to improve production efficiency.”

The project substantially reduced the number of defects, thereby lowering energy consumption and environmental costs due to less waste and less product re-work. The steel company client followed up by deploying the quality- control algorithm at its mills elsewhere in the U.S., plus Europe, Japan, and China.

In addition to its research component, the SIAC concentration includes six core courses and a minimum of three courses from related fields such as stochastics and simulation, statistics, and dynamics and control.

Kaibo Liu is a recent graduate of the SIAC Ph.D. specialization. In November 2013 he joined the faculty of the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as an assistant professor. Liu first learned about the SIAC concentration as an undergraduate at the University of Hong Kong, from two of his professors who happened to be former students of Professor Shi’s.

“I was very interested in and good at applied statistics,” he said. “And as an engineering student, I also had a strong foundation in engineering fundamentals and in-depth domain knowledge. The SIAC program was a perfect match for me, as it requires developing quantitative models to integrate data extraction and engineering knowledge, and employs the models in the analysis and control of complex manufacturing and service systems.”

Liu credits the SIAC program with imparting the research skills he needs in his new position. “This program taught me how to develop novel research ideas, formulate and solve interesting problems, and write-up the results for journals and research papers.”

Another SIAC alumnus is Ran Jin, who was particularly impressed by the SIAC faculty. “I think the SIAC group has the best scholars in this field,” said Jin, an assistant professor of industrial and systems engineering at Virginia Tech. “Although they have very different backgrounds and skills, their areas of expertise are complementary, which makes the courses and research strong.”

Written by: Gary Goettling

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

 

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387269825 2013-12-17 08:43:45 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news Nagi Gebraeel, the Chandler Family Associate Professor in ISyE, and his Ph.D. students use sensor data from a turbojet simulation to document the various scenarios that predict engine malfunction or failure, helping extend engine life and may also be a source for future design enhancements.

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2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
261911 261911 image <![CDATA[The systems informatics and control faculty]]> image/jpeg 1449243999 2015-12-04 15:46:39 1475894948 2016-10-08 02:49:08
<![CDATA[Ten Ways to Collaborate with ISyE]]> 27868 The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) works closely with a wide network of collaborators. Here are 10 commonly employed mechanisms in which ISyE and the professional community are working together for mutual benefit. However, this is by no means an exhaustive list, and we are always eager to explore new and creative ways to collaborate with our alumni and industry friends. For more information, visit www.isye.gatech.edu/about/how-to-work/

 1.       Industry Research Opportunities

ISyE’s faculty and graduate students regularly work with corporations and other organizations to perform in-context research that provides new knowledge, tools, and insights.

 2.       Project Opportunities

ISyE capstone courses, both at the undergraduate and graduate level, provide a unique opportunity for companies and organizations to partner and interact with a team of bright, creative, and dedicated students.

 3.       Presentations and Learning Opportunities in the Classroom

Industry executives from a variety of fields can interact directly with ISyE students through class presentations, panels, and lectures to inspire and steep students in real-world problems and solutions. For example and as seen in the photos, Caterpillar, Inc. brought its production systems game into the classroom so that students could learn how to run productions efficiently.

 4.       Tour of Industry Facilities

Touring industry facilities, such as warehouses and distribution centers, is a great opportunity for students to see how principles taught in the classroom are put into action.

 5.       Mentoring Students

Mentor Jackets is an alumni-to-student mentoring program sponsored by the Georgia Tech Alumni Association and the Georgia Tech Student Alumni Association.  Mentoring pairs develop their partnerships through face-to-face interactions, electronic communication, telephone conversations, video and teleconferencing, special events, and programming exclusively designed for members of the program.

 6.       Cooperative Education and Internships

Through undergraduate and graduate co-ops and internships, companies have the opportunity to work with some of the nation’s top students while evaluating their effectiveness and potential as future employees. Students also benefit by gaining valuable work experience.

 7.       Recruiting

Interesting in hiring one of our students? Companies are encouraged to send job announcements to our various lists.

 8.       Career Fairs

Participate in one of Georgia Tech’s Career Fairs to enhance your company’s visibility to future job candidates in ISyE.

 9.       Continuing Professional Education

The Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute in ISyE offers a comprehensive professional education curriculum in supply chain and logistics. You can select short courses for an in-depth knowledge of a specific topic or enroll in one of the multi-course certificate programs for a complete and highly sought after supply chain education.

 10.   Philanthropy and Sponsorship

Outside support through philanthropy and sponsorship allows us to enhance our programs, increase the number of graduate fellowships and undergraduate scholarships, provide endowed chairs and professorships, and much more.

This article first appeared in the Fall 2013 ISyE Alumni Magazine.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1387270059 2013-12-17 08:47:39 1475896533 2016-10-08 03:15:33 0 0 news The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) works closely with a wide network of collaborators. Here are 10 commonly employed mechanisms in which ISyE and the professional community are working together for mutual benefit. For more information, visit www.isye.gatech.edu/about/how-to-work/

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2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
<![CDATA[First Time for ISyE Senior Design Teams At Georgia Tech Capstone Expo, Finalists Announced]]> 27868 For the first time, ISyE Senior Design participated in the Georgia Tech Capstone Design Expo held December 5 at McCamish Pavilion. The Capstone Expo brought together undergraduates in various disciplines including ISyE, BME, ME, ID, and ECE to showcase their research projects they have been working on throughout the year.  With over 3,800 attendees, 130 teams on display, and 200 judges, it was one of the biggest non-athletic events of the year for Georgia Tech. Out of all the participating teams, 24 were from ISyE Senior Design, making the fall event one of the largest capstone expos at any university.

From the 24 ISyE teams that were judged at the expo, three teams have placed as finalists: Coca-Cola Refreshments, The Home Depot, and United Soft Plastics. These teams will move on to present their project at the ISyE Senior Design Finalist presentation on Wednesday, December 11 at 6:30pm in Klaus 1443.

The Coca-Cola Refreshments team members include Erinn Manby, Drew Downey, Meredith Freeman, Kevin Jamison, Sahil Ramakrishnan, Natalie Souther, and Max Tanski. Their faculty advisor is Ton Dieker. The team worked with the Coca-Cola Refreshments Procurement Team with a goal of optimizing inventory levels at three bottling plants by implementing new ordering policies for the raw materials.

The Home Depot team members include Lauren Kley, Drew Keller, Michael Gilkenson, Bryce Ferguson, Robert Faulk, Silvana Vivanco, Jing Mei Ho, and Melanie Ostis.  Their faculty advisor is Steve Hackman. They are working to improve labor allocation and process flow at The Home Depot paint desk through a simulation model and labor scheduling tool.

The United Soft Plastics team members include Yash Dabriwal, Po-Hsiang Wang, Patrick Koehler, Chang Woong Yoon, Patrick Chen, Dylan Arnold, Cathy Nguyen, and John Kincheloe.  Their faculty advisor is Leon McGinnis.  Their project focuses on improving the clients Order Fulfillment Process, which includes eliminating quality issues, late shipments, and improving internal processes,

Capstone Design is a series of courses offered to undergraduate students from all disciplines at the Georgia Tech. Students work in teams to design, build, and test prototypes with real world applications.  At the end of each semester students showcase their efforts at the “Capstone Design Expo”, where teams display and pitch their inventions and marketability to a panel of judges, invited guest, media, and their peers. 

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1386676196 2013-12-10 11:49:56 1475896529 2016-10-08 03:15:29 0 0 news For the first time, ISyE Senior Design participated in the Georgia Tech Capstone Design Expo held December 5 at McCamish Pavilion. Three teams have placed as finalists out of the 24 ISyE teams judged: Coca-Cola Refreshments, The Home Depot, and United Soft Plastics.

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2013-12-10T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-10T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-10 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
260541 259841 259851 260541 image <![CDATA[ISyE Senior Design United Soft Plastics Team]]> image/jpeg 1449243987 2015-12-04 15:46:27 1475894945 2016-10-08 02:49:05 259841 image <![CDATA[ISyE Senior Design Coca-Cola Refreshments Team]]> image/jpeg 1449243977 2015-12-04 15:46:17 1475894943 2016-10-08 02:49:03 259851 image <![CDATA[ISyE Senior Design The Home Depot Team]]> image/jpeg 1449243977 2015-12-04 15:46:17 1475894943 2016-10-08 02:49:03
<![CDATA[ISyE 2013 Distinguished Leadership Lecture Featured Guy Primus; Now Available for Download]]> 27868 While entertainment will continue to be dominated by artists, those looking to improve upon the creative process have embraced tools of industrial engineering and industrial engineers have risen to the top of many creative organizations. Guy Primus, IE 1992, has devoted his career to optimizing the technology and entertainment world with a primary focus on "helping them execute their vision."

Primus' passion for technology and entertainment has resulted in experiences that range from being a patent-pending inventor to serving as A&R for Universal Music recording artist Anjulie. His success in the worlds of media and technology led to his selection as a ‘CUP Catalyst’ in Media & Entertainment by the Council of Urban Professionals, a ‘Captain of Industry’ the Institute of Industrial Engineers and being named to Georgia Tech’s Council of Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni.

In this lecture, Primus provided a look behind the curtain of entertainment and shared case studies that demonstrate how the principles of industrial engineering are apparent in the most artsy of industries. The lecture was first presented at the IIE Conference and was such a success that ISyE knew they had to bring him to campus.

If you missed the lecture, you can now watch it here: http://b.gatech.edu/17FwPcv

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1385113079 2013-11-22 09:37:59 1475896525 2016-10-08 03:15:25 0 0 news Guy Primus, IE 1992, provided a look behind the curtain of entertainment and shared case studies that demonstrate how the principles of industrial engineering are apparent in the most artsy of industries. Watch the lecture here: http://b.gatech.edu/17FwPcv

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2013-11-22T00:00:00-05:00 2013-11-22T00:00:00-05:00 2013-11-22 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
256711 256711 image <![CDATA[Primus (center) with School Chair Jane Ammons and Professor Don Ratliff after the 2013 Distinguished Leadership Lecture on October 17.]]> image/jpeg 1449243846 2015-12-04 15:44:06 1475894936 2016-10-08 02:48:56
<![CDATA[Alan Erera Named ISyE’s New Associate Chair for Graduate Studies]]> 27868 Alan Erera has been appointed associate chair for graduate studies for the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering. Erera stepped into this new role on November 25th, succeeding Paul Kvam who held the position since 2011.

"Graduate education programs are critical to the success of our school,” said Erera. “The outstanding students in our Ph.D. program work with faculty to create new knowledge through research, and we are focusing our Master’s programs on developing the skills required to translate cutting-edge research into practical solutions. I look forward to leading these important programs in my new role.”

As associate chair for graduate studies for the number one ranked program of its kind in the nation, Erera will oversee the graduate experience focusing on policy matters relative to all graduate academic programs, activities, and curricula, including graduate admissions, class scheduling, and performance assessment.

Erera received his B.S. Eng. from Princeton University, and his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research from the University of California, Berkeley. For the past two years, he has led ISyE's newest master's degree program, serving as faculty director of the M.S. in Supply Chain Engineering program. Erera also maintains a large, active research program supported by federal agencies as well as major U.S. freigh transportation and manufacturing firms, and he currently serves as co-Director of the Center for Global Transportation at ISyE's Supply Chain and Logistics Institute.

His research focuses primarily on transportation and logistics systems planning and control, with a focus both on innovative modeling and solution methodologies, and on challenging application areas including dynamic and stochastic vehicle routing and scheduling, robust resource management, service network design, and supply chain security and resiliency.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1385985362 2013-12-02 11:56:02 1475896525 2016-10-08 03:15:25 0 0 news Alan Erera has been appointed associate chair for graduate studies for the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering.

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2013-12-02T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-02T00:00:00-05:00 2013-12-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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229871 229871 image <![CDATA[Alan Erera]]> image/jpeg 1449243582 2015-12-04 15:39:42 1475894901 2016-10-08 02:48:21
<![CDATA[Clean-up in the Philippines challenges aid]]> 27868 Typhoon Haiyan made its landfall in central-eastern Philippines, with a wind speed exceeding 195 miles per hour. It left behind thousands dead, and hundreds of thousands homeless and in need of aid. The challenge becomes how to clear the debris so responders can deliver the aid. 

Ozlem Ergun, Coca Cola Associate Professor, and Pinar Keskinocak, Joseph C. Mellow Professor, are co-directors of Georgia Tech’s Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics.They and Ph.D. student Melih Celik explain what’s next in the clean-up process in a recent posting in the Amplifer, Georgia Tech’s blog featuring experts on current issues.

Read more at: http://b.gatech.edu/18IZubr 

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1384770869 2013-11-18 10:34:29 1475896522 2016-10-08 03:15:22 0 0 news Ozlem Ergun, Coca Cola Associate Professor, Pinar Keskinocak, Joseph C. Mellow Professor, and Ph.D. student Melih Celik explain what’s next in the Typhoon Haiyan clean-up process in a recent posting in the Amplifer, Georgia Tech’s blog.

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2013-11-18T00:00:00-05:00 2013-11-18T00:00:00-05:00 2013-11-18 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
65264 234051 65264 image <![CDATA[Dr. Pinar Keskinocak]]> image/jpeg 1449176801 2015-12-03 21:06:41 1475894577 2016-10-08 02:42:57 234051 image <![CDATA[Dr. Özlem Ergun]]> image/jpeg 1449243641 2015-12-04 15:40:41 1475894908 2016-10-08 02:48:28
<![CDATA[Andradottir and Kim receive Naval Research Logistics 2013 Harold W. Kuhn Award]]> 27868 Professor Sigrun Andradottir and Associate Professor Seong-Hee Kim are the recipients of the Naval Research Logistics 2013 Harold W. Kuhn Award. Their manuscript, "Fully Sequential Procedures for Comparing Constrained Systems via Simulation" was selected by a panel of Naval Research Logistics Associate Editors. The Harold W. Kuhn Award is presented annually during INFORMS awards to an exceptional paper published in Naval Research Logistics (NRL) during the previous three years as selected by a committee of the Associate Editors.

The Kuhn Committee had this to say about the prize-winning paper:

Andradottir and Kim (2010) extends ranking and selection (R&S) procedures, which are statistical approaches for choosing the best system from a set of alternative systems, to consider problems with stochastic constraints. This paper is noteworthy for providing the first formulation of the constrained R&S problem. The authors introduce fully-sequential algorithms for finding the best feasible system with a given probability of correct selection in the presence of a single stochastic constraint. The problem consists of two stages: the feasibility check and the selection of the best system. The authors present two alternative procedures, depending on whether the two stages are preformed sequentially or simultaneously. The authors prove that these procedures guarantee that the best feasible system is selected with a given (pre­ specified) probability. These procedures are evaluated and compared using a set of extensive numerical experiments.

Constrained R&S is an important problem class in the simulation-optimization community. The authors have provided a rigorous analytical approach, as well as practical algorithms, for this problem. They have done so in a paper that is very clearly written, well-organized, with a strong practical motivation. This paper's relevance and contribution are demonstrated by the large number of citations the paper has already received from a variety of sources. In fact, Andradottir and Kim (2010) is the most highly cited paper (measured in citations per year) published in Naval Research Logistics during the 2010-2012 time period.

Sigrun Andradottir joined Georgia Tech in 1995 after five years on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research interests are in decision making under uncertainty, discrete event simulation, applied probability, stochastic optimization, resource flexibility, and agile production and service systems. Andradottir is the only two-time winner of the Harold W. Kuhn prize (2011 and 2013).  She received a B.S. in Mathematics from the University of Iceland in 1986, an M.S. in Statistics from Stanford University in 1989, and a Ph.D. in Operations Research from Stanford University in 1990.

Kim's research interest centers on ranking and selection procedures for stochastic simulation, optimization via simulation, statistical output analysis, quality control, and applications of simulation methods to environmental management. Kim received the INFORMS Simulation Society Outstanding Simulation Publication Award in 2006 and the NSF Career Award in 2007. She received a B.S. in Industrial Management from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology and an M.S. & Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering and Management Sciences from Northwestern University.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1382713792 2013-10-25 15:09:52 1475896514 2016-10-08 03:15:14 0 0 news Professor Sigrun Andradottir and Associate Professor Seong-Hee Kim are the recipients of the Naval Research Logistics 2013 Harold W. Kuhn Award.

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2013-10-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-10-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-10-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
247691 247701 247691 image <![CDATA[Sigrun Andradottir]]> image/jpeg 1449243772 2015-12-04 15:42:52 1475894926 2016-10-08 02:48:46 247701 image <![CDATA[Seong-Hee Kim]]> image/jpeg 1449243772 2015-12-04 15:42:52 1475894926 2016-10-08 02:48:46
<![CDATA[Norback Releases New, Free Book, “Oral Communication Excellence for Engineers and Scientists"]]> 27868 Afraid of giving that looming presentation in your class, or worried about that conference talk? Worry no more. Judith Norback has authored a new book that has the answers you seek. It will help you learn how to be stellar in oral communication, and the best part is, it's free---go here to download your copy.

“The book is different because it is based on input from over 75 executives from various companies where engineers and scientists work,” said Norback.  “The executives, of course, might eventually be your boss; or if not your boss, the research shows that your actual boss will have similar views about presentations.”

The books' content has already been used in instruction improving Georgia Tech ISyE students' presentation skills. Slides actually used in courses at Georgia Tech and 11 other universities complete the real-life aspect of the book.  Through a special arrangement, you can download a free copy of this book from the publisher.

