<![CDATA[Bioengineering Distinguished Lecture]]> 27195 "Regenerative Medicine: Current Concepts and Changing Trends"

Anthony Atala, M.D.
G. Link Professor and Director, Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine
W. Boyce Professor and Chair of Urology
Wake Forest School of Medicine

Virtual Event - REGISTER HERE for participation link


ABSTRACT
Patients with diseased or injured organs may be treated with transplanted tissues. There is a severe shortage of donor organs and tissues which is worsening yearly due to the aging population. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering apply the principles of cell transplantation, material sciences, and bioengineering to construct biological substitutes that may restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Stem cells may also offer a potentially limitless source of cells. 3D bioprinting is being utilized for potential tissue engineering therapies, and Body-on-a-Chip technologies are being applied for drug discovery and personalized medicine. Applications of these new technologies that may offer novel diagnostics and therapies for patients with tissue injury and organ disease will be described. Recent advances that have occurred in regenerative medicine will be reviewed.

BIO
Anthony Atala, MD, is the G. Link Professor and Director of the Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, and the W. Boyce Professor and Chair of the Department of Urology at Wake Forest University. His work focuses on growing human cells, tissues and organs. Fifteen applications of technologies developed in Dr. Atala's laboratory have been used clinically in human patients.

Dr. Atala was elected to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies of Sciences (now the National Academy of Medicine), to the National Academy of Inventors as a Charter Fellow, and to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. Dr. Atala is a recipient of the US Congress funded Christopher Columbus Foundation Award, bestowed on a living American who is currently working on a discovery that will significantly affect society; the World Technology Award in Health and Medicine, for achieving significant and lasting progress; the Edison Science/Medical Award; the Fast Company World Changing Ideas Award; the R&D Innovator of the Year Award; and the Smithsonian Ingenuity Award.

Dr. Atala’s work was listed twice as Time Magazine’s top 10 medical breakthroughs of the year, and as one of 5 discoveries that will change the future of organ transplants. Dr. Atala’s work was ranked in 2019 by the Project Management Institute as one of the top 10 most impactful biotech projects from the past 50 years. Dr. Atala was named by Scientific American as one of the world’s most influential people in biotechnology, by U.S. News & World Report as one of 14 Pioneers of Medical Progress in the 21st Century, by Life Sciences Intellectual Property Review as one of 50 key influencers in the life sciences intellectual property arena, and by Nature Biotechnology as one of the top 10 translational researchers in the world.

Dr. Atala has led or served several national professional and government committees, including the National Institutes of Health working group on Cells and Developmental Biology, the National Institutes of Health Bioengineering Consortium, and the National Cancer Institute’s Advisory Board. He was a Founder of the Tissue Engineering Society, the Regenerative Medicine Society, the Regenerative Medicine Foundation, the Alliance for Regenerative Medicine, the Regenerative Medicine Development Organization, the Regenerative Medicine Manufacturing Society, and the Regenerative Medicine Manufacturing Consortium.

Dr. Atala works with several journals and serves in various roles, including Editor-in-Chief of: Stem Cells- Translational Medicine; Therapeutic Advances in Urology; and BioPrinting. He is the editor of 25 books, has published more than 800 journal articles and has applied for or received over 250 national and international patents.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1580995339 2020-02-06 13:22:19 1631718853 2021-09-15 15:14:13 0 0 event 2021-09-23T12:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23 16:00:00 2021-09-23 17:00:00 2021-09-23 17:00:00 2021-09-23T12:00:00-04:00 2021-09-23T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-09-23 12:00:00 2021-09-23 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[IBB website]]> Vahid Serpooshan, Ph.D. - faculty host

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141991 632149 141991 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449178723 2015-12-03 21:38:43 1475894774 2016-10-08 02:46:14 632149 image <![CDATA[Anthony Atala, M.D. - Wake Forest School of Medicine]]> image/jpeg 1580995379 2020-02-06 13:22:59 1620741861 2021-05-11 14:04:21 <![CDATA[Atala profile]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 Virtual event - REGISTER here for participation link

"Genome Folding, Unfolding, and Refolding in the Human Brain"

Jennifer Phillips-Cremins, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Dean’s Faculty Fellow in Engineering and Medicine New York Stem Cell Foundation
Robertson Investigator Department of Genetics
Perelman School of Medicine Department of Bioengineering
School of Engineering and Applied Sciences
University of Pennsylvania 


RESEARCH
The Cremins lab investigates the epigenetic mechanisms regulating development and function of the mammalian central nervous system. We map and analyze neuronal epigenomes in three-dimensions using quantitative, genome-wide technologies. We also perturb epigenomes by employing state-of-the art genetic engineering strategies (e.g. CRISPR/Cas9, optoepigenetics). To test our hypotheses, we primarily use embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell models of neuronal differentiation and disease. Our long-term goal is to discover how genome architecture controls genome function, applying this to study fundamental mechanisms controlling neuronal phenotype and, by extension, the onset and progression of neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disease states.

BIO
Jennifer Phillips-Cremins, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor and Deans' Faculty Fellow in Engineering and Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania with primary appointments in the Departments of Bioengineering and Genetics. Dr. Cremins obtained her Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in the laboratory of Andres Garcia. She then conducted a multi-disciplinary postdoc in the laboratories of Job Dekker and Victor Corces. Dr. Cremins now runs the Chromatin Architecture and Systems Neurobiology laboratory at UPenn. Her primary research interests lie in understanding the long-range chromatin architecture mechanisms that govern neural specification and synaptic plasticity in healthy neurons and how these epigenetic mechanisms go awry in neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. She has been selected as a 2014 New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Investigator, a 2015 Albert P. Sloan Foundation Fellow, a 2016 and 2018 Kavli Frontiers of Science Fellow, 2015 NIH Director's New Innovator Awardee, 2020 NSF CAREER Awardee, and a 2020 CZI Neurodegenerative Disease Pairs Awardee.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1623334951 2021-06-10 14:22:31 1631202776 2021-09-09 15:52:56 0 0 event 2021-09-09T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09T14:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09T14:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09 17:00:00 2021-09-09 18:00:00 2021-09-09 18:00:00 2021-09-09T13:00:00-04:00 2021-09-09T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-09-09 01:00:00 2021-09-09 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Karmella Haynes, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[IBB Juneteenth Ice Cream Social]]> 27195 IBB's Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee invites you to our first Ice Cream Social to commemorate Juneteenth and renew in-person community!

Open to all in the bio-community, while supplies last.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1623793990 2021-06-15 21:53:10 1623794010 2021-06-15 21:53:30 0 0 event 2021-06-25T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25 17:00:00 2021-06-25 18:00:00 2021-06-25 18:00:00 2021-06-25T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-06-25 01:00:00 2021-06-25 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Colly Mitchell - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Center for Integrative Genomics Seminar ]]> 27195 The Center for Integrative Genomics (CIG) reinitiates their monthly advanced research seminars (CIGars) with two presentations given by graduate students and post-docs.

Today we will also include a special farewell to our departing colleague, Soojin Yi, with boxed Korean lunches for the first 20 attendees.

“Improving Rare Disease Diagnostics through Comprehensive Analysis of Targeted RNA-seq Data”

Kiera Berger
Graduate Student, Bioinformatics - Greg Gibson, Ph.D., Advisor
Georgia Tech

“Distribution of DNA Methylation in Insect Genomes”

Carl Dyson
Graduate Student, Biology - Michael Goodisman, Ph.D., Advisor
Georgia Tech

This is a great opportunity to: 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1622750117 2021-06-03 19:55:17 1622813363 2021-06-04 13:29:23 0 0 event 2021-06-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15 17:00:00 2021-06-15 18:00:00 2021-06-15 18:00:00 2021-06-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-06-15 01:00:00 2021-06-15 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Stefanie Boettle - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Center for Integrative Genomics website]]>
<![CDATA[Center for Integrative Genomics Seminar ]]> 27195 Two, 25-minute presentations given by graduate students and post-docs that are open to anyone who is interested in the topics. Today we will also include a special farewell to our departing colleague, Soojin Yi.

“Improving Rare Disease Diagnostics through Comprehensive Analysis of Targeted RNA-seq Data”

Kiera Berger
Graduate Student, Bioinformatics - Greg Gibson, Ph.D., Advisor
Georgia Tech

“Distribution of DNA Methylation in Insect Genomes”

Carl Dyson
Graduate Student, Biology - Michael Goodisman, Ph.D., Advisor
Georgia Tech

This is a great opportunity to: 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1622750116 2021-06-03 19:55:16 1622750116 2021-06-03 19:55:16 0 0 event 2021-06-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15 17:00:00 2021-06-15 18:00:00 2021-06-15 18:00:00 2021-06-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-15T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-06-15 01:00:00 2021-06-15 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Stefanie Boettle - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Center for Integrative Genomics website]]>
<![CDATA[Microphysiological Systems Seminar]]> 27195 "Serial Cytometry: Improving Measurement of Single Cells in an Optofluidic Device"

Gregory A. Cooksey, Ph.D., Paul N. Patrone, Ph.D., Anthony J. Kearsley, Ph.D.
National Institute of Standards and Technology

PARTICIPATION LINK

ABSTRACT
Commercial flow cytometers are highly utilized clinical and research instruments that make thousands of single-cell measurements per second. However inherent instrument variability coupled with changes in operating conditions or procedures hinder day-to-day and lab-to-lab comparability of data. Moreover, the challenges of developing physically-informed mathematical analyses prevent cytometers from having well-characterized uncertainties, thereby limiting their ability to detect rare events (a task nonetheless suited to their throughput). To address these issues, we have developed an optofluidic system that interlaces advanced fabrication techniques and novel signals analysis to dramatically improve understanding of measurement variability and rare event detection.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1622736417 2021-06-03 16:06:57 1622739590 2021-06-03 16:59:50 0 0 event 2021-06-25T17:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25T18:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25T18:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25 21:00:00 2021-06-25 22:00:00 2021-06-25 22:00:00 2021-06-25T17:00:00-04:00 2021-06-25T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-06-25 05:00:00 2021-06-25 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Yu Tong - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Cooksey profile]]> <![CDATA[Karsley profile]]> <![CDATA[Patrone profile]]>
<![CDATA[Accelerating the Next Generation of Immune Medicine with Cellular Proteomics at CMaT]]> 27195 REGISTER HERE for participation link

Looking to keep your data on the cutting edge of research?

Join our webinar to discuss the IsoPlexis product suite capabilities and how it’s cellular proteomics and functional phenotyping is addressing urgent challenges central to unlocking the next stage of personalized cancer immunotherapies and identifying immunological mechanisms in infectious disease. With single-cell proteomics barcoding and detection of a full range of cytokines (30+) per single cell, across thousands of single cells, the IsoLight platform is showing the unique value of resolving the heterogeneity of a variety of immune cell types.

Discover how IsoPlexis is powering the future of advanced medicines to fight complex diseases by providing correlative clinical & pre-clinical immune biomarkers that differentiate mechanistic information in the competitive clinical world of immunology. 

IsoPlexis’ interdisciplinary product suite allows you to gain insight and further research, including:

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1622720894 2021-06-03 11:48:14 1622720995 2021-06-03 11:49:55 0 0 event 2021-06-08T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-08T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-08T14:00:00-04:00 2021-06-08 17:00:00 2021-06-08 18:00:00 2021-06-08 18:00:00 2021-06-08T13:00:00-04:00 2021-06-08T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-06-08 01:00:00 2021-06-08 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Punya Mardhanan

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<![CDATA[Pediatric Technology Center Seed Grant Funding Workshops]]> 27195 The Pediatric Technology Center would like to invite you to participate in four upcoming workshops in the areas of: Data Analytics, Synthetic Bio, Robotics, & Nursing. The goal is to promote collaborations between Georgia Tech scientists and engineers and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta clinicians in the solving of problems that impact the healthcare of children.

All seed grants must show potential clinical impact, quality and feasibility of the proposed work, quality and synergism of the team, and identification of key potential pitfalls and alternatives. Any topic on pediatric healthcare is eligible for submission, with preference given to seed grant proposals that target large, center grants.

Please register for the workshops at the links given below.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1622035664 2021-05-26 13:27:44 1622035739 2021-05-26 13:28:59 0 0 event 2021-06-01T15:00:00-04:00 2021-06-04T15:00:00-04:00 2021-06-04T15:00:00-04:00 2021-06-01 19:00:00 2021-06-04 19:00:00 2021-06-04 19:00:00 2021-06-01T15:00:00-04:00 2021-06-04T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-06-01 03:00:00 2021-06-04 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Leanne West - Pediatric Technology Center

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<![CDATA[Building the Foundation: Energy and Public Health 2021]]> 27338 Georgia Tech's Strategic Energy Institute (SEI) and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB) will jointly host a workshop of public health professionals from the greater Atlanta area focused on the intersection of energy and public health. The field's leading experts will convene to explore how to best leverage local public health assets for maximum impact in the energy transition.

REGISTER HERE

The intersections with energy systems on public health occur at all points along the energy system lifecycle and may produce both positive and negative outcomes, at times placing undue burden on vulnerable populations and disadvantaged communities. We are also in the midst of a dynamic period as energy systems evolve to deal with climate, environment, and scarcity concerns. It is critical that we develop a foundational knowledge in order to effectively respond to the interrelated challenges of public health and energy infrastructure.

We seek to create a vibrant community of researchers whose focus is on the potential health impacts of energy technologies by leveraging Georgia Tech’s energy expertise and the world class public health resources in Atlanta. Our objective is to shift the energy and health paradigm from an historically reactive one to an increasingly proactive one.

ATTENTION Georgia Tech Faculty!

CALL for SUMMARY WHITE PAPERS
The Energy Policy and Innovation Center and the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Biomedicine are soliciting two-page white paper submissions that provide ideas for energy and public health intersections, frame issues for policy makers, identify promising and relevant research areas, develop impactful regional partnerships, or achieve other strategic objectives, particularly in areas which are differentiating for Georgia Tech. We will provide $1,000 in discretionary funds to cover faculty/student time in developing these white papers - deadline Monday, May 14, 2021.

Information and Submission

Keynote: Patrick Breysse, Ph.D. - Director, National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (NCEH/ATSDR), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Moderated by: Laura Taylor, Ph.D. - Professor and Chair, School of Economics, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Georgia Tech

Panelists:
Sally Ng, Ph.D. - School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech
Marilyn Brown, Ph.D. - Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Georgia Tech
Rich Simmons, Ph.D. - Energy Policy and Innovation Center, Georgia Tech
Noah Scovronick, Ph.D. - Emory Rollins School of Public Health

Agenda:

Call for Abstracts - Do you have expertise in this area that you'd like to present during the "Lightning Talks" segment? Submit your abstract by Monday, May 11, 2021. All submissions will be included in the workshop packet with 10 selected to present.
Submit Abstract Here

]]> Brent Verrill 1 1618508315 2021-04-15 17:38:35 1620833542 2021-05-12 15:32:22 0 0 event SEI and IBB will jointly host a workshop of GT and public health professionals from the greater Atlanta area focused on the intersection of energy and public health. It is our hope to convene Atlanta’s leading experts on this topic to figure out how to best leverage local assets for maximum impact.

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2021-05-17T14:00:00-04:00 2021-05-17T17:00:00-04:00 2021-05-17T17:00:00-04:00 2021-05-17 18:00:00 2021-05-17 21:00:00 2021-05-17 21:00:00 2021-05-17T14:00:00-04:00 2021-05-17T17:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-05-17 02:00:00 2021-05-17 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Registration Link]]> Sharon Murphy, Research Associate, Strategic Energy Institute

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646505 646505 image <![CDATA[Energy - Health Workshop Banner]]> image/jpeg 1618508549 2021-04-15 17:42:29 1618508549 2021-04-15 17:42:29 <![CDATA[Registration Link]]> <![CDATA[Submit Lightning Talk Abstract]]>
<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "Financing and Dilution in Start-Up Companies"

James Stubbs, Ph.D.
Professor of the Practice

Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech / Emory University


Register Here

Speaker, James Stubbs, Ph.D. has over 20 years of commercialization experience and has held senior executive roles in five medical device startups including founder, CEO, CTO, CSO and VP Scientific Affairs. Since 2005 he has contributed to four successful startup exits valued at over $500M. James is currently teaching medical device design and Capstone in the Biomedical Engineering Department at Georgia Tech and is an active private investor.

This event is part of the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1604508983 2020-11-04 16:56:23 1620326832 2021-05-06 18:47:12 0 0 event 2021-06-02T12:30:00-04:00 2021-06-02T13:30:00-04:00 2021-06-02T13:30:00-04:00 2021-06-02 16:30:00 2021-06-02 17:30:00 2021-06-02 17:30:00 2021-06-02T12:30:00-04:00 2021-06-02T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-06-02 12:30:00 2021-06-02 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Info on Bench2Market Talks series]]>
<![CDATA[Microphysiological Seminar]]> 27195 Co-hosted by Georgia Tech, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and Emory University.

BlueJeans participation link: https://bluejeans.com/794598598

ABSTRACTS

Hanhao "Spencer" Zhang (Advisor: Aniruddh Sarkar) - "Electrochemical Detection Enables Rapid Point of Care COVID Testing:"

The wide spread of COVID-19 and its heterogeneity – a large number of mild or asymptomatic cases coupled with the relatively rapid degradation in symptoms in some patients - have underscored the need for developing inexpensive point-of-care diagnostic and monitoring tools for infectious diseases. While impressive progress has been made overall in scaling and implementation of existing diagnostics, most still require complex, bulky and expensive equipment designed to be used in dedicated central laboratories. Miniaturization via microfabrication and nanofabrication methods offers a unique opportunity to make simple, portable and inexpensive diagnostic tools. Compared to conventional optical detection methods, electrochemical detection has significant advantages at the microscale. Here, I will present our progress on developing a multiplexed electrochemical detection scheme for COVID19 biomarkers. I will also discuss their applicability to the general unmet needs in biomarker detection including for other infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis and beyond.

Zhe "Monica" Zhong (Advisor:Ankur Singh) - "Lymphoid Organoids for Understanding B Cell Immune Response in Aging:"

Older people demonstrate a decline in immune response to new pathogens and vaccines, the causes of which are poorly understood but can be attributed to a defective T cell and B cell interaction in acquired immunity. Prior work suggests that the B cell immunosenescence and impaired expression of CD40L on CD4+ T cells leads to a less durable, lower-affinity antibody response, which depends on the induction of a transient subanatomical structure, called germinal centers (GC), in the B cell follicles of lymph nodes. The challenge in testing vaccines and generating antibody responses against infectious agents in the aged individual is the limited induction of GC B cell reaction. Identifying molecular targets in GC reaction that regulate GC response in B cells in aged people can enable design and discovery of better vaccines and immunotherapies. However, the study of aged immune system has long been limited to in vivo approaches, which often do not allow multidimensional spatial and temporal control of intracellular and extracellular processes. Additionally, no current ex vivo techniques entail the bona fide somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation process of antibody formation in aged B cells. . In my doctoral research, I am developing a 3D-biomaterial-based immune organoid that presents lymphoid microenvironmental cues to B cells and enables the recapitulation of GC-like phenotype ex vivo. Using these enabling technologies, I am understanding factors that regulate B cell outcomes during host-pathogen interactions in aging.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1619188131 2021-04-23 14:28:51 1620058674 2021-05-03 16:17:54 0 0 event 2021-05-14T17:00:00-04:00 2021-05-14T18:00:00-04:00 2021-05-14T18:00:00-04:00 2021-05-14 21:00:00 2021-05-14 22:00:00 2021-05-14 22:00:00 2021-05-14T17:00:00-04:00 2021-05-14T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-05-14 05:00:00 2021-05-14 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Tong Yu - graduate student coordinator

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<![CDATA[2021 Regenerative Engineering & Medicine Center Retreat - "Staying Connected REM 2021"]]> 27195 Join us for the Regenerative Engineering & Medicine Center's annual retreat, hosted by the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech, and Emory University. Advances in the delivery of molecular and biological therapeutics that will enhance the body’s ability to heal itself will be discussed, along with opportunities to meet and collaborate with PIs who will apply to the 2021-2022 "Therapeutic Delivery Innovation Initiative" collaborative grant RFA on this topic. CLICK HERE for complete seed grant into - Submision Deadline June 25, 2021.


REGISTER HERE for Participation Link

AGENDA

MAY 10, 2021

10:30 a.m.
    Introductory remarks – Steven Stice, Ph.D., University of Georgia
10:35 a.m.    Keynote Presentation - "Universal Vaccines for Flu and COVID-19" - Ted Ross, Ph.D. - Director, GRA Eminent Scholar of Infectious Diseases, Professor, Animal Health Research Center, Center for Vaccines and Immunology, Department of Infectious Diseases - University of Georgia
11:05 a.m.    Julie Champion, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech
11:20 a.m.    Yao Yao, Ph.D. - University of Georgia
11:35 a.m.    break
11:45 a.m.    Hicham Drissi, Ph.D. - Emory University
12:00 p.m.    Breakout "Rooms" on Zoom (links to be provided):

Session A - Making New Drugs (Including Biologics)

Session B - Targeted Drug Delivery

Session C - Longer Acting or Enhanced Drugs

12:30 p.m.    Adjourn


REM Vision
Accelerate therapeutic delivery innovation and translation to treat disease. REM’s initiative will achieve this goal, which will position Georgia as a leading innovation hub in this intellectual space and benefit Georgia’s knowledge economy, by fostering interdisciplinary and multi-institutional collaborations and supporting research ranging from fundamental to translational to positively impact human health.
 
REM Mission
The goal of this initiative is to support drug delivery research that has high innovation and potential for translational impact among diverse investigators at Emory, Georgia Tech and University of Georgia in the areas of tissue regeneration, cell therapy, and immune modulation.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1614791214 2021-03-03 17:06:54 1620054607 2021-05-03 15:10:07 0 0 event 2021-05-10T11:30:00-04:00 2021-05-10T13:00:00-04:00 2021-05-10T13:00:00-04:00 2021-05-10 15:30:00 2021-05-10 17:00:00 2021-05-10 17:00:00 2021-05-10T11:30:00-04:00 2021-05-10T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-05-10 11:30:00 2021-05-10 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Steven Stice, Ph.D. - Co-Director, University of Georgia
Susan Thomas, Ph.D. - Co-Director, Georgia Tech
Edmund Waller, M.D.-Ph.D. - Co-Director, Emory University

Charlene Betourney - event inquiries

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353181 353181 image <![CDATA[Regenerative Engineering & Medicine Center (REM)]]> image/png 1449245728 2015-12-04 16:15:28 1475895080 2016-10-08 02:51:20 <![CDATA[REM Website]]>
<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "Go to Market Strategy"

Register Here

This interactive workshop will guide you through the process of setting commercialization milestones and determining your most critical next steps for a “killer” experiment. Speaker, Brian Walsh, is an industry leader with more than 30 years of experience successfully taking technologies from ideas to the market.

This event is the ninth session in the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. Series topics include how to take your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.


This event is part of the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1604508927 2020-11-04 16:55:27 1620054423 2021-05-03 15:07:03 0 0 event 2021-05-12T12:30:00-04:00 2021-05-12T13:30:00-04:00 2021-05-12T13:30:00-04:00 2021-05-12 16:30:00 2021-05-12 17:30:00 2021-05-12 17:30:00 2021-05-12T12:30:00-04:00 2021-05-12T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-05-12 12:30:00 2021-05-12 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Info on Bench2Market Talks series]]>
<![CDATA[Bio LaunchPad Seminar (formerly Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar)]]> 27195 Helping GT entrepreneurs learn how to fund and commercialize their technology.

REGISTER to receive participation link

"Two Venture Capitalists Walk into a Lab…"

AGENDA


The series is hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and GT's VentureLab. For inquiries or suggestions about future seminars, contact Cynthia Sundell, Senior Director of Life Sciences, IBB, or Harold Solomon, Principal, VentureLab.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1614800463 2021-03-03 19:41:03 1620054354 2021-05-03 15:05:54 0 0 event 2021-05-11T12:00:00-04:00 2021-05-11T13:30:00-04:00 2021-05-11T13:30:00-04:00 2021-05-11 16:00:00 2021-05-11 17:30:00 2021-05-11 17:30:00 2021-05-11T12:00:00-04:00 2021-05-11T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-05-11 12:00:00 2021-05-11 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D. - Senior Director of Life Sciences, IBB
Harold Solomon - Principal, GT VentureLab

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<![CDATA[IBB Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Seminar]]> 27195 "My Perspective on Disability for the STEM Community and Beyond"

Mark Colasurdo

Doctoral Candidate
Andrés García, Ph.D., Advisor
Georgia Tech

VIEW RECORDING

A conversation with Georgia Tech graduate student Mark Colasurdo who will discuss his background and provide personal and broader perspectives on what it’s like to navigate STEM with disability. He will share some of the difficult aspects ranging from making work in the lab accessible to the challenges of disclosing disability, identifying as someone with a disability, and how this may play a role in facing obstacles such as imposter syndrome.

This series is hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Science (IBB) Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1617989830 2021-04-09 17:37:10 1619541329 2021-04-27 16:35:29 0 0 event 2021-04-27T12:00:00-04:00 2021-04-27T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-27T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-27 16:00:00 2021-04-27 17:00:00 2021-04-27 17:00:00 2021-04-27T12:00:00-04:00 2021-04-27T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-04-27 12:00:00 2021-04-27 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Ed Botchwey, Ph.D. - Chair, IBB Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Committee
Colly Mitchell - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Petit Institute Antiracism Distinguished Lecture]]> 27195 "Considering Citizenship in a New World"

Kamau Bobb, Ph.D.
Global Lead for Diversity Strategy and Research, Google
Senior Director, Constellations Center for Equity in Computing, College of Computing, Georgia Tech


In a world profoundly divided along lines of race, skills and ideology, Kamau Bobb, Ph.D., will discuss the role of STEM education as an arm of justice and a requirement for modern citizenship.

AGENDA

BIO
Kamau Bobb, Ph.D., is the Global Lead for Diversity Strategy and Research at Google and the founding Senior Director of the Constellations Center for Equity in Computing at Georgia Tech. He is an engineer and science and technology policy scholar whose work focuses on the relationship between equity in the STEM enterprise, large educational systems, and the structural conditions that influence contemporary American life.

He brings to his current position a wealth of experience as a former Program Officer at the National Science Foundation (NSF). At NSF he was responsible for $30 million annually of investments targeted on improving computing and STEM education. In that role Dr. Bobb worked at the highest levels of the federal government to help shape the national research agenda for effective means of delivering equitable and quality computational education to all students. He has worked with members of the Office and Science and Technology Policy in the Obama Administration to set the national strategy for STEM education at both post-secondary and secondary school levels. He was selected as a member of President Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper STEM + Entrepreneurship Taskforce to help U.S. cities craft strategies to engage young men and boys of color in the STEM landscape. Prior to his federal appointment, Dr. Bobb was the Director of the STEM Initiative for the University System of Georgia, a collaborative effort with the governor’s office to improve STEM education across the 30 public institutions serving approximately 325,000 students in the state.

Bobb holds a Ph.D. in Science and Technology Policy from Georgia Tech and M.S. and B.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Organizing Committee
Edward Botchwey, Ph.D. - Chair
Andrés García, Ph.D. - Petit Institute executive director
María Coronel, Ph.D. - Postdoctoral representative
Nettie Brown - Predoctoral representative
Milan Riddick - Undergraduate representative
Lakeita Servance - Petit Institute staff representative

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1603469230 2020-10-23 16:07:10 1619528091 2021-04-27 12:54:51 0 0 event 2021-02-04T11:00:00-05:00 2021-02-05T13:59:00-05:00 2021-02-05T13:59:00-05:00 2021-02-04 16:00:00 2021-02-05 18:59:00 2021-02-05 18:59:00 2021-02-04T11:00:00-05:00 2021-02-05T13:59:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-02-04 11:00:00 2021-02-05 01:59:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Ed Botchwey, Ph.D. - Chair, Petit Institute Diversity Committee
Colly Mitchell - event inquiries

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640522 640522 image <![CDATA[Kamau Bobb, Ph.D. - Global Lead for Diversity Strategy and Research, Google, Founding Senior Director of the Constellations Center for Equity in Computing, Georgia Tech]]> image/jpeg 1603468822 2020-10-23 16:00:22 1603468822 2020-10-23 16:00:22
<![CDATA[IBB Lab Cleanup & Swap-O-Rama Days]]> 27195 IBB will be resuming our annual summer lab clean-up and Swap-O-Rama Days! Tables and large trash cans will be available in the IBB atrium, under the Cell Wall, for your lab's unwanted items to make them available for SWAPPING. 

And, how cool is this? Gently used or excess supplies left after The Swap will be donated to the Georgia BioEd Institute's Equipment Depot which go right into Georgia K-12 classrooms! 

HIGH-NEED & ACCEPTED ITEMS

Only items from Petit Biotech Building labs may be contributed to The Swap, but anyone in Georgia Tech's bio-community is welcome to come and "shop!"