You can learn the following skills from Oral Communication Excellence: presenting clear, professional talks, for example, by answering questions effectively and by clearly connecting the points on each slide with the big picture; communicating in meetings and in teams; excelling at phone communication; choosing the right electronic medium to support your oral communication; listening; communicating across cultures; and designing and presenting posters.

You will also learn how to give engaging elevator pitches. 

 Norback is the Director of Workplace and Academic Communication in ISyE. Over the past 13 years, she has developed the ISyE Workforce Communication Program, which is based on executive and faculty input.  Her research on the communication skills required for engineers' success in the workforce and the assessment of those skills has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Engineering Information Foundation, and many ISyE alumni.. Norback is Chair of her division of the American Society for Engineering Education, Vice President for External Relations of INFORM-ED (the Education Forum of INFORMs), and she recently served as Associate Chair for the Capstone Design Conference.  Norback's numerous articles have appeared in INFORMS Transactions on Education, the American Society for Engineering Education Annual Conference Proceedings, the International Journal of Engineering Education, and IEEE Transactions on Professional Communication.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1380531976 2013-09-30 09:06:16 1475896500 2016-10-08 03:15:00 0 0 news Judith Norback recently released her new book, Oral Communication Excellence for Engineers and Scientists, with free access to Georgia Tech Students .

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2013-09-30T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-30T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-30 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
241121 241121 image <![CDATA[Norback Releases New, Free Book, “Oral Communication Excellence for Engineers and Scientists"]]> image/jpeg 1449243688 2015-12-04 15:41:28 1475894916 2016-10-08 02:48:36
<![CDATA[Associate Professor Nicoleta Serban Speaks About Her Role as a Foster Parent]]> 27868 There is a tremendous need for foster parents in Georgia and one Georgia Tech professor has taken it upon herself to help meet that need. In this month's employee profile we talk to Nicoleta Serban (ISyE) about her decision to become a foster mother, the process involved, and the unique mindset it requires.
 

How long have you been at Georgia Tech and what is your role?

I've been here since 2005 and I am an associate professor. My background is in statistics. In the last few years I've started working in the healthcare area and I work on some projects related to improving the Medicaid system. I have some collaborators who do work in pediatric healthcare. That's where most of my research is focused right now.
 

What got you interested in becoming a foster parent?

In 2011 my sister fell ill with leukemia. She spent about nine months in a hospital and she eventually passed away. That experience changed my perspective related to life and priorities. I learned a lot about myself as well because I was her primary caregiver during that time. I was tested, and I learned about caring for others physically and emotionally. That's when I started playing with the idea of adopting or foster care. I kept hearing about foster care so I looked into it and learned more through the community "Single Mothers by Choice." I talked to a woman I met through an agency who fostered and I learned about the experience and process through her.


What is the process for becoming a foster parent?

You have to go through some training and show that you have a stable income. They want to make sure you're going to be able to provide a good home. You also have to go through impact training. In my case it was a weekend full of classes. You get connected to other people in the foster world and you learn more about it. They try to scare you away a little bit, to make sure you really want to do it, and about half of the people drop it at that point. And that's fine. You need to know if it's for you or not. After that training you have to take some more classes, like CPR and other things you may take anyway if you are a parent. You have to take 15 hours a year of classes, which is not a big deal. Then you are approved, you enter the system, and you start getting phone calls.


How were you connected with your foster child?

I have a little boy who is now six months old. I've had him with me since he was born. 

I wanted to have an experience with a young child. I thought I'd be able to have a better impact that way, so I chose 0-6 months. Down the road I may be interested in other foster ages but this is what I wanted to start with. 

I was in NYC and they called me on a Friday saying "We have this little boy who was just born and he needs a home. Would you be willing to take him in?" I came home on Sunday and picked him up on Monday. It was very short notice to put everything together, but that's how it works. You have to understand it and be prepared for it.

 

How difficult is it to be a parent for him knowing that he may not be with you for a long time? 

You have to think one day at a time and love one day at a time because you don't know the future for your child. You don't know how long they will be with you, so you don't think about what you will get back or what the future holds. You get back what you get today and you don't expect anything tomorrow.

I realize not everyone can do it, but that I can. I know my little one will probably go back someday to his family. People ask me how I'll be able to give him back, but I just don't think about it. I just enjoy my time with him now. 

The time commitment is very open ended. Sometimes it might only be for a weekend and other times it may be for two or more years. Some foster parents end up adopting the children. Some want to but can't because they go back to their families. You have to enter the process with no expectations.

 

Why should others consider becoming foster parents?

For families with children of their own, it's a great experience for children. I talk to families who have cared for foster children and their children all talk about how much they learned. The children keep in touch with the foster kids and it helps them appreciate what they have. They also learn how to care for others and be compassionate.

It sounds like an intimidating process because it's a big investment of time and energy. You think "Why should I invest like that in somebody else's child?" But it's not about getting a return. It's about helping others and once you do it it's so rewarding. It's just a different mindset from what many people are used to. When the time comes for me to let my little boy go, I just have to let him go. That's part of the deal. That's what I signed up for. 

This is something I will probably do all of my life. It just makes sense to me. It's a very special relationship with the child because you love completely unconditionally.


Where can people go to find out more about foster parenting?

I work with an agency called Giving Children A Chance. They, or any other agency would be happy to tell you more about it. They're very helpful at teaching you about the process and determining if it's a good fit for you. 

I would encourage people to strongly consider being foster parents. There is such a need for it and it is a nice way to give. 

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1380721519 2013-10-02 13:45:19 1475896500 2016-10-08 03:15:00 0 0 news Nicoleta Serban talks about her decision to become a foster mother, the process involved, and the unique mindset it requires.

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2013-10-02T00:00:00-04:00 2013-10-02T00:00:00-04:00 2013-10-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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54665 54665 image <![CDATA[Nicoleta Serban]]> image/jpeg 1449175459 2015-12-03 20:44:19 1475894478 2016-10-08 02:41:18
<![CDATA[Once Again U.S. News and World Report Ranks ISyE Undergraduate Program No. 1]]> 27868 Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) undergraduate program maintained its top ranking in the 2014 Edition of America's Best Colleges by U.S. News and World Report. This issue marks the nineteenth year that ISyE has been ranked as the foremost program of its kind in the nation at the undergraduate level in the industrial/manufacturing specialty.

“Thanks to the outstanding work of our faculty, staff, students and partners, Georgia Tech enjoys a long track record of continued excellence,” said Georgia Tech President G. P. “Bud” Peterson.  “We are committed to building on our success in teaching and research, developing leaders and innovators who will improve the human condition in Georgia, the U.S., and around the globe.”

Georgia Tech’s College of Engineering maintained its 5th place ranking for undergraduate engineering programs that award doctoral degrees. With eight of its engineering programs ranked in the top five, Tech also continued its strong showing in individual disciplines.

The Stewart School is honored to receive the U.S. News and World Report's (USNWR) top ranking for its graduate and undergraduate programs. These rankings say much about our alumni, faculty, and students.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1378822263 2013-09-10 14:11:03 1475896493 2016-10-08 03:14:53 0 0 news Georgia Tech's Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) undergraduate program maintained its top ranking in the 2014 Edition of America's Best Colleges by U.S. News and World Report

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2013-09-10T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-10T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-10 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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<![CDATA[In Memorium – Nelson K. Rogers, MS IE 1956]]> 27868 Georgia Tech engineering alumnus and Professor Emeritus, Nelson Kimball Rogers, MS IE 1956, passed away on September 15, 2013.

Rogers was born on May 17, 1928 in Flushing, New York, the son of Lewis Edward Rogers and Marion Nelson Rogers, both formerly of Cartersville. He was a graduate of Cartersville High School, the United States Naval Academy, and the Georgia Institute of Technology. He was a veteran of the Korean War. During his early career he was vice president of operations for the Sea-Land Corporation, where he was instrumental in building the industry’s first container ships. He also did considerable engineering consulting, most notably for Coca-Cola, and various marine transportation corporations as well as textile corporations.  

Rogers received a B.S. at the U.S. Naval Academy in Marine Engineering in 1950 and went on to complete an M.S. in IE at Georgia Tech in 1956. His career in the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE) began in 1965 as a lecturer.  Four years later he became an Associate Professor where he was actively involved in research, publishing and thesis student advising. In 1973, he took a position as the Associate Director of Undergraduate Programs. His responsibilities were vital to the ongoing thrust of excellence at ISyE and worked to enhance the reputation of the school. He won the “Outstanding Professor Awards” in ISyE the year of 1979, 1981 and 1984. He also won the “George C. Griffin Award – Outstanding Teacher at Georgia Tech” in 1985, awarded by the Georgia Tech Student Government. After spending twenty nine years at Georgia Tech, Rogers retired in 1993.

Professor Rogers is survived by his wife Marian Morris Rogers of Cartersville; son Edward Morris Rogers (Jeanette) of Roswell, GA; daughter Kimball Amanda Rogers (LaVon Napier) of Nashville, TN; son James Madison Rogers of Cartersville; granddaughter Kyla Louise Rogers of Atlanta, GA; grandson Matlock Nelson Rogers of St. Louis, MO; granddaughter Kirby Lee Rogers of Nashville, TN; brother Madison Leete "Pete" Rogers (Sally) of Cartersville; and nephew Lewis Charles Rogers (Lusiya) of Shanghai, China. If desired, memorials may be sent to Sam Jones Memorial United Methodist Church, 100 Church Street, Cartersville, GA 30120 or to the charity of your choice. Owen Funeral Home, Cartersville, GA is in charge of arrangements.

Comments from Faculty & Staff

“Nelson was appointed to his position as the undergraduate chair at or shortly after I was hired in 1971.  He was devoted to undergraduates and he seemed to know them all.  He was one of the last of a breed at Tech.” - Gary Parker, Professor Emeritus and former Graduate Associate Chair

“Nelson was a wonderful human being and was invaluable to the quality of the undergraduate program.  In the 1980s we had about 600-700 undergraduates in ISyE and he seemed to know every one of them.  Not once did I go to talk to him about an undergrad, whether because they were doing very well or doing very poorly, that Nelson did not know. He always knew how good a job we were doing in our teaching because he talked to so many students and they trusted him.  If your teaching got worse, he told you, and if your teaching got better, he told you. A typical Nelson Rogers story: one of our juniors was still doing well in her courses in the winter quarter, but was slipping a little and was not as perky as usual. Nelson knew that she had taken courses two summers in a row and saw that she was in danger of burning out. He arranged a good-paying summer job for her in the shipping business.  When she came back she was her old self, and she had an excellent senior year.  For Nelson, that was all part of a day's work.  I'll miss him.”  -Craig Tovey, David M. McKenney Family Professor

“Nelson retired quite some time ago, but there are still those around who remember him.  He was my ‘boss’ for many years.  He taught me many wonderful lessons about working with young people.  He influenced my method of advising undergraduate students.  He was a wonderful teacher, mentor, and friend.” -Patti Parker, Academic Advising Manager

“Nelson Rogers played a key role in the development of container shipping, but  after many years of ‘climbing the golden ladder’ and traveling the world, he choose to come to GT and work with Bob Lehrer to build the best IE department in the world.  He was a fixture, for sure, and there are literally thousands of ISyE alums who will join all Nels's friends in mourning his passing.” -Leon McGinnis, Professor Emeritus 

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1379427738 2013-09-17 14:22:18 1475896493 2016-10-08 03:14:53 0 0 news Georgia Tech engineering alumnus and Professor Emeritus, Nelson Kimball Rogers, MS IE 1956, passed away on September 15, 2013. 

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2013-09-17T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-17T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-17 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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239581 239581 image <![CDATA[Nelson K. Rogers]]> image/jpeg 1449243670 2015-12-04 15:41:10 1475894914 2016-10-08 02:48:34
<![CDATA[Gebraeel Appointed Chandler Family Associate Professor]]> 27868 Nagi Gebraeel has been appointed Chandler Family Associate Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. The Chandler Family Early Career Professorship is designed to enhance the ability of ISyE to “attract and retain eminent teacher-scholars.”

Gebraeel’s accomplishments to date are impressive. His research focuses on improving the accuracy of predicting unexpected failures of engineering systems by leveraging real-time sensor-based data streams. His major research interests are in the areas of sensor-based prognostics and degradation modeling, reliability engineering, and maintenance operations and logistics. Prof. Gebraeel is also the director of the Advanced Prognostics Laboratory for supporting research in Diagnostics, Prognostics and Condition Monitoring.  Dr. Gebraeel's contributions to education include an instrumental role in establishing ISyE’s System Informatics and Control (SIAC) PhD Focus.  Dr. Gebraeel is also leading efforts in establishing the Center for Predictive Analytics and Real-Time Optimization, in the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute. His work has been recognized by the 2006 Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) Material Modeling and Testing Recognition Award, the 2006 IEEE-AUTOTESTCON, and the 2008 SAE Aircraft Electrical Power System Recognition Award. In 2007 the National Science Foundation (NSF) recognized Gebraeel with a CAREER Award.  Gebraeel is a member of IIE, INFORMS, and AIAA.   He was the President of the IIE Quality and Reliability Engineering Division(2011-2012).  He received his MS and PhD from Purdue University in 1998 and 2003, respectively.

"The Chandler Family early career professorship appointment provides a well-deserved opportunity to enhance Gebraeel’s growing research and educational impacts,” said Jane Ammons, ISyE School Chair.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1378305798 2013-09-04 14:43:18 1475896489 2016-10-08 03:14:49 0 0 news Nagi Gebraeel has been appointed Chandler Family Associate Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. 

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2013-09-04T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-04T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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234021 234021 image <![CDATA[Dr. Nagi Gebraeel]]> image/jpeg 1449243641 2015-12-04 15:40:41 1475894908 2016-10-08 02:48:28
<![CDATA[Ergun Appointed Coca Cola Associate Professor]]> 27868 Özlem Ergun has been appointed the Coca Cola Associate Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. The Coca Cola Early Career Professorship is designed to enhance the ability of ISyE to “attract and retain eminent teacher-scholars.”

Ergun, who is also a co-founder and director of the Center for Health & Humanitarian Logistics, has a passion for applying her industrial engineering and operations research knowledge and expertise in ways that will have a positive impact. Ergun's research focuses on the design and management of large-scale networks. Specifically, she studies logistics and communications networks that are dynamic, partially decentralized, and are used and operated by coordinating but selfish entities. Her main research contributions are the development of a set of new algorithmic and analytical tools and their applications (together with well-known concepts from optimization and game theory) to important real world problems.

Ergun has been recognized with several awards, including the 2011 Georgia Tech Senior Faculty Outstanding Undergraduate Research Mentor Award, the EURO/INFORMS 2007 Management Science Strategic Innovation Prize, the 2005-2007 Most Cited Paper Award from Signal Processing: Image Communication, and the 2003 National Science Foundation CAREER Award.  In addition, her students have received almost 20 different awards based on their dissertations, papers, posters, and other accomplishments.  She received a B.S. in Operations Research and Industrial Engineering from Cornell University in 1996 and a Ph.D. in Operations Research from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2001.

“The Coca Cola early career professorship appointment provides a well-deserved opportunity to enhance Ergun’s growing research and educational impacts,” said Jane Ammons, ISyE School Chair.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1378306042 2013-09-04 14:47:22 1475896489 2016-10-08 03:14:49 0 0 news Özlem Ergun has been appointed the Coca Cola Associate Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. 

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2013-09-04T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-04T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-04 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
234051 234051 image <![CDATA[Dr. Özlem Ergun]]> image/jpeg 1449243641 2015-12-04 15:40:41 1475894908 2016-10-08 02:48:28
<![CDATA[Dey Appointed Fouts Family Assistant Professor]]> 27868 Santanu Dey has been appointed the Fouts Family Assistant Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. The Fouts Family Early Career Professorship is designed to enhance the ability of ISyE to “attract and retain eminent teacher-scholars.”

Dey's research is in the area of non-convex optimization, and in particular mixed integer linear and nonlinear programming. His research is partly motivated by applications of non-convex and discrete optimization arising in areas such as economics, logistics and petroleum industry. Dey has been honored by the 2007 INFORMS George Nicholson Student Paper Prize, the 2009 IBM Faculty Award, and the 2012 National Science Foundation CAREER Award. In addition, he has been a finalist in the INFORMS Junior Faculty Interest Group Paper Competition in 2010, 2011, and 2012. Dey was selected as a 2010 Class of 1969 Teaching Fellow by the Center for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning at Georgia Tech. He worked as a research fellow at the Center for Operations Research and Econometrics (CORE) of the Catholic University of Louvain in Belgium. He joined the faculty of the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering on July 1, 2009.

“The Fouts Family early career professorship appointment provides a well-deserved opportunity to enhance Dey’s growing research and educational impacts,” said Jane Ammons, ISyE School Chair.  

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1378371944 2013-09-05 09:05:44 1475896489 2016-10-08 03:14:49 0 0 news Santanu Dey has been appointed the Fouts Family Assistant Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013.

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2013-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
234521 234521 image <![CDATA[Dr. Santanu Dey]]> image/jpeg 1449243641 2015-12-04 15:40:41 1475894908 2016-10-08 02:48:28
<![CDATA[Sokol Appointed Fouts Family Associate Professor]]> 27868 Joel Sokol has been appointed as the Fouts Family Associate Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. The Fouts Family  Early Career Professorship is designed to enhance the ability of ISyE to “attract and retain eminent teacher-scholars.””

Whether attracting worldwide attention for the development of a highly accurate method for predicting the outcomes of the NCAA basketball tournament or having one of his research papers recognized with the 2007 EURO Management Science Strategic Innovation Prize in Logistics, Sokol’s accomplishments are remarkable in both teaching and research.  Sokol’s primary research interests are in sports analytics and applied operations research and he has had the opportunity to work with teams and leagues in all three of the major American sports.  Sokol is the recipient of one of Georgia Tech’s highest awards for teaching and his LRMC method for predictive modeling of the NCAA basketball tournament is an industry leader.  He currently serves as INFORMS Vice President of Education, and is a past Chair and founding officer of the INFORMS section on sports operation research. 

Sokol’s contributions to education include leading ISyE’s current efforts to develop an MS Analytics degree program and enhancements to Senior Design that have been recognized at the National Academy of Engineering Foundations of Engineering Education Symposium, by the Georgia Tech Class of 1934 Outstanding Use of Innovative Educational Technology award, and by the 2011 Institute of Industrial Engineers/Council of Industrial Engineering Academic Department Heads Innovation in Curriculum Award.  In addition, Joel’s teaching awards include the 2010 IIE Excellence in Teaching Operations Research Award, the 2009 Hesburgh Award Teaching Fellow, the 2008 Class of 1940 W. Roane Beard Outstanding Teacher Award, the 2007 institute-wide Apple Award, the 2007 Women in Engineering Faculty Award for Excellence in Teaching, the 2006 CETL/BP Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award, and the 2005 ANAK award.  Sokol’s PhD in operations research is from MIT, and his bachelor’s degree in mathematics, computer science, and applied sciences in engineering are from Rutgers University.

“The Fouts Family early career professorship appointment provides a well-deserved opportunity to enhance Joel’s growing research and educational impacts,” said Jane Ammons, ISyE School Chair.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1378396222 2013-09-05 15:50:22 1475896489 2016-10-08 03:14:49 0 0 news Joel Sokol has been appointed as the Fouts Family Associate Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. 

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2013-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
55507 55507 image <![CDATA[Joel Sokol, ISyE associate professor]]> image/jpeg 1449175533 2015-12-03 20:45:33 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[Shapiro Receives Khachiyan Prize from INFORMS]]> 27868 ISyE Professor Alexander (Alex) Shapiro is the recipient of the prestigious Khachiyan Prize for outstanding lifetime contributions to the field of optimization by an individual or team for his life-time achievements in the field of optimization.  This prize is awarded annually by the 2013 INFORMS Optimization Society Prize winners. The award winners will give a presentation in a special session sponsored by the Optimization Society during the INFORMS annual meeting in Minneapolis, MN in October 2013.

His citation read “Alexander Shapiro has been one of the most prolific scholars in the field of Operations Research, contributing significantly to nonlinear analysis (specifically sensitivity and optimality), and to stochastic programming, where his work on complexity analysis and risk-averse decision making has been highly influential.”

His current research interests are focused on stochastic programming, risk analysis; stimulations based optimization, nondifferentiable optimization and nonsmooth analysis, sensitivity analysis and optimization of queuing networks, sensitivity analysis of nonlinear programs, multivariate statistical analysis.  Dr. Shapiro serves on an editorial board of a number of professional journals.  He was an Area editor (optimization) of the operations Research journal and currently is the Editor-In-Chief of the Mathematical Programming, Series A, journal.  In 2004, Dr. Shapiro joined the list of ISI Highly Cited Researchers.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1377613998 2013-08-27 14:33:18 1475896486 2016-10-08 03:14:46 0 0 news ISyE Professor Alexander (Alex) Shapiro is the recipient of the prestigious Khachiyan Prize for outstanding lifetime contributions to the field of optimization by an individual or team for his life-time achievements in the field of optimization.  

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2013-08-27T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-27T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-27 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
231551 231551 image <![CDATA[Professor Alex Shapiro]]> image/jpeg 1449243602 2015-12-04 15:40:02 1475894906 2016-10-08 02:48:26
<![CDATA[Jim Dai Appointed Chandler Family Chair]]> 27868 Professor Jiangang (Jim) Dai was appointed the Chandler Family Chair in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) beginning August 15, 2013. The Chandler Family Chair is designed to enhance ISyE’s ability to “identify and employ a senior professor of international eminence in the fields associated with the missions of the School. The appointee will be an individual with a distinguished research record as evidenced by a significant record of publications in outstanding journals, prize paper awards, editorships of high quality journals, and elected positions in national professional organizations." 

Dai is currently on leave at the School of Operations Research and Information Engineering at Cornell University. He has been a Special Term Professor at Tsinghua University since 2002 and a Visiting Professor in Decision Sciences at National University of Singapore since 2009.  Dai received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in mathematics from Nanjing University in China. He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University in applied probability and joined the Georgia Tech faculty in 1990. For more than twenty years, he has worked on stochastic models arising from communications, manufacturing, and service systems that include data switches, semiconductor wafer fabrication lines, call centers, and healthcare-delivery systems. Dai is an elected fellow of Institute of Mathematical Statistics and an elected fellow of Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS).  He is currently the Editor-in-Chief for Mathematics of Operations Research, a past Area Editor for Operations Research,  a past Series Editor for Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1377689289 2013-08-28 11:28:09 1475896486 2016-10-08 03:14:46 0 0 news Professor Jim Dai was appointed the Chandler Family Chair which is designed to enhance ISyE’s ability to “identify and employ a senior professor of international eminence in the fields associated with the missions of the School. 

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2013-08-28T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-28T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-28 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
50149 50149 image <![CDATA[Professor Jim Dai]]> image/jpeg 1449175428 2015-12-03 20:43:48 1475894468 2016-10-08 02:41:08
<![CDATA[Building the Future Power Grid: Researchers Tackle Energy Challenges with Technology Development and Policy Analysis]]> 27868 On a warm afternoon in August 2003, a high-voltage power line in a rural area of Ohio brushed against some untrimmed trees, tripping a relay that turned off the power it was carrying.  As system operators tried to understand what was happening, three other lines sagged into trees and were also shut down, forcing other power lines to shoulder the extra burden until they also tripped off, starting a cascade of failures throughout southeastern Canada and eight northeaster U.S. states.

Almost 10 years later, out electric power system continues to be challenged, by increasing demands of a digital society, the need to accommodate renewable energy generation, growing threats to infrastructure security and concerns over global climate change. The technology for a smart grid – with a two-way flow of electricity and information between utilities and consumers – could help address these challenges, but technical, regulatory and financial obstacles have slowed its deployment.

Researchers at Georgia Tech are helping to advance the smart grid.  They are developing technologies, creating methodologies and analyzing policies that will allow for integration of renewable energy sources and electric vehicles in the grid, with dynamic electricity pricing, and improved assessment and monitoring of the grid and its components.  Here are some highlights of how researchers at the Georgia Tech Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) and their colleagues are researching and studying these issues.

Integrating Renewables into the Grid

The electricity grid is a large, complex system of power generation, transmission and distribution.  High-voltage transmission lines carry power from large power plants to load center hundreds of miles away.  Next, lower-voltage distribution systems draw electricity form the transmission lines and distribute it to individual customers.  This long-standing electricity paradigm is being challenged as the grid becomes equipped with advanced sensing, communication, and control systems, and as an increasing quantity of power is generated by renewable sources.

Wind and sunshine constantly ebb and flow with the slightest weather shifts, creating a variable supply.  So even when the renewables are going strong, conventional power plants must always be ready to step in and carry the load. Renewable energy sources – wind, sun, water, wood, organic waste, organic waste, and geo thermal – generated about 12 percent of the electricity in the United States in 2012. Increasing that percentage will require redesign of the power grid control architecture, scheduling framework and market mechanisms to balance supply and demand in the presence of these energy sources.

Integrating renewable electricity into the grid requires a transition by the electric industry from a centralized control architecture to a more distributed and flexible one that allows many actors to participate. To help accomplish that, Georgia Tech researchers in 2012 received a three-year, $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) to develop and demonstrate a distributed electric power grid that would support high levels of renewable energy generation and storage.

The architecture is based on the emerging concept of electricity “prosumers” – a combination of the words “consumer” and “producer” – which are economically motivated small-scale energy ecosystems that can consume, produce, and store electricity. For example, prosumers could include homeowners who consume energy from the grid while also producing power onsite from solar panels on their homes’ roofs that feeds back into the grid.

“The power network from generation to transmission and distribution to consumption, needs to undergo the same kind of architectural transformation that computing and the communications network have gone through in the past few decades,” said Santiago Grijalva, associate director for the electricity at the Strategic Energy Institute and the Georgia Power Distinguished Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE). “We are taking one step toward transformation by developing a reliable architecture that will allow the electricity industry to operate with characteristics similar to the Internet – distributed, flat, layered, and scalable.”

To develop the architecture, Grijalva is collaborating with Marilyn Wolf, the Farmer Distinguished Chair in Embedded Computing Systems and a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in ECE; Magnus Egerstedt, the Schlumberger Professor in ECE and a robotics expert; and Shabbir Ahmed, a professor in ISyE.  The system will be backward compatible with the current electricity industry model, deployable by incrementally enabling prosumer services and interoperable with emerging smart grid technologies.

The system relies on a computational cyber infrastructure and an autonomous secure prosumer energy scheduler that allows small-scale producers to offer energy and grid services based on their capabilities and desire to achieve their sustainability, efficiency, reliability, and economic objectives, while contributing to system-wide reliability and efficiency goals.  The researchers have teamed with industry partners ISISoft, PJM, Midwest ISo, and Duke Energy to demonstrate the architecture and software using realistic utility datasets. They are also exploring commercialization opportunities for the technology.

Craig Tovey, the David M. McKenny Family Professor in ISyE, is taking an inverse optimization approach to determining the least expensive way for a utility company to produce, store, and use electricity to meet demand in an area that contains prosumers.. Tovey and Tanguy Hubert, and electrical and computer engineering graduate student, are developing a computational model to determine what prices to offer small-scale producers to provide enough incentive that they will make production, storage, and use choices consistent with utility company’s optimal production plan.

“To solve this real-world inverse optimization problem, we need to decide what action we want the prosumer to take so that the overall goal is to achieve and then determine what price to offer so that when they minimize their own costs, they will select the action that is optimal for the general welfare,” said Tovey.

Andy Sun, assistant professor, has been collaborating with researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and ISO New England to create an adaptive optimization model that makes robust unit commitment decision and ensures system reliability, while considering real-time uncertainly from renewable energy.

“Wind and solar energy sources are intermittent and uncertain because they are greatly impacted by slight changes in weather and because predicting wind or sunshine amounts a day ahead can be difficult,” said Sun. “Unlike coal or natural gas plants, when wind farm is scheduled to generate 100 megawatts of electricity at 7 a.m., there is no guarantee that amount of power will be produced.”

With support from ISO New England, the team tested its model on the large-scale system operated by the organization and compared its model with the current approach of overcommitting generators to create a “just –in-case” reserve.  Reserves can be expensive to maintain and ineffective due to the mismatch of supply and demand. The adaptive model demonstrated sizable savings on average operating and total costs and significantly reduced the volatility of the operating cost. A paper on the model was published in the February 2013 issue of the journal IIE Transactions on Power Systems.

In Europe, power exchanges run the day-ahead auctions, rather than independent systems operators, but the exchanges consider network constraints regarding system feasibly and reliability provided by the system operators.  Sebastian Pokutta, ISyE assistant professor, and researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universitat-Erlangen-Nurnberg in Germany, created a model of the European electricity market, with support from the German Stock Exchange “Deutsche Borse Frankfurt.”

Determining the price of power in Europe has recently become more difficult with power market coupling, an initiative to integrate transmission allocation and power trading across national borders so that cheaper electricity generation in one country can meet demand and reduce prices in another country.

“While market coupling creates a more efficient market because of a strong interaction between price zones, it creates a very challenging real-world optimization problem that needs to be solved daily,” said Pokutta. “The market coupling optimization problem involves demand and supply orders of different exchanges that need to be matched to maximize the total gains from trade.”

Pokutta and his colleagues analyzed optimization techniques for determining the price of electricity that would maximize the financial surplus of all participants, while considering quantity and price constraints. The algorithms matched energy demand and supply for 24 hours and calculated all market prices, net positions, and cross-border flows at the same time.

Members of the European Union aim to deliver 20 percent of their energy from renewable sources, which is based on a target in the European Renewables Directive of 2008. The increase in renewable generation will require an intraday market that will allow for adjustments after the closure of the day-ahead market.  Pokutta plans to create an intraday market model and combine the market models he has developed with atmospheric models to consider air quality, sustainability and energy generation together.

Examining the Effect of Electric Vehicles on the Grid

Electric vehicles could make it easier and cheaper to have renewables – particularly wind energy – on the grid and make it easier to manage electricity with its peaks at high demand times, according to the preliminary findings of a new study.  The study was conducted by Valerie Thomas, the Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems at ISyE; Deepak Divan, a professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering; and their graduate students Dong Gu Choi and Frank Kreikebaum.

The researchers modeled the electricity system in six eastern and midwestern regions of the United States and are examining the interplay among the use, availability, and cost of different energy sources in those regions and electric vehicle adoption levels, electric vehicle charging methods, fuel economy standards, and renewable portfolio standards. Initial results from the study show how the time of day that users charge their electric vehicles affects how much electricity must be generated and the sources and costs of that power.

“Our preliminary findings indicate that controlled charging of electric vehicles reduces cost and makes it significantly less expensive to have large amounts of renewables in the electric system,” said Thomas. “The main cost saving is from reduced electric system capacity requirements.”

Controlled charging occurs when a driver plugs in a vehicle after completing the last trip of the day, but charging doesn’t begin until off-peak nighttime or early-morning hours when the cost of electricity is lowest.  This contrasts with uncontrolled charging, when charging commences immediately upon plugging in the vehicle.  Additional findings of the study detail the effects of electric vehicle adoption levels, electric vehicle charging methods, fuel economy standards, and renewable portfolio standards on gasoline consumption, electricity cost, greenhouse gas emissions, and consumer cost. The study is supported by the Intelligent Power Infrastructure Consortium, a university-industry-utility consortium that fosters and accelerates the development and adoption of early-stage, high-risk and high-impact technologies in power applications.

Assessing the Condition of the Grid

Predicting the degradation and remaining useful life of generators, transformers, and transmission lines could significantly improve the performance of the grid and reduce maintenance costs.  Nagi Gebraeel, associate professor at ISyE, is developing methods for monitoring the degradation of power grid components and predicting their remaining lifetimes.

“Recent advances in sensor technology and wireless communication have enabled us to develop innovative methods for indirectly monitoring the health of different engineering systems and using that information in decision-making processes,” said Gabraeel.

Gabraeel has developed models that use data from real-time sensor measurements – such as vibration, temperature, insulation degradation, and partial discharge – to calculate and continuously revise the amount of remaining useful life of mechanical systems based on their current condition.

“We want to ensure the power grid remains reliable,” said Gebraeel. “Power utilities can no longer rely on time- or usage-based maintenance policies for generators or transformers. They need to be able to monitor the units in operation for up-to-date information on their condition and functionality to avoid unexpected failure.”

---

This article, written by Abby Robinson, has been excerpted from the full story that appears in the Spring-Summer 2013 issue of Research Horizons.    

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1377180667 2013-08-22 14:11:07 1475896486 2016-10-08 03:14:46 0 0 news Research surrounding smart grid issues is a major focus of energy and sustainable infrastructure studies at Georgia Tech.  The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering plays a strong role in researching and studying these issues.

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2013-08-22T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-22T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-22 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
231111 231101 231111 image <![CDATA[A study led by ISyE professor Valerie Thomas showed that electric vehicles could make it easier and cheaper to have renewable energy in the grid.]]> image/jpeg 1449243602 2015-12-04 15:40:02 1475894903 2016-10-08 02:48:23 231101 image <![CDATA[Andy Sun, assistant professor at ISyE, is collaborating with other research groups on an adaptive optimization model that considers the uncertainty of renewable resources in systems capacity and reliability.]]> image/jpeg 1449243602 2015-12-04 15:40:02 1475894903 2016-10-08 02:48:23
<![CDATA[Huo to Serve as Program Director of Statistics at National Science Foundation]]> 27868 Professor Xiaoming Huo is on leave from the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech to serve as a program director of Statistics at National Science Foundation (NSF) starting August 12, 2013.  His initial appointment at NSF is for a year, with a possibility of one year extension. He will be reviewing proposals, and making funding decisions on behalf of NSF. Huo will return to Georgia Tech regularly to maintain some of his research and education projects.  He will also be directing a newly created program called Computational and Data-enabled Science and Engineering. NSF is a United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering, and it is a great place to observe the splendid spectrum of scientific frontier.

 “I am excited about this opportunity to serve the community as well as the general public,” said Huo.  

Huo received the B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Science and Technology, China, in 1993, and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering and the Ph.D. degree in statistics from Stanford University, Stanford, CA, in 1997 and 1999, respectively. Since August 2006, he has been an Associate Professor with the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta. He represented China in the 30th International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO), which was held in Braunschweig, Germany, in 1989, and received a golden prize.