Items that are permitted to be left on the tables include:

*If you have inventoried equipment that you would like to get rid of, please contact IBB Facilities Manager Jeffrey Austin with the tag number.

Chemicals, broken glassware, and contaminated materials must be disposed of properly. 

Items not picked up from the atrium by 12 noon on Monday, May 17 will be disposed of by the IBB facilities team. 

For the latest on GT's Environmental Health & Safety, visit HERE.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1617986288 2021-04-09 16:38:08 1617986831 2021-04-09 16:47:11 0 0 event 2021-05-13T01:00:00-04:00 2021-05-18T00:59:00-04:00 2021-05-18T00:59:00-04:00 2021-05-13 05:00:00 2021-05-18 04:59:00 2021-05-18 04:59:00 2021-05-13T01:00:00-04:00 2021-05-18T00:59:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-05-13 01:00:00 2021-05-18 12:59:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Jeffrey Austin, IBB facilities manager
Colly Mitchell, IBB events

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<![CDATA[Cancer and Racial Health Disparities Workshop Series]]> 27195 "Disparities in Cancer Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment"

Cancer affects all population groups, but certain groups bear a disproportionate burden of cancer incidence and mortality. Why do these health disparities exist and what can we do about it? 

Sign up below to participate in the upcoming virtual discussion-based workshop that will include breakout sessions for focused conversations. Open to all undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, faculty, and staff.

Workshop presented by:
Katie Young, Ph.D. Candidate - Todd Sulchek, Advisor - Georgia Tech

SIGN-UP HERE - participation link to be provided

Limited Seating!
Attendance will be capped to allow for effective discussion, in which case a waitlist will be created for additional registrants to remain a part of this ongoing discussion and be informed of future workshops.

Direct event inquiries to Katie Young.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1613494234 2021-02-16 16:50:34 1617194222 2021-03-31 12:37:02 0 0 event 2021-04-29T12:00:00-04:00 2021-04-29T13:30:00-04:00 2021-04-29T13:30:00-04:00 2021-04-29 16:00:00 2021-04-29 17:30:00 2021-04-29 17:30:00 2021-04-29T12:00:00-04:00 2021-04-29T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-04-29 12:00:00 2021-04-29 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]>  Katie Young

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<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar - Industry Talk for Trainees]]> 27195 A virtual event open to all trainees in Georgia Tech's bio-community.

"Industry Biomaterials Development at Dexcom"

Ted Lee, Ph.D.
Senior Staff Scientist
Dexcom

REGISTER for participation link

Ted Lee, Ph.D., is interested in the development and commercialization of next-generation medical devices and biotechnology products. He specializes in the areas of: medical devices, diagnostics, cell engineering, micro/nanofabrication, molecular biology, surface modification chemistry, bio-conjugate chemistry, polymer/hydrogel technology, confocal/SEM imaging, in vivo models/surgery, and cell/bacteria culture.

Publication List


Hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1615234788 2021-03-08 20:19:48 1617111131 2021-03-30 13:32:11 0 0 event 2021-04-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-15T14:00:00-04:00 2021-04-15T14:00:00-04:00 2021-04-15 17:00:00 2021-04-15 18:00:00 2021-04-15 18:00:00 2021-04-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-15T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-04-15 01:00:00 2021-04-15 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Colly Mitchell - event inquiries

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645114 645114 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB)]]> image/png 1615235110 2021-03-08 20:25:10 1615235110 2021-03-08 20:25:10
<![CDATA[Pediatric Tech Talk Webinar]]> 27195 "Patient-specific Robotic Systems for Medical Interventions"

Jaydev Desai, Ph.D.
Professor
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Director, Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)
Associate Director, Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (IRIM)
Georgia Tech


REGISTER HERE

Over the past few decades, robotic systems for diagnosis and therapy have undergone tremendous transformation. The goal of a medical intervention is to try to do it as minimally invasively as possible, since it can significantly reduce post-operative morbidity, reduce recovery time, and also lead to lower healthcare costs. However, minimally invasive surgical interventions, for example, for a range of procedures will require a significant change in the healthcare paradigm for both diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. Advances in surgical interventions will benefit from “patient-specific robotic tools” to deliver optimal diagnosis and therapy. Likewise, patient-specific robotic systems and customized interfaces could also benefit rehabilitation and assistive robotics. In this talk Jaydev Desai, Professor at Georgia Tech in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, founding Director of the Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR) and an Associate Director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines (IRIM) will focus on [his team's] research in the development of patient-specific robotic systems with applications in neurosurgery, endovascular interventions, and rehabilitation and assistance for spinal cord injury patients.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1616165195 2021-03-19 14:46:35 1617111075 2021-03-30 13:31:15 0 0 event 2021-04-21T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-21T13:30:00-04:00 2021-04-21T13:30:00-04:00 2021-04-21 17:00:00 2021-04-21 17:30:00 2021-04-21 17:30:00 2021-04-21T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-21T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-04-21 01:00:00 2021-04-21 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christopher Jackson - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "Licensing Strategies"

Register Here

Trying to determine how to maximize your technology value while minimizing time to market? Learn the pros and cons of different licensing options and better understand complex go-to-market strategies for your technology.

Speakers

This event is part of the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1604508871 2020-11-04 16:54:31 1616170616 2021-03-19 16:16:56 0 0 event 2021-04-14T12:30:00-04:00 2021-04-14T13:30:00-04:00 2021-04-14T13:30:00-04:00 2021-04-14 16:30:00 2021-04-14 17:30:00 2021-04-14 17:30:00 2021-04-14T12:30:00-04:00 2021-04-14T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-04-14 12:30:00 2021-04-14 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Info on Bench2Market Talks series]]>
<![CDATA[Microphysiological Seminar Series - "Brain Organoids"]]> 27195 REGISTER HERE

Multi-cellular engineered living systems (M-CELS) are purpose-driven living systems with multiple interacting living components. They are engineered for specific goals or functions but take emergence into account during the design process, allowing the final system to emerge through natural and non-natural biological processes.

M-CELS research is intended to provide a fundamental engineering understanding that enables a quantitative approach bridging between single cells and organs or organisms.

Thank you for joining us for this MCELS Seminar discussing brain organoids. 

AGENDA

ABSTRACTS

"What Does the Developing Brain Want?" - Hang Lu, Ph.D.
Brain organoids are promising systems for studying developmental, psychiatric, and other neurological diseases. With the possibility of using patient derived cells, they provide a platform for mechanistic studies as well as drug screens. The holy grail has been how to direct differentiation, how best to mimic disease conditions, how to rein in stochasticity, and how to increase reproducibility and efficiency. Are micro or mesofluidic systems really the answer? Is there a minimal condition to produce these organoids? Is size limiting the complexity of these systems? Can time be sped up or slowed down in these systems? How and what do we measure to help addressing these questions?

"Engineering the Next Generation of Organoids" - Melissa Cadena
The ability to direct human somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has revolutionized the field of developmental neurobiology. Even more powerful is the development of protocols that promote self-organization of iPSCs into whole tissues or organs, often referred to as organoids. Using various protocols, we can now generate organoids that recapitulate various brain regions. These models can be used to study neurodevelopment, study developmental neurodegenerative, or neuropsychiatric disorders, and serve as a drug screening and discovery platform. Despite these advances, there remain several important limitations of brain organoids. Namely, the lack of cell type diversity seen in vivo, the absence of morphogen gradients, the lack of vasculature, and scalability.

This MCELS Seminar is a joint student lead seminar series by UIUC, GT, and MIT.

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1615840003 2021-03-15 20:26:43 1615986410 2021-03-17 13:06:50 0 0 event 2021-03-26T17:00:00-04:00 2021-03-26T18:00:00-04:00 2021-03-26T18:00:00-04:00 2021-03-26 21:00:00 2021-03-26 22:00:00 2021-03-26 22:00:00 2021-03-26T17:00:00-04:00 2021-03-26T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-26 05:00:00 2021-03-26 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Tong Yu - Georgia Tech event organizer
Shuichi Takayama, Ph.D. - faculty advisor

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<![CDATA[CMaT Lunch & Learn with Scientific Bioprocessing Inc.]]> 27195 PARTICIPATION LINK

In this Lunch and Learn presentation, we share how we have combined multiple sensors in suitable form factors for the measurement of pH and dissolved oxygen in a range of culture systems such as multi-well culture plates, microfluidics devices, shake flasks, and bioreactors.

Scientific Bioprocessing Inc. Presenters:

Personalized medicine in cell and gene therapy has moved therapeutics development back to small scale bioreactors and added new process constraints: cost and form factor. SBI has developed technologies that overcome these challenges and allow researchers to collect real-time sensing data with non-invasive, biocompatible, sterilizable sensors.

We will also present our new fiber optic sensor platform that allows for sensing measurements inside a bioreactor at multiple locatins in a perfusion flow loop upstream or downstream of the bioreactor. This mapping can reveal stagnation zones, insufficient mixing and other process improvement opportunities.

While overcoming form factor limitations is highly beneficial for personalized medicine applications, multi-sensing platforms are also critical in bioprocessing and in increasing reproducibility, reducing cost, and resulting in better cell outcomes. We welcome the CMaT community to this presentation and offer evaluations of our technology to the CMaT researchers to encourage collaborations and help accelerate the development and commercialization of cell therapies.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1615903798 2021-03-16 14:09:58 1615904290 2021-03-16 14:18:10 0 0 event 2021-03-18T14:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18T15:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18T15:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18 18:00:00 2021-03-18 19:00:00 2021-03-18 19:00:00 2021-03-18T14:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-18 02:00:00 2021-03-18 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Punya Mardhanan - CMaT event inquiries

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638862 638862 image <![CDATA[CMat]]> image/png 1599612217 2020-09-09 00:43:37 1599612217 2020-09-09 00:43:37 <![CDATA[Scientific Bioprocessing Inc. website]]> <![CDATA[CMaT website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 35514 REGISTER for Participation Link

"Talking to Cells: Biomolecular Engineering for Non-invasive Imaging and Control of Cellular Function"

Mikhail Shapiro, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemical Engineering
Investigator, Heritage Medical Research Institute
California Institute of Technology


ABSTRACT
The study of biological function in intact organisms and the development of targeted cellular therapeutics necessitate methods to image and control cellular function in vivo. Technologies such as fluorescent proteins and optogenetics serve this purpose in small, translucent specimens, but are limited by the poor penetration of light into deeper tissues. In contrast, most non-invasive techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging – while based on energy forms that penetrate tissue effectively – are not effectively coupled to cellular function. Our work attempts to bridge this gap by engineering biomolecules with the appropriate physical properties to interact with magnetic fields and sound waves. In this talk, I will describe our recent development of biomolecular reporters and actuators for ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. The reporters are based on a unique class of gas-filled protein nanostructures from buoyant photosynthetic microbes. These proteins produce nonlinear scattering of sound waves, enabling their detection with ultrasound, and perturb magnetic fields, allowing their detection with MRI. I will describe our recent progress in understanding the biophysical and acoustic properties of these biomolecules, engineering their mechanics and targeting at the genetic level, developing methods to enhance their detection in vivo, expressing them heterologously as reporter genes, and turning them into dynamic sensors of enzyme activity. Our actuators are based on temperature-dependent transcriptional repressors, which provide switch-like control of bacterial gene expression in response to small changes in temperature. We have genetically tuned these repressors to activate at thresholds within the biomedically relevant range of 32ºC to 46ºC, and constructed genetic logic circuits to connect thermal signals to various cellular functions. This allows us to use focused ultrasound to remote-control engineered cells in vivo. In addition, I will describe methods to use ultrasound in combination with viral vectors and engineered receptors to provide spatially and cell-type specific non-invasive control over neural activity.

BIO
Mikhail Shapiro is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and an Investigator of the Heritage Medical Research Institute at Caltech. The Shapiro laboratory develops biomolecular technologies allowing cells to be imaged and controlled inside the body using sound waves and magnetic fields to enable the study of biological function in vivo and the development of cell-based diagnostic and therapeutic agents. Mikhail received his Ph.D. in Biological Engineering from MIT and his BSc in Neuroscience from Brown, and conducted post-doctoral research at the University of Chicago and the University of California, Berkeley, where he was a Miller Fellow. Mikhail’s awards include the Packard Fellowship, the Pew Scholarship, the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award and the Roger Tsien Award for Excellence in Chemical Biology. 

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University. All are welcome.

]]> Rose Brito 1 1606943501 2020-12-02 21:11:41 1615566062 2021-03-12 16:21:02 0 0 event 2021-03-18T12:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18T13:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18T13:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18 16:00:00 2021-03-18 17:00:00 2021-03-18 17:00:00 2021-03-18T12:00:00-04:00 2021-03-18T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-18 12:00:00 2021-03-18 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> James Dahlman, Ph.D. - faculty host
Stas Emelianov, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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141991 141991 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449178723 2015-12-03 21:38:43 1475894774 2016-10-08 02:46:14 <![CDATA[Shapiro lab website ]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 35514 REGISTER for Participation Link

"Biophysics-driven Multi-lineage Induction in Engineered Cardiac Organoids"

Zhen Ma, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Carol and Samuel Nappi Research Scholar
Department of Biomedical & Chemical Engineering
Syracuse Biomaterials Institute
Syracuse Soft & Living Matters 
Syracuse University


ABSTRACT
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have altered the landscape of regenerative medicine and developmental biology, since these cells provide an unprecedented opportunity to study human-specific tissue morphogenesis and organ development. With the emergent concept of stem cell organoids, these 3D cultures of developing tissue imply similarity to the manner in which different organs establish their characteristic structure and functions based on dynamic multicellular self-organization at the tissue level. My research group has developed a spatial-organized 3D organoid model that captures the dynamic process of early human organ development during embryogenesis. By varying the geometric shape of patterned hiPSCs, we have achieved multi-lineage induction with co-emergent cell specification of cardiac lineage, stromal lineage and hepatic lineage. Our multi-lineage organoids not only recaptured the parallel organ development of the heart-liver synergy, but also demonstrated that biophysical cues can modulate the co-emergent developmental process by shifting cell lineages between mesoderm and endoderm. More recently, to elucidate structure-function relationship for cardiac organoids, we applied advanced data mining techniques for analysis and visualization of sophisticated, large-scale multidimensional “Physiomics” datasets from these organoids.
 

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

 

]]> Rose Brito 1 1606946227 2020-12-02 21:57:07 1615565839 2021-03-12 16:17:19 0 0 event 2021-04-13T12:00:00-04:00 2021-04-13T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-13T13:00:00-04:00 2021-04-13 16:00:00 2021-04-13 17:00:00 2021-04-13 17:00:00 2021-04-13T12:00:00-04:00 2021-04-13T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-04-13 12:00:00 2021-04-13 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Andrés García, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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141991 141991 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449178723 2015-12-03 21:38:43 1475894774 2016-10-08 02:46:14 <![CDATA[Ma lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bio TECHXpo]]> 27195 REGISTER HERE

Meet Georgia Tech Inventors and Founders creating the next biotechnologies, diagnostics, therapeutics, and medical devices. Bio TECHXpo is a virtual event designed for Georgia Tech Alumni to learn about, and get involved in, early-stage biotech commercialization ventures being developed by Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience researchers. Attendees will learn about new commercialization efforts at Georgia Tech, hear from successful entrepreneurs, and meet project teams via the Georgia Tech startup, Gatherly, a virtual meeting platform. Alumni interested in mentoring or supporting a team can express their interest in a post-event survey. Please note that this event requires a laptop or desktop computer and Google Chrome web browser.

AGENDA

The event will begin with opening remarks from: Dene Sheheane - President, Georgia Tech Alumni Association; Sivakumar Ragupathy, Ph.D., Interim Chief Commercialization Officer, Georgia Tech; Andrés García, Ph.D. - Executive Director, Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Georgia Tech.

Break Out POSTER PRESENTERS
Bio researchers present early-stage biotech commercialization ventures.

REGISTER HERE

Co-hosted by the Georgia Tech Alumni Association and the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1613661443 2021-02-18 15:17:23 1614785014 2021-03-03 15:23:34 0 0 event 2021-03-15T11:30:00-04:00 2021-03-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-03-15T13:00:00-04:00 2021-03-15 15:30:00 2021-03-15 17:00:00 2021-03-15 17:00:00 2021-03-15T11:30:00-04:00 2021-03-15T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-15 11:30:00 2021-03-15 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Maeghan Horvath
Event Manager, GT Alumni Association

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644839 644839 image <![CDATA[Bio TECHXpo - Building the Future of BioTech]]> image/png 1614631348 2021-03-01 20:42:28 1614631459 2021-03-01 20:44:19
<![CDATA[Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar]]> 27195 Helping GT entrepreneurs learn how to fund and commercialize their technology.

"A Venn Diagram of Science, Medicine, Finance, and Business Management"

Jack Krieger, Ph.D.
Director, Portfolio Intelligence
BridgeBio

REGISTER HERE - 
participation link to be provided upon submission

AGENDA
11:00 a.m.                Seminar
Noon-12:30 p.m.      Extended "Office Hours" discussion

ABSTRACT
Bringing biomedical technologies to patients at scale requires not just deep subject matter expertise, but also “hybrid” capabilities that straddle multiple disciplines. In this session I’ll share my reflections from biotech on what “interdisciplinary” means in the pharmaceutical and medical product ecosystem.

BIO
In his role in portfolio intelligence, Jack Krieger develops and delivers recommendations for executive leadership on capital allocation, R&D strategy, and competitive intelligence across the BridgeBio's portfolio of genetic disease medicines. He has business development experience, leading the diligence of an indication expansion opportunity.

Krieger also co-leads with a cross-functional team the scientific strategy and operations of the preclinical program for autism spectrum disorder associated with PTEN gene variants.

The series is hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and GT's VentureLab. For inquiries or suggestions about future seminars, contact Cynthia Sundell, Senior Director of Life Sciences, IBB, or Harold Solomon, Principal, VentureLab.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1613567466 2021-02-17 13:11:06 1613764083 2021-02-19 19:48:03 0 0 event 2021-03-23T12:00:00-04:00 2021-03-23T13:30:00-04:00 2021-03-23T13:30:00-04:00 2021-03-23 16:00:00 2021-03-23 17:30:00 2021-03-23 17:30:00 2021-03-23T12:00:00-04:00 2021-03-23T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-23 12:00:00 2021-03-23 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D. - Senior Director of Life Sciences, IBB
Harold Solomon - Principal, GT VentureLab

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644360 644360 image <![CDATA[Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar]]> image/png 1613568007 2021-02-17 13:20:07 1613568007 2021-02-17 13:20:07 <![CDATA[Jack Krieger profile]]>
<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "Quality Management Systems - Key Principles of QMS Processes"
Brett Rogers, MBID


REGISTER HERE

Quality Management Systems are an essential process on the path to FDA approval by ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements. Learn what design control means for your medical device and how early implementation of CGMP guidelines impact development of pharma and medical products.

Brett Rogers, MBID is a graduate of the Master of Biomedical Innovation and Development program at the Georgia Institute of Technology and has extensive experience in manufacturing with Facet Medical Technologies and is a co-founder and board member of TendoNova Corporation, an Atlanta based Medical Device start-up.

This event is part of the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1604508799 2020-11-04 16:53:19 1613569382 2021-02-17 13:43:02 0 0 event 2021-03-17T12:30:00-04:00 2021-03-17T13:30:00-04:00 2021-03-17T13:30:00-04:00 2021-03-17 16:30:00 2021-03-17 17:30:00 2021-03-17 17:30:00 2021-03-17T12:30:00-04:00 2021-03-17T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-17 12:30:00 2021-03-17 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Info on Bench2Market Talks series]]>
<![CDATA[Cancer and Racial Health Disparities Workshop Series]]> 27195 Cancer affects all population groups, but certain groups bear a disproportionate burden of cancer incidence and mortality. Why do these health disparities exist and what can we do about it? 

Sign up below to participate in any/either of two upcoming virtual discussion-based workshops that will include breakout sessions for focused conversations. Open to all undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, faculty, and staff.

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
"Cancer Epidemiology and Environmental Racism"
Thursday, March 25, 2021 – 11:00 a.m. - Noon

"Disparities in Cancer Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment"
Thursday, April 29, 2021 – 11:00 a.m. - Noon

Workshops presented by:
Katie Young, Ph.D. Candidate - Todd Sulchek, Advisor - Georgia Tech

SIGN-UP HERE for either/both Workshops - participation link to be provided

Limited Seating!
The workshops stand alone, so feel free to register for both or just the lecture that interests you. Attendance will be capped to allow for effective discussion, in which case a waitlist will be created for additional registrants to remain a part of this ongoing discussion and be informed of future workshops.

Direct event inquiries to Katie Young.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1613493823 2021-02-16 16:43:43 1613493967 2021-02-16 16:46:07 0 0 event 2021-03-25T12:00:00-04:00 2021-03-25T13:00:00-04:00 2021-03-25T13:00:00-04:00 2021-03-25 16:00:00 2021-03-25 17:00:00 2021-03-25 17:00:00 2021-03-25T12:00:00-04:00 2021-03-25T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-25 12:00:00 2021-03-25 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]>
<![CDATA[Cancer and Racial Health Disparities Workshop Series]]> 27195 Cancer affects all population groups, but certain groups bear a disproportionate burden of cancer incidence and mortality. Why do these health disparities exist and what can we do about it? 

Sign up below to participate in any/all of three upcoming virtual discussion-based workshops that will include breakout sessions for focused conversations. Open to all undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, faculty, and staff.

WORKSHOP SCHEDULE
"Disparities in Cancer Biology and Cancer Research"
Thursday, February 25, 2021 – 11:00 a.m. - Noon

"Cancer Epidemiology and Environmental Racism"
Thursday, March 25, 2021 – 11:00 a.m. - Noon

"Disparities in Cancer Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment"
Thursday, April 29, 2021 – 11:00 a.m. - Noon

Workshops presented by:
Katie Young, Ph.D. Candidate - Todd Sulchek, Advisor - Georgia Tech

SIGN-UP HERE for any/all Workshops - participation link to be provided

Limited Seating!
The workshops stand alone, so feel free to register for all three or just the lectures that interest you. Attendance will be capped to allow for effective discussion, in which case a waitlist will be created for additional registrants to remain a part of this ongoing discussion and be informed of future workshops.

Direct event inquiries to Katie Young
 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1613485869 2021-02-16 14:31:09 1613486313 2021-02-16 14:38:33 0 0 event 2021-02-25T11:00:00-05:00 2021-02-25T12:00:00-05:00 2021-02-25T12:00:00-05:00 2021-02-25 16:00:00 2021-02-25 17:00:00 2021-02-25 17:00:00 2021-02-25T11:00:00-05:00 2021-02-25T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-02-25 11:00:00 2021-02-25 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Katie Young - Presenter

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<![CDATA[Southeast Regional Clinical & Translational Science Conference]]> 27195 The 2021 Southeast Regional Clinical & Translational Science Conference is going virtual! Join us as we bring together researchers from across the region to present the best new clinical and translational research and build collaborative partnerships.

AGENDA
DAY ONE - 8:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
DAY TWO - 8:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Keynote Speakers

REGISTER HERE

Registration is $35 per person ($20 for trainees). Fee includes attendance at all scientific sessions.

Visit conference website

Sponsorship opportunities still available.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1613138037 2021-02-12 13:53:57 1613138037 2021-02-12 13:53:57 0 0 event 2021-03-04T08:30:00-05:00 2021-03-05T13:00:00-05:00 2021-03-05T13:00:00-05:00 2021-03-04 13:30:00 2021-03-05 18:00:00 2021-03-05 18:00:00 2021-03-04T08:30:00-05:00 2021-03-05T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-03-04 08:30:00 2021-03-05 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> <![CDATA[Conference website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Design and Translation of New Technologies to Solve Patient-Driven Problems: Examples from Newborn Health, Women’s Health and COVID-19"

Rebecca Richards-Kortum, Ph.D.
Professor of Bioengineering
Director, Rice 360° Institute for Global Health
Founder, Beyond Traditional Borders Undergraduate Global Health Program
Rice University

PARTICIPATION LINK

ABSTRACT
This talk will examine the challenges of designing and translating new biophotonics technologies to solve real clinical needs, drawing from examples to improve early detection of cervical cancer for women in Texas and Latin America, to improve point-of-care diagnosis of COVID-19, and to improve newborn survival in African hospitals. The talk will summarize lessons learned to increase the impact and sustainability of the resulting innovations.

RESEARCH
Guided by the belief that all of the world’s people deserve access to health innovation, Professor Rebecca Richards-Kortum’s research and teaching focus on developing low-cost, high-performance technology for low-resource settings. She is known for providing vulnerable populations in the developing world access to life-saving health technology, focusing on diseases and conditions that cause high morbidity and mortality, such as cervical and oral cancer, premature birth, and malaria. Richards-Kortum is also leading a multi-institutional team to develop a package of 17 life-saving neonatal technologies, designed for low-resource settings while providing the same efficacy a related technologies used in North America, but at a fraction of the cost.

Current technologies are being tested and applied through multidisciplinary collaborations with clinicians and researchers at Rice, the UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, UT Health Science Center-Houston, the British Columbia Cancer Agency. Over the past few years, Richards-Kortum and collaborators have translated these technologies from North America to both low- and medium-resource developing countries (Malawi, China, Botswana, El Salvador, and Brazil).

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1606848101 2020-12-01 18:41:41 1611146124 2021-01-20 12:35:24 0 0 event 2020-01-21T11:00:00-05:00 2020-01-21T12:00:00-05:00 2020-01-21T12:00:00-05:00 2020-01-21 16:00:00 2020-01-21 17:00:00 2020-01-21 17:00:00 2020-01-21T11:00:00-05:00 2020-01-21T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-21 11:00:00 2020-01-21 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Erin Buckley, Ph.D. - faculty host
Aniruddh Sarkar, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Richards-Kortum Research Group]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Pediatric Tech Talk Webinar]]> 27195 "Social Media - Friend, Foe, or Both for Those Suffering from Mental Disorders?"

Elizabeth Mynatt, Ph.D. - IPAT Executive Director, Georgia Tech
Jessica Pater, Ph.D. - IPAT Visiting Research Scientist, Georgia Tech
Leanne West - Pediatric Technology Center Chief Engineer, Georgia Tech

RSVP here

Social media channels including popular apps like Tik-Tok and Instagram are often double edged swords for those suffering from issues like anxiety and eating disorders. They can exacerbate symptoms, harmful behavior, and quality of life for those needing treatment or in early stages of recovery. But they also offer access to support groups and community for many survivors and those seeking to try to understand what they may be experiencing.

What role can computer science play in identifying mental health disorders including eating disorders?

What can we learn about social media’s effect on those suffering from those disorders at various stages in their illness and recovery?

Should we be more or less concerned about new outlets and platforms like Tik-Tok when it comes to development and exacerbation of disorders like anxiety, anorexia, bulimia and so on?

How does recent research compare with other real world evidence?


Sponsored by Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Pediatric Technology Center with marketing partner write2market.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1610456458 2021-01-12 13:00:58 1610456572 2021-01-12 13:02:52 0 0 event 2021-01-20T12:00:00-05:00 2021-01-20T12:30:00-05:00 2021-01-20T12:30:00-05:00 2021-01-20 17:00:00 2021-01-20 17:30:00 2021-01-20 17:30:00 2021-01-20T12:00:00-05:00 2021-01-20T12:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-01-20 12:00:00 2021-01-20 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christopher Jackson - Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Pediatric Technology Center

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<![CDATA[2021 Suddath Award Winner Presentation]]> 27195 2021 Suddath Award Winner Presentation

"Antimicrobial Competition Dynamics of the Vibrio cholerae Type VI Secretion System"

Cristian Crisan
Ph.D. Candidate, Biological Sciences
Georgia Tech

Brian Hammer, Ph.D., Advisor

PARTICIPATION LINK

ABSTRACT
Vibrio cholerae is a Gram-negative bacterium that inhabits marine ecosystems but causes life-threatening cholera disease when ingested by humans. Like approximately 25% of all Gram-negative bacteria, V. cholerae uses the Type VI Secretion System (T6SS) to deliver cytotoxic proteins in a contact-dependent manner to eliminate adjacent cells. After sequencing a diverse set of V. cholerae isolates, we discovered two putative T6SS toxins, which I named TleV1 and TpeV. TleV1 is lethal when expressed in the periplasm of Escherichia coli cells and can be delivered in a T6SS-dependent manner to compromise cell membranes and kill target bacteria. Unlike other V. cholerae T6SS effectors, TpeV does not share homology to proteins with known functions. E. coli cells expressing periplasmic TpeV exhibit profound toxicity, have a disrupted membrane potential and are permeabilized. I determined that V. cholerae can translocate TpeV to permeabilize and kill target cells in a T6SS-dependent manner. Important human, animal and plant pathogens encode tpeV homologs adjacent to known T6SS genes, indicating that the toxin belongs to a large protein family. While many studies have described the regulation and toxins of the T6SS, few have investigated the defensive responses elicited by cells that are targeted by T6SS attacks. I demonstrated that multiple human commensal E. coli strains, which are highly susceptible to killing via the T6SS, show a remarkable survival improvement when co-cultured with V. cholerae in the presence of glucose. I identified that the E. coli glucose-responsive master gene regulator CRP (cyclic AMP receptor protein) controls resistance against T6SS attacks. E. coli cells with a crp gene disruption are protected against V. cholerae T6SS attacks even in the absence of glucose. In summary, I found that V. cholerae isolates employ diverse chemical weapons to eliminate competitor cells and identified a small molecule that confers protection against T6SS attacks in target cells.


The F. L. (Bud) Suddath Memorial Award has been established by the family, friends and colleagues of Bud Suddath to stimulate graduate research in the fields of biology, biochemistry and biomedical engineering. The award is given annually to current Georgia Tech Ph.D. candidates in any field of study who are conducting biological or biochemical research at the molecular or cellular level. The awardee is provided an award of up to $1,000 in value which may be used to facilitate the completion of his or her scholarly development, and they will be invited to present their work at a special event hosted by the Petit Institute at the start of the upcoming annual Suddath Symposium. The recipient of this award will also have his or her name engraved on a commemorative plaque in the Suddath Seminar Room in the Petit Biotech building at Georgia Tech.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1603804704 2020-10-27 13:18:24 1609941900 2021-01-06 14:05:00 0 0 event 2021-01-28T11:00:00-05:00 2021-01-28T11:45:00-05:00 2021-01-28T11:45:00-05:00 2021-01-28 16:00:00 2021-01-28 16:45:00 2021-01-28 16:45:00 2021-01-28T11:00:00-05:00 2021-01-28T11:45:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-01-28 11:00:00 2021-01-28 11:45:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Suddath Symposium website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager, IBB

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<![CDATA[Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar]]> 27195 "What Venture Capitalists Are Looking For - And How to Provide It" 

Christopher Seabolt

Venture Capitalist

REGISTER HERE

PARTICIPATION LINK

Chris holds approximately 30 years of venture capital and operational experience in early-stage growth companies, most recently with T-Venture, Deutsche Telekom’s captive corporate venture capital subsidiary, where he sourced and completed numerous transactions in the technology sector in both the U.S. and Europe. Prior to this, Chris was responsible for the highly successful turnaround and divestiture of Central Europe Telecom Investment (CETI) LP assets, one of the first true venture funds in the Region. He was previously associated with the Silicon Valley office of Patricof & Co (now APAX Partners) as well as the in-house LBO fund of Kidder, Peabody & Co. in New York. Prior positions also include CFO roles in Solvo Biotechnology Rt., a Hungarian biotech start-up, and Hild Real Estate Investment, CEE’s first large-scale life annuity provider.

Of almost 20 deals in the early-stage sector, including a majority of Seed and Start-up, Chris has engineered successful (+money) exits for well over half of these, with extraordinarily high returns across all managed portfolios, particularly given the extremely early stage and EU focus.

Chris is a frequent juror and mentor in the US and EU through various accelerators and start-up and seed events. His network is multinational - spanning the EU, UK and the East and West Coasts of the USA.

He is an avid, if amateur, lifelong student of philosophy, cultures and history. He is also an avid rider and scuba diver, and a deliberately novice martial artist. His broad interests, coupled with his ruthless training as an Economist, tend to make him highly unpopular at dinner parties. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1605722269 2020-11-18 17:57:49 1609773499 2021-01-04 15:18:19 0 0 event 2021-01-12T11:00:00-05:00 2021-01-12T12:00:00-05:00 2021-01-12T12:00:00-05:00 2021-01-12 16:00:00 2021-01-12 17:00:00 2021-01-12 17:00:00 2021-01-12T11:00:00-05:00 2021-01-12T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-01-12 11:00:00 2021-01-12 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D. - Senior Director, Life Sciences, Petit Institute
Colly Mitchell - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 35514 VIRTUAL EVENT 

"Clinically Informed Biomaterials: Chemistry and Engineering"


Mark Grinstaff, Ph.D.
Distinguished Professor of Translational Research
Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemistry, Materials Science and Engineering, and Medicine
Boston University

PARTICIPATION LINK

As an academic scientist and engineer working in interdisciplinary research, I ask questions all the time – from the most basic (how do we design small molecules to enable the synthesis of advanced materials?) to the most translational (how do we take a laboratory discovery to the clinic?). Through this process, I challenge my students and fellows to determine and elucidate the underlying chemistry and engineering principles. In this lecture, I will share our stories and successes in translating ideas from the laboratory to the preclinical and clinic setting. I begin with synthesis of unique dendrimers and dendritic-based hydrogels as adhesives for wound management, followed by the synthesis and use of polyglycerol carbonates for controlled drug delivery to prevent lung cancer recurrence, and, finally, ROMP to prepare large molecular weight polyanions as lubricants for cartilage surfaces and the potential treatment for osteoarthritis. In each section, I will highlight the design requirements, the synthetic routes and characterization data, and the performance outcomes in in vitro and in vivo experiments. 


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Rose Brito 1 1600440896 2020-09-18 14:54:56 1607011606 2020-12-03 16:06:46 0 0 event 2021-02-09T11:00:00-05:00 2021-02-09T12:00:00-05:00 2021-02-09T12:00:00-05:00 2021-02-09 16:00:00 2021-02-09 17:00:00 2021-02-09 17:00:00 2021-02-09T11:00:00-05:00 2021-02-09T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-02-09 11:00:00 2021-02-09 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Erik Dreaden, Ph.D. - faculty host
Rose Brito - event inquiries

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141991 141991 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> image/png 1449178723 2015-12-03 21:38:43 1475894774 2016-10-08 02:46:14 <![CDATA[Grinstaff lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[3rd Annual Southeast Center for Mathematics and Biology (SCMB) Symposium]]> 27195 Mark your calendars! Symposium to take place from 12 noon - 2:00 p.m. EST on December 7-10, 2020.

It's Called Interactional Expertise – Ever Heard of It?


Until three years ago, neither had most of us at SCMB, but it turns out that this phrase epitomizes our approach to the cross-disciplinary training of junior researchers. With effective communication an ever more important skill in our virtual world, we've decided to make Interactional Expertise (IE) the theme of our 3rd Annual Symposium.
 
Connect with more people and research through IE!

In our context, having IE means that you don't need to be an expert in both math and bio in order to work productively at the math-bio interface—you just need to be able to communicate effectively with someone whose research expertise complements your own! 

We hope you will join us December 7 – 10 to hear about:

Each of the first 3 days will spotlight one of these conversations, followed by a pair of short talks. The talks will highlight math-bio research frontiers and will be given by junior researchers from SCMB and the other 3 NSF-Simons MathBioSys research centers.

Come support junior researchers and build math-bio community!

The final day will feature a plenary talk on "Algebraic Systems Biology"  by Prof. Heather Harrington (Oxford), and an interactive poster session with spatial conferencing.  All poster session presenters will be entered into a drawing for complementary registration at SCMB's 4th Annual Symposium (expected to be in-person in Feb 2022). We hope you will enhance this meeting by showcasing your work during the poster session!

Join us for a lively exploration of the math-bio interface!

Learn More and Submit Your Complimentary Registration

SCMB is a collaborative partnership of seven institutions united in advancing the mathematics of complex biological systems and expanding communities at the math-bio interface.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1605708585 2020-11-18 14:09:45 1605709037 2020-11-18 14:17:17 0 0 event 2020-12-07T00:00:00-05:00 2020-12-10T00:00:00-05:00 2020-12-10T00:00:00-05:00 2020-12-07 05:00:00 2020-12-10 05:00:00 2020-12-10 05:00:00 2020-12-07T00:00:00-05:00 2020-12-10T00:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-12-07 12:00:00 2020-12-10 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Chinneta Pettaway - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar]]> 27195 "IP - What Is It and How to Use It to Market Technology"

Patrea L. Pabst, J.D.
Partner
Pabst Partner Group

AGENDA

11:00 a.m.        Seminar
12-1:00 p.m.    Small-group discussions with three Pabst Partners LLC attorneys

RSVP & Post-seminar Sign Up HERE 

PARTICIPATION LINK

For more than three decades, Patrea Pabst has provided comprehensive intellectual property counsel to pacesetters in the biotechnology, medical, pharmaceutical and chemical fields.

Patrea brings a critical business perspective to her legal advice on a wide array of patent matters. She advises corporations, universities, and investors in startup and early-stage initiatives on some of today’s most cutting-edge technologies.

Clients rely on Patrea to evaluate their technology with an eye to patentability and valuation, prosecute patents before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), and coordinate corresponding international filings. She provides strategic planning for her clients’ immediate and long-term goals, reviews licensing agreements, and renders legal opinions. Patrea is also a formidable advocate for her clients in administrative proceedings, including reexaminations, interference proceedings in the U.S., and opposition proceedings before patent offices in jurisdictions around the world.

She identifies the market potential of clients’ discoveries, then designs practical, business-oriented solutions to achieve their strategic goals.

Committed to excellence in all areas of her practice, Patrea balances her clients’ commercial objectives with their budgetary requirements to support their bottom line. Many of Patrea’s clients have chosen to remain with her for decades, a testament to her dependability, productivity, and value.

RECOGNITION
The Best Lawyers in America 2010-2019
Martindale-Hubbell AV Preeminent Rating

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1603472053 2020-10-23 16:54:13 1605530366 2020-11-16 12:39:26 0 0 event 2020-11-17T11:00:00-05:00 2020-11-17T12:00:00-05:00 2020-11-17T12:00:00-05:00 2020-11-17 16:00:00 2020-11-17 17:00:00 2020-11-17 17:00:00 2020-11-17T11:00:00-05:00 2020-11-17T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-11-17 11:00:00 2020-11-17 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D. - Senior Director, Life Sciences, Petit Institute
Colly Mitchell - event inquiries

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640524 640524 image <![CDATA[Patrea Pabst, J.D. - Partner, Pabst Patent Group]]> image/jpeg 1603471808 2020-10-23 16:50:08 1603471808 2020-10-23 16:50:08 <![CDATA[Pabst Patent Group website]]>
<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "FDA Strategy - Pathway Options and Timing"

Register Here

This event is part of the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1604508701 2020-11-04 16:51:41 1604508714 2020-11-04 16:51:54 0 0 event 2021-02-17T11:30:00-05:00 2021-02-17T12:30:00-05:00 2021-02-17T12:30:00-05:00 2021-02-17 16:30:00 2021-02-17 17:30:00 2021-02-17 17:30:00 2021-02-17T11:30:00-05:00 2021-02-17T12:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-02-17 11:30:00 2021-02-17 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Info on Bench2Market Talks series]]>
<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "IP Strategy - Patentability, Freedom to Operate, Prior Art & Patent Strategies"

Register Here

This event is part of the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1604508305 2020-11-04 16:45:05 1604508393 2020-11-04 16:46:33 0 0 event 2021-01-22T11:30:00-05:00 2021-01-22T12:30:00-05:00 2021-01-22T12:30:00-05:00 2021-01-22 16:30:00 2021-01-22 17:30:00 2021-01-22 17:30:00 2021-01-22T11:30:00-05:00 2021-01-22T12:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-01-22 11:30:00 2021-01-22 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Info on Bench2Market Talks series]]>
<![CDATA[2021 Suddath Symposium - "Origins and Early Evolution of Life"]]> 27195 The origin of life on Earth is one of the most intriguing questions of all time and has been a topic of active research for almost a century. The 2021 Suddath Symposium will bring together leaders in origins of life research who will share, in a widely accessible format, recent progress in answering central questions in this field, including: How did RNA, polypeptides, and polysaccharides first emerge on the early Earth? The symposium will provide a forum to celebrate the legacy of the NSF/NASA Center for Chemical Evolution, which has been headquartered at Georgia Tech for the past decade.

The Suddath Symposium, to be presented in a virtual format in 2021 (two half-days, afternoons EST), is held annually to celebrate the life and contribution of F.L. "Bud" Suddath by discussing the latest developments in the fields of bioengineering and bioscience. The speakers include leading researchers across the world, and the research topic changes each year. This highly-interactive symposium has been taking place for 29 years and is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience at Georgia Tech.

Symposium Chairs: Nick Hud, Ph.D., and Loren Williams, Ph.D.

Visit: Suddath Symposium website

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1589918650 2020-05-19 20:04:10 1603805803 2020-10-27 13:36:43 0 0 event 2021-01-28T13:00:00-05:00 2021-01-29T17:00:00-05:00 2021-01-29T17:00:00-05:00 2021-01-28 18:00:00 2021-01-29 22:00:00 2021-01-29 22:00:00 2021-01-28T13:00:00-05:00 2021-01-29T17:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2021-01-28 01:00:00 2021-01-29 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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<![CDATA[Suddath Symposium Website]]>
<![CDATA[Webinar - Blue Sky Group: COVID-19 and Health Equity]]> 27195 Blue Sky Groups are unstructured meetings that provide a unique opportunity for attendees to drive the agenda as well as utilize the session as a catalyst for future collaborations and research opportunities.

REGISTER HERE

Discussion topics may include, but not limited to:

Share your experience, learn from others, enjoy opportunities for interdisciplinary networking and find potential collaborators!

Breakout session topics will include:

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1599742906 2020-09-10 13:01:46 1603547653 2020-10-24 13:54:13 0 0 event 2020-10-27T17:00:00-04:00 2020-10-27T18:30:00-04:00 2020-10-27T18:30:00-04:00 2020-10-27 21:00:00 2020-10-27 22:30:00 2020-10-27 22:30:00 2020-10-27T17:00:00-04:00 2020-10-27T18:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-10-27 05:00:00 2020-10-27 06:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Direct inquiries to Georgia CTSA

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<![CDATA[Registration link]]>
<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "An Accidental Entrepreneur: From Assistant Professor to Chief Operating Officer" -

Pamela Bhatti, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Georgia Tech


Learn from Pamela Bhatti, Associate Chair for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Georgia Tech, on her experience and lessons learned launching a life science startup. This interactive event will walk attendees through her startup experience and highlight resources for entrepreneurs in our clinical and translational ecosystem.

Register Here

This event is the third session in the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1603119207 2020-10-19 14:53:27 1603467562 2020-10-23 15:39:22 0 0 event 2020-11-11T11:30:00-05:00 2020-11-11T12:30:00-05:00 2020-11-11T12:30:00-05:00 2020-11-11 16:30:00 2020-11-11 17:30:00 2020-11-11 17:30:00 2020-11-11T11:30:00-05:00 2020-11-11T12:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-11-11 11:30:00 2020-11-11 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]>
<![CDATA[Bench2Market Talks]]> 27195 "Preparing High-Quality Invention Disclosures"

Join our webinar to learn how to prepare an invention disclosure that clearly communicates the patentability and commercialization potential of your innovation. Researchers and principal investigators will learn how to think broadly about their innovations to develop a high-quality invention disclosure. Lead by Nicole Morris, Esq. Director of TI:GER and Professor in Practice at Emory School of Law.

Register Here

This event is the fourth session in the Bench2Market Talks series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. The series covers topics to help bring your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1603119473 2020-10-19 14:57:53 1603119695 2020-10-19 15:01:35 0 0 event 2020-12-09T11:30:00-05:00 2020-12-09T12:30:00-05:00 2020-12-09T12:30:00-05:00 2020-12-09 16:30:00 2020-12-09 17:30:00 2020-12-09 17:30:00 2020-12-09T11:30:00-05:00 2020-12-09T12:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-12-09 11:30:00 2020-12-09 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christina Wessels - event inquiries

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<![CDATA[Info on Bench2Market Talks series]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Diversity Town Hall - Race and Racism in Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> 27195 JOIN via Microsoft Teams

Moderator
Kaye Husbands Fealing, Ph.D.
Dean and Ivan Allen Jr. Chair, Ivan Allen College of Liberal Arts, Georgia Tech

With opening presentation by:
Manu Platt, Ph.D.
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech and Emory University


COVID-19 is a Health Disparity
This town hall discussion is focused on the scientific problem of today: COVID-19. There are multiple aspects to research angles on COVID-19: therapeutics, diagnosis, co-morbidities, public health, public policy, healthcare systems, and more. As we tackle this multivariate problem as a community, this session will also highlight the health disparities associated with COVID-19, presenting an additional perspective to include when thinking of biomedical and other solutions to address this health problem that has rocked our lives over the last seven months.

The Petit Institute Diversity Committee is beginning a series on the ways that we can all think about systemic racism and inequities in research and training of graduate students and postdocs across our disciplines.

We must confront the routines, biases and contradictions that preserve the status quo. This town hall is a fresh call to antiracist action in the bioengineering and bioscience community. Please join our conversation as we look within our own community for the ways in which all of our members can answer the call.

Petit Diversity Committee Members:
Edward Botchwey (BME, Committee Chair)
Andrés García (ME, Petit Institute Executive Director)
María Coronel (ME, Postdoctoral Representative)
Nettie Brown (BME, Pre-doctoral Representative)
Lakeita Servance (Petit Institute, Staff Representative)
Milan Riddick (BME, Undergraduate Representative)

IMPORTANT PARTICIPANT INFO - PLEASE READ!

We hope to have a large number of participants and will be encouraging an open dialogue with as many attendees as time permits following the opening presentation by Professor Platt. During the opening remarks and presentation, all attendees' microphones and cameras should remain off. Participants will be encouraged to utilize the "Chat" feature for comments and questions throughout the event. We look forward to listening and learning from each other.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1600972514 2020-09-24 18:35:14 1602854053 2020-10-16 13:14:13 0 0 event 2020-10-19T14:00:00-04:00 2020-10-19T15:00:00-04:00 2020-10-19T15:00:00-04:00 2020-10-19 18:00:00 2020-10-19 19:00:00 2020-10-19 19:00:00 2020-10-19T14:00:00-04:00 2020-10-19T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-10-19 02:00:00 2020-10-19 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Ed Botchwey, Ph.D. - Chair, Petit Institute Diversity Committee

Colly Mitchell - Events, Petit Institute

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639553 639553 image <![CDATA[IBB’s Commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion]]> image/png 1601039505 2020-09-25 13:11:45 1601039505 2020-09-25 13:11:45
<![CDATA[Pediatric Tech Talk Webinar]]> 27195 "Building a Foundation for Growth - How GT 'Born' Jackson Medical Used 'Phase Zero' to Give Their Technology A Better Chance of Ending 'Never Events' in the Operating Room"

REGISTER HERE

Spencer Kozinn, M.D. - Jackson Medical
Kamil Makhneija - Jackson Medical
James Rains - Georgia Tech / Jackson Medical


Overheating lighting instruments coupled with human error are a leading cause of intraoperative fires and patient burns. The healthcare system refers to these as “never events” so they should never happen, right? But, data suggests that they occur more than twice a day. This was a red flag for Jackson Medical Co-founders James Rains and Kamil Makhnejia.

At the Georgia Institute of Technology, Rains and Makhnejia began conceptualizing GloShield™ to address this safety issue. They then brought on to the team Dr. Spencer Kozinn, a local Atlanta urologist, who not only resonated with the safety issue being addressed, but also provided clinical expertise to the team.

Together, the future Jackson Medical team knew they had a great base concept but to successfully commercialize the idea, they would need an additional outside design and development perspective. “We knew that we had an innovative concept and that there is nothing like GloShield currently on the market, but needed to ensure that we were taking the correct steps that would help us reach commercialization in a timely and cost-efficient manner,” Rains said.

Professor Rains, Dr. Kozinn, and Mr. Makhnejia will discuss the questions researchers and innovators must answer and what they should anticipate from a funding and development timeline standpoint at the earliest stages of the pathway in their medical product concept’s journey toward commercialization.

This event is sponsored by Children's Healthcare of Atlanta's Pediatric Technology Center, with marketing partner write2market
 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1601908862 2020-10-05 14:41:02 1602686383 2020-10-14 14:39:43 0 0 event 2020-10-21T13:00:00-04:00 2020-10-21T13:30:00-04:00 2020-10-21T13:30:00-04:00 2020-10-21 17:00:00 2020-10-21 17:30:00 2020-10-21 17:30:00 2020-10-21T13:00:00-04:00 2020-10-21T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-10-21 01:00:00 2020-10-21 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Christopher Jackson

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<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series - Virtual]]> 27195 These back-to-back seminars will be presented virtually using the BlueJeans Meeting format.

BLUE JEANS PARTICIPATION LINK

8:30 A.M.
Seth Hutchinson, Ph.D.
Professor and KUKA Chair for Robotics
School of Interactive Computing
Executive Director of the Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Machines 
Georgia Tech

"A Biologically Inspired Approach to Robotic Flapping Flight"

RESEARCH
Robots never know exactly where they are, what they see, or what they're doing. They live in dynamic environments, and must coexist with other, sometimes adversarial agents. Robots are nonlinear systems that can be underactuated, redundant, or constrained, giving rise to complicated problems in automatic control. Many of even the most fundamental computational problems in robotics are provably hard. 

Over the years, these are the issues that have driven my group's research in robotics. Topics of our research include visual servo control, planning with uncertainty, pursuit-evasion games, as well as mainstream problems from path planning and computer vision. The links to the left will take you to pages that describe some of our results to date. 


9:00 A.M.
Gregory S. Sawicki, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and 
School of Biological Sciences
Georgia Tech

"A Biologically Inspired Approach to Lower-limb Exoskeleton Design"

RESEARCH
Gregory Sawicki, Ph.D., directs the Human Physiology of Wearable Robotics (PoWeR) laboratory—where the goal is to combine tools from engineering, physiology and neuroscience to discover neuromechanical principles underpinning optimal locomotion performance and apply them to develop lower-limb robotic devices capable of improving both healthy and impaired human locomotion (e.g., for elite athletes, aging baby-boomers, post-stroke community ambulators).

By focusing on the human side of the human-machine interface, Sawicki and his group have begun to create a roadmap for the design of lower-limb robotic exoskeletons that are truly symbiotic---that is, wearable devices that work seamlessly in concert with the underlying physiological systems to facilitate the emergence of augmented human locomotion performance.

BACKGROUND
Sawicki is an Associate Professor at Georgia Tech with appointments in the School of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Biological Sciences. He holds a B.S. from Cornell University (’99) and a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from University of California-Davis (’01).

Sawicki completed his Ph.D. in Human Neuromechanics at the University of Michigan, Ann-Arbor (‘07) and was an NIH-funded Post-Doctoral Fellow in Integrative Biology at Brown University (‘07-‘09). Sawicki was a faculty member in the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at NC State and UNC Chapel Hill from 2009-2017. In summer of 2017, he joined the faculty at Georgia Tech with appointments in Mechanical Engineering 3/4 and Biological Sciences 1/4.


 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559230837 2019-05-30 15:40:37 1598289918 2020-08-24 17:25:18 0 0 event 2020-09-08T09:30:00-04:00 2020-09-08T10:30:00-04:00 2020-09-08T10:30:00-04:00 2020-09-08 13:30:00 2020-09-08 14:30:00 2020-09-08 14:30:00 2020-09-08T09:30:00-04:00 2020-09-08T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-09-08 09:30:00 2020-09-08 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Petit Events Manager

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622104 622104 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 <![CDATA[Hutchinson Lab Website]]> <![CDATA[Sawicki PoWeR Lab Website]]>
<![CDATA[BBUGS Annual Recruiting Carnival]]> 27195 Looking to get involved? If you're in a bio-related GT graduate program, BBUGS is for you.

Georgia Tech's Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS) is hosting our annual (virtual) Recruiting Carnival on Zoom (link coming soon)!

BBUGS is the largest and most diverse graduate student organization at Georgia Tech, and aims to create social, professional, and personal opportunities for all graduate students in bioengineering and biosciences.

Join to learn more about BBUGS as a whole, each committee (Education & Outreach, Industry, Research, Policy, Service, Social, and Wellness), and how to get involved for the 2020-21 year. We'll be giving away brand-new BBUGS stickers so make sure to stop in for some swag!

SIGN UP HERE to receive BBUGS notifications throughout the year.

BBUGS is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1595511398 2020-07-23 13:36:38 1595512057 2020-07-23 13:47:37 0 0 event 2020-08-20T18:30:00-04:00 2020-08-20T19:30:00-04:00 2020-08-20T19:30:00-04:00 2020-08-20 22:30:00 2020-08-20 23:30:00 2020-08-20 23:30:00 2020-08-20T18:30:00-04:00 2020-08-20T19:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-08-20 06:30:00 2020-08-20 07:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Meghan O'Melia, Co-Chair
Casey Vantucci, Co-Chair

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<![CDATA[VIRTUAL - Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar Series]]> 27349 This seminar will be presented as an online/virtual event

Helping GT entrepreneurs learn how to fund and commercialize their technology

"Navigating the Risks and Opportunities in Regenerative Medicine Product Development - Examples in Orthopaedic Surgery"

Scott Bruder, M.D., Ph.D.

Founder and Chief Executive Officer
Bruder Consulting & Venture Group

AGENDA

11:00 a.m.       Seminar
12-2:00 p.m.    Individual or small-group discussions with Dr. Bruder **

**All spots to meet with Dr. Bruder individually or in small groups have now been filled.

RSVP for Seminar

BlueJeans Seminar Participation Link

Scott Bruder, M.D., Ph.D., has enjoyed a long and distinguished career in the discovery, development and commercialization of products to diagnose and treat patients around the world.  He founded the Bruder Consulting and Venture Group in 2015 after 25 years in the industrial sector, serving in the C-Suites of Stryker Corporation as the Chief Medical and Scientific Officer, and at BD, as the Chief Science and Technology Officer, where he also led Corporate Business Development.  Previously, while at Johnson & Johnson, he and his team built a portfolio of tissue repair products for the DePuy franchise before establishing a new business unit known as J&J Regenerative Therapeutics, LLC.  Earlier in his career, he was the first scientist hired by Osiris Therapeutics, a mesenchymal stem cell company based on the work of his PhD mentor, Prof. Arnold Caplan.  In addition to his tenure through industry, Dr. Bruder has maintained an active academic presence, serving as an Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Case Western Reserve University since 2011, after 13 years as adjunct faculty in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery.  Currently, he also serves on the Board of Directors of both publicly held and private equity backed medical device companies.

​Dr. Bruder's inventions, technologies and teams have launched dozens of products, earning billions of dollars for his employers and patent licensors.  He has published more than 125 original articles, book chapters and abstracts, and lectured extensively around the world. He is the recipient of numerous honors, and is both the youngest and only industry scientist to receive the Kappa Delta Award from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the Marshall R. Urist Award for Excellence in Tissue Regeneration Research from the Orthopedic Research Society, and the Pierre Galletti Award from the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, all of which represent the highest scientific honors bestowed by these organizations. He also served three years as the Industry Member on the FDA Advisory Committee on Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies.  Dr. Bruder received his Sc.B. from Brown University, and both his M.D. and Ph.D. from CWRU School of Medicine before post-graduate clinical training at the Albert Einstein Medical Center and the University of Pennsylvania. Scott resides in Northern New Jersey with his beloved wife and dog, and has two daughters in college and graduate school. 

Support for this series provided by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and VentureLab.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1584704010 2020-03-20 11:33:30 1591984303 2020-06-12 17:51:43 0 0 event 2020-06-18T12:00:00-04:00 2020-06-18T15:00:00-04:00 2020-06-18T15:00:00-04:00 2020-06-18 16:00:00 2020-06-18 19:00:00 2020-06-18 19:00:00 2020-06-18T12:00:00-04:00 2020-06-18T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-06-18 12:00:00 2020-06-18 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D.
Principal, VentureLab
Petit Institute

Harold Solomon
Principal, VentureLab

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<![CDATA[VentureLab website]]> <![CDATA[Bruder profile]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Diversity & Inclusion Town Hall]]> 27195 Dear IBB Community, 

In the wake of the recent tragic and heartbreaking events in our nation and here in our city, we stand in support and solidarity for social justice for all citizens and our constitutional right for peaceful protests. Georgia Tech and IBB remain resolute in our commitment to diversity, inclusion and social justice. We denounce all forms of racism, injustice, and violence. We are a catalyst for change and together we will improve the human condition.

We are committed to listening and learning from each other, building a space for continued reflection, and creating change.

Please join us at a virtual town hall for a community conversation.

Sincerely, 
Andrés García
Executive Director
Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience

Join remotely via Microsoft Teams 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1591207947 2020-06-03 18:12:27 1591800627 2020-06-10 14:50:27 0 0 event 2020-06-11T12:00:00-04:00 2020-06-11T13:00:00-04:00 2020-06-11T13:00:00-04:00 2020-06-11 16:00:00 2020-06-11 17:00:00 2020-06-11 17:00:00 2020-06-11T12:00:00-04:00 2020-06-11T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-06-11 12:00:00 2020-06-11 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Colly Mitchell

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<![CDATA[VIRTUAL - Regenerative Engineering & Medicine Annual Retreat]]> 27195 Join us for the Regenerative Engineering & Medicine Center's annual retreat, hosted by Georgia Tech, Emory, and the University of Georgia. Advances in the delivery of molecular and biological therapeutics that will enhance the body’s ability to heal itself will be discussed, along with opportunities to meet and collaborate with PIs who will apply to the 2020 grant RFA on this topic - RFA INFO HERE.