His research interests include statistical theory, data mining, and issues related to big data. He has made numerous contributions on topics such as sparse representation, wavelets, and statistical problems in detectability. His papers appeared in top journals, and some of them are highly cited. He is a senior member of IEEE since May 2004. He was a Fellow of IPAM in September 2004. He won the Georgia Tech Sigma Xi Young Faculty Award in 2005. His work has led to an interview by Emerging Research Fronts in June 2006 in the field of Mathematics - every two months, one paper is selected.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1377507057 2013-08-26 08:50:57 1475896486 2016-10-08 03:14:46 0 0 news Professor Xiaoming Huo to serve as a program director of Statistics at National Science Foundation for one year. 

]]>
2013-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-26T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-26 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
231561 231561 image <![CDATA[Professor Xiaoming Huo]]> image/jpeg 1449243602 2015-12-04 15:40:02 1475894906 2016-10-08 02:48:26
<![CDATA[Ton Dieker awarded an IBM Faculty Award]]> 27868 Ton Dieker, assistant professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) has been awarded an IBM Faculty Award. The IBM Faculty Awards is a competitive worldwide program intended to foster collaboration between researchers at leading universities worldwide and those in IBM research, development and services organizations, and promote courseware and curriculum innovation to stimulate growth in disciplines and geographies that are strategic to IBM. Candidates are nominated by an IBM employee with common interests who will serve as a liaison for the collaboration. Candidates must have an outstanding reputation for contributions in their field or, in the case of junior faculty, show unusual promise.

Dieker works in the area of Applied Probability, and his research is motivated in part by applications to computer networks and to business processes such as workforce management and service systems. His expertise includes stochastic processes, stochastic networks, and stochastic analysis of algorithms. He recently received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation and The Erlang Prize from the Applied Probability Society of INFORMS. He serves as an associate editor for Operations Research and Mathematics of Operations Research.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1375781089 2013-08-06 09:24:49 1475896482 2016-10-08 03:14:42 0 0 news Ton Dieker has been awarded an IBM Faculty Award, a competitive worldwide award intended to foster collaboration between researchers at leading universities worldwide and those in IBM research, development and services organizations.

]]>
2013-08-06T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-06T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-06 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
177171 177171 image <![CDATA[Ton Dieker]]> image/jpeg 1449179031 2015-12-03 21:43:51 1475894822 2016-10-08 02:47:02
<![CDATA[White, Erera Tapped for E.U.-U.S. Transportation Research Symposium]]> 27868 An E.U.-U.S. Transportation Research Symposium on City Logistics Research was held from May 30-31 at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C. The invitation-only Symposium was organized by the European Commission, the Research and Innovative Technology Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and the Transportation Research Board of the National Academies. The planning committee was composed of four U.S. and four E.U. researchers and included Chelsea C. White III, Schneider Chair of Freight Transportation and Logistics for the Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering (ISyE.) ISyE Professor Alan Erera, who was one of the 25 U.S. invitees, also attended the Symposium.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1376924294 2013-08-19 14:58:14 1475896482 2016-10-08 03:14:42 0 0 news Professors Chip White and Alan Erera participated in the by invitation-only E.U.-U.S. Transportation Research Symposium on City Logistics Research that was held from May 30-31 at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C.

]]>
2013-08-19T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-19T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
74044 229861 229871 74044 image <![CDATA[Dr. Chip White]]> 1449178037 2015-12-03 21:27:17 1475894686 2016-10-08 02:44:46 229861 image <![CDATA[E.U. U.S. Planning Committee]]> image/jpeg 1449243582 2015-12-04 15:39:42 1475894901 2016-10-08 02:48:21 229871 image <![CDATA[Alan Erera]]> image/jpeg 1449243582 2015-12-04 15:39:42 1475894901 2016-10-08 02:48:21
<![CDATA[ISyE Welcomes Four New Faculty Members]]> 27868 ISyE welcomes four new assistant professors to the faculty this August. They include: Marco Molinaro, Alejandro Toriello, Yao Xie, and Enlu Zhou.

Marco Molinaro’s research interests are broadly in discrete optimization, and in particular integer programming and optimization under limited information. He was the recipient of an IBM Ph.D. Fellowship, the Brazilian Computing Society award for best master’s thesis in Computer Science, and the Gerald L. Thompson Doctoral Thesis Award in Management Science. Molinaro received his Ph.D. from the Algorithms, Combinatorics and Optimization program at Carnegie Mellon University in 2013.

Alejandro Toriello’s research interests lie in the theory and application of supply chain management, logistics and transportation, and in related optimization methodologies. Prior to joining ISyE, he served as an assistant professor in the Epstein Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the University of Southern California. Toriello received his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from Georgia Tech in 2010.

Yao Xie’s research interests are in sequential statistical methods, statistical signal processing, big data analysis, compressed sensing, optimization, and has been involved in applications to wireless communications, sensor networks, medical and astronomical imaging. Xie previously served as Research Scientist in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Duke University after receiving her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (minor in Mathematics) from Stanford University in 2011.

Enlu Zhou’s research interests include simulation optimization, stochastic control, and Markov decision processes. Prior to Georgia Tech, Zhou served as an assistant professor at the Industrial & Enterprise Systems Engineering Department at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign from 2009 to 2013. She received her Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 2009.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1376925098 2013-08-19 15:11:38 1475896482 2016-10-08 03:14:42 0 0 news ISyE welcomes four new assistant professors to the faculty this August. They include: Marco Molinaro, Alejandro Toriello, Yao Xie, and Enlu Zhou.

]]>
2013-08-19T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-19T00:00:00-04:00 2013-08-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
229921 229941 229931 229911 229921 image <![CDATA[Marco Molinaro]]> image/jpeg 1449243582 2015-12-04 15:39:42 1475894901 2016-10-08 02:48:21 229941 image <![CDATA[Enlu Zhou]]> image/jpeg 1449243582 2015-12-04 15:39:42 1475894901 2016-10-08 02:48:21 229931 image <![CDATA[Yao Xie]]> image/jpeg 1449243582 2015-12-04 15:39:42 1475894901 2016-10-08 02:48:21 229911 image <![CDATA[Alejandro Toriello]]> image/jpeg 1449243582 2015-12-04 15:39:42 1475894901 2016-10-08 02:48:21
<![CDATA[Mission Possible: High School Students Participate in the 2nd Annual ISyE Summer Enrichment Program]]> 27868 The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) hosted the second annual Mission Possible STEM Summer Enrichment Program following an extremely successful first year. Mission Possible is designed to introduce rising 10th to 12th grade high school students to the fascinating world of industrial engineering. The program was met with so much popularity that this year it was offered in two separate week-long summer sessions to accommodate a larger number of students. Students had the opportunity to attend either the June 24-28 session, or the July 15-19 session.

“The energy was phenomenal. They really enjoyed the interactive activities and we even had students who came back for the second time” said Valarie DuRant-Modeste, academic advising manager in ISyE and program director for Mission Possible. “This year we had students not only from metro Atlanta, but also from as far as Puerto Rico, Taiwan, and El Salvador.”

Mission Possible is open to students who excel in math and science, with a focus on recruiting under-represented minority students from schools across the country. This year, a total of forty six high school students participated in the program where they interacted with industry representatives from companies such as Coca-Cola and Caterpillar Inc., and gained insight from ISyE students, faculty, and academic advisors.

For more information about the program contact Valarie DuRant Modeste, academic advising manager in ISyE, at vrd@isye.gatech.edu or 404.894.8405. If you would like to help sponsor this program, contact Nancy Sandlin, ISyE director of Development, at nsandlin@isye.gatech.edu.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1375263384 2013-07-31 09:36:24 1475896478 2016-10-08 03:14:38 0 0 news ISyE hosted Mission Possible for rising 10th to 12th grade high school students to learn more about the fascinating world of industrial engineering.

]]>
2013-07-31T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-31T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-31 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
225531 225541 225551 225531 image <![CDATA[Summer 2013 Mission Possible]]> image/jpeg 1449243551 2015-12-04 15:39:11 1475894896 2016-10-08 02:48:16 225541 image <![CDATA[Industry representatives from Caterpillar Inc. played a supply chain game with the students to demonstrate principles in manufacturing and supply chain logistics.]]> image/jpeg 1449243551 2015-12-04 15:39:11 1475894896 2016-10-08 02:48:16 225551 image <![CDATA[Students worked in teams on a variety of projects that reflected the exciting world of industrial engineering.]]> image/jpeg 1449243551 2015-12-04 15:39:11 1475894896 2016-10-08 02:48:16
<![CDATA[Georgia Tech life-cycle study finds TCO of medium-duty electric and diesel delivery trucks similar; electric life-cycle energy use and GHG lower than diesel]]> 27511 A Georgia Tech team consisting of Dong-Yeon Lee, Civil and Environmental Engineering Ph.D. student, Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, and Marilyn Brown, professor in the School of Public Policy, compared the life-cycle energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), and total cost of ownership (TCO) of medium-electric and diesel urban delivery trucks for a range of drive cycles and electricity generation scenarios.

The study was published in the ACS journal Environmental Science & Technology:

For both types of trucks, vehicle efficiency is important from the perspective of energy consumption, GHG emissions, and TCO over the vehicle lifetime. The TTW [tank-to-wheels] efficiency of the truck depends strongly on the drive cycle, and the electric truck is more likely to provide higher benefits with the NYCC-style driving conditions than with the CSHVC or similar conditions. Given the same drive cycle and thus the same vehicle efficiency, the electric truck would be more attractive to fleet operators with high truck utilization (VKT [vehicle kilometers traveled] demand), of course within the electric drive range.

Battery replacement is another key factor; to maximize the benefits from electric trucks, the durability and reliability of the automotive Li-ion battery are crucial, which might be advanced with technological development. Recycling of the EV Li-ion battery could also improve life-cycle energy consumption and GHG emissions. There is also variation by state in the electric truck’s comparative energy consumption and GHG emissions. For the baseline case, recent and projected future generation mixes result in similar or less energy consumption and GHG emissions of the electric truck compared to the diesel truck in most parts of the US.

—Lee et al.

For more information visit http://www.greencarcongress.com/2013/07/gatech-20130706.html

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1373292131 2013-07-08 14:02:11 1475896470 2016-10-08 03:14:30 0 0 news Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems at ISyE, worked with a team of Georgia Tech researchers to compare the life-cycle energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, and total cost of ownership of medium-electric and diesel urban delivery trucks for a range of drive cycles and electricity generation scenarios.

]]>
2013-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-08T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-08 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
63774 63774 image <![CDATA[Valerie Thomas, Anderson Interface Associate Professor of Natural Systems]]> image/jpeg 1449176708 2015-12-03 21:05:08 1475894561 2016-10-08 02:42:41
<![CDATA[Jan Shi elected Academician of the International Academy for Quality]]> 27511 Jianjun Shi, the Carolyn J. Stewart Chair and Professor at the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, was elected an Academician of the International Academy for Quality (IAQ) based upon his “knowledge, leadership experience, and accomplishments.”  Shi delivered his acceptance speech at the European Organization for Quality Congress in Tallinn, Estonia on June 19, 2013.

The Mission of the IAQ is to “fully utilize the leadership of the Academicians worldwide, individually and in teams, to advance worldwide, the knowledge, understanding and communication of the philosophy, theory and practice of all activities involved in achieving quality for the benefit of people.”

Shi also gave a keynote lecture on “Data Fusion for In-Process Quality Improvement” during the 5th Manufacturing Engineering Society International Conference in Spain on June 26.

Shi received his B.S. and M.S. in Electrical Engineering at the Beijing Institute of Technology in 1984 and 1987 respectively, and his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan in 1992.

His research interests focus on system informatics and control for the design and operational improvements of manufacturing and service systems. He is one of the early pioneers in the field. Shi is a Fellow of INFORMS, IIE, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineering, and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute.  He is also a past recipient of the National Science Foundation Career Award and the IIE Albert G. Holzman Distinguished Educator Award.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1373367497 2013-07-09 10:58:17 1475896470 2016-10-08 03:14:30 0 0 news Jianjun Shi was elected an Academician of the International Academy for Quality at the European Organization for Quality Congress on June 19, 2013. He also gave a keynote lecture on “Data Fusion for In-Process Quality Improvement” during the 5th Manufacturing Engineering Society International Conference on June 26.

]]>
2013-07-09T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-09T00:00:00-04:00 2013-07-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
221481 221491 221481 image <![CDATA[Shi received the IAQ Academician award, and was congratulated by Sr. Mary Jean Ryan, Chair of the International Academy for Quality (left), and Mr. Janak Mehta, President of the International Academy for Quality (right)]]> image/jpeg 1449243516 2015-12-04 15:38:36 1475894891 2016-10-08 02:48:11 221491 image <![CDATA[Shi at the 2013 MESIC Conference]]> image/jpeg 1449243516 2015-12-04 15:38:36 1475894891 2016-10-08 02:48:11
<![CDATA[In Memoriam - Edward Ernesto Iacobucci BS IE ‘75]]> 27511 Engineering alumnus and CoE Advisory Board member Edward Ernesto Iacobucci, BS IE ‘75, passed away June 21, 2013. A man known in the business world for his tenacity, Ed fought a difficult, 16-month battle with pancreatic cancer.

Ed was a renowned technology visionary and serial entrepreneur. Free spirited, profound thinker Ed was bold enough to believe he could change the world. His creativity and innovative spirit made it happen. He is survived by his wife, Nancy Lee (Iacobucci); his three children, Marianna (Eden), William (Iacobucci), and Michelle (Iacobucci); mother, Costantina (Iacobucci); brother, Billy (Iacobucci); and three grandchildren, Sophia, Haven and Estelle. Gifts to memorialize Ed may be directed to the Georgia Tech Foundation, Inc., 760 Spring Street, Suite 400 Atlanta, GA 30308. Donations will establish a scholarship for engineering students with financial need.

Ed was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina to Dr. Guillermo and Costantina Iacobucci. His father, a biochemist, moved his family to the U.S. in 1960 to work for E.R. Squibb & Sons and then Coca-Cola. Roberto Goizueta, then Chairman of Coca-Cola, became a close friend of the family and Ed's godfather. Both men, his father and Goizueta, strongly influenced Iacobucci's business ethos. Ed graduated from Georgia Tech Institute with a B.S. in systems engineering.

A 30-year veteran of the technology industry, Iacobucci began his career at IBM in 1979 where he played a key role in Big Blue's entry into the commercial software and personal computer business. While at IBM Iacobucci held architecture and design leadership responsibilities for IBM DOS and OS/2 and led the joint IBM-Microsoft design team that launched the modern era of multi-tasking personal computer operating systems.

In 1989, Iacobucci left IBM to co-found Citrix Systems, Inc. (NASDAQ: CTXS) and implement his vision of server-based computing. He led the company as chairman and chief technology officer through all of its market and product development phases. Under his leadership, Citrix grew rapidly and was named to both the Nasdaq 100 and S&P 500 in record time. In 1997, Iacobucci forged an unprecedented, five-year joint development agreement with Microsoft to include Citrix multi-user capabilities within Microsoft Windows NT Server. He served as Citrix chairman through 2000, when he retired to pursue his vision of Software-as-a-Service – flying aircraft.

In 2002, Iacobucci co-founded and served as president and CEO DayJet Corporation, an on-demand airline service, with the mission of bringing affordable, accessible Per-Seat, On-Demand jet travel to more people and more communities. He and his engineering team built a breakthrough computer system for solving highly-complex optimization problems for the world's first true on-demand air service. His most recent venture was VirtualWorks Group, a company he co-founded in 2009 to tackle data sprawl – an outgrowth of the information age that he helped to create. He founded VirtualWorks in 2011 which helps manage data across many platforms. Iacobucci served as President and CEO until May 20, 2013 when he stepped down for health reasons.

In 1998, he was recognized as the top entrepreneur in the world with the prestigious CNN, USA Today, and Ernst & Young "International Entrepreneur of the Year" award. In 2005, Newsweek included him in its list of "10 Big Thinkers for Big Business", and in 2007 Iacobucci was named to Business 2.0 magazine's list of the "50 Who Matter Now".

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1372074030 2013-06-24 11:40:30 1475896467 2016-10-08 03:14:27 0 0 news Engineering alumnus and CoE Advisory Board member Edward Ernesto Iacobucci, BS IE 1975, passed away June 21, 2013. A man known in the business world for his tenacity, Ed fought a difficult, 16-month battle with pancreatic cancer.

]]>
2013-06-24T00:00:00-04:00 2013-06-24T00:00:00-04:00 2013-06-24 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
218821 218821 image <![CDATA[Edward Ernesto Iacobucci, BS IE 1975]]> image/jpeg 1449180151 2015-12-03 22:02:31 1475894885 2016-10-08 02:48:05
<![CDATA[Humanitarian Relief: What does ISyE think?]]> 27511 The tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma, on May 20, 2013 resulted in loss of life and heart-wrenching devastation.  ISyE works in a variety of ways to support humanitarian relief by system transformations through education, outreach, projects and research. 

(Georgia Tech Amplifier) Ozlem Ergun is co-director of Georgia Tech's Center for Health and Humanitarian Logistics and explains what happens next in the clean-up process. Read more.

(Georgia Tech Amplifier)­­­ Julie Swann, co-director of the Humanitarian Logistics Center at Georgia Tech, explains what is the best way to reach those in need. Read more.

Today, unsolicited in-kind donations from well-intended donors often cripple relief operations and create what is known as the "second disaster." To address the issue, NGOs have mounted public education campaigns for "cash only" donations. This effort has not been effective in reducing the flow of unsolicited in-kind donations in response to disaster. ISyE Ph.D. Student Moin Islam along with Professor John Vande Vate are working on a "Retail Donation Model" that can help NGOs covert the energy and willingness of well-intended donors, who want to do something specific, to productive in-kind donations.