RSVP to Attend HERE

AGENDA

10:30 a.m.        Introductory remarks

10:35 a.m.        Keynote Presentation - "The Return of the Trojan Horse: Efficient Delivery of Therapeutics to the CNS to Treat Brain Disorders" - Greg A. Gerhardt, Ph.D., Co-Director, Brain Restoration Center, Director, Center for Microelectrode Technology, University of Kentucky Medical Center

11:05 a.m.        Brian Cummings, Ph.D. - University of Georgia

11:15 a.m.        Haian Fu, Ph.D. - Emory University

11:25 a.m.        Mark Prausnitz, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech

11:35 a.m.        Questions & Answers

11:40 a.m.        Breakout "Rooms" on Delivery Routes/Methods - links to join below

12:30 p.m.        Adjourn

Participate via BlueJeans HERE


REM Vision
The integration of engineering technologies, biological discoveries, and clinical expertise and infrastructure will establish Georgia as leader in developing and delivering clinical therapies
 
REM Mission
To fundamentally transform the treatment of human diseases and injuries through the development and delivery of molecular and biological therapeutics that will that enhance the body’s ability to heal itself.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1581946310 2020-02-17 13:31:50 1589465545 2020-05-14 14:12:25 0 0 event 2020-05-15T11:30:00-04:00 2020-05-15T13:30:00-04:00 2020-05-15T13:30:00-04:00 2020-05-15 15:30:00 2020-05-15 17:30:00 2020-05-15 17:30:00 2020-05-15T11:30:00-04:00 2020-05-15T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-05-15 11:30:00 2020-05-15 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Susan Thomas, Ph.D. - Co-Director, Georgia Tech
Steven Stice, Ph.D. - Co-Director, University of Georgia
Edmund Waller, M.D., Ph.D. - Co-Director, Emory University

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353181 353181 image <![CDATA[Regenerative Engineering & Medicine Center (REM)]]> image/png 1449245728 2015-12-04 16:15:28 1475895080 2016-10-08 02:51:20 <![CDATA[REM Website]]>
<![CDATA[VIRTUAL - Project ENGAGES Senior Celebration]]> 27195 Join us ONLINE to CELEBRATE our 2020 Project ENGAGES Seniors!

AGENDA

3:00 p.m.  Opening Remarks
3:15 p.m.  Words of Reflection about Bob Nerem, joined by Marilyn Nerem 
3:30 p.m.  Recognition of Graduating Scholars 
3:45 p.m.  Recognition of Mentors and 2019-2020 STARs Science Club Leaders
3:50 p.m.  Remarks from GT Officials/APS School Officials
4:00 p.m.  Closing Remarks

WATCH LIVE

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1589222769 2020-05-11 18:46:09 1589224310 2020-05-11 19:11:50 0 0 event 2020-05-19T16:00:00-04:00 2020-05-19T17:00:00-04:00 2020-05-19T17:00:00-04:00 2020-05-19 20:00:00 2020-05-19 21:00:00 2020-05-19 21:00:00 2020-05-19T16:00:00-04:00 2020-05-19T17:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-05-19 04:00:00 2020-05-19 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Lakeita Servance
Project ENGAGES Program Coordinator

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<![CDATA[Project ENGAGES website]]>
<![CDATA[POSTPONED - BioTech Commercialization Bootcamp]]> 27195 DUE TO GEORGIA TECH'S CAMPUS CLOSURE IN RESPONSE TO THE PANDEMIC, THIS EVENT WILL BE RESCHEDULED AT A LATER DATE

Together, Georgia Tech's Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Pediatric Technology Center (PTC), the Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN), the Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience (IBB), and VentureLab are hosting this 1 1/2 day bootcamp to educate and motivate faculty and students across multiple IRIs and colleges to pursue biomedical translational and commercialization work. In addition, the bootcamp will help Georgia Tech bio entrepreneurs build their networks.

Open to all in Georgia Tech's bio community. 

$20 registration fee, all attendees

AGENDA

TUESDAY, MAY 12, 2020

9:00 a.m. – FDA Regulatory Session – What Researchers Need to Know - Medical Devices and Combination Devices
This session will offer best practices when conducting trials using FDA approved and unapproved devices. It will give an overview of the marketing process for medical devices, the IDE application process, and the obligations of the sponsor-investigator once the IDE application is filed with the FDA. Case studies will be presented to enhance learning and stimulate audience participation. This session will address the following questions:

Session Facilitator:
David Jensen, Ph.D., R.A.C., Duke University
David Jensen, Ph.D., R.A.C., is a Regulatory Associate, Senior in the office of Regulatory Affairs and Quality (ORAQ) within the Duke University School of Medicine. He uses his 15+ years of experience in US FDA-regulated medical product development to advise Duke Faculty and project teams, primarily at the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI), on regulatory strategy development, FDA meetings, regulatory submissions, product manufacturing, and preclinical testing. He assists project teams with the development, coordination, and implementation of complex regulatory projects involving drugs, biologics, devices (including Software as a Medical Device), and dietary supplements. Jensen is also a patent-holding cell & molecular biologist with broad experience in drug discovery and development and with significant scientific knowledge in a variety of therapeutic areas. Prior to Duke, Jensen held regulatory positions at a major CRO and at a biotechnology company (focused on nanotechnology) and he was a project leader for oncology, osteoarthritis, and virology programs at a major pharmaceutical company. Jensen has an undergraduate degree in Chemistry from California State University at Fullerton, a master’s degree in Medicinal Chemistry from Duquesne University, and a doctoral degree in Pharmacology from the University of Virginia. He also holds the US regulatory affairs certification (RAC) from the Regulatory Affairs Professional Society. 

12:00 p.m. – Networking Lunch

1:30 p.m. – Therapeutics – What Researchers Need to Know
This session will offer best practices when conducting trials using FDA approved and unapproved drugs or substances (including biologics). It will give an overview of the IND application process and the regulatory obligations of the sponsor-investigator once an IND is filed with the FDA. Case scenarios will be presented to enhance learning and stimulate audience participation. This session will address the following questions:

Session Facilitator:
Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., R.A.C., Duke University
Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., R.A.C.Johnson is a Regulatory Affairs Scientist in the Office of Regulatory Affairs and Quality (ORAQ) within the Duke University School of Medicine.  In this role, Johnson is responsible for providing support and guidance to investigators and regulatory study coordinators regarding the regulatory requirements relevant to their research study activities. She performs a variety of services including regulatory education, regulatory consultation, and support for regulatory submissions. Johnson is also involved in the implementation of operational initiatives within ORAQ. Johnson received her undergraduate degree in biochemistry from Clemson University.  She conducted her graduate research at Duke University, where she earned her PhD in Molecular Cancer Biology. During her graduate training, Johnson was the recipient of a James B. Duke Fellowship, a Ruth L. Kirschstein-NRSA Predoctoral Fellowship, and a Robert J. Fitzgerald Scholar Award.  After her graduate studies, Johnson spent two years as a Regulatory Coordinator at the Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke University. Johnson holds the Regulatory Affairs Certification (RAC) from the Regulatory Affairs Professional Society.

4:30 p.m. – Networking Reception, Petit Biotech Building Atrium


WEDNESDAY, MAY 13, 2020

8:00 a.m. – Keynote Presentation – How to Move Technology into Clinical Trials
Daria Mochly-Rosen, Ph.D., George D. Smith Professor in Translational Medicine, Stanford University

Daria Mochly-Rosen, Ph.D., is a chemist turned drug developer with clinical trials experience. Mochly-Rosen founded Stanford’s SPARK program to provide a cost-effective model to generate diagnostic and drug proof of concept using out-of-the-box academic approaches combined with industry standards. Product proposals are reviewed annually by an expert panel of faculty and industry advisors. The panel reviews new, unlicensed disclosures made to the University Office of Technology Licensing as well as proposals submitted from across the university. SPARK Scholars are funded for an average of two years and participate in weekly seminars with industry and academic experts. In addition, Mochly-Rosen runs a multi-disciplinary research lab that includes chemists, biochemists, biologists, and physician scientists. She has a Ph.D. from Weizmann Institute, Israel in Chemical Immunology and a B.S. from Tel Aviv University, Israel in Life Sciences.

9:00 a.m. – Health Information Technology Regulatory and Deep Technology Commercialization
This session will offer best practices for thinking about and assisting in drafting patents, answering office actions, and focusing on IP so that it is ready for venture capital investors. Case studies from other academic inventors will be presented to enhance learning and stimulate audience participation.

Session Facilitators: 
John Sears, J.D., Ph.D., CLP - Director of Intellectual Property, Anzu Partners LLC
Sears is an experienced patent attorney and licensing professional, educator, and chemist. John founded the law firm, Innovators Legal which specializes in working with early-stage technology companies and investors on areas of intellectual property (IP) protection and diligence. He also serves as the Director of IP at the venture capital firm Anzu Partners, where he leads the firm’s IP diligence efforts and assists portfolio companies in all areas of intellectual property strategy. John is Adjunct Faculty at Wake Forest University School of Law, where he develops and teaches courses at the intersection of IP and business.

Richard Timmer, Ph.D. - Patent Agent, Thomas Horstemeyer
Timmer specializes in the areas of chemistry, biotechnology, and medical devices. He has over 25 years of experience in the chemical and life sciences industries, which includes more than 15 years of experience with patent preparation and prosecution of patent applications with three national law firms and the management of patent portfolios within biotechnology start-ups and multinational pharmaceutical companies. Timmer has drafted well-over 100 patent applications involving medicinal and polymer chemistry inventions, and nearly as many life sciences inventions involving expression vectors, recombinant proteins, transgenic plants, medical devices, diagnostic methods, and health IT.

12:00 p.m. – Closing Remarks

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1580838562 2020-02-04 17:49:22 1588772854 2020-05-06 13:47:34 0 0 event 2020-05-12T09:00:00-04:00 2020-05-13T13:00:00-04:00 2020-05-13T13:00:00-04:00 2020-05-12 13:00:00 2020-05-13 17:00:00 2020-05-13 17:00:00 2020-05-12T09:00:00-04:00 2020-05-13T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-05-12 09:00:00 2020-05-13 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Events Manager

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<![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> <![CDATA[Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology website]]> <![CDATA[Children's Healthcare of Atlanta Pediatric Technology Center website]]>
<![CDATA[VIRTUAL - 7th Annual BioE Day]]> 27195 Join us virtually to celebrate the Petit Institute's Bioengineering Interdisciplinary Graduate Program!

RSVP HERE

Attend via BlueJeans Link HERE

AGENDA

12 noon        Welcome and Opening Remarks - Hang Lu, Ph.D., Director, and Manu Platt, Ph.D., Deputy Director - BioEngineering Program
 
12:05 p.m.    "Journey to Bioengineering" - Shuichi Takayama, Ph.D. - Outstanding BioE Faculty Advisor; Introduced by Hannah Viola
 
12:45 p.m.    "Biosensors for Field Deployable Diagnostics" - Monica McNerney, Ph.D. - Outstanding BioE Thesis; Introduced by Mark Styczynski, Ph.D.
 
1:15 p.m.      Rapid Fire Presentations - 10 current BioE students to present
 
2:15 p.m.      "Securing a Job as a Ph.D. Student: A Few Pitfalls and Tactical Solutions" - Steven Schwaner, Ph.D., BioE Alum Class of 2019, Consultant, Exponent; Introduced by Ross Ethier, Ph.D.
 
2:45 p.m.      "Universal Brain-machine Interfaces Enabled by Flexible Scalp Electronics & Deep-learning” - Musa Mahmood, Doctoral Candidate - Outstanding BioE Paper; W. Hong Yeo, Ph.D., Advisor
 
3:15 p.m.      "Adhesion Analysis to Interrogate Extravasation Capacity of CD8 T Cells for Adoptive Cell Therapy" - Camila Camargo, Doctoral Candidate - Outstanding BioE Abstract; Susan Thomas, Ph.D., Advisor
 
3:30 p.m.      “Insect Pee: How Sharpshooters Excrete Ultrafast Fluid Droplets” - Elio Challita, Doctoral Candidate - Outstanding BioE Abstract; Saad Bhamla, Ph.D., Advisor
 
3:45 p.m.      "A Bioengineering Journey: Navigating Unique Challenges and Opportunities" - Ivana Parker, Ph.D., BioE Alum Class of 2015, Assistant Professor University of Florida; Introduced by Manu Platt, Ph.D.
 
4:15 p.m.      2020 Awards Announced – Outstanding Rapid Fire Presentation, Christopher Ruffin Leadership Award

4:30 p.m.       Virtual Happy Hour 

5:30 p.m.       Adjourn

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1586796768 2020-04-13 16:52:48 1588188090 2020-04-29 19:21:30 0 0 event 2020-05-05T13:00:00-04:00 2020-05-05T18:30:00-04:00 2020-05-05T18:30:00-04:00 2020-05-05 17:00:00 2020-05-05 22:30:00 2020-05-05 22:30:00 2020-05-05T13:00:00-04:00 2020-05-05T18:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-05-05 01:00:00 2020-05-05 06:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Laura Paige

404-385-6655

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<![CDATA[GT Bioengineering Program Website]]>
<![CDATA[Buzz on Biotechnology High School Open House]]> 27349 The popular annual event, hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS), is held for high school students to come and engage their interest in science and biotechnology. Students will be able to participate in interesting - and fun! - hands-on demonstrations, take tours of state-of-the-art Georgia Tech laboratories and attend short scientific seminars on a variety of biotechnology topics.

For complete event information and for FREE registration, visit the Buzz on Biotechnology website.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1586867679 2020-04-14 12:34:39 1586869407 2020-04-14 13:03:27 0 0 event 2020-09-26T11:00:00-04:00 2020-09-26T14:00:00-04:00 2020-09-26T14:00:00-04:00 2020-09-26 15:00:00 2020-09-26 18:00:00 2020-09-26 18:00:00 2020-09-26T11:00:00-04:00 2020-09-26T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-09-26 11:00:00 2020-09-26 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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245221 245221 image <![CDATA[Buzz on Biotechnology]]> image/jpeg 1449243722 2015-12-04 15:42:02 1475894921 2016-10-08 02:48:41 <![CDATA[Buzz on Biotechnology website]]>
<![CDATA[Cancelled: Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 “Mechanical Properties of Biological Systems: Bones and Bacteria”

Christopher Hernandez, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering
Cornell University
Adjunct Scientist, Hospital for Special Surgery

ABSTRACT
My research focuses on the mechanical properties of living tissues and how mechanical forces stimulate biological responses. This talk for Mechanical Engineers includes Materials Science, Additive Manufacturing, Fluid Dynamics, Nanoscience, Biology and even Robotics (sort of).
Cancellous bone is an open cell foam with an anisotropic microstructure made of a heterogeneous polymer-ceramic composite. In the body, cancellous bone is thought to make bones more lightweight and also assist in energy absorption. In a series of experiments examining the accumulation of fatigue damage in high porosity cancellous bone. We show that fatigue failure is influenced by two traits have little effect on uniaxial properties: matrix heterogeneity and microstructural elements oriented transverse to habitual loads. Our findings may not only help prevent osteoporosis-related fractures in the elderly but may also be useful for the design of ultralightweight microarchitectured materials used in aircraft.
In addition to studying the mechanical properties of biological materials, my group also studies how mechanical stress and strain influence biological processes. Here I show how mechanical stress influences the physiology of the most ubiquitous type of organism on Earth: bacteria. We use a novel microfluidic platform with nanoscale features to capture and mechanically load individual bacteria and use super-resolution microscopy to measure responses. Our findings demonstrate that bacteria, like mammalian cells, have mechanosensitive systems that influences fundamental processes including those involved in the resistance of toxins and antibiotics.

BIO
Christopher Hernandez, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor in the Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. His work examines bone biomechanics and adaptation, the effects of the microbiome on bone and joint disease and mechanoresponsive properties of bacteria. In addition to his scientific work, Hernandez’s outreach activities include leadership responsibilities with the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers national meeting and programs to enhance diversity in engineering at Cornell. Hernandez is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineer. He is a recipient of the Zellman Warhaft Faculty Award for Commitment to Diversity (Cornell University) and is one of only three engineers to receive the Fuller Albright Award for scientific excellence (American Society for Bone and Mineral Research). Hernandez received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University and his undergraduate degree from Harvard University.    

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1573158477 2019-11-07 20:27:57 1584540546 2020-03-18 14:09:06 0 0 event 2020-04-02T12:00:00-04:00 2020-04-02T13:00:00-04:00 2020-04-02T13:00:00-04:00 2020-04-02 16:00:00 2020-04-02 17:00:00 2020-04-02 17:00:00 2020-04-02T12:00:00-04:00 2020-04-02T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-04-02 12:00:00 2020-04-02 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Nick Willett, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Hernandez lab]]>
<![CDATA[CANCELLED: Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR) Seminar Series]]> 27195 William Durfee, Ph.D.
Morse Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor
Director Design Education
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Minnesota

 

RESEARCH
William Durfee's research interests include design of medical devices, rehabilitation engineering, advanced orthotics, biomechanics and physiology of human muscle including electrical stimulation of muscle, product design and design education.

Example research projects: (1) Developing a system that combines electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles with a mechanical brace to restore walking to individuals with paraplegia. (2) Exploring the fundamental characteristics of tiny hydraulic systems and their application to powered exoskeletons for orthotics and human power amplification. (3) Developing a tiny internal combustion engine and compressor for supplying compressed air to portable, wearable pneumatic systems. (4) Researching the mechanical properties of human muscle including developing new research and clinical diagnostic instrumentation to quickly and easily measure muscle function. (5) Assessing performance characteristics of tools and devices used in surgical procedures. (6) Exploring new ways to educate engineers, including low-cost take-home lab kits.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1582304643 2020-02-21 17:04:03 1584365488 2020-03-16 13:31:28 0 0 event 2020-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 2020-04-14T14:00:00-04:00 2020-04-14T14:00:00-04:00 2020-04-14 17:00:00 2020-04-14 18:00:00 2020-04-14 18:00:00 2020-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 2020-04-14T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-04-14 01:00:00 2020-04-14 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Drew Elliott - Research Technician II | Biomedical Engineering

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<![CDATA[Durfee profile]]> <![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)]]>
<![CDATA[CANCELLED - Regenerative Medicine Workshop]]> 27349 In an abundance of caution over concerns regarding the spread of the COVID-19 (Coronavirus), the 2020 Regenerative Medicine Workshop has been cancelled.


The 24th Regenerative Medicine Workshop will take place at the Wild Dunes Resort in Isle of Palms, South Carolina, bringing together leading experts from across the expansive field of regenerative medicine. This annual event is, by design, a collegial and “Gordon-style” gathering of interdisciplinary researchers who come together, often bringing their families, to enjoy an intimate, accessible environment just as spring is arriving on the Carolina coast.
 
Each year approximately 200 participants – faculty, trainees, clinicians, industry representatives, and exhibitors – mingle and discuss their work face-to-face during a busy, diverse program spanning four days, which includes more than 40 podium presentations. Other events include a poster session, a trainee networking event, a lively debate/panel discussion, an ocean-side conference dinner, and other networking opportunities. A variety of sponsorship and exhibit opportunities with customized packages are available.
 
The workshop, with a focus on combining scientific discovery with engineering principles to ultimately develop better clinical outcomes, is organized by Georgia Tech, Emory University, University of Georgia, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Medical University of South Carolina, and University of Florida.

Register here

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1578322176 2020-01-06 14:49:36 1584041971 2020-03-12 19:39:31 0 0 event 2020-03-18T18:00:00-04:00 2020-03-21T13:00:00-04:00 2020-03-21T13:00:00-04:00 2020-03-18 22:00:00 2020-03-21 17:00:00 2020-03-21 17:00:00 2020-03-18T18:00:00-04:00 2020-03-21T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-03-18 06:00:00 2020-03-21 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Colly Mitchell

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<![CDATA[RMW Website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Communication between the Extracellular Landscape and the Cytoskeleton by Integrins and Tensile Force"

Timothy A. Springer, Ph.D.
Latham Family Professor
Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Professor of Medicine
Harvard Medical School
Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine
Division of Hematology/Oncology
Department of Medicine
Boston Children’s Hospital

Tim received his B.A. in Biochemistry from University of California in 1971, his Ph.D. in Molecular Biology and Biochemistry from Harvard in 1976 and did a fellowship with Cesar Milstein in Cambridge, England.  He began as Assistant Professor on the Quad at HMS in 1977 and has been here ever since, although his institution has changed several times.  Since 1989 Springer has been Latham Family Professor. He currently is Professor of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology and of Medicine at HMS and in the Program of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, and in the Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine at Children’s Hospital.

Springer discovered with monoclonal antibodies, then cloned and functionally and structurally characterized, many of the adhesion receptors in the immune system. He was the first to demonstrate that lymphocytes and leukocytes had adhesion molecules. His work on these receptors has advanced to characterizing their interactions and allosteric transitions by x-ray crystallography, electron microscopy, and laser tweezers force spectroscopy.

He discovered the lymphocyte function-associated (LFA) molecules, the intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs), and the first subfamily of integrins. He discovered that LFA-1 bound to ICAM-1, that LFA-2 (CD2) bound to LFA-3, and that blocking either of these adhesion pathways could block antigen recognition by T lymphocytes.  These two pathways were the first examples of like-unlike cell adhesive recognition in biology.  These discoveries directly led to the development and FDA approval of efalizumab (Raptiva, Genentech) - an antibody to LFA-1, and Alefacept (Amevive, Biogen) - the LFA-3 ectodomain fused to Fc, both for plaque psoriasis.

Springer later discovered the three step paradigm for leukocyte diapedesis: 1) rolling adhesion of leukocytes on the vessel wall through a translating zone of selectin-carbohydrate adhesion; 2) activation of G protein-coupled receptors on the leukocyte by chemoattractants presented by vascular endothelium; and 3) activation of integrin adhesiveness for CAMs on endothelium, which mediates firm adhesion and leukocyte migration through the vessel wall.  The use of different molecular digits in each step creates area codes that govern which particular subset of leukocytes or lymphocytes will emigrate from the bloodstream to a particular subset of inflammatory signals.  This together with the realization that blocking any of these steps could completely block emigration led Springer to found LeukoSite in 1993.  In 1996 LeukoSite published that an antibody to integrin α4β7, a lymphocyte homing receptor for mucosal tissues, rapidly resolved colitis in non-human primates.  This antibody, vedolizumab (Entyvio, Takeda) was approved for moderate to severe ulcerative colitis and Crohns disease in 2014.  Springer recruited to the SAB Herman Waldmann, the creator of the antibody CAMPATH-1 (Alemtuzumab). Waldmann arranged to license CAMPATH-1 to LeukoSite in 1997, which was approved by the FDA for B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in 2001. CAMPATH was later acquired by Genzyme, and reintroduced as Lemtrada, which was approved for multiple sclerosis in 2013.  LeukoSite went public in 1998 and acquired ProScript and with it the proteasome inhibitor bortezimib in 1999, which was approved for multiple myeloma in 2003 (Velcade, Millenium Pharmaceuticals).  LeukoSite was acquired by Millenium in December 1999 and as 35% of Millenium was valued at $3 billion by 2001.

Springer’s academic interests now focus on how protein conformational change together with tensile force activates integrins, von Willebrand factor, the transforming growth factor-β family, and adhesins on malaria sporozoites, and discovering new binding partners.  Springer has over 500 publications, a Hirsch index of 147, and over 30 patents.  He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and his honors include the Crafoord Prize, the American Association of Immunologists Meritorious Career Award, and the Stratton Medal from the American Society of Hematology.

Springer is an investor in Selecta Bioscience since its B round and a founding investor in Moderna Therapeutics and Editas Medicine.  He is a Resident Professor at Pfizer.  He is founder and investor in Scholar Rock and in Morphic Rock Therapeutics, and board member and lead angel of Ab Initio Biotherapeutics. IRR to date (12/31/08 to 3/31/16) is 78% for the private investments, excluding founders shares. As a philanthropist, Springer has endowed Chairs at Harvard Medical School and Children’s Hospital, and is on the Children’s Hospital Boston Board of Trust.

Current projects include a non-profit to advance entrepreneurship and innovation in protein therapeutics and open-source antibodies and small molecules. Next is a dual-acting malaria vaccine, to both protect humans from being infected, and to prevent mosquitos from transmitting infection.


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559228393 2019-05-30 14:59:53 1582905390 2020-02-28 15:56:30 0 0 event 2020-03-03T11:00:00-05:00 2020-03-03T12:00:00-05:00 2020-03-03T12:00:00-05:00 2020-03-03 16:00:00 2020-03-03 17:00:00 2020-03-03 17:00:00 2020-03-03T11:00:00-05:00 2020-03-03T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-03-03 11:00:00 2020-03-03 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> David Ku, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Spring Lab Website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 “Molecular Imaging and Cellular Reprogramming in Immuno-engineering”

Peter Yingxiao Wang, Ph.D.
Professor of Bioengineering
Department of Bioengineering
Institute of Engineering in Medicine
University of California, San Diego

ABSTRACT
Genetically-encoded biosensors based on fluorescence proteins (FPs) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have enabled the specific targeting and visualization of signaling events in live cells with high spatiotemporal resolutions. FRET biosensors have been successfully developed to monitor the activity of a variety of signaling molecules, including tyrosine/serine/threonine kinases. We have a developed a general high-throughput screening (HTS) method based on directed evolution to develop sensitive and specific FRET biosensors which allowed the visualization of signaling activation patterns in live immune cells. It has also been increasingly clear that controlling protein functions can control cellular behaviors for therapeutics. We have engineered a novel class of machinery molecules which can provide a surveillance of the intracellular space, visualizing the spatiotemporal patterns of molecular events and automatically triggering corresponding molecular actions to guide cellular functions. We have adopted a modular assembly approach to develop these machinery molecules, and applied them to reprogram the “don’t eat me” CD47 receptor SIRPa on macrophages such that the engagement of SIRPa and its activation of naturally negative signals will be rewired to turn on positive actions to facilitate phagocytosis of red blood cells and target tumor cells. Because of the modular design of our engineered molecule, our approach can be extended to perform a broad range of cell-based imaging and immunotherapies, and hence highlight the translational power in bridging the fundamental molecular engineering to clinical medicine. We have further integrated with lights and ultrasound to control the molecular activations of genes and enzymes, which allowed us to control the cellular functions of immunocells for therapeutics with high precision in space and time.

BIOGRAPHY
Peter Wang, Ph.D., obtained his bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Mechanics and Fluid Mechanics from Peking University, Beijing, P.R. China, in 1992 and 1996, respectively. He received his Ph.D. degree in Bioengineering from UC, San Diego in 2002 and continued his postdoctoral work at UC San Diego working under Bioengineering Professor Shu Chien and Professor Roger Y. Tsien in the Department of Pharmacology. He is current a professor at the department of Bioengineering at UCSD and a fellow of American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). Before joining the UC San Diego faculty in 2012, he was an associate professor at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Department of Bioengineering and a full-time faculty member in the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Illinois. Dr. Wang is the recipient of the Wallace H. Coulter Early Career Award (both Phase I and Phase II), the National Science Foundation CAREER Award, and National Institutes of Health Independent Scientist Award. His research is supported by the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and private foundations.



VIEW TALK VIA LIVESTREAM

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1576253075 2019-12-13 16:04:35 1582902011 2020-02-28 15:00:11 0 0 event 2020-03-12T12:00:00-04:00 2020-03-12T13:00:00-04:00 2020-03-12T13:00:00-04:00 2020-03-12 16:00:00 2020-03-12 17:00:00 2020-03-12 17:00:00 2020-03-12T12:00:00-04:00 2020-03-12T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-03-12 12:00:00 2020-03-12 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Ross Ethier, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Wang lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 “PICS: Phase Imaging with Computational Specificity”

Gabriel Popescu, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Director, Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory
Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

ABSTRACT
Due to its specificity, fluorescence microscopy (FM) has been the main imaging tool in cell biology. However, photobleaching, phototoxicity, and related artifacts continue to limit FM’s performance. Recently, it has been shown that artificial intelligence (AI) can transform one form of contrast into another. We present PICS, a combination of quantitative phase imaging and AI, which provides quantitative information about unlabeled live cells with high specificity. Our imaging system allows for automatic training, while inference is built into the acquisition software and runs in real-time. Applying the computed specificity maps back to the QPI data, we measured the growth of both nuclei and cytoplasm independently, over many days, without loss of viability. Using a QPI method that suppresses multiple scattering, we measured the dry mass content of individual cell nuclei within spheroids.

BIOGRAPHY
Gabriel Popescu, Ph.D., is a Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Following his BS and MS in Physics from University of Bucharest, he received his Ph.D. in Optics in 2002 from the School of Optics/ CREOL (now the College of Optics and Photonics), University of Central Florida.  He continued his training with the late Michael Feld at M.I.T., working as a postdoctoral associate. He joined Illinois in August 2007 where he directs the Quantitative Light Imaging Laboratory (QLI Lab) at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology. Dr. Popescu served as Associate Editor of Optics Express and Biomedical Optics Express, Editorial Board Member for Journal of Biomedical Optics and Scientific Reports. He authored three books, edited another book, authored 175 journal publications, gave 230 lecture/plenary/invited talks, 230 conference presentations, 32 patents. He founded Phi Optics, Inc., a start-up company that commercializes quantitative phase imaging technology. He is a Fellow of OSA, SPIE, AIMBE, and senior member of IEEE.


VIEW TALK VIA LIVESTREAM

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1576518423 2019-12-16 17:47:03 1582747791 2020-02-26 20:09:51 0 0 event 2020-03-05T11:00:00-05:00 2020-03-05T12:00:00-05:00 2020-03-05T12:00:00-05:00 2020-03-05 16:00:00 2020-03-05 17:00:00 2020-03-05 17:00:00 2020-03-05T11:00:00-05:00 2020-03-05T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-03-05 11:00:00 2020-03-05 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Ross Ethier, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Popescu lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR) Seminar Series]]> 27195 “A Seismic Shift in Wearable Robotics”

Rich Mahoney, Ph.D.
CEO/Founder

Seismic

ABSTRACT
Seismic was founded in 2015 to commercialize technology developed at SRI International under the DARPA Warrior Web Program.  Rich will talk about Seismic's journey to first product, some of his own journey, and the ultimate vision for powered clothing.

BIO
Rich Mahoney's career looks like this: BS/MS ME Drexel U (I'm a Philly boy); PhD Cambridge, attended on a Fulbright; early Rehab Robotics KOL, but wanted to make products instead of research; did lots of SBIRs and eventually brought to market (2006) a robot for stroke therapy for the arms; moved to CA (2008) to be Director of Robotics at SRI; became founding president of Silicon Valley Robotics (a good way to meet fellow roboticists); led an amazing team doing lots of good work for DARPA and big companies, and spun out a few things (Abundant, Verb, Redwood, ...); founded Seismic to get back to doing real products (2015).

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1582290035 2020-02-21 13:00:35 1582290044 2020-02-21 13:00:44 0 0 event 2020-03-10T14:00:00-04:00 2020-03-10T15:00:00-04:00 2020-03-10T15:00:00-04:00 2020-03-10 18:00:00 2020-03-10 19:00:00 2020-03-10 19:00:00 2020-03-10T14:00:00-04:00 2020-03-10T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-03-10 02:00:00 2020-03-10 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Drew Elliott - Research Technician II | Biomedical Engineering

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<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR) Seminar Series]]> 27195 “Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Healthcare Economics, Surgical Robotics, Value-based Healthcare”

Catherine Mohr, M.D.
President

Intuitive Foundation

ABSTRACT
In a traditional fee for service model for healthcare, new medical technology products were brought into a system that evaluated therapies by themselves in isolation – were they effective enough in the single patient to warrant use of this new device or drug?  Even government-funded single-payer systems have traditionally used a population-based average of this same concept of cost effectiveness.

The current global move to true value-based healthcare requires an expansion from this traditional narrow focus of evaluating the therapies in isolation.  It is a systems-based approach, that must take into account not just individual patient outcomes for the episode of care, but the effects of therapies on the workflow in the hospital, dynamics at a population level, and even has repercussions into how a country trains and credentials its doctors and nurses.  This level of complexity presents challenges to both providers of care, and those who would develop tools for those providers to use.  

In her talk, Dr. Mohr will explore the history of our technological medical interventions, understanding measurements of value with an eye towards developing the next generation of medical devices.  

BIO 
Dr. Catherine Mohr is President of the Intuitive Foundation, the corporate Foundation of Intuitive Surgical, a high technology Silicon Valley based company that makes the da Vinci surgical robot. In this role she invests in research and development programs aimed at understanding and improving education of medical practitioners around the world and applying novel technologies aimed at reducing the global burden of disease. In addition, she is on Faculty at Singularity University which studies the impact of exponentially changing technologies on our society.

Dr. Mohr has a diverse background which covers surgery, medical technology, engineering, product design, healthcare, alternative energy, automotive, aerospace, global entrepreneurship, IP litigation, FDA compliance, education, and product development. From this she brings extensive industry experience and deep insights into emerging opportunities, trends, issues and challenges. Proven history of visionary thought-leadership as an advisor on future technologies to a wide range of companies and government agencies, and a sought-after speaker/lecturer.

Dr. Mohr received her BS and MS in mechanical engineering from MIT, and her MD from Stanford University School of Medicine. She has been involved with numerous startup companies in the areas of alternative energy transportation, and worked for many years developing high altitude aircraft and high efficiency fuel cell power systems, computer aided design software, and medical devices.

Dr. Mohr has served as a scientific advisor for several startup companies in Silicon Valley, the NCI SBIR program, and government technology development programs in her native New Zealand, and entrepreneurship programs worldwide. She is the author of numerous scientific publications, the recipient of multiple design awards, and speaks regularly internationally on the subject of the future of surgery, technology and robotics.
 

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1578328108 2020-01-06 16:28:28 1581103613 2020-02-07 19:26:53 0 0 event 2020-02-11T12:00:00-05:00 2020-02-11T13:00:00-05:00 2020-02-11T13:00:00-05:00 2020-02-11 17:00:00 2020-02-11 18:00:00 2020-02-11 18:00:00 2020-02-11T12:00:00-05:00 2020-02-11T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-02-11 12:00:00 2020-02-11 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Drew Elliott - Research Technician II | Biomedical Engineering

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<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series - NEW Two-Speaker Format!]]> 27195 NEW TWO-SPEAKER FORMAT for 2019-2020!

Blair Brettmann, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Georgia Tech

"Surface Modified Cellulose Nanocrystals for Drug Polymorph Screening"

RESEARCH
Brettmann’s current research interests focus on developing technologies that enable multicomponent, rapidly customizable product design, with a specific focus on polymer systems. Mass customization of manufactured material goods presents significant technical challenges, but could yield significant rewards, similar to advances in “just in time” logistics and on-demand consumer services. Substantial challenges in engineering and design, extending from the complexity of multicomponent functional materials and the difficulty in applying scientific principles to these complex systems, slow material product development. Her research group designs and studies new processing and characterization technologies using both experiments and theory, focusing on linking molecular to micron scale phenomena in complex systems to product performance.

BIO
Blair Brettmann received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin in 2007. She received her Master's in Chemical Engineering Practice from MIT in 2009 following internships at GlaxoSmithKline (Upper Merion, PA) and Mawana Sugar Works (Mawana, India). Blair received her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at MIT in 2012 working with the Novartis-MIT Center for Continuous Manufacturing under Prof. Bernhardt Trout. Her research focused on solid-state characterization and application of pharmaceutical formulations prepared by electrospinning. Following her Ph.D., Blair worked as a research engineer for Saint-Gobain Ceramics and Plastics for two years. While at Saint-Gobain she worked on polymer-based wet coatings and dispersions for various applications, including window films, glass fiber mats and architectural fabrics. Later, Blair served as a postdoctoral researcher in the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago with Prof. Matthew Tirrell.


Rebecca Levit, M.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech and Emory University
Assistant Professor
Division of Cardiology
Emory University

"Modulating Innate Inflammation in the Heart with Biomaterials"

RESEARCH
Cardiovascular diseases are the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. We are dedicated to developing new therapies to help cardiac patients by identifying, testing, and moving new therapies towards clinical use. We study stem cell therapies to prevent heart damage and promote repair. We use biomaterials to increase cell retention, increase efficacy, and target activity. Damage to heart muscle one hour after ischemia-reperfusion. Large amounts of neutrophils have already infiltrated the damaged heart muscle. Our lab is working on new therapies to minimize the damaging effects of these cells.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559236137 2019-05-30 17:08:57 1580999359 2020-02-06 14:29:19 0 0 event 2020-02-11T08:30:00-05:00 2020-02-11T09:30:00-05:00 2020-02-11T09:30:00-05:00 2020-02-11 13:30:00 2020-02-11 14:30:00 2020-02-11 14:30:00 2020-02-11T08:30:00-05:00 2020-02-11T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-02-11 08:30:00 2020-02-11 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Petit Events Manager

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622104 622104 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 <![CDATA[Brettman Lab]]> <![CDATA[Levit Cardiovascular Lab]]>
<![CDATA[Coronavirus Forum]]> 35021 The Center for Microbial Dynamics and Infection will host a special Coronavirus Forum, featuring three short talks spanning real-time sequence analysis (by Trevor Bedford, Fred Hutch, joining via video conference), outbreak strength estimation (by Joshua Weitz, BioSci, GT), and drug development (by Phil Santangelo, BME, GT).  The forum is open to all and will take place in IBB 1128 on Monday 2/10 from 3-4pm with science networking to follow from 4-4:30pm. Light refreshments to follow.

]]> mavdonina3 1 1580917389 2020-02-05 15:43:09 1580934033 2020-02-05 20:20:33 0 0 event 2020-02-10T15:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10T16:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10T16:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10 20:00:00 2020-02-10 21:00:00 2020-02-10 21:00:00 2020-02-10T15:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-02-10 03:00:00 2020-02-10 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Joshua Weitz

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632131 632131 image <![CDATA[CMDI Special Seminar]]> image/jpeg 1580917496 2020-02-05 15:44:56 1580917496 2020-02-05 15:44:56 <![CDATA[CMDI @ GaTech]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 Matthew Rowan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Cell Biology
Emory University

"Dissection of Neural Circuit Function and Degeneration from a Subcellular Perspective"
 

How do neurons perform the set of signaling functions necessary for proper circuit function?We aim to uncover cellular and molecular mechanisms that shape excitability among different mammalian neurons. We approach these questions in intact brain circuits, using intersectional approaches combining optogenetics, in vivo and ex vivo electrophysiology, 2P imaging, AAV vectors, and transgenic models. Perhaps the most critical neuronal signaling features are action potential firing and synaptic transmission. Neurons regulate these features by spatially segregating different ion channels in the soma, dendrites, and axon. We are now beginning to understand the significance of these cellular processes in terms of circuit function and disease. We are interested in understanding how different cell classes, (e.g., inhibitory neurons) utilize these excitable mechanisms to their advantage in the circuit. Knowledge gained from these studies will fuel the design of robust, cell-type-specific therapeutic approaches against neurological disorders.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1580318732 2020-01-29 17:25:32 1580318732 2020-01-29 17:25:32 0 0 event 2020-02-17T11:15:00-05:00 2020-02-17T12:15:00-05:00 2020-02-17T12:15:00-05:00 2020-02-17 16:15:00 2020-02-17 17:15:00 2020-02-17 17:15:00 2020-02-17T11:15:00-05:00 2020-02-17T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-02-17 11:15:00 2020-02-17 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley, faculty host

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series - NEW Two-Speaker Format!]]> 27195 NEW TWO-SPEAKER FORMAT for 2019-2020!

Presenting at 8:30 AM:

Nicoleta Serban, Ph.D.
Professor
H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Georgia Tech

"Health Analytics: From Data to Decision Making"

RESEARCH
Nicoleta Serban's research interests on Health Analytics span various dimensions including large-scale data representation with a focus on processing patient-level health information into data features dictated by various considerations, such as  data-generation process and data sparsity; machine learning and statistical modeling to acquire knowledge from a compilation of health-related datasets with a focus on geographic and temporal variations; and integration of statistical estimates into informed decision making in healthcare delivery and into managing the complexity of the healthcare system.

BIO
Nicoleta Serban is Virginia C. and Joseph C. Mello Professor in the H. Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Dr. Serban's education and research trajectory makes her unique in the pursuit of data-driven discovery endeavors. Her research record is quite diverse, from mathematical statistics to modeling to data analysis to statistical learning, with recent contributions on drawing principled inferences on healthcare delivery and health policy. She has also been involved in broad impact research activities; the most noteworthy is the leadership of the Health Analytics initiative (http://www.healthanalytics.gatech.edu). This is a collaborative effort anchored in partnership with a varied network of clinicians, healthcare providers, and public health entities. To date, she has published more than 55 journal articles, and a collaborative (with Dr. William B. Rouse) book titled Understanding and Managing the Complexity of Healthcare published by MIT Press and single-authored book titled Healthcare System Access: Measurement, Inference and Intervention published by Wiley.  She is the editor for physical sciences, engineering, and the environment for the Annals of Applied Statistics Journal. She has reviewed for multiple funding agencies and she has served in multiple workshops and meetings organized by the National Academies.


Presenting at 9:00 AM:

Jeffrey Skolnick, Ph.D.
Professor, Mary and Maisie Gibson Chair
Director, Center for the Study of Systems Biology
Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar in Computational Systems Biology
Georgia Tech

"The Possible Origin of the Biochemical Function of Proteins and its Implications for the Origin of Life"

RESEARCH
Computational Systems Biology & Bioinformatics including the development of algorithms and their application to proteomes for the prediction of protein structure and function, the prediction of small molecule ligand-protein interactions with applications to drug discovery and the prediction of off-target uses of existing drugs, fundamental studies on the nature and completeness of protein structure space and the exploration of the interplay between protein physics and evolution in determining protein structure and function, prediction of protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions, cancer metabolomics and molecular simulations of cellular processes.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1560365573 2019-06-12 18:52:53 1579792848 2020-01-23 15:20:48 0 0 event 2020-03-10T09:30:00-04:00 2020-03-10T10:30:00-04:00 2020-03-10T10:30:00-04:00 2020-03-10 13:30:00 2020-03-10 14:30:00 2020-03-10 14:30:00 2020-03-10T09:30:00-04:00 2020-03-10T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-03-10 09:30:00 2020-03-10 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Petit Events Manager

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622104 622104 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 <![CDATA[Serban Lab]]> <![CDATA[Center for the Study of Systems Biology Lab Website]]>
<![CDATA[Micro-Physiological Systems Seminar Series]]> 27349 Hansang Cho, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Sungkyunkwan University & University of North Carolina at Charlotte

“3D Human Brain models in Microfluidics for the Study of Neurological Disorders”

With hundreds of billions of neurons and thousands of trillions of synaptic connections between them, the human brain is the most complex system on earth. However, there are no well-developed human brain models to study the brain activities in either laboratory environments or in animal bodies. Here, I present micro-scaled 3D environments that reconstruct a 3D human brain in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by recapitulating AD signature of elevated levels of amyloid-beta (A-beta), tau proteins, activation of microglia, immune cells resident in a central nervous system (CNS), and consequent neuronal damage. In particular, the model mirrored microglial neurotoxic activities such as axonal cleavage and neurotoxic release.

Lunch will be provided at the beginning of the seminar.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1579720109 2020-01-22 19:08:29 1579720109 2020-01-22 19:08:29 0 0 event 2020-02-10T13:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10T14:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10T14:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10 18:00:00 2020-02-10 19:00:00 2020-02-10 19:00:00 2020-02-10T13:00:00-05:00 2020-02-10T14:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-02-10 01:00:00 2020-02-10 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Shuichi Takayama, faculty host

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<![CDATA[Seminar Website]]> <![CDATA[Cho profile]]>
<![CDATA[3rd Annual Exploration and Origins Colloquium]]> 27349 The ExplOrigins group is hosting the 3rd annual Exploration and Origins Colloquium on January 27th and 28th, in another example of Georgia Tech’s thriving collaboration between the astrobiology and space science communities. This interdisciplinary colloquium will highlight space exploration science and biological, geological, and astronomical origins research going on at the Georgia Institute of Technology, as well as neighboring universities. The goals of the colloquium are to forge relationships between diverse individuals, encourage collaboration and interdisciplinary understanding, and kick-start future fundable projects requiring the skills and expertise of multi-lab teams. With a cohort of presenters from a wide range of fields, the colloquium aims to bring together the diverse  research of Georgia Tech scientists and engineers who explore our world, space, and the universe as well as to investigate the origins of life, earth, and our solar system. 

The colloquium will  begin with a poster session on the evening of the 27th where attendees will show off their latest work in an environment conducive to interdisciplinary collaboration. Activities on the 28th include a day-long seminar with twelve contributed talks, and highlighted keynote addresses by: Mariel Borowitz of Georgia Tech’s Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, and Christopher Carr of MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital. This colloquium takes place in the context of a burgeoning astrobiology community at Georgia Tech, with the Institute having recently hosted the Astrobiology Graduate Conference in 2018 and announced the host of Astrobiology Science Conference in 2021.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1579711566 2020-01-22 16:46:06 1579711611 2020-01-22 16:46:51 0 0 event 2020-01-27T08:00:00-05:00 2020-01-28T17:00:00-05:00 2020-01-28T17:00:00-05:00 2020-01-27 13:00:00 2020-01-28 22:00:00 2020-01-28 22:00:00 2020-01-27T08:00:00-05:00 2020-01-28T17:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-27 08:00:00 2020-01-28 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Frank Rosenzweig, faculty host

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<![CDATA[ExplOrigins Website]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 “A Motor Theory of Sleep Control”

Yang Dan, Ph.D.
Paul Licht Distinguished Professor
Molecular and Cell Biology
University of California, Berkeley

Sleep is a fundamental biological process, and its disruption has profound impacts on human health. Using a variety of techniques including optogenetics, electrophysiology, imaging, and gene expression profiling, we identify key neurons in the sleep control circuits and map their synaptic connections. Sleep appears to be controlled by a highly distributed network spanning the forebrain, midbrain, and hindbrain, where REM and non-REM sleep neurons are part of the central somatic and autonomic motor circuits. The intimate association between the sleep and autonomic/somatic motor control circuits suggests that a primary function of sleep is to promote biological processes incompatible with movement.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1579011155 2020-01-14 14:12:35 1579011155 2020-01-14 14:12:35 0 0 event 2020-03-09T12:15:00-04:00 2020-03-09T13:15:00-04:00 2020-03-09T13:15:00-04:00 2020-03-09 16:15:00 2020-03-09 17:15:00 2020-03-09 17:15:00 2020-03-09T12:15:00-04:00 2020-03-09T13:15:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-03-09 12:15:00 2020-03-09 01:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley, faculty host

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Dan profile]]>
<![CDATA[Micro-Physiological Systems Seminar Series]]> 27349 Pilgyu Kang, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
George Mason University

"Micro/Nano Mechanics and Photonics for Biomedical Applications"

Nanostructuring of atomically-thin two-dimensional (2D) materials (e.g. graphene and MoS2) has showed promise to create new functionalities for various biomedical applications, especially flexible and wearable electronics. In this talk, I will discuss how nanostructuring of atomically-thin materials could create new functionalities based on the fundamental studies of mechanics and photonics at nanoscale. I will first discuss how nanostructuring of atomically-thin 2D materials allows for the enhancement of their exceptional material properties and creating new functionalities in mechanical, optical, plasmonic properties. I will also introduce a shrink nanomanufacturing method developed based on nanoscale mechanics of atomically-thin materials, including graphene and MoS2 atomic layers. Shrink nanomanufacturing allows large-scale, uniform crumpling of graphene, a two-dimensional (2D) material, enabling mechanical stretchability and strain tunability of a flexible optoelectronic device. I will highlight a high-performance flexible photodetector developed based on the shrink nanomanufacturing approach as well as its potential in flexible/wearable optical sensing technology for biomedical applications.

Lunch will be served at the beginning of the seminar.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1578930909 2020-01-13 15:55:09 1578931726 2020-01-13 16:08:46 0 0 event 2020-01-27T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-27T14:00:00-05:00 2020-01-27T14:00:00-05:00 2020-01-27 18:00:00 2020-01-27 19:00:00 2020-01-27 19:00:00 2020-01-27T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-27T14:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-27 01:00:00 2020-01-27 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Shuichi Takayama, faculty host

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<![CDATA[RSVP]]> <![CDATA[Kang profile]]> <![CDATA[Seminar website]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 Daniel O’Connor, Ph.D.
Associate Professor 
Department of Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

“A Functional Cortical Network for Sensorimotor Sequence Generation”

I will discuss my laboratory’s recent work on the sensorimotor control of complex tongue movements. The brain generates complex sequences of movements that can be flexibly reconfigured in real-time based on sensory feedback, but how this occurs is not fully understood. We developed a novel ‘sequence licking’ task in which mice directed their tongue to a target that moved through a series of locations. Mice could rapidly reconfigure the sequence online based on tactile feedback. Closed-loop optogenetics and electrophysiology revealed that tongue/jaw regions of somatosensory (S1TJ) and motor (M1TJ) cortex encoded and controlled tongue kinematics at the level of individual licks. Tongue premotor (anterolateral motor, ALM) cortex encoded intended tongue angle in a smooth manner that spanned individual licks and even whole sequences, and progress toward the reward that marked successful sequence execution. ALM activity regulated sequence initiation, but multiple cortical areas collectively controlled termination of licking. Our results define a functional cortical network for hierarchical control of sensory- and reward-guided orofacial sequence generation.
 

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1578664045 2020-01-10 13:47:25 1578664045 2020-01-10 13:47:25 0 0 event 2020-01-27T11:15:00-05:00 2020-01-27T12:15:00-05:00 2020-01-27T12:15:00-05:00 2020-01-27 16:15:00 2020-01-27 17:15:00 2020-01-27 17:15:00 2020-01-27T11:15:00-05:00 2020-01-27T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-27 11:15:00 2020-01-27 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley - faculty host

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[O'Connor profile]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Workshop]]> 27349 Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Workshop: “Taking Your Research to the Next Level”

This workshop will provide an overview of resources available here at Georgia Tech. Break out groups will be available based on interest areas that will dive deeper into each area. 

When you register for the workshop, please select your interest area (when to start a company, patent strategy, sources of funding, etc.). Lunch will be provided!

We look forward to seeing you there! RSVP

 

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1577972002 2020-01-02 13:33:22 1578495003 2020-01-08 14:50:03 0 0 event 2020-01-21T11:30:00-05:00 2020-01-21T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-21T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-21 16:30:00 2020-01-21 18:00:00 2020-01-21 18:00:00 2020-01-21T11:30:00-05:00 2020-01-21T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-21 11:30:00 2020-01-21 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Harold Solomon

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<![CDATA[RSVP]]> <![CDATA[VentureLab]]>
<![CDATA[Pediatrics@GT Presents: Pediatric Tech Talk Webinar]]> 27349 "New Paradigms for Preventing and Treating Viral Infections"

Dr. Philip J. Santangelo is a Professor in the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering. In 1998, he obtained his Ph.D. in Engineering from the University of California at Davis, and then was a postdoctoral fellowship at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California. He also spent time as a research faculty member at Georgia Tech until becoming an Assistant Professor in 2007. Dr. Santangelo’s research focuses on the development of imaging tools for the study of viral pathogenesis and immune responses, and the development of mRNA-based therapies and vaccines.

On Wednesday January 29th, 2020, Dr. Santangelo will discuss his research into mRNA-based therapeutics, what they are and how we are using them for prevention and treatment. If you are interested in new approaches to preventing and treating viral infection, including synthetic mRNA and gene modulation technology will find Dr. Santangelo’s Pediatric Tech Talk of high value. We will be live broadcasting this webinar from the Georgia Tech campus and be serving lunch to any participants that attend in person!

RSVP HERE! http://bit.ly/2N0M2xo

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1578494791 2020-01-08 14:46:31 1578494791 2020-01-08 14:46:31 0 0 event 2020-01-29T12:00:00-05:00 2020-01-29T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-29T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-29 17:00:00 2020-01-29 18:00:00 2020-01-29 18:00:00 2020-01-29T12:00:00-05:00 2020-01-29T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-29 12:00:00 2020-01-29 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR) Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Challenges in Prosthetic Limbs: Design, Control, Use and Utility"

Peter Adamczyk, Ph.D.
Charles Ringrose Assistant Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
University of Wisconsin-Madison

ABSTRACT
Artificial limbs offer an opportunity to improve movement through biomimetic devices. One approach is to directly replace joint function, but achieving humanlike performance is challenging for design, control, cost and longevity of the systems. An alternative approach is to exploit biomechanical workarounds for lost function rather than directly replacing it. This presentation will describe several such “semi-active” prostheses – low-power systems that modulate their mechanical properties without powering body movement. This approach aims to add adaptability and versatility with minimal addition of weight, height, complexity, power demand and cost. 

Another challenge in rehabilitation and assistive technology is determining which among several interventions is most beneficial to everyday movement. “Real-world” assessment using wearable sensors is a popular approach, but current analysis techniques struggle to reduce days-long data sets to generalizable knowledge. The second part of this presentation will describe this challenge and a novel approach to data reduction aimed at enabling lab-like scientific findings from long-term wearable data sets, with upcoming application to prosthetic ankle-foot systems. 

BIO 
Peter Adamczyk, Ph.D., earned degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University (B.S.) and the University of Michigan (M.S. and Ph.D) in the areas of Robotics and Biomechanics. He spent several years running a startup company dedicated to advancing the science and technology of lower-limb prosthetics and real-world motion assessment. He is now the Charles Ringrose Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison where he directs the Biomechatronics, Assistive Devices, Gait Engineering and Rehabilitation Laboratory (UW BADGER Lab). 

Adamczyk’s research aims to enhance physical and functional recovery from impairments affecting walking, running, and standing. Core foci include the design of semi-active foot prostheses for gait restoration after amputation; wearable sensors for movement assessment during real-life activities; and rehabilitation robotics to explore motor learning and neural adaptation in the lower limb. 

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1578327819 2020-01-06 16:23:39 1578327854 2020-01-06 16:24:14 0 0 event 2020-01-14T12:00:00-05:00 2020-01-14T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-14T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-14 17:00:00 2020-01-14 18:00:00 2020-01-14 18:00:00 2020-01-14T12:00:00-05:00 2020-01-14T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-14 12:00:00 2020-01-14 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Drew Elliott - Research Technician II | Biomedical Engineering

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<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)]]> <![CDATA[Adamczyk Lab]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 “Evolution and Development of a Minimal Nervous System in our Closest Invertebrate Relatives” 

Alberto Stolfi, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor
School of Biological Sciences
Georgia Tech

Animal behavior depends both on the intrinsic properties of individual neurons and how these neurons connect to and modulate one another. A major focus of modern neuroscience is to dissect behavior at the level of individual genes, neurons, and specific synaptic connections, but we are far from fully understanding how the composition and connectivity of even the smallest nervous systems can determine the wide range of behaviors observed in a free-living animal. Our lab is investigating the development of the simple larval nervous systems of tunicates like Ciona, marine invertebrates closely related to vertebrates. Although tunicates are chordates like us, Ciona larvae possess the smallest nervous system ever described at only 231 total neurons (177 central nervous system neurons and 54 peripheral sensory cells), comprising only the second complete “connectome” ever mapped. Using experimental tools such as CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis and single-cell RNAseq, we have uncovered neurodevelopmental processes that shape this minimal nervous system, some of which are conserved even in mammals. We are also interested in studying an even more extreme example of the “minimization” of the tunicate nervous system, focusing on certain species that bypass the swimming larval phase and are therefore undergoing evolutionary loss of the larval nervous system altogether.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1572283540 2019-10-28 17:25:40 1577980650 2020-01-02 15:57:30 0 0 event 2019-11-25T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-25T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-25T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-25 16:15:00 2019-11-25 17:15:00 2019-11-25 17:15:00 2019-11-25T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-25T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-25 11:15:00 2019-11-25 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley- faculty host

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Stolfi profile]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 “Straighten Up and Fly Right:  Navigation and Motor Control in Fruit Flies”

Michael H. Dickinson, Ph.D.
Esther M. and Abe M. Zarem Professor of Bioengineering and Aeronautics
California Institute of Technology

Over 400 million years ago, a group of tiny six-legged creatures evolved the ability to fly—an event that fundamentally transformed our planet. Equipped with the ability to fly, insects underwent an extraordinary radiation and have dominated every terrestrial ecosystem ever since. In order to employ fly effectively, these ancient insects must have possessed the rudimentary ability to take off, fly stably, disperse, forage, and land — a core set of behavioral modules that constitute a ‘Devonian Toolkit’. The fact that the basic architecture of the nervous system is remarkably uniform across species, further suggests that many behaviors of modern insects are deeply rooted in a common evolutionary history. My lab is attempting to reconstruct the behavior and ecology of ancestral insects through investigations of the common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Most experiments on fly behaviors have been confined to small laboratory chambers, yet the natural history of these animals involves dispersal that takes place on a much larger spatial scale. New release-and-recapture experiments in the Mojave Desert confirm that flies can navigate over 10 kilometers of open landscape in just a few hours. Such excursions are only possible because flies can actively maintain a constant heading. In this talk, I will discuss a hierarchy of neural mechanisms that enable flies to maintain a stable course in the face of external and internal perturbations. Collectively, this new research provides insight into ancient sensory-motor modules that have helped make insects the most successful group of animals in the history of life.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1577979987 2020-01-02 15:46:27 1577979987 2020-01-02 15:46:27 0 0 event 2020-02-03T11:15:00-05:00 2020-02-03T12:15:00-05:00 2020-02-03T12:15:00-05:00 2020-02-03 16:15:00 2020-02-03 17:15:00 2020-02-03 17:15:00 2020-02-03T11:15:00-05:00 2020-02-03T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-02-03 11:15:00 2020-02-03 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley - faculty host

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Dickinson lab]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 "Corticocortical Communication"

Adam Kohn, Ph.D.
Professor, Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience
Professor, Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences
Professor, Department of Systems & Computational Biology
Isidor Tachna Professor in Ophthalmology
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Most brain functions involve neuronal population activity that is distributed across multiple areas. The routing of signals through this distributed network is flexible, changing from moment-to-moment to meet task demands. To determine how flexible cortical communication could be instantiated, we recorded spiking activity of neuronal populations across several stages of the macaque cortical visual stream.  Using dimensionality reduction methods, we find that inter-areal interactions occur through a communication subspace: downstream fluctuations are related to a small subset of source population activity patterns. Subspaces for feedforward and feedback interactions appear distinct. We propose that the communication subspace may be a general, population-level mechanism by which activity can be selectively and flexibly routed across brain areas.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1577979680 2020-01-02 15:41:20 1577979680 2020-01-02 15:41:20 0 0 event 2020-02-10T11:15:00-05:00 2020-02-10T12:15:00-05:00 2020-02-10T12:15:00-05:00 2020-02-10 16:15:00 2020-02-10 17:15:00 2020-02-10 17:15:00 2020-02-10T11:15:00-05:00 2020-02-10T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-02-10 11:15:00 2020-02-10 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley - faculty host

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Kohn profile]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series - NEW Two-Speaker Format!]]> 27195 NEW TWO-SPEAKER FORMAT for 2019-2020!