For more information on these efforts, visit the Georgia Tech Health & Humanitarian Logistics Center at http://humanitarian.scl.gatech.edu/home.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1369389634 2013-05-24 10:00:34 1475896460 2016-10-08 03:14:20 0 0 news The tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma, on May 20, 2013 resulted in loss of life and heart-wrenching devastation.  ISyE works in a variety of ways to support humanitarian relief by system transformations through education, outreach, projects and research.

]]>
2013-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-24T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-24 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
214571 214571 image <![CDATA[The tornado that hit Moore, Oklahoma resulted in loss of life and heart-wrenching devastation.]]> image/jpeg 1449180096 2015-12-03 22:01:36 1475894879 2016-10-08 02:47:59
<![CDATA[ISyE Advisory Board Inducts Six New Members]]> 27511 Five distinguished alumni and an industry friend have joined the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) Advisory Board for the 2013 to 2017 term. Don Greene, IE 1980, Joaquin Gonzalez Varela, Neca Holley, IE 1986, Andrew Ibbotson, IE 1998, Charles Murrah, IE 1984, and Jocelyn Stargel, IE 1982, MS IE 1986, were inducted in during the annual spring meeting on May 17, 2013 in Puerto Rico, which was held in conjunction with the IIE Annual Conference and Expo.  The board serves as a sounding body for the School chair, as well as assists with the School’s strategic initiatives and development goals. 

Current board member Lou Fouts, IE 1990, a partner at Water Street Capital, a large Jacksonville-based hedge fund that manages money for leading endowments, institutions, and family offices, will serve as the board’s new chair.

More on the new advisory board members:

Don Greene is the CEO and Executive Director of the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE).  Prior to becoming Executive Director, Greene served as Managing Director of the International Gas Turbine Institute, an Institute within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.  He has also been the Director of Member Services and Operations for Polaris International, an association of independent public accounting firms. Earlier in his career, Greene worked at IIE for ten years in a variety of positions including staff industrial engineer, product development manager and membership manager.  He gleaned additional experience from his employment at Scientific-Atlanta, where he worked as an industrial engineer. Greene became a registered Professional Engineer in 1988 and is also a Certified Association Executive.  He is a member of the Institute of Industrial Engineers, American Society of Association Executives, Georgia Society of Association Executives, and the Council of Engineering and Scientific Society Executives.

Joaquín Gonzalez Varela is executive vice president of Walmart and president of Walmart Stores, Inc.’s East Business Unit, representing nearly 1,600 stores in four divisions spanning from Maine to Puerto Rico with revenues greater than $95 billion dollars and more than 500,000 associates.  He is responsible for establishing the strategic direction of all growth opportunities including execution of store innovation, supply chain, real estate and people development. Before joining Walmart’s U.S. operations, Gonzalez Varela held a variety of positions with Walmart de México in which he has worked across some of the company’s most important divisions including operations, merchandising, logistics, and finance. His efforts in Mexico led to a handful of important milestones and achievements, including the development of a new store format, Bodega Express, which today is one of the main growing vehicles for Walmart de México. He implemented a cold supply chain network for all fresh merchandise – the first of its class in Latin America – including operations standards, procedures and the grand opening of the first distribution center in Mexico.

Neca Holley is an Area Manager with Outside Plant Engineering and Planning Design where she manages the central and western parts of Georgia for AT&T.  Her group designs and implements facilities to supply high speed data and Ethernet services which allows AT&T to meet bandwidth needs for cellular and U-verse customers. She has been with AT&T/BellSouth/Southern Bell for 27 years and started her career as an Outside Plant Engineer designing copper cable, fiber optic and digital systems.  During her career she has served in various capacities from managing budgets to staffing the Cooperative Education Program for the BellSouth region where she recruited students from diverse schools around the country. Neca has a Professional Engineering License, is a member of the National Society of Professional Engineers, The Institute of Industrial Engineers and attended Dr. W. Edwards Deming’s course in “Quality, Productivity and Competitive Position” which was taught by Dr. Deming himself.

Andrew Ibbotson currently serves as founder and CEO of Digital Assent, a healthcare technology company that helps physicians and brands more effectively engage patients at the point of care.  Under his leadership, Digital Assent has earned significant recognition. Highlights include being selected by Forbes Magazine as a finalist for its “List of America’s Most Promising Companies” and winning the “Cool Technology of the Year” award presented by TechAmerica and the Technology Association of Georgia.  Digital Assent’s rapidly growing PatientPad® Network now spans every major metropolitan market in the country.  Andrew was named 2012 “Business Person of the Year” by the Metro Atlanta Chamber, “Entrepreneur of the Year” at TiECON Southeast, and "Mobile Marketer of the Year" at the 2012 Tech Marketing Awards.  He was also recognized as one of Atlanta’s “40 Under 40″ business leaders by the Atlanta Business Chronicle.  Andrew is an active member of the Atlanta technology community. He sits on the Board of Directors for Venture Atlanta, serves as a mentor to first-time entrepreneurs, and regularly speaks at events throughout the country to promote innovation and entrepreneurship.

Charlie Murrah is executive vice president and president of Southwire’s Energy Division, which serves customers in the electrical utility industry, primarily in the United States.  Murrah began his career with Southwire in 1984 as an industrial engineer in the Carrollton Utility Products Plant. He subsequently held numerous engineering and management positions in Southwire’s energy cable and copper operations, serving most recently as the company’s vice president of supply chain. Murrah is a Georgia registered professional engineer and a certified production and inventory manager. In 1996, he was inducted into the Council of Outstanding Young Engineering Alumni of Georgia Tech.

Jocelyn Stargel is the manager of Business Assurance at Southern Company Services.  With 4.4 million customers and nearly 46,000 megawatts of generating capacity, Atlanta-based Southern Company (NYSE: SO) is the premier energy company serving the Southeast through its subsidiaries - Georgia Power, Alabama Power, Mississippi Power, Gulf Power, Southern Power, Southern Nuclear, Southern Telecom and SouthernLINC Wireless.  In her role, Jocelyn oversees the Southern Company program focused on minimizing or eliminating the impact of events that have the potential to disrupt critical business operations, functions, or services.  Jocelyn currently serves on the board of the Georgia Tech Women’s Alumni Network, and the Finance Committee of CHRIS Kids, Inc.  She has also served on the Board of Directors of CHRIS Kids, Inc, the Marketing Committee of Heating Energy Assistance Team (HEAT), and on the Board of the Directors for the Spruill Center for the Arts.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1369821409 2013-05-29 09:56:49 1475896460 2016-10-08 03:14:20 0 0 news Don Greene, IE 1980, Joaquin Gonzalez Varela, Neca Holley, IE 1986, Andrew Ibbotson, IE 1998, Charles Murrah, IE 1984, and Jocelyn Stargel, IE 1982, MS IE 1986, were inducted into the ISyE Advisory Board during the annual spring meeting.

]]>
2013-05-29T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-29T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-29 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
215251 215261 215291 215301 215311 215321 215251 image <![CDATA[Don Greene is the CEO and Executive Director of the Institute of Industrial Engineers]]> image/jpeg 1449180096 2015-12-03 22:01:36 1475894879 2016-10-08 02:47:59 215261 image <![CDATA[Joaquín Gonzalez Varela is executive vice president of Walmart and president of Walmart Stores, Inc.’s East Business Unit]]> image/jpeg 1449180096 2015-12-03 22:01:36 1475894879 2016-10-08 02:47:59 215291 image <![CDATA[Neca Holley is an Area Manager at Outside Plant Engineering and Planning Design]]> image/jpeg 1449180096 2015-12-03 22:01:36 1475894879 2016-10-08 02:47:59 215301 image <![CDATA[Andrew Ibbotson is founder and CEO of Digital Assent]]> image/jpeg 1449180096 2015-12-03 22:01:36 1475894879 2016-10-08 02:47:59 215311 image <![CDATA[Charlie Murrah is executive vice president and president of Southwire’s Energy Division]]> image/jpeg 1449180096 2015-12-03 22:01:36 1475894879 2016-10-08 02:47:59 215321 image <![CDATA[Jocelyn Stargel is the manager of Business Assurance at Southern Company Services]]> image/jpeg 1449180114 2015-12-03 22:01:54 1475894879 2016-10-08 02:47:59
<![CDATA[Jane Snowdon Appointed IBM Chief Innovation Officer for U.S. Federal Business]]> 27511 Jane L. Snowdon, Ph.D. IE 1994, has been appointed IBM Chief Innovation Officer for U.S. Federal, a first-of-a-kind role created by IBM for a technology vendor serving the U.S. Federal government. With a strong background in strategy, modeling, analytics, and consulting, Snowdon will focus on emerging areas like Big Data, Cloud Computing, and Mobile. 

Snowdon, who has 17 years of experience in IBM Research, most recently served as the co-leader of IBM’s Global Technology Outlook reporting to the Vice President of Strategy and Worldwide Technical Operations at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center. Snowdon has been a leader in IBM for developing strategies and driving research efforts worldwide to create innovative solutions for smarter buildings as part of IBM’s Smarter City initiative for which she received an IBM Research Division Outstanding Technical Achievement Award.  She was instrumental in defining a partnership with Columbia, the City University of New York (CUNY), and NYU for research collaboration, which was announced by Mayor Bloomberg, to help address New York City’s energy challenges.

Snowdon is a senior member of IEEE and IIE, and a member of INFORMS and the New York Academy of Sciences. In 2006, she was elected to the Connecticut Academy of Science and Engineering and in 2008, was inducted into the Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni at Georgia Tech. Snowdon is an emeritus member of the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) Advisory Board, where she served as chair from 2011 until the spring of 2013.  She is also a member of the Georgia Tech College of Engineering Advisory Board and serves on the CUNY Institute of Software Design and Development Advisory Board.

In addition to her Ph.D. in Industrial and Systems Engineering from Georgia Tech, Snowdon holds a B.S. in Industrial and Management Systems Engineering from Pennsylvania State University, and a M.S. in Industrial and Operations Engineering from the University of Michigan.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1370431866 2013-06-05 11:31:06 1475896460 2016-10-08 03:14:20 0 0 news Jane L. Snowdon, Ph.D. IE 1994, has been appointed IBM Chief Innovation Officer for U.S. Federal, a first-of-a-kind role created by IBM for a technology vendor serving the U.S. Federal government.

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2013-06-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-06-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-06-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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174061 174061 image <![CDATA[Jane Snowdon, PhD IE 1994]]> image/jpeg 1449179012 2015-12-03 21:43:32 1475894816 2016-10-08 02:46:56
<![CDATA[Pratt & Whitney Team Named Winners in the 2013 Spring Senior Design Competition]]> 27511 Out of 27 teams of undergraduate students in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE), the Pratt & Whitney team has been selected to receive the coveted first place award in the Spring 2013 Senior Design Competition.  Guided by faculty advisor Shabbir Ahmed, students Daniel Forrest, Andrew Frazelle, Dustin Hsu, Leanne Measroch, Megan Sweeney, and Christopher Taylor were chosen for their project “Material Flow & Deployment for Next Generation Product Family Engines.”

Pratt & Whitney, a world leader in aircraft engine manufacturing, requested help optimizing transportation decisions to support assembly of Next Generation Product Family engines.  For their project, the team delivered an optimization model with a customizable interface capable of providing recommendations under varying operational conditions.  The solution represents annual transportation savings of approximately 21%.

Finalists in the competition were the three Senior Design teams who worked with Delta Cargo, Kubota Manufacturing, and UPS Worldport.

Guided by faculty advisor Pinar Keskinocak, students Betsy Calender, Kevin Coe, Jimmy Le, Kyungha (Diana) Lim, Jose Sarmiento, Alyssa Wachs, and Alexey Zarnitsyn made up the Delta Cargo team.  In Atlanta, Delta Cargo is experiencing high overtime costs and a low on-time shipment delivery rate. The deliverables of the team’s project “Workforce Management and Process Improvement” included: estimation of a shipment’s processing rate, a demand forecast, a staffing schedule optimization model, and a decision support tool. These solutions have an expected annual savings of over half a million dollars.

The Kubota Manufacturing team, guided by faculty advisor Shabbir Ahmed, was made up of students Kelly Chen, Jin-Su Kim, Rozina Merchant, David Mun, Abhinav Sawhney, Yumehito Takimoto, Dhruvik Talaviya, and Jason Yeh. Their project, “Domestic Inbound Freight Optimization,” focused on minimizing logistics costs for Kubota Manufacturing. The team developed an optimization-based system to decide the routes and modes for shipping parts from 200 suppliers all over the U.S. to Kubota’s manufacturing plant in Gainesville, GA. The developed system achieves average savings worth 11% per week in transportation costs.

The UPS Worldport team, guided by faculty advisor Doug Bodner, was made up of students Yuelin (Lyn) Chen, Diana Chow, Stefan Ferguson, Sohyun Kim, Jianing (Jessica) Le, Nirmit Shah, Zhixun (Herman) Wu, and Brandon Wykoff.  UPS Worldport is the world’s largest package sorting facility. For their project, “Aircraft Arrival Schedule Optimization for UPS Worldport,” The team developed a flexible optimization model for aircraft arrival scheduling to address the problem of operational delays due to irregular volume inflow. This provided an annual value of approximately $1.7 million in reduced overtime and downstream costs.

All senior students in ISyE culminate their undergraduate educational experience with the Senior Design course in order to provide firsthand experience at solving real world problems in a team environment. Students typically work in teams of six to eight individuals with 15-25 Senior Design teams running each semester. Each group is advised by an ISyE faculty member, and the faculty coordinator manages the overall course. Companies interested in submitting a project for consideration can either contact Joel Sokol at 404-894-6484 or can post a project through the ISyE webpage at http://www.isye.gatech.edu/seniordesign/.  Senior design teams look for projects before the start of the fall and spring semesters.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1367503159 2013-05-02 13:59:19 1475896452 2016-10-08 03:14:12 0 0 news Out of 27 teams of undergraduate students in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE), the Pratt & Whitney team has been selected to receive the coveted first place award in the Spring 2013 Senior Design Competition.

]]>
2013-05-02T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-02T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
211031 211041 211051 211061 211031 image <![CDATA[Pratt & Whitney, Spring 2013 Winning Senior Design Team]]> image/jpeg 1449180039 2015-12-03 22:00:39 1475894871 2016-10-08 02:47:51 211041 image <![CDATA[Delta Cargo, Spring 2013 Senior Design Team Finalist]]> image/jpeg 1449180039 2015-12-03 22:00:39 1475894871 2016-10-08 02:47:51 211051 image <![CDATA[Kubota Manufacturing, Spring 2013 Senior Design Team Finalist]]> image/jpeg 1449180039 2015-12-03 22:00:39 1475894871 2016-10-08 02:47:51 211061 image <![CDATA[UPS Worldport, Spring 2013 Senior Design Team Finalist]]> image/jpeg 1449180039 2015-12-03 22:00:39 1475894871 2016-10-08 02:47:51
<![CDATA[Ramudhin and Ratliff Author Recent Study on Port Performance in Belize, Central America, and Dominican Republic]]> 27511 Amar Ramudhin, director of Supply Chain Management & Technology at Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), and Don Ratliff, executive director of SCL, were authors of a study released at the annual meeting of the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) in Panama March 14-17, 2013.  The study, titled "Assessment of Port Performance and Port Connectivity Study in Belize, Central America, and the Dominican Republic," evaluates the performance of 18 ports in Belize, Central America, and the Dominican Republic, and suggests initiatives that could improve trade in the region.

According to the report, “The result of this study points to the need of an integrated intermodal sea-land network to foster global trade and trade exchanges between the various countries. The recommendation for governments of the region is to optimize road infrastructure and connectivity between regions of production/consumptions and develop strong and resilient road links to ports. Access roads should be developed to support container traffic and reduce delays in container pick-up and delivery.”

The study, conducted by Ramudhin with the Georgia Tech Logistics Innovation & Research Center Panama, included individual country reports and the Think Piece assessing overall port performance and the impact of the widening of the Panama Canal on the countries studied.  

“The expansion of the Panama Canal will very likely create one or more mega hubs on the Atlantic side and it is crucial that countries work with the carriers and liner services to develop good connectivity with these hubs,” said Ramudhin.  “The ports in Panama and Caucedo in the Dominican Republic are natural candidates as no other ports in this study, whether in the Pacific or Atlantic, can handle the larger vessels that will come through the expanded Canal.  But even these ports have to improve their performance and capability to handle the larger ship efficiently.”

Click here to view a pdf of the full report.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1368091661 2013-05-09 09:27:41 1475896452 2016-10-08 03:14:12 0 0 news Amar Ramudhin and Don Ratliff were authors of a recent study, titled "Assessment of Port Performance and Port Connectivity Study in Belize, Central America, and the Dominican Republic," which was released at the annual meeting of the Inter-American Development Bank in Panama March 14-17.

]]>
2013-05-09T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-09T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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47643 47643 image <![CDATA[Donald Ratliff, executive director of Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute]]> image/jpeg 1449175354 2015-12-03 20:42:34 1475894447 2016-10-08 02:40:47
<![CDATA[Student Spotlight: Richard Lu on Undergraduate Research]]> 27511 Richard Lu, a second year undergraduate student in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE), is going beyond his required IE coursework, and tackling real world problems through undergraduate research.  

“I wanted to take my learning and push boundaries, finding where IE concepts can be applied in various areas and discovering novel concepts,” said Lu. 