Costas Arvanitis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Georgia Tech

AT 8:30 AM:

"Converting Mechanistic Understanding of Ultrasound-mediated Mass Transport to Effective Treatments against Brain Diseases"

RESEARCH
Costas Arvanitis’ research is focused on biomedical ultrasound and image guided therapy. His work focuses on understanding the biological effects of ultrasound and of acoustically induced microbubble oscillations (acoustic cavitation) and using them to study complex biological systems, such as the neurovascular network and the tumor microenvironment, with the goal of developing novel therapies for the treatment of cancer and central nervous system diseases and disorders.The current research efforts of the lab are focused on the study of the interactions of ultrasound with single and multiple cells and cell types, ultrasound mediated transport of molecules and pharmaceuticals across cellular and vascular barriers, and microbubble dynamics in vessels and tissues.

To facilitate our research, we engineer and integrate multi-modality and multi-scale systems with numerical models and in vivo and in vitro experimentation. We envision that such systems and approaches will allow us to study and understand biological systems in a completely different way, resulting in new concepts, tools and methods to treat cancer and central nervous system diseases and disorders.

BIO
Costas Arvanitis, Ph.D., joined Georgia Institute of Technology as a joint Assistant Professor at the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering in August 2016. Before joining Georgia Institute of Technology he was Instructor (Research Faculty) at Harvard Medical Scholl and Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Arvanitis has also worked as a research fellow in the Biomedical Ultrasonics, Biotherapy and Biopharmaceuticals Laboratory at the Institute of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Oxford.


AT 9:00 AM:

Thomas Orlando, Ph.D.
Professor
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Georgia Tech

"Low-energy Electron Interactions with Complex Biomolecules and Carcinogenesis"

RESEARCH
Professor Orlando directs the Electron- and Photon-Induced Chemistry on Surfaces Lab (EPICS). EPICS is primarily a surface chemistry and physics group that focuses on the use of high-powered pulsed lasers, low-energy electron scattering, micro-plasmas, mass spectrometry, and ultrahigh vacuum surface science techniques. The unifying theme within the group is to understand the important role electronic excitations of surfaces and interfaces play in chemical transformations, which can occur in radiation environments within the interstellar media, plasmas, or planetary magnetospheres. Understanding nonequilibrium processing of surfaces and materials within and beyond our solar system is a specific area of focus, particularly the role of electrons, protons, and extreme ultraviolet radiation in transforming surfaces of planets, their satellites (moons), asteroids, and comets. In addition, there are major efforts to examine the atomic and chemical composition of meteorite and lunar samples that may hold clues to the details of planet formation and possibly the chemical origin of life. These fundamental efforts are connected to many space missions including the Galileo, Cassini, MESSENGER, Deep Impact, and LADEE. Efforts are also underway that examine the chemical processes that occur in star-forming regions, within the solar nebulae, and on grains within interstellar regions. This research group is also affiliated with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory NAI on "Titan as a Pre-biotic Chemical System" and the John Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory Lunar Science and SERVI Institutes.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559321389 2019-05-31 16:49:49 1576872221 2019-12-20 20:03:41 0 0 event 2020-01-14T08:30:00-05:00 2020-01-14T09:30:00-05:00 2020-01-14T09:30:00-05:00 2020-01-14 13:30:00 2020-01-14 14:30:00 2020-01-14 14:30:00 2020-01-14T08:30:00-05:00 2020-01-14T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-14 08:30:00 2020-01-14 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Petit Events Manager

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622104 622104 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 <![CDATA[Arvanitis Lab]]> <![CDATA[Orlando EPIC Lab]]>
<![CDATA[Suddath Award Winner Presentation]]> 27195 "DNA Mechanotechnology for Sensing and Generating Piconewton-scale Forces"

Aaron Blanchard, Doctoral Candidate
Khalid Salaita, Ph.D., Advisor
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech and Emory University


Abstract
Mechanical forces drive and regulate countless biological processes including muscle contraction, embryogenesis, immunity, and coagulation. Such processes are mediated by networks of biomolecular motors, sensors, and structures that generate, sense, and transmit piconewton-scale forces. The ability to engineer similar nanoscale mechanical devices from scratch could reveal the properties of biological mechanical systems and pace the way for nanorobotics and functional nanomachines of the future. DNA nanotechnology has been central in efforts to such engineering efforts. In recent decades, dozens of devices – including rigid DNA beams that resemble cytoskeletal fibers, DNA-based mechanosensors, and DNA motors that mimic motor proteins such as kinesin – have been developed for use in diverse fields including biophysics research, molecular sensing, and the development of active nanomaterials. We recently introduced the term DNA mechanotechnology to collectively describe this emerging field of technological development (Blanchard & Salaita, Science, 2019). In my talk, I will highlight some of the most exciting examples of DNA mechanotechnology and emerging applications of these devices. I will then discuss in greater detail the DNA mechanotechnology that I have helped to develop during my PhD studies. Specifically, I will discuss DNA hairpin tension probes that transduce piconewton-scale mechanical tension into fluorescence (Brockman & Blanchard et al., Nature Methods, 2018), a force-transmitting DNA origami body that links multiple force sensors and ligands in parallel (Dutta, Zhang, & Blanchard et al., Nano Letters, 2018), and the world’s strongest synthetic DNA-based motor reported to date (Blanchard et al., Nano Letters, 2019).


The F. L. (Bud) Suddath Memorial Award has been established by the family, friends and colleagues of Bud Suddath to stimulate graduate research in the fields of biology, biochemistry and biomedical engineering. The award is given annually to a doctoral student of Georgia Tech who has at least one year remaining in his or her doctoral program and who has demonstrated significant research achievement in the field of biology, biochemistry or biomedical engineering. The awardee is provided an award of up to $1,000 in value which may be used to facilitate the completion of his or her scholarly development. The recipient will also be presented with an award as well as having his or her name engraved on the School's commemorative plaque. The recipient of this award will speak at a special event hosted by the Petit Institute the following year to present his or her research and talk about how the award impacted their research.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1576694919 2019-12-18 18:48:39 1576694965 2019-12-18 18:49:25 0 0 event 2020-01-09T11:00:00-05:00 2020-01-09T11:40:00-05:00 2020-01-09T11:40:00-05:00 2020-01-09 16:00:00 2020-01-09 16:40:00 2020-01-09 16:40:00 2020-01-09T11:00:00-05:00 2020-01-09T11:40:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-09 11:00:00 2020-01-09 11:40:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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<![CDATA[Salaita lab website]]> <![CDATA[2020 Suddath Symposium website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 "Intercellular Force Transduction"

Deborah Leckband, Ph.D.
Reid T. Milner Professor of Chemical Sciences
Professor of Chemistry
University of Illinois

ABSTRACT
Our research focuses on determining how intercellular force transduction contributes to human pathologies such as ventilator induced lung injury and malignant transformation in breast cancer.  Specifically we focus on cadherins, which are essential intercellular adhesion proteins and mechanical and signalling hubs in all tissues. Cadherins regulate tissue barriers, cell segregation in morphogenesis, and proliferation. We use mechanical perturbations, together with biochemical and biophysical approaches to determine how force fluctuations in tissues regulate these cadherin-dependent tissue functions. We established two force-transduction mechanisms that regulate cell mechanics and transcriptional activation. One mechanism involves a cytoplasmic protein, alpha catenin, which links cadherin complexes to actin. Under increased tension, alpha catenin exposes a binding site for vinculin, which scaffolds actin remodelling at perturbed junctions. In epithelia, we also demonstrated that force-loaded cadherin receptors activate the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFR and a kinase cascade that in turn activates integrins. In epithelia, E-cadherin and EGFR regulate contact-inhibited proliferation. Our studies show that increased intercellular tension disrupts the complex to potentiate EGF-dependent activation of EGFR and downstream Erk1/2, thus directly coupling mechanics to pro-proliferative signalling. Both the alpha catenin and kinase-mediated cascades also operate in other tissues, but involve tissue-specific cadherin/growth factor receptor pairs. Our findings reveal that cadherins, growth factor receptors, and integrins form a mechanosensitive network that regulates force sensitive tissue functions. I will discuss the broader implications of our findings for vascular function, breast cancer, and stem cell differentiation.

BIO
Deborah Leckband is the Reid T. Milner professor of Chemical Sciences at the University of Illinois. She earned a PhD in biophysical chemistry at Cornell, and did postdoctoral work with Robert Langer and then with Jacob Israelachvili.  She has appointments in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Chemistry, and Bioengineering at the University of Illinois. She is a former Head of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and directed the Bioengineering graduate program at Illinois. She held/holds elected positions in the BMES and is a BMES Fellow. She is a Fellow of AIMBE and the American Chemical Society. Deborah pioneered the use of surface force measurements to study proteins at interfaces to identify molecular scale interfacial properties of biomaterials. Her group discovered unexpected relationships between structures of adhesion proteins and their adhesive functions. Her current research focuses on multiscale investigations of force transduction at intercellular junctions. Her group was one the first to discover force transducton at cell-to-cell junctions. They continue to build on those initial findings, with a particular focus on how force transduction impacts tissue functions in development and disease. This multidisciplinary  research program involves a wide range of collaborations with cell biologists, clinical researchers, tissue engineers, and biophysicists.


DISTINCTIONS / AWARDS
Fellow, Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES), 2014
Fellow, American Chemical Society, 2009
Reid T. Milner Professor, University of Illinois, UC, 2006-
Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2005
Fellow, American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, 2005
James W. Westwater Professor, University of Illinois, UC, 2004-2006
Britton Chance Distinguished Lecturer, University of Pennsylvania, 2004


Can't make it to the talk? Watch via webcast

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1565872702 2019-08-15 12:38:22 1574435978 2019-11-22 15:19:38 0 0 event 2019-12-05T11:00:00-05:00 2019-12-05T12:00:00-05:00 2019-12-05T12:00:00-05:00 2019-12-05 16:00:00 2019-12-05 17:00:00 2019-12-05 17:00:00 2019-12-05T11:00:00-05:00 2019-12-05T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-12-05 11:00:00 2019-12-05 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Karen May - BME

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<![CDATA[Leckband Lab]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Holiday Party]]> 27195 The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience will hold its annual Holiday Party to celebrate another great year of interdisciplinary and collaborative research!

Above & Beyond Faculty, Student and Staff Awards to be given, so take a break from your offices and labs to come and celebrate the holiday season with the Petit Institute community!

This event is open to all faculty, staff, research staff, postdocs, and graduate students of the Petit Institute.

RSVP required by December 5 (space limited)

AND....please be sure to bring your donations for the Atlanta Community Food Bank and drop it off in one of the collection cans in the Petit Biotech Building atrium by Friday, Dec. 13!

MOST NEEDED:

Whole Grain Foods
Shelf-stable Milk
Dried or Canned Fruit
Low-sodium Canned Vegetables
Low-sodium Pasta Sauce (plastic containers only)
Peanut Butter
Dried Peas
Dried Beans
Canned Tuna, Salmon, or Chicken
Cooking Oil
100% Fruit or Vegetable Juice
**no glass containers

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1573847044 2019-11-15 19:44:04 1574278903 2019-11-20 19:41:43 0 0 event 2019-12-12T16:30:00-05:00 2019-12-12T18:30:00-05:00 2019-12-12T18:30:00-05:00 2019-12-12 21:30:00 2019-12-12 23:30:00 2019-12-12 23:30:00 2019-12-12T16:30:00-05:00 2019-12-12T18:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-12-12 04:30:00 2019-12-12 06:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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69773 69773 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449177264 2015-12-03 21:14:24 1475894611 2016-10-08 02:43:31 <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar, Jointly hosted by Neural Engineering Center]]> 27195 A Petit Institute Seminar, jointly hosted by Neural Engineering Center

"Towards the Development of Brain Imaging Biomarkers"

Vince Calhoun, Ph.D.
Professor
Distinguished University Professor
Department of Psychology
Georgia State University


Watch Via Livestream

Vince Calhoun, Ph.D., has secondary appointments in Computer Science, Math, Neuroscience and Physics at Georgia State University, with additional appointments at Georgia Institute of Technology (Electrical and Computer Engineering, Biomedical Engineering) and Emory University (Neurology, Radiology, Psychiatry, Biomedical Engineering)

Calhoun is the founding director of the tri-institutional Center for Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Data Science, which is focused on improving our understanding of the human brain using advanced analytic approaches with an emphasis on translational research such as the development of predictive biomarkers for mental and neurological disorders. The use of big data approaches and neuroinformatics tools to capture, manage, analyze, and share data is also a major emphasis.

Calhoun develops techniques for making sense of brain imaging data. The use of flexible/data driven approaches is very useful for extracting potentially unpredictable patterns within these data. However, such methods can be further improved by incorporating additional prior information as constraints, in order to benefit from what we know. Because each imaging modality has limitations, the integration of these data is needed to understand the healthy and especially the disordered human brain. He has created algorithms which map dynamic networks of brain function, structure, and genomics and how these are impacted while being stimulated by various tasks or in individuals with mental illness such as schizophrenia. He has released multiple software tools as well as advanced neuroinformatics tools for data management and sharing.

Calhoun is the author of more than 650 peer-reviewed journal articles and over 750 technical reports, abstracts and conference proceedings. Much of his career has been spent on the development of data driven approaches for the analysis of brain imaging data. He has won over $100 million in NSF and NIH grants on various topics including the incorporation of prior information into independent component analysis (ICA) for functional magnetic resonance imaging, data fusion of multimodal imaging and genetics data, and the identification of biomarkers for disease.

Calhoun is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, The Association for the Advancement of Science, The American Institute of Biomedical and Medical Engineers, the International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP). He is also a member and regularly attends the Organization for Human Brain Mapping, the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, the International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, and the ACNP. He is also a regular grant reviewer for NIH and NSF. He has organized workshops and special sessions at multiple conferences. He is currently chair of the IEEE Machine Learning for Signal Processing (MLSP) technical committee. He is a reviewer for many journals and is on the editorial board of the Brain Connectivity and Neuroimage journals and serves as Associate Editor for Journal of Neuroscience Methods and several other journals.


 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1565183581 2019-08-07 13:13:01 1574269385 2019-11-20 17:03:05 0 0 event 2019-12-10T11:00:00-05:00 2019-12-10T12:00:00-05:00 2019-12-10T12:00:00-05:00 2019-12-10 16:00:00 2019-12-10 17:00:00 2019-12-10 17:00:00 2019-12-10T11:00:00-05:00 2019-12-10T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-12-10 11:00:00 2019-12-10 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Garrett Stanley, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Translational Research in Neuroimaging and Date Science website]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR) Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Improving Human Performance with Robotic Prostheses"

Deanna Gates, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Movement Science and Biomedical Engineering
University of Michigan

ABSTRACT
With a prosthetic device, people with a lower limb amputation can remain physically active, but most do not achieve medically recommended physical activity standards and are therefore at a greater risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease.  Their reduced activity may be attributed to the 10 - 30% increase in energetic cost during walking compared to able-bodied individuals.  Several active ankle-foot systems have been developed to provide external power during the push-off phase of gait, potentially alleviation this high cost.  This talk will focus on several of our recent and ongoing projects exploring if and how people utilize external mechanical power to influence their metabolic effort, how this is influenced by the magnitude of power delivered, the influence of the individual’s characteristics, and how we evaluate powered prosthetic technology in real-world environments.  I will also highlight our recent work in controlling prostheses and providing feedback through direct connections with human nerves. 

BIO 
Deanna Gates, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Movement Science and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Michigan.  She earned her B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Virginia (2002), M.S. in Biomedical Engineering from Boston University (2004), and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin (2009).  Dr. Gates worked in engineering consulting and in civilian and military clinical gait laboratories, before arriving at the University of Michigan in 2012.  The goal of her research program is to improve function and quality of life in individuals with musculoskeletal impairments.  Her lab focuses on understanding repetitive human movements such as walking and reaching, and how people are able to perform these movements with robotic devices. Her research explores the factors that relate to a person’s ability to successfully use devices, how to train individuals for optimal use, and the development of appropriate outcome measures to assess success of new technology.  She is also an Associate Editor of IEEE Transactions on Neural Engineering and Rehabilitation.
 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1574097902 2019-11-18 17:25:02 1574097933 2019-11-18 17:25:33 0 0 event 2019-12-03T12:00:00-05:00 2019-12-03T13:00:00-05:00 2019-12-03T13:00:00-05:00 2019-12-03 17:00:00 2019-12-03 18:00:00 2019-12-03 18:00:00 2019-12-03T12:00:00-05:00 2019-12-03T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-12-03 12:00:00 2019-12-03 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Drew Elliott - Research Technician II | Biomedical Engineering

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<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)]]>
<![CDATA[Neural Engineering Research Center Seminar]]> 27349 “Data-driven Dynamic Models for Neuroscience and Neuroengineering”

Bing Brunton, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Biology
University of Washington, Seattle

Discoveries in modern neuroscience are increasingly driven by quantitative understanding of complex data. The work in my lab lies at an emerging, fertile intersection of computation and biology. I develop data-driven analytic methods that are applied to, and are inspired by, neuroscience questions. Projects in my lab explore neural computations in diverse organisms. We work with theoretical collaborators on developing methods, and with experimental collaborators studying insects, rodents, and primates, including humans. The common theme in our work is the development of methods that leverage the escalating scale and complexity of neural and behavioral data to find interpretable patterns. In this talk, I will highlight several research threads. The first focuses on a mathematical framework for spatiotemporal decomposition of large-scale data. The second tackles the challenge of understanding human neural activity "in the wild," outside traditional experimental conditions. The third seeks to uncover principles of hyper-efficient sensing and control supporting agile flight in winged insects.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1573753625 2019-11-14 17:47:05 1573753625 2019-11-14 17:47:05 0 0 event 2019-11-20T13:30:00-05:00 2019-11-20T14:30:00-05:00 2019-11-20T14:30:00-05:00 2019-11-20 18:30:00 2019-11-20 19:30:00 2019-11-20 19:30:00 2019-11-20T13:30:00-05:00 2019-11-20T14:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-20 01:30:00 2019-11-20 02:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley, faculty host

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<![CDATA[Neural Engineering Research Center]]> <![CDATA[Brunton lab]]>
<![CDATA[Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology and Technology]]> 27195 A Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology and Technology is open to all interested in exploring novel ideas about cancer and its detection and treatment.

On display will be posters showing cancer research by scientists and engineers at Georgia Tech and other local institutions as well as summaries of recent publications that have been chosen for display and discussion from Cancer Biology and Technology students.

If you would like to present a poster on your research related to cancer, or for a list of the poster titles and other info about the Festival, please contact Al Merrill or Yuhong Fan.

This event is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1573657333 2019-11-13 15:02:13 1573660128 2019-11-13 15:48:48 0 0 event 2019-11-19T15:00:00-05:00 2019-11-19T17:00:00-05:00 2019-11-19T17:00:00-05:00 2019-11-19 20:00:00 2019-11-19 22:00:00 2019-11-19 22:00:00 2019-11-19T15:00:00-05:00 2019-11-19T17:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-19 03:00:00 2019-11-19 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute]]> Al Merrill, Ph.D. and Yuhong Fan, Ph.D. - faculty organizers

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<![CDATA[ Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar Series]]> 27195 Helping GT entrepreneurs learn how to fund and commercialize their technology

“The I-CORPS Experience: Hear First-hand from Your Colleagues”

Presenting
Team PhasBio - Cameron Yamanishi and Cynthia Sundell
Team Cytomatrix - Ozgun Civelekoglu and Jason Kim
Team Huxley Medical - Brennan Torstrick and Brett Klosterhoff


Lunch provided, RSVP required - Open to all in GT's bio-community.

Can't make it to the talk? View livestream

Support for this series provided by the Parker H. Petit Insitute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and VentureLab.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1571403980 2019-10-18 13:06:20 1573584641 2019-11-12 18:50:41 0 0 event 2019-11-14T11:30:00-05:00 2019-11-14T12:30:00-05:00 2019-11-14T12:30:00-05:00 2019-11-14 16:30:00 2019-11-14 17:30:00 2019-11-14 17:30:00 2019-11-14T11:30:00-05:00 2019-11-14T12:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-14 11:30:00 2019-11-14 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D.
Principal, VentureLab
Petit Institute

Harold Solomon
Principal, VentureLab

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<![CDATA[VentureLab website]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR) Seminar Series]]> 28778 Recent developments in microfabricated ultrasonic transducer technology have led to more effective integration of these devices with microelectronics.

"Catheter Based Microscale Ultrasound Imaging Systems and Acousto-optical Sensors for Image Guided Interventions "

F. Levent Degertekin, Ph.D.
Professor
George W. Woodruff Chair in Mechanical Systems
The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Georgia Tech


This approach enables complex functionalities to be realized in compact implementations in addition to higher overall performance. Catheter based medical ultrasound imaging for guiding interventions is one of the areas where this approach can have direct and significant impact. In this talk, we first motivate miniaturization of ultrasound systems for guiding interventions in the arteries and the heart. We discuss several microsystems where capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) arrays are monolithically integrated with CMOS electronics (CMUT-on-CMOS). These include forward looking volumetric intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging system, essentially a flashlight in coronary arteries, and MRI compatible intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) catheters. We provide details on integrated circuit (ASIC) designs we developed for these applications which have increasing complexity from simple receiver multiplexing to transmit beamforming and receiver multiplexing on a single chip. We also describe approaches for massive parallel RF data transfer using time division multiplexing for cable reduction in catheter implementations. As an ultimate integration example, we present our work on guidewire IVUS where an imaging system to fit on a 0.014” diameter guidewire. Finally, we describe a novel acousto-optical sensor for catheter tracking during interventional MRI.

F. Levent Degertekin is the G.W. Woodruff Chair in Mechanical Systems, and is a Professor at the G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests have been in micromachined acoustic and opto-acoustic sensors, medical ultrasound imaging systems, bioanalytical instrumentation, and atomic force microscopy. Most recently he has been working on intravascular and intracardiac ultrasound imaging, and acousto-optical sensors for guided interventions under MRI. He has authored 59 U.S. patents and over 130 journal publications. Dr. Degertekin serves as an associate editor for the IEEE Transactions on Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control and as a standing member of the Imaging Technology Development (ITD) study section of the NIH (2016-2020). He received the Whitaker Foundation Biomedical Engineering Research Grant Award in 2001, an NSF CAREER award for his work on ultrasonic atomic force microscopy in 2004, IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics, and Frequency Control (UFFC) Society 2004 Outstanding Paper Award, the IEEE UFFC Society 2014 Carl Hellmuth Hertz Ultrasonic Achievement Award, and most recently with his collaborators, the 2017 ASME Energy Harvesting Best Paper (EHBP) Award.

]]> Timothy Whelan 1 1572356040 2019-10-29 13:34:00 1573580111 2019-11-12 17:35:11 0 0 event 2019-11-12T12:00:00-05:00 2019-11-12T13:00:00-05:00 2019-11-12T13:00:00-05:00 2019-11-12 17:00:00 2019-11-12 18:00:00 2019-11-12 18:00:00 2019-11-12T12:00:00-05:00 2019-11-12T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-12 12:00:00 2019-11-12 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Drew Elliott - Research Technician II | Biomedical Engineering

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<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)]]>
<![CDATA[Micro-Physiological Systems Seminar Series]]> 27349 "Bioengineered Human iPSC Tissue Model for Gaining Mechanistic and Therapeutic Insights into CPVT"

Sung Jin Park, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech/Emory University

The cellular phenotypes caused by inherited arrhythmia mutations have been studied using human induced pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs). However, arrhythmias are the emergent properties of cells assembled into tissues, and the impact of these mutations on tissue-level properties of human myocardium has not been reported. In this talk, I will present an in vitro hiPSC-CM-based platform to study the tissue-level properties of engineered human myocardium. I will illustrate how this hiPSC-CM-based platform can be used to investigate pathogenic mechanisms in the deadly, exercise-triggered inherited arrhythmia catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). In addition, I will show how we combined this novel platform with genome editing and identified new therapeutic target for CPVT.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1573226445 2019-11-08 15:20:45 1573226804 2019-11-08 15:26:44 0 0 event 2019-11-20T13:00:00-05:00 2019-11-20T14:00:00-05:00 2019-11-20T14:00:00-05:00 2019-11-20 18:00:00 2019-11-20 19:00:00 2019-11-20 19:00:00 2019-11-20T13:00:00-05:00 2019-11-20T14:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-20 01:00:00 2019-11-20 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Shuichi Takayama, faculty host

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<![CDATA[Park website]]> <![CDATA[Seminar website]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 “Two Forms of Plasticity in Adult Visual Cortex”

Michael Stryker, Ph.D.
Professor
School of Medicine
University of California, San Francisco

Michael Stryker's laboratory studies the development and plasticity of the central visual system. Most of his laboratory's effort focuses on the role of neural activity in the primary visual cortex of the mouse, where they have identified a circuit that dramatically enhances activity-dependent plasticity in adult animals. They use 2-photon microscopy and electrophysiology to study genetically identified types of neurons in alert animals.

His laboratory's major interest is the in the mechanisms responsible for the development and plasticity of precise connections within the central nervous system, and particularly in the role of neural activity in this process. Most of the work performed is on the visual cortex of the mouse. In normal development, neural connections to and within the visual cortex are refined to high precision through the action of activity-dependent mechanisms of neural plasticity in combination with specific molecular signals. In experiments, the lab induces activity-dependent plasticity experimentally through manipulations of genetics or experience or by pharmacological or neurophysiological intervention in order to discover what cellular mechanisms and what changes in cortical circuitry are responsible for rapid, long lasting changes in neuronal responses. These changes are analyzed using microelectrode recordings, novel techniques for measurement of optical and metabolic signals related to neural activity, including 2-photon microscopy and intrinsic signal imaging, and anatomical and neurochemical tracing of connections.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1571318934 2019-10-17 13:28:54 1571318934 2019-10-17 13:28:54 0 0 event 2019-11-18T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-18T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-18T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-18 16:15:00 2019-11-18 17:15:00 2019-11-18 17:15:00 2019-11-18T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-18T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-18 11:15:00 2019-11-18 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Stryker profile]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 “Hyperbolic Geometry of the Olfactory Space”

Tatyana Sharpee, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Biological Studies
Salk Institute

Using the sense of smell as an example, I will describe both theoretical reasons and experimental evidence that natural stimuli and human perception can be mapped onto a low dimensional curved surface. This surface turns out to have a negative curvature, corresponding to a hyperbolic metric. Although this map was derived purely from the statistics of co-occurrence between mono-molecular odorants in the natural environment it revealed topography in the organization of human perception of smell. I will conclude with arguments for why hyperbolic metric should be generally applicable elsewhere in the nervous system.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1571317706 2019-10-17 13:08:26 1571317706 2019-10-17 13:08:26 0 0 event 2019-11-04T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-04T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-04T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-04 16:15:00 2019-11-04 17:15:00 2019-11-04 17:15:00 2019-11-04T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-04T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-04 11:15:00 2019-11-04 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Sharpee lab]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series - NEW Two-Speaker Format!]]> 27195 NEW TWO-SPEAKER FORMAT for 2019-2020!