Lu’s research deals with the effect of uncertainty in econometrics. Simply put, he is studying how people model uncertainty in certain circumstances and how they use these models to make decisions.  Though it is still in the early stages, he hopes this research will eventually help provide a better way to constrain or model uncertainty to the point that its negative effects can be mitigated and its potentially positive effects expanded. 

“A more specific example of this research would be the modeling of uncertainty in inventory theory. In incorporating multiple sources of uncertainty such as economic cycles and supply relations, one may be able to make better educated decisions on inventory like forward buying and safety stock,” Lu explained.

Through his research, Lu has learned a great deal about designing experiments, problem construction, and effective communication.  He has also had the opportunity to learn from ISyE graduate students and faculty members.  Last summer he worked with Professor Jan Shi, and this summer he plans to work with Professor JC Lu.

“By working with research teams and learning under the mentorship of professors, I now have a better understanding of what it means to communicate one's findings. It does help with class along the general concepts of time management and communication. Additionally, it's awesome to see how class concepts can be explored and applied!” said Lu.

Lu, who expects to graduate in the spring of 2014, plans to continue his research throughout the summer and possibly fall, while applying to graduate Ph.D. programs.  

“I would very much like to delve deeper into these concepts!”

Lu was recognized for his work at the annual ISyE Undergraduate Student Awards Ceremony on April 18, receiving the COE Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award which is organized by the Undergraduate Student Research Program.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1368109594 2013-05-09 14:26:34 1475896452 2016-10-08 03:14:12 0 0 news Richard Lu, a second year undergraduate student in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, is going beyond his required IE coursework, and tackling real world problems through undergraduate research.

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2013-05-09T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-09T00:00:00-04:00 2013-05-09 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
212151 212161 212151 image <![CDATA[Richard Lu, undergraduate student in ISyE]]> image/jpeg 1449180039 2015-12-03 22:00:39 1475894874 2016-10-08 02:47:54 212161 image <![CDATA[Richard Lu (L) received the COE Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award on April 18, 2013]]> image/jpeg 1449180039 2015-12-03 22:00:39 1475894874 2016-10-08 02:47:54
<![CDATA[ISyE Tackling the Challenges of Big Data]]> 27511 Every day, billions of bytes of data are generated from product realization, purchasing transactions, information collected from health centers, and more.  Engineers in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) are tackling the challenges of big data sets to solve logistics problems in high volume distribution centers, improve manufacturing processes, build predictive models, and make advancements in healthcare, to name a few.  Some of these projects happening in ISyE were highlighted in the Fall 2012 – Winter 2013 issue of Research Horizons, “Tackling the Challenges of Big Data.”

Below are highlights of some of the ISyE projects that appear in this issue:

Unraveling Logistics Problems

High volume distribution centers – whether they serve WalMart, Home Depot, or the Department of Defense – ship hundreds of thousands of items to many destinations daily. If these facilities can systematically save a few seconds of labor here or a centimeter of space there, the total efficiency gain can be significant.

Yet achieving big savings requires finding patterns in huge data sets. Engineers must analyze thousands or millions of customer orders and then use that information to optimize warehouse layouts and processes.

John Bartholdi is the Manhattan Associates Chair of Supply Chain Management in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering. He’s working on warehousing optimization for the Defense Logistics Agency, and has also performed similar research for numerous corporations.

“We build tools to automate the search for exploitable patterns, which can hide in vast data sets,” said Bartholdi, who is also research director of the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute. “We analyze huge histories of customer orders, just like Amazon does. But instead of doing it to tune advertising and drive sales, we do it to tune the warehouse and the entire supply chain, to drive efficiencies.”

Understanding the Manufacturing Process

Jianjun (Jan) Shi, the Carolyn J. Stewart Chair and professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, employs a multi-disciplinary data fusion approach to improving manufacturing processes that involve massive information sets. Shi combines data, statistical methods, signal processing, control theory, and domain knowledge to solve manufacturing problems.

“We frequently analyze data from a factory’s information system to monitor system status and performance via system informatics and control techniques,” Shi said. “We then develop automated algorithms that can be implemented directly into production systems for performance improvement.”

Among his projects:

Building Predictive Models

Xiaoming Huo focuses on statistical modeling of large, diverse data sets. Huo, a School of Industrial and Systems Engineering professor, uses existing data to build predictive models – tools that forecast probable outcomes.

“That’s a distinct challenge,” Huo said, “because each data set is large and complex and its useful features are unknown.” He works in areas that include geophysics, automatic control, engineering signal modeling, financial data analysis, and smart environment design.

Often, the data appear in the form of images, and Huo must develop feature-extraction methods customized for each problem.

“Given the size of the data and limitations on the number of features that can be utilized, the task of searching for useful data points I truly like searching for needles in a haystack,” said Huo, who teaches both computational statistics and financial data. “Defining the predictors – the variables that you are going to utilize to build the statistical model – is the hardest question.”

Among the approaches he uses are signal and image processing methods, along with inputs of “domain knowledge” – expert knowledge of the domain in question.

In one recent geophysical project, Huo’s goal was to separate desired features from many similar ones. His data source was a lard one – a 3-D image produced by some 8,000 sensors detecting manmade sonic vibrations in the earth over a 10-kilometer area.

Huo used automated image processing techniques, including Fourier domain techniques that analyze signals with respect to frequency rather than time. He extracted desired high frequency data, resulting in a ground structure image that offered important information to petroleum geologists.

Predicting Drug Response

Ming Yuan, an associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, is using computational and mathematical approaches to analyze how gene expression evolves over time in individuals with breast cancer – and whether these patterns can predict treatment outcomes.

Yuan is studying how gene expression evolves during the menstrual cycle and whether there is any association between these patterns and cancer relapse. Gene expression determines how much biochemical material results from a gene, and can be used to judge how active a gene is.

“Our goal is to weed out the genes that just change expression level due to a woman’s menstrual cycle and not because of tumor progression or treatment,” explained Yuan, who is also a Georgia Cancer Coalition Distinguished Cancer Scholar. “We want to know which genes are abnormally expressed over time and behave differently from the majority of genes, because that would make them likely drug targets.”

Improved predictors of relapse risk could help cancer patients make better treatment decisions in consultation with their physicians, he added. Yuan’s research is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Georgia Cancer Coalition.

Advancing Health-related Readiness

Eva K. Lee, a professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering, specializes in large-scale computational algorithms and systems modeling, with an emphasis on medical-healthcare risk and decision analysis, and logistics management. She is bringing complex modeling, machine learning, and optimization techniques to bear on a number of health informatics projects that involve very large data sets.

“Problems in health systems and biomedicine can often be addressed through systems modeling, algorithm and software design, and decision theory analysis,” said Lee, who is director of the Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare. “By advancing these tools, we can model very large-scale evolving and heterogeneous data sets to pursue and uncover effective solutions.”

Among her projects:

 

To view the full issue of Research Horizons, click here.  For more information on big data research at Georgia Tech, please visit: (www.gatech.edu/research/areas/big-data).

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1366884356 2013-04-25 10:05:56 1475896448 2016-10-08 03:14:08 0 0 news Every day, billions of bytes of data are generated from product realization, purchasing transactions, information collected from health centers, and more.  Engineers in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering are tackling the challenges of big data sets to solve logistics problems in high volume distribution centers, improve manufacturing processes, build predictive models, and make advancements in healthcare, to name a few.

]]>
2013-04-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
49791 49767 209171 73339 49791 image <![CDATA[John J. Bartholdi, III]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 49767 image <![CDATA[Jianjun Shi]]> image/jpeg 1449175373 2015-12-03 20:42:53 1475894453 2016-10-08 02:40:53 209171 image <![CDATA[Xiaoming Huo]]> image/jpeg 1449180001 2015-12-03 22:00:01 1475894869 2016-10-08 02:47:49 73339 image <![CDATA[Eva Lee]]> 1449178002 2015-12-03 21:26:42 1475894676 2016-10-08 02:44:36
<![CDATA[Dieker Appointed Fouts Family Assistant Professor]]> 27868 Ton Dieker has been appointed as the Fouts Family Assistant Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. The Fouts Family Early Career Professorship is designed to enhance the ability of ISyE to “attract and retain eminent teacher-scholars.”

Dieker works in the area of applied probability, and his research is motivated, in part, by applications to computer networks and to business processes such as workforce management and service systems. His expertise includes stochastic processes, stochastic networks, and stochastic analysis of algorithms. His recent research recognition includes the 2012 Erlang Prize from the Applied Probability Society of INFORMS, a 2013 National Science Foundation CAREER award, and a 2013 IBM Faculty Award.  He currently serves as an associate editor for Operations Research and Mathematics of Operations Research. Dieker earned his master's degree in Operations Research from the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam in 2002. He carried out his Ph.D. research at the Center for Mathematics and Computer Science (CWI) in Amsterdam, and earned his PhD degree at the University of Amsterdam in 2006. He came to Georgia Tech from the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY. Prior to that, he worked at the University College Cork, Ireland, as a postdoctoral researcher.

“The Fouts Family early career professorship appointment provides a well-deserved opportunity to enhance Ton’s growing research and educational impacts,” said Jane Ammons, ISyE School Chair.

]]> Lizzie Millman 1 1378375115 2013-09-05 09:58:35 1475896444 2016-10-08 03:14:04 0 0 news Ton Dieker has been appointed as the Fouts Family Assistant Professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering for a three year term of service, beginning August 15, 2013. 

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2013-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-05T00:00:00-04:00 2013-09-05 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102


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177171 177171 image <![CDATA[Ton Dieker]]> image/jpeg 1449179031 2015-12-03 21:43:51 1475894822 2016-10-08 02:47:02
<![CDATA[ISyE Hosts Annual Undergraduate Student Awards Ceremony]]> 27511 The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) held its annual Undergraduate Student Awards Ceremony on April 18, 2013. Students, faculty, parents, alumni, and award sponsors joined together to recognize some of ISyE’s exceptional undergraduate students for their outstanding academic achievement as well as for their contributions to the School and the community.  The awards and scholarships were presented by Jane Ammons, Stewart School Chair and professor, Fran Buser, ISyE academic adviser, Maria Frantz, IE 2001, ISyE Associate Professor Anton Kleywegt, Dima Nazzal, Director of Student Services, Patti Parker, ISyE academic advisor, Jose Sarmiento, President of IIE, and ISyE Professor Jan Shi.

Congratulations to the following students:       

Jose Sarmiento and Alexander Terry received the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering Leadership Award which is given to officers of the student chapter of the Institute of Industrial Engineers and to the president of Alpha Pi Mu, IE’s honor society. 

Cathy Guo received The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering Senior Service Award,given to a senior who has provided exceptional service to ISyE.  Dimple Bansal, Matt Fox, Cathy Guo, Diana Lim, Jose Sarmiento, Alex Terry, and Alexey Zarnitsyn were given special recognition certificates as finalists for the award.

Andrew Frazelle received the Alpha Pi Mu Academic Excellence Award.  The Alpha Pi Mu Honor Society presents $500 to a senior with the best academic achievement, including GPA, difficulty in the curriculum, research, and other scholarly accomplishments. The winner’s name will be added to the perpetual plaque outside of the academic office.  Joshua Berne, Hongfan Chen, Dylan Cross, Andrew Frazelle, Nicholas Keith, Lauren Kley, Richard Lu, Megan Sweeney, Alexey Zamitsyn, and Yuanshuo Zhao were given special recognition certificates as finalists for the award.

Richard Lu received the COE Outstanding Undergraduate Research Award which is organized by the Undergraduate Student Research Program.

Lauren Kley received the Henry Ford II Best Junior Award which is administered in the College of Engineering and given to a student at the end of their third year with the best academic performance in ISyE.  Dylan Cross, Wesley Hughes, Lauren Kley, Richard Lu, Alexander Terry, and Yuanshuo Zhao were given special recognition certificates as finalists for the award.

Hye Bae, Dylan Buczek, Nicholas Buczek, Kirsten Carella, Azeem Feroz, Samantha Smith and Caleb Steiner were awarded the Jack C. Webb Scholarship. Jack Webb Scholarships are given to rising juniors or seniors in ISyE.  Recipients are awarded $1,000 for scholarship, leadership and extracurricular and community activities.

Catherine Hwang and Ari Siesser were awarded the Kurt Salmon Associates Scholarship in Industrial and Systems Engineering.  These scholarships of $1000 are awarded to selected seniors in ISyE based on academic merit and contribution in the School. 

Natalie Souther was awarded the ALCOA Foundation Scholarship which is given to a second, third, or fourth year student who has the right to work in the United States and exhibits strong leadership skills, high energy level, solid academic performance, excellent interpersonal skills, tolerance for stress, and demonstrates initiative.

Can Amado, Andrew Borda, Alina Cornejo, Azeem Feroz, Peter Gumulia, and Richard (Yuchen) Zheng received the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals Scholarshipof $2,000 which is shared by the selected awardees who have a GPA of 3.2 or above and contribute to the supply chain engineering program at Georgia Tech.

Anubhav Jain, Huiqi Ma, and Adjoa Aka received the Ligon Fund for Student Travel Award.  This award is to assist ISyE students’ travel to conferences or other worthy activities that will benefit ISyE and the student. The award can be used to cover transportation and accommodations reimbursable from $500 - $1,000.

Simon Chow, Michael Noah, Binita Patel and Nolan Thomson were awarded ISyE Scholarships in recognition of their accomplishments in academics, leadership, and service.

Steven A. Parker received the Frantz Family Young Entrepreneurs Scholarship.  Established in 2006, this award is presented to an industrial engineering student who is interested in establishing a small business and gaining financial freedom. The student must have clear business objectives and goals along with the demonstrated determination to pursue and reach those goals.

Josh Berne received the IIE Outstanding Senior Award, Jacob Blaeser received the IIE Rising Star Award, and Haoxiang Yang received the IIE Top International Student Award.  The student chapter of IIE offers three awards of $1,000 each to recognize those with strong academic performance, service and leadership

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1366380755 2013-04-19 14:12:35 1475896444 2016-10-08 03:14:04 0 0 news The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering held its annual Undergraduate Student Awards Ceremony on April 18, 2013.

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2013-04-19T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-19T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

]]>
208061 208071 208061 image <![CDATA[Chen Zhou, Ph.D., Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies, served as Master of Ceremony during the awards.]]> image/jpeg 1449179988 2015-12-03 21:59:48 1475894866 2016-10-08 02:47:46 208071 image <![CDATA[Stewart School Chair Jane Ammons standing with Jose Sarmiento (L) and Alexander Terry (R), recipients of the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering Leadership Award.]]> image/jpeg 1449179988 2015-12-03 21:59:48 1475894866 2016-10-08 02:47:46
<![CDATA[Costa Rica TIP Center Moves Forward with Major Projects]]> 27511 Sweeping revisions to Costa Rica's medical-products registration process are receiving one last in-house review before the final recommendations are delivered to officials at the Ministry of Health.

The project, initiated at the request of Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla, is one of three major initiatives on the docket at Georgia Tech's Costa Rica Trade, Innovation, and Productivity Center (TIP). The other projects involve development of a food traceability system and a proposal to create a methodology for prioritizing future infrastructure projects in terms of their value to the country's trade chain.

In Costa Rica as in most countries, certain medical products — primarily pharmaceuticals, either produced in-country or imported — must undergo a registration process before they can be sold there. The problem is that the procedure takes 12 months, strong evidence that it's riddled with inefficiencies. The cumbersome registration process not only results in higher costs, but the long delay prevents patients from receiving the most up-to-date treatments in a timely manner.

Industrial engineers at the TIP Center modeled the registration procedure in detail. "We determined there was a lot of duplication and unnecessary steps in the process," said Emmanuel Hess, general manager at the center.

Using software developed by Amar Ramudhin, director of Supply Chain Management & Technology at Georgia Tech's Supply Chain & Logistics Institute (SCL), the routine was re-engineered and a series of recommendations for its implementation was drawn up. When fully operational, the newly streamlined process will "lead to savings in time and cost not only for the Ministry of Health, but also for the private producers and private distributors that are registering medicines here in Costa Rica," Hess explained.

The effort will open the door for additional TIP Center projects with other government agencies, said Jaymie Forrest, managing director of SCL.

"President Chinchilla has a Competitiveness Council that's using this project as a base study to show how other internal processes need to be improved, and how they can be more efficient in other matters," she said.

Food Traceability

A product tracing requirement that documents Costa Rican agricultural exports each step of the way, from local farm to retailer in the U.S., will help ensure a safe and wholesome food supply, and could serve as a model for other Latin American countries.

Started four years ago, the TIP Center's food traceability project presaged the Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011, a U.S. law passed in the wake of several high-profile cases of food contamination. The law mandates a number of health and safety measures for food imports, including a product tracing system requirement. The Act gives the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authority to unilaterally block any import or importer of fruits and vegetables even if there is only the suspicion of contaminated product in the food chain. Before, a problem had to be specifically identified — a painstaking process that could take months.

Regulations detailing the law's requirements and implementation are still unfolding, with the FDA requesting industry feedback on the latest set of food safety standards it issued in January 2013.

"Currently we are working with local authorities in giving back comments and making remarks with regard to these rules," said Hess. "We're also trying to create a sense of urgency among small- and medium-size producers around the country as to the need to adapt and abide by the law's provisions."

Tightening import rules will have a significant impact on countries that rely heavily on agricultural exports, by spurring them to deploy a formalized, country-level structure so their governments can ensure that their products are traceable to point of origin, as required by the Food Modernization Act, and all the necessary documentation is readily available if something goes wrong.

"Being able to know exactly where contaminated products came from is important to a developing country because it would be devastating to their economy if all of their U.S. exports of a particular product were shut off," Forrest said, noting that more than 60 percent of the produce Americans consume is imported. "The only way you can trace an international food chain in two days is if you have a well-defined, automated system where participants are talking to each other. It really has to be an integrated supply chain.”

She added, "We've probably done more in this area than anybody else right now. We want Costa Rica to be the first country in the world to be able to say that their exports are traceable with a country-level strategy."

Optimizing Infrastructure Planning

The Costa Rica TIP Center has completed the necessary groundwork to conduct a structured value-chain analysis that will inform the country's decision making regarding current and future infrastructure investments. The next step is to secure funding to implement the proposal, but to date, an appropriation has not been forthcoming. Hess, however, remains optimistic.

"We're hopeful to get funding through the Costa Rican government and the Interamerican Development Bank in the next few months," he said. "We feel this is going to happen, but we're not sure if this is going to be done under this administration, which has about a year left in its term."

The proposal, developed at the request of Vice President Luis Lieberman, calls for Georgia Tech engineers to examine selected infrastructure projects already built, under construction or on the drawing board, in terms of their overall value to the national trade chain.

"After analyzing the cost-benefit opportunities of these particular investments, we'll create a methodology of how to make better decisions in the future," said Forrest.

Worldwide Outreach 

The Costa Rica TIP Center is one of six international logistics research centers operated under the auspices of the Supply Chain and Logistics Institute and the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering at Georgia Tech in Atlanta.

Centers are located in Atlanta, Singapore, Shanghai, Panama, and Mexico. Their common purpose is to develop insights, strategies, and methodologies to improve the productivity of existing trade chains while promoting innovation for identifying and enabling new trade-chain opportunities. In addition, the centers support a range of educational activities related to trade-chain infrastructure, innovation, and productivity.

Written by: Gary Goettling

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1366903526 2013-04-25 15:25:26 1475896435 2016-10-08 03:13:55 0 0 news Sweeping revisions to Costa Rica's medical-products registration process are receiving one last in-house review before the final recommendations are delivered to officials at the Ministry of Health. The project, initiated at the request of Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla, is one of three major initiatives on the docket at Georgia Tech's Costa Rica Trade, Innovation, and Productivity Center.

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2013-04-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-25T00:00:00-04:00 2013-04-25 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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209371 209371 image <![CDATA[Emmanuel Hess, general manager Georgia Tech's Costa Rica Trade, Innovation, and Productivity Center]]> image/jpeg 1449180001 2015-12-03 22:00:01 1475894869 2016-10-08 02:47:49
<![CDATA[ISyE Graduate Program Maintains Top Ranking in 2014 U.S. News & World Report]]> 27279 The Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering's graduate program maintained its top ranking once again in the just released 2014 edition of the U.S. News & World Report.

This issue marks the twenty-third consecutive year that ISyE has ranked as the foremost program of its kind in the nation at the graduate level within industrial/manufacturing/systems engineering category.

"This sustained recognition is a remarkable tribute to our outstanding students, world-class faculty, and alumni who can be found around the globe making significant contributions to the world," said Jane Ammons, the H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart School Chair.

All of the Institute’s College of Engineering graduate programs continued to earn rankings in the top 10.  The Collge of Engineering is ranked No. 5.

The 11 Engineering program rankings are:

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1363086587 2013-03-12 11:09:47 1475896428 2016-10-08 03:13:48 0 0 news The Georgia Tech Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering's graduate program maintained its top ranking once again in the just released 2014 edition of the U.S. News & World Report.

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2013-03-12T00:00:00-04:00 2013-03-12T00:00:00-04:00 2013-03-12 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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55616 55616 image <![CDATA[Georgia Tech Tower]]> image/jpeg 1449175556 2015-12-03 20:45:56 1475894491 2016-10-08 02:41:31
<![CDATA[Mallory Soldner Honored as IIE Representative for 2013 New Faces of Engineering]]> 27279 Mallory Soldner, a Ph.D. student in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, has been selected as the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) representative for the 2013 New Faces of Engineering, a program that honors promising young engineers who are contributing greatly to society, thus promoting the image of engineering globally.

Soldner, along with the other honorees, will be profiled in a special section of USA Today during National Engineers Week, February 17-23, as well as in various IIE publications including the IIE website, member magazine, and member e-newsletter.  Soldner will also be profiled on the National Engineers Week website at www.eweek.org.

 Since 2009, Soldner has served as a research assistant for the Georgia Tech Center for Health & Humanitarian Logistics (HHL) where she works to develop innovative applications of operations research techniques to practical health and humanitarian topics.  Her work with HHL led Soldner to become involved in collaboration efforts with the United Nations World Food Programme as a research affiliate in 2010, a relationship that is creating a foundation for continued collaboration with the World Food Programme and Georgia Tech.  Soldner spent this past summer in Rome, Italy where she was given the lead on developing business requirements and designing the dashboards for the World Food Programme’s Supply Chain Key Performance Indicator project.  The dashboards are set to be launched worldwide in 2013.

In addition to her accomplishments with HHL and the World Food Programme, Soldner has also been active on several fronts of campus leadership through her involvement with the Georgia Tech College of Engineering Graduate Student Advisory Council (COE GSAC) and the ISyE Graduate Student Advisory Council (ISyE GSAC).  As a member of the ISyE GSAC, Soldner organized the Academic Job Panel in April 2012 where she invited professors and former students to discuss career placement and the interviewing process with current ISyE Ph.D. students.  In addition to organizing the job panel, she coordinated prospective graduate student visits, and organized a weekly tea which brought together Ph.D. students and faculty members within ISyE. As a member of the COE GSAC, Soldner attends bimonthly lunch meetings with the Dean of Engineering and other student representatives to help ensure that the College’s policies and initiatives are meeting student needs.

Some of Soldner’s past leadership roles include Session Co-Chair for the Health and Humanitarian Applications of Revenue Management during the 2010 INFORMS Annual Meeting, President of the MIT INFORMS Student Chapter, Captain of the Virginia Tech Women’s Soccer Team, and Corresponding Secretary and SGA representative for Alpha Pi Mu (Industrial Engineering Honor Society).

Soldner was a finalist in the 2011 INFORMS Case Study Competition and has been a recipient of the Georgia Tech President’s Fellowship since fall 2009.  She has also been the past recipient of the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, the ACC Postgraduate Scholarship, a Finalist for Virginia Tech Undergraduate Woman of the Year, the Casey National Merit Scholarship, and a three-time winner of the ACC Top Six for Service Award, to name a few. 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1361265244 2013-02-19 09:14:04 1475896420 2016-10-08 03:13:40 0 0 news Mallory Soldner, a Ph.D. student in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering, has been selected as the Institute of Industrial Engineers representative for the 2013 New Faces of Engineering, a program that honors promising young engineers who are contributing greatly to society, thus promoting the image of engineering globally.

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2013-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2013-02-19T00:00:00-05:00 2013-02-19 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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193191 193201 193191 image <![CDATA[Mallory Soldner, ISyE PhD Student]]> image/jpeg 1449179879 2015-12-03 21:57:59 1475894843 2016-10-08 02:47:23 193201 image <![CDATA[Mallory Soldner spent this past summer in Rome, Italy working on a project for the World Food Programme.]]> image/jpeg 1449179879 2015-12-03 21:57:59 1475894843 2016-10-08 02:47:23 <![CDATA[Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering]]> <![CDATA[National Engineers Week]]>
<![CDATA[Mission to Panama: Georgia Tech Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center]]> 27279 By Rachael Maddux

On the map, the Republic of Panama appears as an umbilical arc connecting the southern tip of Central America with the northwestern corner of South America, bordered on its north by the Caribbean Sea and its south by the Pacific Ocean. The country’s population of just more than 3.5 million is spread out over an area roughly the size of South Carolina, an isthmus peppered with shipping ports and bisected by the 48-mile-long Panama Canal.

Trade between Latin America and the United States is growing faster than trade between the United States and Asia, and Panama’s geographic location and existing resources mean it’s poised to become one of the most important trade hubs in the region, if not the world.

At the moment, though, its position is precarious.

Take Panama’s famous canal, for example: First dug out by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in the early 1900s, the passageway is, in some places, no more than 110 feet wide—too narrow to accommodate massive modern cargo ships. Those vessels’ containers are often offloaded in one of Panama’s many ports, loaded onto a train, shuttled across the country, then loaded onto another ship waiting at another port on the opposite side. Any snafu along the way can send the supply chain toppling like dominoes.

“Whenever there’s any sort of disruption, containers get backed up,” says Don Ratliff, Regents professor in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering and executive director of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute. “And when they get backed up, they get delayed, and when they get delayed then you have a big problem because now they miss their ship schedules and they’re late getting wherever they go.”

An eight-year effort is underway to broaden the passageways, but even when that’s done, in 2014, Panama’s internal supply chains—the systems of organization, transportation and communication that keep the physical elements of its economy running smoothly—still will be outdated and inefficient, and the country still will lack the academic and applied knowledge base necessary to keep it competitive among the ever-changing international marketplace. That is, unless Ratliff and the industrial and systems engineers of Georgia Tech have something to say about it.

Georgia Tech’s H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering is the largest of its kind in the United States, and it has been recognized as having the top undergraduate and graduate program in its field for 23 years. And in 2010, Tech’s ISyE program brought its world-class logistics know-how to Panama with the founding of the Georgia Tech Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center, which aims to bolster the supply chain and logistics systems that will power Panama into the future.

The Center also is focused on helping Panama improve its standing with the World Bank, which annually ranks countries in terms of the ease of doing business. For 2012, Panama was ranked at No. 61, but would prefer to be closer to top-ranked Singapore.

It’s a tall order, but Gary May, EE 85, dean of Tech’s College of Engineering, has equally high confidence. “We’ve been the number one program in industrial engineering for more than 20 years, and I think the reason why you become number one is because you are providing solutions that solve challenges that are relevant to worldwide issues,” he says. “My hope is that we will be able to [meet] this particular challenge and lend our expertise and demonstrate why we have the best industrial engineering minds at Georgia Tech.”

Why Panama?

The Georgia Tech Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center may be the most ambitious of its kind, but it’s not the first of Tech’s international trade outpost endeavors. In 1999, Tech partnered with the National University of Singapore to launch The Logistics Institute-Asia Pacific to promote research and education in the field of global logistics. Tech has since mostly phased out of operations there, but similar research centers followed in San Jose, Costa Rica and Monterey, Mexico.

Ratliff had wanted to get the ball rolling on a Panama center before the launch of the Costa Rica project, but hadn’t established the needed government contacts. In 2009, the Panamanian government changed hands, and plans for the center took off.

Panama City is just a four-hour flight from Atlanta and also is in the Eastern time zone, so there’s less jet lag and fewer middle-of-the-night phone calls with team members; plus the local economy accepts U.S. dollars, and many Panamanians speak English. And in terms of logistics, Panama was the perfect combination of prime location and raw potential, its canal and rail system offering relatively easy access between Asia and the eastern United States, Central America and South America.

“It’s just naturally a good place for logistics,” Ratliff says. “And [the country] has yet to live up to that potential, so it was very intriguing to figure out why, and what it had to do to improve.”

Jaymie Forrest, Mgt 89, managing director of the Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute, puts it more bluntly. “From a logistics standpoint,” she says of Panama, “it’s Disneyland.”

Why  Logistics?

According to Gary May, in 2013 the study of supply chain and logistics management has “probably never been more important.”

“What that field is trying to do is optimize the method in which materials and goods are transported from place to place to ensure that they go from their manufacturer to the customer in such a way that it’s seamless and efficient and low cost and on time,” May says. “There can be a significant distance between where materials and supplies exist for a particular product, where it’s manufactured and where it’s ultimately sold on the marketplace. So to get all those materials and supplies into the right place at the right time is a pretty significant undertaking.”

Supply chain and logistics management requires expertise across a variety of fields: trade, transportation, policy, manufacturing. And there are always unknown qualities demanding to be identified; like snowflakes, every supply chain in every country is unique.

“You can’t sit in your office in Atlanta and understand how these supply chains work,” Ratliff says. “If you want to look at what the role of Singapore is or Panama is in global supply chain networks, you have to actually go there and see what’s different about what they actually do—what their functions are, everything about them.”

Academically, the field of supply chain and logistics management is concerned with both the micro level (the most efficient way to stack pallets in a warehouse, for example) and macro level (like the complex interactions between a country’s ports and railways).

“Supply chains and logistics and trade are very closely interrelated,” Ratliff says. “The more efficient [a country’s logistics] capability is, the less friction there is in trading between countries, and the less friction there is, the better the product’s going to move. If you want to improve your trade, then improving your logistics is one of the essential components of doing that.”

Supply chains aren’t something the average person usually has to be concerned with, but they become a matter of great public significance when they are poorly organized, mismanaged or otherwise disrupted. Forrest notes that, because of a scarcity of temperature-controlled supply chain elements within Panama, the country is wasting close to 50 percent of the food that it produces. That lack of cold-chain food supply especially affects the country’s more remote populations, including its indigenous tribes. “If [Panama] can improve [its] logistics performance, even if they could just save 20 percent of that food, they could feed the rest of the country,” she says.

It’s the job of the Center’s team of engineers to ask: If there’s a disruption within the supply chain, what can be done immediately to lessen the impact? After the disruption, what can be done to get everything back on schedule as quickly as possible? What is the best way to amplify capacity? And what’s the best way to work with public officials to determine the priority of a project’s solution?

Most supply chain and logistics work is done in relation to private companies, but one of the many unique aspects of Tech’s Panama Center is that it’s about “trying to figure out how a country can do it better,” Ratliff says. The concepts are the same, but the challenges are different. In the public sector, he says, the major players are elected officials, so the turnover rate is higher than within a private company—and the leadership base isn’t always as accustomed to thinking about their work in the logistics context.

“I believe we’re the only engineering group, maybe in the world, that tries to look at country-level logistics performance and the ideas to improve the ability of private sector companies to have better supply chains,” Ratliff says.

Meet the Pyramid

To maximize Panama’s emerging role in the international trade economy, the Panama Logistics Research Center has developed a three-part plan that interlocks and builds upon itself, each element—research, education, competitiveness—integral to the rest. Ratliff thinks of it as a pyramid, with research as the foundation, education the middle rung, and competitiveness the pinnacle.

The research aspect has been underway since Tech first established itself in Panama and began to ask the most basic questions: What is the country’s supply chain system like? What are all the elements, the moving parts? What works? What doesn’t?

The education component allows Panamanians to become involved with that research, to both directly benefit from it and carry it forward. The Center itself offers two professional certifications, Principles of Supply Chain and Logistics and the Lean Supply Chain series, both three-module programs aimed at quickly developing human capital to support the country’s burgeoning logistics needs. And Tech has partnered with local Panamanian universities to offer dual master's degrees through a combination of university coursework in Panama, online coursework with Tech professors, a semester in Atlanta and a capstone project completed back on the ground at the Center. As those students move through the programs, their work generates more research, more data to funnel into the knowledge pool.

As more is learned about the supply chain logistics in Panama, more can be done to improve them. And as more Panamanians graduate from the Tech program, they’re better equipped to work toward that improvement themselves.

Boots on the Ground

Pablo Achurra, MS SCE 11, is a graduate of the dual master’s program. His capstone project on “Panama’s ocean containerized connectivity” complemented the Center’s research agenda, and he was hired as a research engineer upon the completion of his degree. A year and a half into his stint at the Center, he’s collaborating with the Inter-American Development Bank on a project relating to port performance and connectivity in Central America and the Dominican Republic.

“Some projects have expanded from a Panama-only scope to a regional scope. Methodologies and problem-solving techniques developed for Panama are applicable to other countries with similar logistics issues,” he says. “This is a win-win situation because it facilitates future improvement of regional logistics performance and even integration.”

Yuritza Oliver has been a senior research engineer at the Center for a little more than two years. “At the beginning, in order to comply with our research agenda, we needed to request information in many places and knock on doors, since people did not know that much about the Center,” she says. Now, though, as knowledge of the Center’s purpose and reputation have spread among those higher-ups, she says, “Sometimes they’re even the ones looking for us.”

Bridging the gap between the research and competitiveness components of the Center’s pyramid is a cabinet of some of Panama’s most influential players in the technology and transportation industries. Among them are Jose Barrios Ng, MS EE 71, deputy administrator of the Panama Canal Authority; and Roberto Roy, ME 69, MS IM 71, secretary of Metro, Panama’s countrywide public transportation system. Panama’s vice president, Juan Carlos Varela, is also a Tech alumnus (IE 85) and has been supportive of the Center.

The center’s research engineers provide analytics and data-derived concepts to the cabinet, whose members are in a position of power to act on those suggestions. “It’s the first time that we’ve been involved with that level of activity,” Ratliff says, “where you’re not only trying to do the research and the education, but you’re trying to help the public sector understand what they need to do.”

Look to the Future

So far, one of the Center’s most visible accomplishments has been the development of the Panama Logistics Portal (logistics.gatech.pa), an extensive, open-access repository for the data gathered by researchers. It’s open to Panamanian officials, industry leaders, potential trade partners—even just curious internet users who want to gawk at video of cargo ships moving through locks in real time or fiddle around with the seemingly endless scalable maps.