@ 8:30 A.M.

Steve Diggle, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
School of Biological Sciences
Georgia Tech

"Diversity Shapes Community Function in Evolving Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Populations"


RESEARCH
Bacteria communicate, cooperate and compete, resulting in a wide range of behaviors such as biofilm formation, chemical warfare (bacteriocins) and quorum sensing. Microbiologists have made huge strides forward, using molecular and genomic approaches, in determining ‘how’ certain behaviors function. Despite this, answers are still lacking to adaptive questions, such as ‘why’ do such behaviors evolve? How are they maintained in natural populations? What role do they play during infection?

We are interested in understanding microbial interactions and social behaviors, and the implications for virulence, disease and antimicrobial resistance. The main organism that we focus on is the antibiotic resistant superbug Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The CDC has identified P. aeruginosa as a 'serious threat' in healthcare settings. It is also the key pathogen in cystic fibrosis lungs and is commonly isolated from non-healing chronic wounds.


@ 9:00 A.M.

Cassie Mitchell, Ph.D. @ 9:00 a.m.
Assistant Professor
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech and Emory University

"Literature Mining Strategies for Predictive Medicine"

ABSTRACT
This talk will focus on newer approaches and tools for text mining of biomedical relationships and concepts from the 28+ million PubMed publications.  A real case study will illustrate how literature mining using biomedical concept graphs can be used to derive new actionable insights for disease etiology, treatment discovery, clinical care support, and research prioritization.

RESEARCH
Cassie Mitchell’s research goal centers around expediting clinical translation from bench to bedside using data-enabled prediction. Akin to data-based models used to forecast weather, Cassie’s research integrates disparate, multi-scalar experimental and clinical data sets to dynamically forecast disease.  Cassie is the principal investigator of the Laboratory for Pathology Dynamics, which uses a combination of big data, machine learning, biostatistics, and informatics-based techniques to identify complex disease etiology, predict new therapeutics, and optimize current interventions.  Cassie’s research has predominantly targeted neuropathology, but her research applications in predictive medicine expand across all clinical specialties, including cancer, pediatrics, and cardiovascular medicine.

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559234888 2019-05-30 16:48:08 1571164894 2019-10-15 18:41:34 0 0 event 2019-11-12T08:30:00-05:00 2019-11-12T09:30:00-05:00 2019-11-12T09:30:00-05:00 2019-11-12 13:30:00 2019-11-12 14:30:00 2019-11-12 14:30:00 2019-11-12T08:30:00-05:00 2019-11-12T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-12 08:30:00 2019-11-12 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Petit Events Manager

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622104 622104 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 <![CDATA[Brown Lab Website]]> <![CDATA[Mitchell Pathology Dynamics Lab Website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 “Telomere Length Regulation of Muscle Stem Cells in Chronic Injuries”

Foteini Mourkioti, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Perelman School of Medicine
University of Pennsylvania

In chronic injuries such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), the repeated cycles of muscle damage and repair lead to stem cell dysfunction. We and others previously showed that the muscle stem cell (MuSC) pool becomes less efficient at repairing damage in dystrophic mouse models. While progress has been made over the last decade with respect to potential treatments for DMD, current strategies are focused on treatment of skeletal muscle and do not take muscle stem cells into consideration. We recently demonstrated that telomere shortening is a district feature of dystrophic MuSCs in both mice and DMD patients already at a very young age. We have generated unique mouse tools that allow us to study stem cells within their native tissue environment of live mice and have determined the cellular consequence of telomere shortening in MuSCs. Furthermore, we discovered a previously unknown crosstalk between NF-kappaB and telomeres and determined the function of a telomeric protein in the progression of muscular dystrophy. These findings expand the fundamental knowledge of stem cell biology in diseased muscles. Understanding the molecular link between stem cell functional exhaustion and telomere shortening in DMD will significantly impact the conceptual view of DMD skeletal muscle pathology, providing fresh therapeutic perspectives on disease progression and will likely inform similar mechanisms in musculoskeletal applications with stem cell dysfunction, such as chronic or repeated muscle injuries in aging.

The Mourkioti lab has a long-term interest in understanding the fundamental aspects of skeletal muscle and cardiac function in normal or diseased conditions and in the practical aspects of manipulating these functions by using animal models and tissue engineering approaches for treatment intervention.


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1561739058 2019-06-28 16:24:18 1570544601 2019-10-08 14:23:21 0 0 event 2019-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29T13:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29T13:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29 16:00:00 2019-10-29 17:00:00 2019-10-29 17:00:00 2019-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-10-29 12:00:00 2019-10-29 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Young Jang, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[MourkiotiLab Website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Micro-physiological Systems Seminar Series]]> 27349 "Biomimetic Drugs: In Vitro, In Vivo & Mechanistic Studies of 5-12mer Antibacterial Peptoids to Treat Respiratory Infections"

Annelise E. Barron, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Bioengineering
Stanford School of Medicine & School of Engineering

Growing bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics has spurred the exploration of bioengineered antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and mimetics as novel anti-infective agents. However, since peptide bioavailability is limited by proteolysis, non-natural AMP mimics are interesting as more robust and biostable analogues of AMP and seem to offer distinct advantages as potential clinical therapeutics. We report here on our experimental exploration of the development of poly-N-substituted glycines (peptoids) as a new class of biomimetic antimicrobial drugs, via multiple approaches including several different in vitro assays and in vivo mouse studies. After studying more than 120 peptoid sequence variants, we identified a number of unique peptoids that exhibit potent, broad-spectrum antibacterial in vitro activity, and which have a unique, biomimetic mechanism of action: bacterial rigidification. In our recent in vivo testing, mice were infected intratracheally with bioluminescent Pseudomonas aeruginosa, then treated by our TM5 peptoid, providing a significant reduction in bacterial loads compared to untreated animals. TM5 peptoid was also well tolerated in the lung by mice. In addition, new super-resolution fluorescence videomicroscopy studies confirm that these peptoids rapidly “rigidify” bacterial cytoplasm, just like natural cathelicidin AMPs. Taken together, these results show the highly promising potential clinical applicability of these 5-12mer peptoids.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1570464622 2019-10-07 16:10:22 1570465396 2019-10-07 16:23:16 0 0 event 2019-10-16T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 2019-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 2019-10-16 16:00:00 2019-10-16 17:00:00 2019-10-16 17:00:00 2019-10-16T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-10-16 12:00:00 2019-10-16 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Shuichi Takayama

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<![CDATA[Barron profile]]>
<![CDATA[ Micro-physiological Systems Seminar Series]]> 27349 "Helical Peptoid Mimics of the Hydrophobic Lung Surfactant Proteins Provide Effective In Vivo Treatment of Acute Lung Injury"

Annelise E. Barron, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Bioengineering
Stanford School of Medicine & School of Engineering

Acute lung injury (ALI) leads to progressive loss of breathing capacity and hypoxemia, as well as pulmonary surfactant dysfunction. ALI’s pathogenesis and management are complex, and it is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Exogenous surfactant therapy is currently impractical for adults because of the high cost of current surfactant preparations and the large amount of material needed to treat adult-sized lungs. Prior in vitro work has shown that helical, sequence-specific 21mer poly-N-substituted glycines (peptoids), in a biomimetic lipid mixture, emulate key biophysical activities of lung surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C, respectively) at the air-water interface. We have found good in vivo efficacy of a peptoid-based surfactant, compared with extracted animal surfactant and a synthetic lipid formulation, in a rat model of lavage-induced ALI. Adult rats were subjected to whole-lung lavage followed by administration of surfactant formulations and monitoring of outcomes. Treatment with a SP-C mimic formulation improved blood oxygenation, blood pH, shunt fraction, and peak inspiratory pressure to a greater degree than SP-B mimic or combined formulations. All peptoid-enhanced treatment groups showed improved outcomes compared to synthetic lipids alone, and some formulations improved outcomes to a similar extent as animal-derived surfactant. In recent work, we have designed improved mimics of SP-C with more biomimetic side chain chemistries, which perform better in vitro, and we expect to see improved efficacy in future in vivo studies with these new designs. Robust biophysical mimics of natural surfactant proteins may enable new medical research in approaches to the treatment of acute lung injury and pneumonia.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1570464908 2019-10-07 16:15:08 1570464908 2019-10-07 16:15:08 0 0 event 2019-10-18T14:30:00-04:00 2019-10-18T15:30:00-04:00 2019-10-18T15:30:00-04:00 2019-10-18 18:30:00 2019-10-18 19:30:00 2019-10-18 19:30:00 2019-10-18T14:30:00-04:00 2019-10-18T15:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-10-18 02:30:00 2019-10-18 03:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Shuichi Takayama

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<![CDATA[Barron profile]]>
<![CDATA[Core Facilities Seminar - RedShiftBio]]> 27349 AQS3 pro with MMS delivers increased analytical performance for five key measurements for protein biotherapeutics characterization: Aggregation, Quantitation, Stability, Similarity & Structure. The unique, fully automated IR analysis of secondary structure over a concentration range from 0.1 mg/ml to 200mg/ml enables drug development and manufacturing to “See Change” never possible before.

The AQS3pro directly addresses the limitations of current protein characterization technologies:

It provides an efficient tool for direct, label-free protein analysis.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1569852375 2019-09-30 14:06:15 1569852375 2019-09-30 14:06:15 0 0 event 2019-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29T14:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29T14:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29 16:00:00 2019-10-29 18:00:00 2019-10-29 18:00:00 2019-10-29T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-29T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-10-29 12:00:00 2019-10-29 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Bettina Bomarius

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Implanted Neurotechnology to Understand and Restore Arm and Hand Function"

Jennifer Collinger, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
University of Pittsburgh

Watch via Livestream

ABSTRACT
After a cervical spinal cord injury, restoration of arm and hand function is a top rehabilitation priority.  A brain-computer interface (BCI) can tap into sensorimotor information that remains intact in the brain and bypass the injured spinal cord to control an assistive device that may help the user regain function. Intracortical BCIs have allowed people to control reaching and grasping movements using their neural activity. However, BCIs users have primarily relied on visual feedback which may be insufficient for tasks involving object manipulation.  Recently, we showed that intracortical microsimulation of somatosensory cortex can generate focal sensations that feel like they originate on the BCI users hand and that can be graded in intensity. Our current BCI study participant was able to use restored tactile sensations to improve performance on object transfer tasks. The time required to grasp the objects was reduced when ICMS feedback was provided as compared to visual feedback alone, likely due to increased certainty about the timing of object contact. Sensory feedback is particularly critical for dexterous and complex movements that are essential for many activities of daily living. We have also begun to investigate the role of motor cortex in modulating grasp force across a variety of task conditions.  Across all experiments, we identified a large transient neural response during periods of active force application, as well as a tonic neural response during periods of constant force application.  Interestingly, the relative strength of the transient and tonic neural components changes with task complexity suggesting a reallocation of cortical resources to accommodate the task requirements.  This has implications for BCIs, which must account for contextual changes in order to maintain consistent performance.   


BIO
Jennifer Collinger, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Pittsburgh and a Research Biomedical Engineer at the Pittsburgh VA R&D Center of Excellence.  Dr. Collinger’s research interests are related to the use of neuroprosthetics to restore function for individuals with upper limb paralysis or loss. Specifically, she is developing intracortical brain-computer interface technology for individuals with tetraplegia. She also uses non-invasive imaging tools to study sensorimotor control and neuroplasticity after spinal cord injury or amputation.
 

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559056091 2019-05-28 15:08:11 1568826526 2019-09-18 17:08:46 0 0 event 2019-09-26T12:00:00-04:00 2019-09-26T13:00:00-04:00 2019-09-26T13:00:00-04:00 2019-09-26 16:00:00 2019-09-26 17:00:00 2019-09-26 17:00:00 2019-09-26T12:00:00-04:00 2019-09-26T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-26 12:00:00 2019-09-26 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Chethan Pandarinath, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Collinger profile]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 Maryam Shanechi, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Viterbi Early Career Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Viterbi School of Engineering
University of Southern California

“Neural Decoding and Control of Multiscale Brain Networks: From Motor to Mood”

In this talk, I first discuss our recent work on modeling, decoding, and controlling multisite human brain activity underlying mood states. I present a multiscale dynamical modeling framework that allows us, for the first time, to decode mood variations and identify brain sites that are most predictive of mood. I then develop a system identification approach that can predict large-scale brain network dynamics (output) in response to electrical stimulation (input) to enable closed-loop control of brain activity. Finally, I demonstrate that our modeling framework can uncover multiscale neural dynamics from hybrid spike-field activity in monkeys performing unconstrained movements and can further combine information from multiple scales of activity and model their different time-scales and statistical profiles. These models, decoders, and controllers could facilitate future closed-loop therapies for neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders and help probe neural circuits.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1568817743 2019-09-18 14:42:23 1568817743 2019-09-18 14:42:23 0 0 event 2019-11-11T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-11T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-11T12:15:00-05:00 2019-11-11 16:15:00 2019-11-11 17:15:00 2019-11-11 17:15:00 2019-11-11T11:15:00-05:00 2019-11-11T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-11 11:15:00 2019-11-11 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Shanechi profile]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 Michael Borich, D.P.T., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Division of Rehabilitation Medicine
Emory University School of Medicine

“Perturbation-imaging Approaches to Study Functional Contributions of Cortical Activity to Human Movement”

The ability to learn and produce skilled movements is required for humans to successfully engage with each other and their environment. A principal role of the brain is to guide current, and plan future, movements based on past actions and potential rewards. In this talk, I will describe ongoing work in our lab employing multiple approaches to investigate the functional contributions of brain activity to normal and abnormal human movement. I will discuss how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), a form of non-invasive brain stimulation, can be used both characterize and modulate cortical activity and connectivity during movement. I will also describe our recent findings showing abnormal TMS-evoked cortical reactivity post-stroke that is related to persistent paretic arm impairment. Lastly, I will discuss preliminary work applying alternative perturbation paradigms to study brain-behavior relationships in health and disease.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1568817195 2019-09-18 14:33:15 1568817462 2019-09-18 14:37:42 0 0 event 2019-09-30T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-30T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-30T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-30 16:15:00 2019-09-30 17:15:00 2019-09-30 17:15:00 2019-09-30T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-30T13:15:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-30 12:15:00 2019-09-30 01:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Borich profile]]>
<![CDATA[Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems Distinguished Lecture]]> 27349 Mina Bissell, Ph.D.
Distinguished Scientist

Biological Systems and Engineering Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

“How Does a Breast Cell Learn to Become a Tissue, and What Happens When it Forgets?”

Mina Bissell, is Distinguished Senior Scientist, (the highest rank bestowed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory LBNL), serves as Senior Advisor to the Laboratory Director on Biology. She is Faculty of four Graduate Groups in UC Berkeley: Comparative Biochemistry, Endocrinology, Molecular Toxicology, and Bioengineering (UCSF/UCB joint program). She has challenged several established paradigms, and pioneered the field of tumor microenvironment. Using mammary gland and breast cancer her body of work has provided the foundation for the current recognition of the pivotal role that extracellular matrix (ECM) signaling plays in regulation of gene expression in both normal and malignant cells. Her laboratory pioneered the use of 3D organoids and techniques that allowed her to prove her signature phrase that after conception, “phenotype is dominantover genotype.”

Bissell earned her undergraduate degree in chemistry from Harvard College where she received the medal of American Institute of Chemistry doctorate in microbiology and molecular genetics from Harvard Medical School, won an American Cancer Society fellowship for her postdoctoral studies, and soon after joined LBNL. She was the founding Director of the Cell and Molecular Biology Division and later the Associate Laboratory Director for all Life Sciences at Berkeley Lab where she recruited outstanding scientists and developed a strong program in cell and molecular biology and breast cancer. Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) is a National 

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1568740008 2019-09-17 17:06:48 1568740058 2019-09-17 17:07:38 0 0 event 2019-10-08T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-08T13:00:00-04:00 2019-10-08T13:00:00-04:00 2019-10-08 16:00:00 2019-10-08 17:00:00 2019-10-08 17:00:00 2019-10-08T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-08T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-10-08 12:00:00 2019-10-08 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> LaKeita Servance

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<![CDATA[EBICS]]>
<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics Seminar Series ]]> 27349 Gregory Sawicki, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
School of Mechanical Engineering and School of Biological Sciences
Georgia Tech

"Ankle Exoskeletons to Restore Mobility Post-stroke"

The goal of the Human Physiology of Wearable Robotics (PoWeR) Laboratory is to discover and exploit key principles of locomotion neuromechanics in order to build wearable devices that can augment intact and/or restore impaired human locomotion. The primary performance goal of such devices is to reduce metabolic energy consumption of the user.

Our design approach is motivated by two key mechanisms observed in human gait that are crucial to efficient movement. The first is optimally timed, impulsive ankle joint ‘push-off’ for propelling the body forward. The second is the effective cycling of mechanical energy from the body’s center of mass to elastic tissues (i.e., tendon and aponeurosis) and back.

In this talk I will highlight our work over the last ~5 years to understand how changes in neuromechanics -- from limbs to joints – may underpin elevated energetic cost of walking due to unilateral hemiparesis following stroke. Then I will detail our (mostly failed) efforts to improve human ’gas-mileage’ post-stroke using myoelectrically controlled powered ankle exoskeletons at both fixed and increasing walking speeds.

I will conclude with some thoughts on the major gaps in knowledge that may be preventing successful application of robots to restore mobility following neurological injury; suggest what we might try next; and motivate the need for more formal collaboration between scientists studying the neuroscience of motor (re)learning and rehabilitation engineers seeking to develop wearable robots that can restore movement post-stroke.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1568032859 2019-09-09 12:40:59 1568128144 2019-09-10 15:09:04 0 0 event 2019-09-10T13:00:00-04:00 2019-09-10T14:00:00-04:00 2019-09-10T14:00:00-04:00 2019-09-10 17:00:00 2019-09-10 18:00:00 2019-09-10 18:00:00 2019-09-10T13:00:00-04:00 2019-09-10T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-10 01:00:00 2019-09-10 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Jaydev Desai

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<![CDATA[Georgia Center for Medical Robotics (GCMR)]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Entrepreneurship Academy Seminar Series]]> 27195 Helping GT entrepreneurs learn how to fund and commercialize their technology

"Networking for Entrepreneurs and How to Give an Effective Elevator Pitch"

Presented by:

Kirk Barnes

Jane McCracken
Assistant Director, ATDC


Refreshments provided.

RSVP required - open to all in GT's bio-community

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1567182049 2019-08-30 16:20:49 1567182049 2019-08-30 16:20:49 0 0 event 2019-09-13T12:30:00-04:00 2019-09-13T13:30:00-04:00 2019-09-13T13:30:00-04:00 2019-09-13 16:30:00 2019-09-13 17:30:00 2019-09-13 17:30:00 2019-09-13T12:30:00-04:00 2019-09-13T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-13 12:30:00 2019-09-13 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D.
Principal, VentureLab
Petit Institute

Harold Solomon
Principal, VentureLab

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<![CDATA[Pediatrics@Georgia Tech Webinar]]> 27349 Pediatric device development is an exciting area of innovation that traverses academic and commercial settings. However, it does not come without its own unique challenges and obstacles. In this upcoming Pediatric Tech Talk webinar, Wilbur Lam, MD, PhD will share with attendees his experiences in the field of pediatric device development as a co-founder of two such startup companies, Cellscope and Sanguina. 

Dr. Lam is a biomedical engineer at Emory and Georgia Tech and a clinical pediatric hematologist/oncologist at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. His research involves developing and translating innovative micro-engineered and mHealth technologies to advance research and improve the health of children, especially those with blood diseases. One of the more recent innovations that Dr. Lam helped develop is the app AnemoCheck, which allows patients that are suspected of suffering from low blood levels of hemoglobin to test their levels by using photos of their fingernails instead of having to draw blood. 

Dr. Lam was the principal investigator for the Atlanta Center for Microsystems Engineering Point-Of-Care Technologies’ Pediatric Device Consortium and received the 2019 Frank A. Oski Memorial Lectureship at the American Society of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Conference. He was also awarded the Emerging Investigator Award from the NIH, worth $5 million over the next seven years. 

Those who attend this webinar will learn more about the opportunities and challenges of developing and translating biomedical technologies for commercialization in an academic setting, with a focus on pediatric and diagnostic spaces. 

There are various barriers to pediatric device development, ranging from the small numbers of geographically dispersed pediatric patients with a given medical condition to the lack of an overarching entity that can make determinations about the coverage and reimbursement of pediatric medical devices. By sharing his vast experience in the area, Dr. Lam hopes to help innovators better navigate this sometimes difficult and unpredictable development process. 

This webinar will be highly relevant to both researchers and students of pediatric medicine who are interested in clinically translating their inventions or in forming university-borne startups.

Webinar Link

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1566566850 2019-08-23 13:27:30 1566998661 2019-08-28 13:24:21 0 0 event 2019-08-28T13:00:00-04:00 2019-08-28T13:30:00-04:00 2019-08-28T13:30:00-04:00 2019-08-28 17:00:00 2019-08-28 17:30:00 2019-08-28 17:30:00 2019-08-28T13:00:00-04:00 2019-08-28T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-08-28 01:00:00 2019-08-28 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Sheri Russell

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<![CDATA[PTC Website]]> <![CDATA[Register to Attend]]>
<![CDATA[Mass Cytometry Seminar]]> 27349 Schedule:
11:00–12:00 pm Seminar 
12:00 pm Lunch will be served
12:00–1:00 pm Step-right-up Q&A Table
Bring your questions and project ideas for the new Fluidigm Helios CyTOF Instrument 

Getting Started with Mass Cytometry (CyTOF®)
Presented by Azucena Gomez-Cabrero, Ph.D.
Field Application Scientist, Fluidigm Mass Cytometry 

High-dimensional single-cell analysis has become critical to basic and clinical research. In traditional flow cytometry, the spectral overlap between fluorophores requires complicated data compensation and limits the number of markers measured, thus creating speed, labor and reproducibility bottlenecks. Mass Cytometry overcomes these limitations by utilizing antibodies labelled with rare earth metals. 2019 has been the most active year yet in the mass cytometry community with over 200 publications to date. CyTOF® technology has also been adopted by multiple consortia and in more than 40 clinical trials.
The Helios™, a CyTOF® system permits the analysis of 37+ unique targets on a per-cell basis enabling unparalleled insight into the phenotype and function of cell populations from normal and diseased states in a single tube. Additionally, barcoding for Mass Cytometry allows combining up to 20 samples in one tube for increased efficiency and to eliminate sample to sample variation. 
In this seminar, we will describe the workflow for the Helios™ system, how to get started with your own mass cytometry experiments, and the resources that are available to you to ensure your success.

Quantitative Single Cell Dissection of Tumor Microenvironments with Mass Cytometry Analysis 
Presented by Deon B. Doxie, Ph.D.
Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1566928935 2019-08-27 18:02:15 1566928935 2019-08-27 18:02:15 0 0 event 2019-09-17T12:00:00-04:00 2019-09-17T14:00:00-04:00 2019-09-17T14:00:00-04:00 2019-09-17 16:00:00 2019-09-17 18:00:00 2019-09-17 18:00:00 2019-09-17T12:00:00-04:00 2019-09-17T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-17 12:00:00 2019-09-17 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Steve Woodard

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 Steven A. Sloan, M.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor 
Department of Human Genetics  
Emory University

“Using Human Brain Organoids to Unveil Neuron-Glial Interactions During Development”

Glia are the most abundant cell types in the mammalian nervous system. They are integral to normal brain physiology, yet we still understand very little about what functions they perform, how they develop, and how they are involved in disease. We understand even less about these cells in humans because of the lack of direct access to intact, functioning human brain tissue. Our lab is using pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived non-invasively from skin samples to generate brain cells in the lab. Because the brain is a 3D structure and studying cells growing on a plate does not recapitulate its complexity, we are using human iPSCs to generate functional 3D structures that are patterned to mirror specific regions of the human brain. We can culture these 'brains-in-a-dish' for long periods of time to ask how normal brain development is occurring in a human system. Additionally, this method allows us to ask questions about how neurons and glia interact with each other in both healthy and diseased contexts, and to manipulate specific variables of brain development in an otherwise complex developmental system.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1566410937 2019-08-21 18:08:57 1566412329 2019-08-21 18:32:09 0 0 event 2019-09-23T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-23T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-23T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-23 16:15:00 2019-09-23 17:15:00 2019-09-23 17:15:00 2019-09-23T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-23T13:15:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-23 12:15:00 2019-09-23 01:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley

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<![CDATA[Sloan Lab]]> <![CDATA[GT Neuro]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 Abigail Person, Ph.D.
Associate Professor 
Department of Physiology and Biophysics  
University of Colorado School of Medicine 

“Neural Mechanisms of Movement Precision”

How the brain makes movements fast, smooth and accurate has remained a mystery. In this talk I will discuss our studies identifying predictive, adaptively scaled activity in a cerebellar output structure that causally controls limb velocity to enhance movement precision. The data have implications into the fundamental algorithms of the cerebellum and suggest loci for interventions in motor disorders.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1566411443 2019-08-21 18:17:23 1566411443 2019-08-21 18:17:23 0 0 event 2019-09-09T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-09T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-09T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-09 16:15:00 2019-09-09 17:15:00 2019-09-09 17:15:00 2019-09-09T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-09T13:15:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-09 12:15:00 2019-09-09 01:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[Person profile]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 Nancy Kanwisher, Ph.D.
Investigator, McGovern Institute
Walter A. Rosenblith Professor of Cognitive 
Neuroscience, Brain and Cognitive Sciences
MIT

“Functional Imaging of the Human Brain: A Window into the Architecture of the Mind”

The last 20 years of brain imaging research has revealed the functional organization of the human brain in glorious detail, including dozens of cortical regions each of which is specifically engaged in a particular mental task, like recognizing faces, perceiving speech sounds, and understanding the meaning of a sentence. Each of these regions is present, in approximately the same location, in every normal person. This initial rough sketch of the functional organization of the brain counts as real progress, giving us a kind of diagram of the major components of the human mind. But at the same time, it is just the barest beginning. Really what our new map of the human brain offers is a vast landscape of new questions. In this talk I will first broadly survey some of the most widely replicated functionally distinctive cortical regions, and then describe ongoing work into three such questions. First, in light of widespread findings that functionally specific cortical regions contain information about “nonpreferred” stimuli, do some patches of cortex really play a highly specific causal role in processing just one class of stimuli? Second, how does all this complex structure, that is so similar across subjects, arise in development? I will discuss the developmental origins of cortical specificity, including a new finding of what appears to be a fusiform face area in the ventral visual pathway of congenitally blind people. Third, why do we have the particular functionally specific cortical regions we do, and apparently not others, and why, from a computational point of view, is functional specificity a good design feature for brains in the first place?
 

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1566409959 2019-08-21 17:52:39 1566409959 2019-08-21 17:52:39 0 0 event 2019-09-16T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-16T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-16T13:15:00-04:00 2019-09-16 16:15:00 2019-09-16 17:15:00 2019-09-16 17:15:00 2019-09-16T12:15:00-04:00 2019-09-16T13:15:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-16 12:15:00 2019-09-16 01:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Garrett Stanley

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<![CDATA[Kanwisher Lab]]> <![CDATA[Neruro Website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Computational Biomechanical Models of Human Pregnancy – Evaluating the Risk of Preterm Birth"

Kristin Myers, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Columbia University

ABSTRACT
The reproductive soft tissues that support the fetus undergo some of the most dramatic and unique growth and remodeling events in the human body. During pregnancy, the uterus and fetal membrane must grow and stretch to accommodate the fetus. Simultaneously, the cervix must remodel and be a mechanical barrier to keep the fetus within the uterus. All three tissues must withstand mechanical forces to protect, support, and maintain an optimal growth environment for the developing baby. Then, in a reversal of roles, ideally nearing term, the uterus begins to contract and the cervix deforms to allow for a safe delivery. The magnitude of stress and stretch of these soft tissues supporting the fetus are thought to control physiologic processes that regulate tissue growth, remodeling, contractility, and rupture, and it is generally hypothesized that these mechanical signals are clinical cues for normal labor and preterm birth, a major long-lasting public health problem with heavy emotional and financial consequences. In this talk I will reveal what we know about the soft tissue mechanics of pregnancy. I will present finite element models of pregnancy based on ultrasonic anatomical data, and I will examine the mechanical function of the soft tissues that support the fetus. I will also specifically characterize cervical material properties using a hyperelastic constitutive model that accounts for the cervical collagen fiber architecture and hormone-mediated remodeling relationships. Through this experimental and modeling effort I aim to identify which factor or combination of factors is responsible for clinically-observed mechanical dysfunction in pregnancy.