In many ways, though, it’s too early to speak of the Center’s major successes or predict what its future may bring. Ultimately, it all depends on how Panama’s industry leaders choose to utilize the knowledge and the skilled workers the Center produces.

One way to measure the success is a tally of how many other countries call Ratliff and his team to see about installing a center on their own turf. Recently he’s heard from industry leaders in Argentina and Chile interested in forging a partnership with the Institution similar to Panama’s and Costa Rica’s. He’s had to shuffle those projects to a wish list, for now, but he recognizes that Tech is in a unique position.

“Most countries want to improve their exports, and poor logistics is a barrier. And so they’re very interested in what we do,” Ratliff says. “When it comes to logistics and trade, I don’t believe there’s another university anywhere that has comparable knowledge. If you look at people who do research in trade, they’re mostly economists—they’re not engineers.”

For all its success so far, the Panama center is still an experiment, and one at the mercy of SENACYT, Panama’s equivalent of the National Science Foundation, which partly funds the center. It could always pull the plug, leaving Ratliff and his team no choice but to pack it up and apply what they’ve been able to learn in Panama to their next overseas foray. But the director feels confident about the Center’s mission and its future.

“You’re going in, and if you’re providing value then you stay, and if you’re not providing and getting value then you do something else,” he says. “But I think we’ve just sort of scratched the surface.” 

(This article first appeared in the Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine, Volume 89, No. 1, 2013)

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1361468481 2013-02-21 17:41:21 1475896420 2016-10-08 03:13:40 0 0 news Georgia Tech has brought its world-class logistics know-how to Panama with the founding of the Georgia Tech Panama Logistics Innovation & Research Center, which aims to bolster the supply chain and logistics systems that will power Panama into the future.

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2013-02-22T00:00:00-05:00 2013-02-22T00:00:00-05:00 2013-02-22 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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60242 64661 194461 60242 image <![CDATA[Cargo ship travels through Panama Canal]]> image/jpeg 1449176253 2015-12-03 20:57:33 1475894523 2016-10-08 02:42:03 64661 image <![CDATA[Jaymie Forrest, Managing Director, Supply Chain & Logistics Institute]]> image/jpeg 1449176765 2015-12-03 21:06:05 1475894569 2016-10-08 02:42:49 194461 image <![CDATA[Donald "Don" Ratliff, Executive Director, Georgia Tech Supply Chain & Logistics Institute]]> image/jpeg 1449179891 2015-12-03 21:58:11 1475894846 2016-10-08 02:47:26
<![CDATA[Student Spotlight: Student Matthew Plumlee Discusses Pursuing a Ph.D. in ISyE]]> 27511 Matthew Plumlee is a third year Ph.D. student at the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) and the recipient of the 2012 INFORMS Quality, Reliability and Statistics Best Paper Award which he received for his paper “Tractable Functional Response Modeling using Nonstationary Covariance Functions.” Jointly advised by ISyE Associate Professor Roshan Vengazhiyil and Professor Jianjun Shi, Plumlee’s research interests focus on system informatics for product and process improvement.  According to Plumlee, the expertise of his advisors and the faculty in ISyE has been one of the most beneficial aspects of being in the graduate program. 

“The faculty in ISyE are the best in the world and extremely open. If you have a research idea or even a random question in mind, you have the capability to walk down the hall and find a world-renowned expert,” said Plumlee.

During his time as a student in ISyE, Plumlee has been awarded both the Morris Fellowship as well as the Tennenbaum Fellowship.  Plumlee has been invited to attend and present his work at several conferences including the 2012 IMS/ASA Spring Research Conference, the 2012 Design and Analysis of Experiments Conference, the 2012 NSF CMMI Engineering Research and Innovation Conference, and the 2011 NSF Summer Institute on Energy Manufacturing. Prior to coming to Georgia Tech in 2010, he received a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Purdue University where he received the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship and the College of Engineering Dean's Choice Award for best poster. 

Plumlee is originally from Indiana and enjoys outdoor activities such as hiking and camping during his free time. To learn more about Plumlee and his work as an ISyE Ph.D. student, read the interview that follows.

ISyE:      What influenced your decision to get your Ph.D. at Georgia Tech?

MP:        Obviously its ranking and reputation had a huge influence on my decision, but ultimately where to get a Ph.D. comes down to potential thesis advisers and Georgia Tech had faculty members working closely within my research interests.

ISyE:      What piqued your interest in becoming an industrial engineer?

MP:        As an undergraduate in mechanical engineering, my fellow ME friends were out building solar powered cars and 3-d printers, and I was taking real analysis and algebra as electives. Industrial engineering departments tend to give students a little more freedom to study ideas in abstraction, focusing more on my interests which are math and statistics, so I switched departments.

ISyE:      Can you explain your thesis in layman's terms? 

MP:        My thesis work is on the development of efficient techniques to analyze simulation models. People, from material engineers to financiers, have a habit of building simulation models with computer code to study problems, mostly due to the cost or infeasibility of experimenting on certain systems. For example, most people do not have the resources to create a natural disaster on the level of a hurricane or earthquake (Department of Homeland Security might have some questions if you do). Therefore, people in this department build simulations of disaster relief to find optimal procedures in the event of a catastrophic event. How do we analyze these models? Simulation models can be computationally expensive to run, so we have a sample size limited by computer power and time.

ISyE:      What did it mean to you to receive an award at INFORMS this year?

MP:        It is always nice to get a pat on the back, but ultimately you always hold out hope that your research is useful to others. Luckily, people asked me for more details, wanting to try similar techniques on different problems.

ISyE:      What are your plans for the future?

MP:        I plan on continuing my research through the foreseeable future. Simulation models are becoming more popular, and huge amounts of data are sitting out there without well-developed techniques to put the data to use.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1357834923 2013-01-10 16:22:03 1475896409 2016-10-08 03:13:29 0 0 news Matthew Plumlee is a third year Ph.D. student in ISyE who's research interests focus on system informatics for product and process improvement. 

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2013-01-10T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-10T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-10 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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182441 182441 image <![CDATA[Plumlee (centered) received the 2012 INFORMS Quality, Reliability and Statistics Best Paper Award]]> image/jpeg 1449179062 2015-12-03 21:44:22 1475894828 2016-10-08 02:47:08
<![CDATA[Andrea Laliberte Named Edenfield Executive in Residence]]> 27511 Andrea Laliberte, IE 1982, MS IE 1984, joined the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) as the Edenfield Executive in Residence starting January 1, 2013.  

In this role, she will pull from her extensive industry background to offer ISyE students experiential learning opportunities that are reflective of the real world of business and enhance student’s leadership skills through these experiences through class projects.  She will also counsel and advise students on their prospective career choices.

Previously, Laliberte was a senior vice president of distribution and consumer service for Coach, Inc., a leading marketer of modern classic American accessories.  In this role, she was responsible for global distribution, customer service, transportation, and customs compliance.  Laliberte joined Coach in 1991 as director of operations support.  Prior to joining Coach, Andrea was in the retail management consulting practice of Coopers & Lybrand (now PriceWaterhouseCoopers).  Her clients included L.L.Bean, Metropolitan Museum of Art,and Bass Pro Shops.  Laliberte is an emeritus member of the ISyE Advisory Board, and a current member of the Georgia Tech Alumni Trustee Board and Georgia Tech Advisory Board.  Additionally, she was the recipient of the 2008 College of Engineering Distinguished Alumnus Award.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1357122350 2013-01-02 10:25:50 1475896406 2016-10-08 03:13:26 0 0 news Andrea Laliberte, IE 1982, MS IE 1984, has joined the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering as the Edenfield Executive in Residence as of January 1, 2013.  

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2013-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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160201 160201 image <![CDATA[Andrea Laliberte, MS IE 1984]]> image/jpeg 1449178896 2015-12-03 21:41:36 1475894794 2016-10-08 02:46:34
<![CDATA[Tovey Appointed the David M. McKenney Family Professorship]]> 27511 Professor Craig Tovey has been appointed the David M. McKenney Family Professorship in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) for a three year term, beginning January 1, 2013. The David M. McKenney Family Professorship was created by David McKenney (BS Physics 1960, B IE 1964) and is designed to enhance ISyE’s ability to “attract and retain eminent teacher-scholars to this position of academic leadership in the field of sustainability, energy, and environmental initiatives.” 

“Craig has a sustained record of contributions to this field, and this professorship appointment provides a well-deserved opportunity to enhance his research and educational impacts,” said Jane Ammons, H. Milton and Carolyn J. Stewart School Chair and Professor in ISyE.

Tovey received his A.B. in applied mathematics from Harvard College in 1977 and both an M.S. in computer science and a Ph.D. in operations research from Stanford University in 1981. Tovey's principal research and teaching activities are in operations research and its interdisciplinary applications to social and natural systems, with emphasis on sustainability, the environment, and energy. His current research concerns inverse optimization for electric grid management, classical and biomimetic algorithms for robots and webhosting, the behavior of animal groups, and sustainability measurement.

Tovey received a Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985 and the 1989 Jacob Wolfowitz Prize for research in heuristics. He was granted a Senior Research Associateship from the National Research Council in 1990, was named an Institute Fellow at Georgia Tech in 1994, and received the Class of 1934 Outstanding Interdisciplinary Activity Award in 2011.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1357123174 2013-01-02 10:39:34 1475896406 2016-10-08 03:13:26 0 0 news Craig Tovey has been appointed the David M. McKenney Family Professorship in the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering for a three year term, beginning January 1, 2013.

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2013-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-02T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-02 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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71943 71943 image <![CDATA[Craig Tovey - Profile image]]> image/jpeg 1449177414 2015-12-03 21:16:54 1475894647 2016-10-08 02:44:07
<![CDATA[Ron Johnson tapped for Managing Director of the Tennenbaum Institute and Professor of Practice in ISyE]]> 27279 Ronald L. Johnson, retired 2-Star Army General and graduate of the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE), has accepted a joint appointment at Georgia Tech. Effective January 2, 2013, he will serve as a Professor of Practice in ISyE, and the Managing Director of the Tennenbaum Institute (TI).

The Tennenbaum Institute, the first multi-disciplinary center of its kind, uniting academic, government and corporate experts to create industry-shaping business models to deal with real, large-scale enterprise transformation, is an integral part of Georgia Tech's Institute for People and Technology (IPaT).   In Johnson’s role as TI Managing Director and member of IPaT's leadership team, he will provide overall administrative oversight for TI as well as engage and expand relationships with industry and government partners to provide knowledge and skills for enterprise transformation, engage in research and economic development, and coordinate with other Georgia Tech Interdisciplinary Research Institutes and their staff.  Associate Professor Rahul Basole continues his role as Associate Director for enterprise transformation research where his principal objective is to define a research program for enterprise transformation that will grow interdisciplinary research in enterprise transformation at Georgia Tech and internationally.

As a Professor of the Practice in ISyE, Johnson will use his substantial experience and extensive background to assist the School in identifying teaching and research opportunities that support the public interest and societal needs.  He will teach a couple of courses, advise students, and work with faculty on projects and research.

Johnson is well equipped to fulfill both roles.  He received his bachelor’s degree from the United States Military Academy at West Point, and his master’s in operations research from ISyE in 1985.  Most recently, Johnson served as the National Basketball Association’s (NBA) first Senior Vice President of Referee Operations from July 2008 until July 2012. In this role, he was responsible for all aspects of the NBA’s officiating program, including recruiting, training and development, scheduling, data management and analysis, and work rules enforcement. Johnson’s quantitative skills in areas such as systems analysis, processes, and operations were critical in evaluating officiating performance and improving play-calling and the overall evaluation process.  Johnson's has a deep passion for sports and sports analytics - - the use of data to improve performance and to gain a competitive edge.

Prior to his work with the NBA, Johnson held an illustrious 32 year career in the U.S. Army where he held the title of deputy commanding general and deputy chief of engineers, the second highest-ranking senior engineer staff officer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE).

From October 2005 until his retirement in April 2008, Johnson was assisting the chief of engineers in maintaining Army Staff oversight for organizing, training, and equipping 70,000 engineer soldiers in the active and reserve components and USACE. He additionally served as the principal engineer advisor to the chief of staff of the Army.

Prior to his appointment to this command, he served as the director of the U.S. Army Installation Management Agency (IMA). Johnson also served as the commander of USACE’s Gulf Region Division (GRD) and U.S. deputy director of the Program Management Office (PMO) in Iraq where he oversaw an $18.4 Billion reconstruction program in Iraq. In June 2003, Johnson was named director of military programs and G3 for the USACE in which he was directly responsible for oversight of the Army’s Military Construction, Real Estate Services and Environmental Programs. Additional previous command assignments included: Commanding General, Pacific Ocean Division, USACE; Assistant Commandant, U.S. Army Engineer School/Deputy Commanding General, U.S. Army Maneuver Support Center; Executive Officer to the Secretary of the Army; Brigade Commander, 130th Engineer Brigade, V Corps, Germany; Senior Aide to the Secretary of the Army; and Battalion Commander in both Fort Lewis, WA and Fort Ord, CA.

Johnson’s awards and decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal (with two Oak Leaf Clusters), Bronze Star, Legion of Merit (with 4 Oak Leaf Clusters), Combat Action Badge, Parachutist Badge, Air Assault Badge, Army Staff Identification Badge, and the Recruiter Badge. He is also the recipient of the 2003 Black Engineer of the Year Award for Professional Achievement in Government Service, an inductee into the 2005 Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni at Georgia Tech, and the recipient of the 2008 Black Engineer Lifetime Achievement Award.

Johnson serves on the Executive Advisory Council of Mission: Readiness, the National Workforce Solutions Advisory Board, and is a Trustee on the Georgia Tech Foundation. He is a past member of the Georgia Tech President’s Advisory Board. A devoted philanthropist, he has FOUR scholarships - - two scholarships endowed in his name at Georgia Tech, and another one at West Point, that bears the name of a fellow Soldier,  who recently passed away. Johnson also has a room named for him in the Clough Student Center at Georgia Tech. Johnson serves on the Board of Directors of Leave No Veteran Behind and is an Advisor to the Rushman-Micah Foundation, both 501 (c)(3) nonprofits.

 

]]> Barbara Christopher 1 1357230430 2013-01-03 16:27:10 1475896406 2016-10-08 03:13:26 0 0 news Ronald L. Johnson, retired 2-Star Army General and graduate of ISyE, has accepted a joint appointment at Georgia Tech. Effective January 2, 2013, he will serve as a Professor of Practice in ISyE, and the Managing Director of the Tennenbaum Institute.

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2013-01-03T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-03T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-03 00:00:00 Barbara Christopher
Industrial and Systems Engineering
404.385.3102

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179821 179821 image <![CDATA[Ronald L. Johnson, retired 2-star Army General, tapped for Managing Director of Tennenbaum Institute and Professor of Practice in ISyE.]]> image/jpeg 1449179053 2015-12-03 21:44:13 1475894825 2016-10-08 02:47:05
<![CDATA[Mission Possible STEM Summer Enrichment Program Opens for Summer 2013 Registration]]> 27511 After a tremendously successful first year, the Stewart School of Industrial & Systems Engineering (ISyE) will be hosting the second annual Mission Possible STEM Summer Enrichment Program designed to introduce rising 10th and 12th grade high school students to the fascinating world of industrial engineering.  This year, to accommodate a larger number of students, the program will be offered in two separate week-long summer sessions from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. each day.  Students will have the opportunity to attend either the June 24-28 session, or the July 15-19 session.

“After last year’s exciting response to the program, we are looking forward to offering an additional weeklong session, accommodating a larger number of students than we were able to accept last year.” said Valarie DuRant-Modeste, academic advising manager in ISyE and program director for Mission Possible. “We look forward to hosting another exceptional and diverse group of students eager to learn about industrial engineering.”

Mission Possible is open to students who excel in math and science, with a focus on recruiting under-represented minority students.  Last year, twenty-four high school students, from schools across the country, participated in the weeklong program where they interacted with industry representatives from companies such as Coca-Cola, Proctor & Gamble, and Caterpillar Inc., and gained insight from ISyE students, faculty, and academic advisors.

Students can apply through the Georgia Tech Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC) website beginning February 2013. For more information about the program or to learn about scholarship opportunities available for students, contact Valarie DuRant Modeste, academic advising manager and undergraduate recruiter in ISyE, at vrd@isye.gatech.edu or 404.894.8405. If you would like to help sponsor this program, contact Nancy Sandlin, ISyE director of Development, at nsandlin@isye.gatech.edu.

]]> Ashley Daniel 1 1357646051 2013-01-08 11:54:11 1475896406 2016-10-08 03:13:26 0 0 news This summer, ISyE will be hosting the second annual Mission Possible STEM Summer Enrichment Program designed to introduce rising 10th and 12th grade high school students to the fascinating world of industrial engineering.

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2013-01-08T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-08T00:00:00-05:00 2013-01-08 00:00:00 Valarie DuRant Modeste
Academic Advising Manager and Undergraduate Recruiter
404-894-8405

 

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181431 181441 181431 image <![CDATA[Twenty-four high school students from across the country participated in the first annual Mission Possible STEM Summer Program.]]> image/jpeg 1449179053 2015-12-03 21:44:13 1475894828 2016-10-08 02:47:08 181441 image <![CDATA[Mission Possible: An introduction to the fascinating world of industrial engineering]]> image/jpeg 1449179053 2015-12-03 21:44:13 1475894828 2016-10-08 02:47:08