BIO
Kristin is an associate professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Columbia University in the City of New York. Her current obstetrics research is done in collaboration with the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Columbia University Irving Medical Center. She received her Mechanical Engineering doctorate and masters degree from MIT and her bachelors degree from the University of Michigan. In 2017 Kristin was given the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Y.C. Fung Young Investigators award for her contributions to the field of biomechanics, and in 2019 Kristin was awarded the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers for her work in understanding tissue growth and remodeling in pregnancy.

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559055663 2019-05-28 15:01:03 1565115413 2019-08-06 18:16:53 0 0 event 2019-09-12T12:00:00-04:00 2019-09-12T13:00:00-04:00 2019-09-12T13:00:00-04:00 2019-09-12 16:00:00 2019-09-12 17:00:00 2019-09-12 17:00:00 2019-09-12T12:00:00-04:00 2019-09-12T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-12 12:00:00 2019-09-12 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Ross Ethier, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Myers Soft Tissue Lab]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series - NEW Two-Speaker Format!]]> 27195 NEW TWO-SPEAKER FORMAT for 2019-2020!

@ 8:30  A.M.

F. Levent Degertekin, Ph.D.
George W. Woodruff Chair in Mechanical Systems and Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Georgia Tech

"Microscale Systems and Sensors for Ultrasound and Magnetic Resonance Imaging"

ABSTRACT
Levent Degertekin's group performs modeling, design and implementation of microscale ultrasound devices and integrated systems for a broad range of medical applications spanning from catheter based intravascular and intracardiac ultrasound imaging systems, ultrasound imaging of the brain and skull, to acousto-optical sensors for safer magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

RESEARCH
F. Levent Degertekin's research focuses on understanding of physical phenomena in acoustics and optics, and utilizing this knowledge creatively in the form of microfabricated devices. The research interests span several fields including atomic force microscopy (AFM), micromachined opto-acoustic devices, ultrasound imaging, bioanalytical instrumentation, and optical metrology. Degertekin's research group, in collaboration with an array of collaborators, has developed innovative devices for applications such as nanoscale material characterization and fast imaging, hearing aid microphones, intravascular imaging arrays for cardiology, bioanalytical mass spectrometry, and microscale parallel interferometers for metrology.


@ 9:00 A.M.

John Oshinski Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Emory University and Georgia Tech
Associate Professor
Department of Radiology
Emory University School of Medicine

"Measuring Brain Tissue Motion and Cerebrovascular Blood Flow with MRI"

RESEARCH
John Oshinski's research is focused on developing cardiovascular imaging applications that directly impact patient care.  His work includes development of cardiovascular imaging for understanding physiology,  elucidating disease mechanisms, and evaluating treatment efficacy.  Specific applications include development of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing myocardial function and vascular hemodynamics.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559233666 2019-05-30 16:27:46 1565006854 2019-08-05 12:07:34 0 0 event 2019-10-15T09:30:00-04:00 2019-10-15T10:30:00-04:00 2019-10-15T10:30:00-04:00 2019-10-15 13:30:00 2019-10-15 14:30:00 2019-10-15 14:30:00 2019-10-15T09:30:00-04:00 2019-10-15T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-10-15 09:30:00 2019-10-15 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Petit Events Manager

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622104 622104 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 <![CDATA[Degertekin Profile]]> <![CDATA[Oshinski Profile]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Smart Photonic Biomaterials for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications"

Sei Kwang Hahn, Ph.D.
Professor
Biomedical Nanomaterials Lab
Department of Materials Science and Engineering
POSTECH, Korea
Department of Chemical Engineering
Stanford University

ABSTRACT
Advances in photonics have stimulated significant progress in medicine with many techniques now in routine clinical use. However, the finite depth of light penetration in tissue is a serious constraint to clinical applications. Here, we developed implantable light-delivery devices using biodegradable polymers. With this light delivery system, we demonstrated photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) for wound healing with a Rose Bengal (RB) dye, achieving a full thickness (410 mm) wound closure of porcine skin. In addition, we successfully demonstrated the facilitated PTB using hyaluronic acid (HA) – RB conjugate and upconversion nanoparticle (UCNP). The UCNP emitting red and green light in the skin tissue by skin-penetrating near infrared (NIR) laser illumination could activate the RB dye and crosslink the collagen, inducing skin repair and deep tissue wound healing. Furthermore, we developed cell-integrated poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for in vivo optogenetic sensing and therapy. Real-time optical readout of encapsulated heat-shock-protein-coupled fluorescent reporter cells made it possible to measure the nanotoxicity of cadmium-based quantum dots in vivo. Using optogenetic cells producing glucagon-like peptide-1, we performed light-controlled therapy and obtained improved glucose homeostasis in diabetic model mice. Finally, we developed a smart contact lens composed of biosensors, drug delivery systems, and power sources for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy as a model disease. This presentation will provide the current state-of-the-art smart photomedicines for further clinical applications.

BIO
Sei Kwang Hahn obtained his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST). As the youngest Ph.D. at LG Chemical Group in 1996, he started his research on biodegradable polymer and then sustained release formulation of hGH, which was successfully commercialized in Korea under the trade name of Declage® in 2007. From 2001, he did his post-doctoral research with Prof. Allan Hoffman in the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Washington. After that, he worked for long acting formulation of various biopharmaceuticals at the Roche Group, Chugai Pharmaceutical Co. in Japan for more than three years. Since 2005, he has worked as a professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at POSTECH, and an adjunct professor in the School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering and in the Department of Creative IT Engineering at POSTECH. He was a consultant for Johnson & Johnson in New Jersey in 2008 and made a collaboration project contract with Hoffman-La Roche. In 2012, he joined in the Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital for his sabbatical research supported by LG Yeonam Fellowship. Currently, he is a visiting professor at Stanford University starting from Feb 1, 2019. He was the Samsung Future Technology Committee Member for 2016-2018 and the Presidential Advisory Council on Science and Technology for 2017-2019. He is the founder and CEO of PHI BIOMED Co. He received the Controlled Release Society Award in 2018, the Minister of Health and Welfare Award in 2017, the Korean President Award in 2015 and Korean Minister of Education Award in 2013. He published more than 120 SCI journal papers including Nature Photonics, Nature Communications, Progress in Polymer Science, Advanced Materials, and ACS Nano, and filed more than 130 Korean and international patents. He is one of the editorial board members of ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering, ACS Applied Bio Materials, Biomacromolecules, and an Associate Editor of Biomaterials Research.

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559056388 2019-05-28 15:13:08 1561985852 2019-07-01 12:57:32 0 0 event 2019-11-21T11:00:00-05:00 2019-11-21T12:00:00-05:00 2019-11-21T12:00:00-05:00 2019-11-21 16:00:00 2019-11-21 17:00:00 2019-11-21 17:00:00 2019-11-21T11:00:00-05:00 2019-11-21T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-11-21 11:00:00 2019-11-21 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Andrés García, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Biomedical Nanomaterials Lab]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Immunoengineering Seminar Series]]> 27349 Encoding and Decoding Specificity in Adaptive Immunity by Deep Learning

Sai Reddy, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering 
ETH Zurich

The ability to predict and correspondingly manipulate adaptive immune responses is highly valuable for biotechnology and medicine. To achieve this requires a greater molecular understanding of antigen selection and specificity by adaptive immune cells. In this I will explain how we are using deep learning to identify patterns of antigen-specificity in antibody responses following immunization. Deep neural networks are used to elucidate the antibody sequence space by generating thousands of novel and functional variants in-silico, highlighting how deep learning can be used to encode and decode specificity in adaptive immunity.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1561646145 2019-06-27 14:35:45 1561646145 2019-06-27 14:35:45 0 0 event 2019-08-26T12:00:00-04:00 2019-08-26T13:00:00-04:00 2019-08-26T13:00:00-04:00 2019-08-26 16:00:00 2019-08-26 17:00:00 2019-08-26 17:00:00 2019-08-26T12:00:00-04:00 2019-08-26T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-08-26 12:00:00 2019-08-26 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Susan Thomas, faculty host

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<![CDATA[Center for Immunoengineering]]> <![CDATA[Reddy profile]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar Series - NEW Two-Speaker Format!]]> 27195 NEW TWO-SPEAKER FORMAT for 2019-2020!

@ 8:30 A.M.

Levi Wood, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Georgia Tech

"Novel Neuroinflammatory Signatures Responsible for Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury"

RESEARCH
Our research focuses on applying systems analysis approaches and engineering tools to identify novel clinical therapeutic targets for complex diseases. It is challenging to develop new treatments for these diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), because they do not have a single genetic cause and they simultaneously present broad physiologic changes. By combining novel engineered in vitro platforms, mouse models, and multivariate computational systems analysis, we will be able to 1) capture a holistic systems-level understanding of complex diseases, and 2) isolate specific mechanisms driving disease. The ultimate goal of our laboratory is to use these tools to identify new mechanisms driving disease onset and progression that will translate to effective therapeutic strategies.

BACKGROUND
Levi Wood, Ph.D., joined Georgia Tech as an Assistant Professor in August, 2015. Prior to his current appointment, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard Medical School. There he used systems biology to elucidate novel signaling mechanisms in Alzheimer’s disease and intestinal inflammation. Dr. Wood received his Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he developed and used a microfluidic platform to identify dominant mechanisms governing vascular geometry during early vascular growth.


@ 9:00 A.M.

Peter Yunker, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
School of Physics
Georgia Tech

"A New Approach to Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing using Old Optical Techniques"

RESEARCH
We research the soft matter physics that underlies squishy materials and living creatures. These disparate systems are united by a focus on nonequilibrium systems. After all, We live in a nonequilibrium world. Everyday, the sun rises, increasing the local temperature, and then sets, decreasing the temperature. Vapor condenses overnight, only to evaporate during the day. Snow melts in the afternoon sun, only to freeze again under the moon. We too are nonequilibrium systems. We consume food, which is broken down to energy and subsequently used or stored. Despite their ubiquity, however, generation of an understanding of nonequilibrium systems represents a major challenge for physicists.

We are investigating the unique and potentially “universal” physics of densely-packed living matter such as bacterial biofilms and multicellular yeast clusters.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559235376 2019-05-30 16:56:16 1561118547 2019-06-21 12:02:27 0 0 event 2019-09-10T09:30:00-04:00 2019-09-10T10:30:00-04:00 2019-09-10T10:30:00-04:00 2019-09-10 13:30:00 2019-09-10 14:30:00 2019-09-10 14:30:00 2019-09-10T09:30:00-04:00 2019-09-10T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-09-10 09:30:00 2019-09-10 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell, Petit Events Manager

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622104 622104 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 1559242091 2019-05-30 18:48:11 <![CDATA[Wood Lab for Systems Biology of Inflammation]]> <![CDATA[Yunker Lab Soft Matter of Life and Death]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Distinguished Lecture]]> 27195 "Learning to Program Cellular Machines: Harnessing Cells to Treat Disease, Build Tissues, and Elucidate Design Principles"

Wendell Lim, Ph.D.
Professor of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology
Biochemistry and Biophysics and Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute    
Byers Distinguished Professorship
University of California San Francisco


Abstract
The eras of molecular biology and genomics have given us an unprecedented picture of the molecular components underlying living systems. Nonetheless, our understanding of how these components are assembled to generate precision physiological systems remains far less developed.  To approach this problem, we and others have been using synthetic biology methods to empirically explore how molecular components can be used to construct novel cellular functions. Using these approaches, we have shown that we can reprogram living cellular machines that carryout new novel precision functions, including therapeutic immune cells that precisely recognize and eliminate cancer cells, or cells that self-organize into tissues.  By merging our understanding of cellular machines with our knowledge of our bodies and its diseases, we envision the development of a mature field of cell engineering with a toolbox of optimized molecular parts and circuit architectures, as well as disease and  "GPS" sensors that allow the cell to target specific sites in the body or brain.  Such a platform will allow us to rapidly and flexibly prototype and design cells that can identify sites of disease or degeneration and execute precisely targeted and controlled therapeutic actions. 

Biography
Wendell Lim is the Byers Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology at the University of California San Francisco, and an Investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He received his A.B. in Chemistry, summa cum laude, from Harvard College, his Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Biophysics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and completed his postdoctoral training at Yale University. His research focuses on the design principles of molecular circuits that govern cell decision-making and responses. His lab has made contributions in understanding the molecular machinery of cell signaling and how molecular modules have been used in evolution to build novel new behaviors. Most recently he has been a pioneer in the emerging field of synthetic biology, exploring how these design principles can be harnessed to engineer cells with customized therapeutic response programs.  He is an author of the textbook, Cell Signaling (Garland Science 2014) and was the founder of the cell therapy biotech startup, Cell Design Labs, which was acquired by Gilead Biosciences in 2017.

A community lunch will be served immediately following the presentation.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1545063637 2018-12-17 16:20:37 1560789212 2019-06-17 16:33:32 0 0 event 2019-10-22T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-22T14:00:00-04:00 2019-10-22T14:00:00-04:00 2019-10-22 16:00:00 2019-10-22 18:00:00 2019-10-22 18:00:00 2019-10-22T12:00:00-04:00 2019-10-22T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-10-22 12:00:00 2019-10-22 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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615504 615504 image <![CDATA[Wendell Lim, Ph.D. - University of California San Francisco]]> image/png 1545063734 2018-12-17 16:22:14 1555347877 2019-04-15 17:04:37 <![CDATA[Lim Profile]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Ice Cream Social]]> 27195 The Petit Institute invites the bio-community to come and celebrate summer with its annual Ice Cream Social. We're doing Ice Cream Floats this year!, so plan to get out of those labs to come and hang out with your fellow Petit community members!

All Petit faculty, staff and trainees are welcome ~ while supplies last. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1560438079 2019-06-13 15:01:19 1560438089 2019-06-13 15:01:29 0 0 event 2019-07-09T14:00:00-04:00 2019-07-09T15:00:00-04:00 2019-07-09T15:00:00-04:00 2019-07-09 18:00:00 2019-07-09 19:00:00 2019-07-09 19:00:00 2019-07-09T14:00:00-04:00 2019-07-09T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-07-09 02:00:00 2019-07-09 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Petit Events Manager

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 "Adapting to a Unique Environment: the Platelet G-protein Highway to Integrin Activation"

Wolfgang Bergmeier, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics University of North Carolina School of Medicine


Wolfgang Bergmeier, PhD, is a biomedical researcher working in the fields of signal transduction, platelet biology, and hemostasis and thrombosis. He studied biology at the University of Regensburg in Germany and graduated from Witten-Herdecke University, Department of Molecular Oncology, in 2001.

For his postdoctoral studies, Bergmeier joined the laboratory of Denisa Wagner at Harvard Medical School (HMS). In 2004 he was promoted to Instructor of Pathology at the HMS. During his time there, Bergmeier studied the molecular mechanisms leading to platelet damage during extended storage and to platelet adhesion at sites of vascular injury.

In 2007, he moved to Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia where he became an Assistant Professor of Medicine and a member of the Cardeza Foundation for Hematologic Research. During his time in Philadelphia, he built an externally funded research program that investigates signaling transduction pathways critical for platelet function in hemostasis.

In 2011 Bergmeier moved his research program to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he became an Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics and a member of the McAllister Heart Institute, both in the UNC School of Medicine. His lab identified the small GTPase Rap1 and its regulators as a unique Rheostat for platelet reactivity, both in circulation and at sites of vascular injury. His ongoing work focuses on a better understanding of the platelet Rap1 signaling pathway and the implementation of his findings for the development of improved anti-platelet therapies.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1559735987 2019-06-05 11:59:47 1559736375 2019-06-05 12:06:15 0 0 event 2019-06-11T12:00:00-04:00 2019-06-11T13:00:00-04:00 2019-06-11T13:00:00-04:00 2019-06-11 16:00:00 2019-06-11 17:00:00 2019-06-11 17:00:00 2019-06-11T12:00:00-04:00 2019-06-11T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-06-11 12:00:00 2019-06-11 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering]]> Cheng Zhu, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Bergmeier Lab Website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Toward Theranostic Applications using Peptide-based Nanomedicine"

Eun Ji Chung, Ph.D.
WiSE Gabilan Assistant Professor
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, and Medicine
University of Southern California

Can't make the talk? Watch Live Here

ABSTRACT
Molecular engineering of multifunctional, multivalent micelles provides a tool for the detection and targeted delivery of therapeutics to diseases including cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. Moreover, through rational design, these nanoparticles have the potential to deliver signals to report back on or influence the regeneration of the cellular niche for personalized medicine regimes, while addressing the limitations of current clinical diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. To this end, we have engineered multimodal micelles that bind to various markers of diseases and incorporated drugs (microRNA, small molecules, peptides) and imaging molecules (NIRF agents, Gd) for therapeutic and diagnostic applications.
For kidney diseases, while small molecule drugs have been proposed as a therapy to manage disease progression, high dosages are often required to achieve therapeutic efficacy, generating off-target side effects, some of which are lethal. To address these limitations, our lab has designed a novel, kidney-targeting peptide amphiphile micelle (KPAM) system toward drug delivery applications. Specifically, KPAMs were found to cross the glomerular filtration barrier and bind to megalin, a multiligand cell surface receptor present on renal tubule cells. When incubated with human kidney proximal tubule cells, KPAMs were found to be biocompatible in vitro and showed higher accumulation in kidneys compared to nontargeted controls in vivo. We provide proof-of-concept studies for their utility in autosomal polycystic kidney disease and their application using various routes of administration.
In addition, due to the modularity of PAMs and their potential for theranostic (“thera”-peutic + “diag”-nostic) applications, I will also present our efforts in developing microRNA nanotherapeutics for calcification and smooth muscle cell targeting to detect and inhibit atherosclerosis. Such micelles have the potential to be the next generation of nanoparticles with capabilities to bind to specific disease markers of interest, deliver a therapeutic, and monitor the progression and regression of the disease in real-time.  
 
BIOGRAPHY
Eun Ji Chung is a Gabilan Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Southern California. She has a courtesy appointment in Chemical Engineering, Medicine (Nephrology and Hypertension), and Surgery (Vascular Surgery and Endovascular Repair), and is an affiliated faculty at the Norris Cancer Center and the Stem Cells department. Her laboratory is interested in harnessing molecular design and self-assembly to develop nano- to macroscale biomaterials that can be utilized in medicine. Dr. Chung received her B.A. with honors in Molecular Biology from Scripps College, her Ph.D. from the Department of Biomedical Engineering from Northwestern University, and her postdoctoral training from the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago. Dr. Chung is a recipient of the K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award from NHLBI and the NIH New Innovator Award (DP2), and was named 35 Under 35 from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, an Emerging Investigator in Biomaterials Science, and a Young Innovator in Nano Research. She also received the USC faculty mentoring award for undergraduates in 2018. Dr. Chung is a member of the Society for Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Society, and is on the editorial boards of the journals Experimental Biology and Medicine and SLAS Technology, and planning committees of Women in Nephrology and Women in Chemistry.

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1527164547 2018-05-24 12:22:27 1557406322 2019-05-09 12:52:02 0 0 event 2019-05-09T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-09T13:00:00-04:00 2019-05-09T13:00:00-04:00 2019-05-09 16:00:00 2019-05-09 17:00:00 2019-05-09 17:00:00 2019-05-09T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-09T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-05-09 12:00:00 2019-05-09 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Blair Brettmann, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Chung profile]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[6th Annual BioE Day]]> 27195 Come celebrate the Petit Institute's Bioengineering Interdisciplinary Graduate Program!

AGENDA
12:30 p.m.     Posters in atrium - refreshments served

1:15 p.m.       Keynote Presentation - “Cast a Wide Net or Thread the Needle, Balancing Your BioE Skill Set for Success in Industry” - Ivan Cáceres, Ph.D., Senior Principal Data Analytics & Cognitive Autonomy Engineer, Northrop Grumman

2:15 p.m.       Rapid Fire

3:15 p.m.       Coffee break

3:30 p.m.       Graduate student presentation

3:40 p.m.       Graduate student presentation

3:50 p.m.       Graduate student presentation

4:00 p.m.       Outstanding Advisor Presentation - "Just (Bio)Eing Yourself" - Susan Thomas, Ph.D., Associate Professor, George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

4:30 p.m.       Outstanding Paper Presentation - "Microfluidic Generation of Transient Cell Volume Exchange for Convectively Driven Intracellular Delivery of Large Macromolecules" - Anna Liu, doctoral candidate; Todd Sulchek, Ph.D., Advisor

5:00 p.m.       Awards

5:15 p.m.       Fun and Games on the Bioquad - refreshments served

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1555502646 2019-04-17 12:04:06 1557404752 2019-05-09 12:25:52 0 0 event 2019-05-09T13:30:00-04:00 2019-05-09T20:00:00-04:00 2019-05-09T20:00:00-04:00 2019-05-09 17:30:00 2019-05-10 00:00:00 2019-05-10 00:00:00 2019-05-09T13:30:00-04:00 2019-05-09T20:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-05-09 01:30:00 2019-05-09 08:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Laura Paige

404-385-6655

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<![CDATA[GT Bioengineering Program Website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "From Mechanical Forces to Tissue Straining – How to Employ Biophysical Cues to Guide Regeneration"

Univ.-Prof. Dr.-Ing. Georg Duda

Julius Wolff Insitute and Berlin Institute of Health Center for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT)
Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin
Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

ABSTRACT
Conceptually, our research aims at understanding endogenous cascades of tissue formation, cytokine signaling and cellular self-organization especially in bone. Mechanical straining and adaptation due to mechanical cues plays a central role in all these tissues. The aim of our work is to understand the mechano-biological cues of regeneration and adaptation and how they can be employed to enable healing even in tissues with impaired regenerative capacity such as muscle, cartilage or tendon. All approaches are motivated by clinical challenges, are based on in vivo patient measurements, employ basic research principles and aim at being translated into daily clinical routine. Examples of translation include innovative concepts for joint replacement procedures, angle stable fixation of implants or cell therapies for immune-modulation to empower tissue regeneration. 

BIO
Georg Duda is director of the Julius Wolff Insitute, co-director of the Berlin Center Regenerative Therapies and Professor of Biomechanics and Musculoskeletal Regeneration at the Charité – Humboldt University of Berlin and Free University of Berlin and an Associated Faculty Member at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg in 1996. After stays at Mayo Clinic, Johns Hopkins University, Technical University Hamburg-Harburg and University of Ulm, he moved to Berlin to initiate a regenerative research focus in musculoskeletal surgery. He initiated a clinician scientist program and chairs the graduate school Berlin-Brandenburg School for Regenerative Therapies.

WATCH LIVESTREAM LINK HERE

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1554835819 2019-04-09 18:50:19 1556116436 2019-04-24 14:33:56 0 0 event 2019-05-01T11:00:00-04:00 2019-05-01T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-01T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-01 15:00:00 2019-05-01 16:00:00 2019-05-01 16:00:00 2019-05-01T11:00:00-04:00 2019-05-01T12:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-05-01 11:00:00 2019-05-01 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Bob Nerem, Ph.D. and Johnna Temenoff, Ph.D. - faculty hosts

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<![CDATA[Duda profile]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 Co-hosted with the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

"Synthetic Human Embryo-like Structure: A New Paradigm for Human Embryology"

Jianping Fu, Ph.D.
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Department of Cell & Developmental Biology
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

ABSTRACT
Early human embryonic development remains mysterious due to drastic species divergences between humans and other mammalian models and limited accessibility to human embryo samples.  Recent studies from my laboratory and others have shown that under suitable culture conditions human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) can undergo intricate morphogenetic events and self-organize to form patterned human embryo-like structures in vitro.  These synthetic human embryonic tissues hold great promises for advancing human embryology and reproductive medicine.  In this talk, I will describe a hPSC-based, synthetic 3D model of human post-implantation development that recapitulates key developmental landmarks successively, including pro-amniotic cavity formation, amniotic ectoderm-epiblast patterning, primordial germ cell specification, and development of the primitive streak with controlled anteroposterior polarity.  We further show that the amniotic ectoderm, as the first lineage that segregates from the epiblast upon implantation of the human embryo, functions as a signaling center to trigger primitive streak development in the epiblast.  Together, our research has developed a powerful synthetic embryological model and provided new understandings of previously inaccessible but critical embryogenic events in human development.

BIO
Jianping Fu is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His group integrates micro/nanoengineering, single-cell technologies, and systems and synthetic biology methods with new discoveries of mechanobiology, epigenetics, and stem cell biology for advancing understandings of human development and cancer biology.  Fu is the recipient of the American Heart Association Scientist Development Award (2012), the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2012), the UM Mechanical Engineering Outstanding Faculty Achievement Award (2014), the UM Robert M. Caddell Memorial Award for Research (2014), the UM Ted Kennedy Family Team Excellence Award (2015), the Rising Star Award from the Biomedical Engineering Society - Cellular and Molecular Bioengineering (2016), and the UM George J. Huebner, Jr. Research Excellence Award (2018).  Fu's research on developing synthetic models of human embryonic development has contributed significantly to the emerging field of "Synthetic Embryos", which was selected by the MIT Technology Review as “10 Breakthrough Technologies of 2018.”  

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1556111185 2019-04-24 13:06:25 1556111297 2019-04-24 13:08:17 0 0 event 2019-05-30T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-30T13:00:00-04:00 2019-05-30T13:00:00-04:00 2019-05-30 16:00:00 2019-05-30 17:00:00 2019-05-30 17:00:00 2019-05-30T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-30T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-05-30 12:00:00 2019-05-30 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Andrés García, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Fu lab website]]>
<![CDATA[2020 Suddath Symposium, "Redox Homeostasis and Signaling in Human Health and Disease"]]> 27195 The Suddath Symposium is held annually to celebrate the life and contribution of F.L. "Bud" Suddath by discussing the latest developments in the fields of bioengineering and bioscience. The speakers include leading researchers across the world. This successful symposium has been taking place for 28 years! Each year the symposium topic changes.

Symposium Chairs: Melissa Kemp, Ph.D., and Amit Reddi, Ph.D.

Registration - Opening Soon!
Early registration $25 - available through Monday, December 13, 2019 - all attendees
Regular registration $35 beginning Tuesday, December 14, 2019 - all attendees

For complete symposium info and registration, visit: Suddath Symposium website

The 2020 Suddath Symposium is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute of Bioengineering and Bioscience at Georgia Tech.

The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 19 research centers, more than 220 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1555947182 2019-04-22 15:33:02 1555947259 2019-04-22 15:34:19 0 0 event 2020-01-09T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-10T16:00:00-05:00 2020-01-10T16:00:00-05:00 2020-01-09 18:00:00 2020-01-10 21:00:00 2020-01-10 21:00:00 2020-01-09T13:00:00-05:00 2020-01-10T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2020-01-09 01:00:00 2020-01-10 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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<![CDATA[Suddath Symposium Website]]>
<![CDATA[Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) Distinguished Lecture]]> 27349 “Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Gastrointestinal Organoids as New Models to Study Human Development and Disease”

James Wells, Ph.D.
Chief Scientific Office, Center for Stem Cell and Organoid Medicine (CuSTOM)
Director for Research, Division of Endocrinology
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Successful efforts to direct the differentiation of human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) into specific organ cell types in vitro have largely been guided by studies of embryonic organ development. We have used principles of organogenesis to generate complex, three-dimensional human gastrointestinal organ tissues from PSCs in vitro. We have done this by focusing on the signaling pathways that drive anterior-posterior and dorsal-ventral patterning of the developing endoderm. We can now generate organoids representing all of the organs of the gastrointestinal tract including esophagus, gastric fundus, gastric antrum, small intestine and colon. GI organoids contain complex epithelial structures and diverse cell types that are unique to their representative organ; esophageal organoids develop a stratified squamous epithelium, gastric organoids have a glandular epithelium that secrete digestive enzymes, hormones, and acid, and intestinal organoids additionally absorb nutrients. While the first generation of GI organoids had epithelium and mesenchyme, they were lacking important cell types and functions. We have now engineered additional cellular complexity into organoids, such as small intestinal organoids with a functional enteric nervous and colonic organoids with functional immune cells capable of triggering an inflammatory cascade in response to pathogenic bacteria. Ongoing studies include PSC-derived organoids to identify the underlying mechanisms behind birth defects including Hirschsprung’s disease and esophageal atresia, to identify new pathologies in patients with complex GI diseases. Lastly we are using human organoids to investigate the how the GI endocrine system modulates a broad array of metabolic functions including nutrient sensing and absorption.

NIH grant funding: P01HD093363, U01DK103117, U19 AI116491, UG3DK119982

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1555343417 2019-04-15 15:50:17 1555343417 2019-04-15 15:50:17 0 0 event 2019-05-02T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-02T13:00:00-04:00 2019-05-02T13:00:00-04:00 2019-05-02 16:00:00 2019-05-02 17:00:00 2019-05-02 17:00:00 2019-05-02T12:00:00-04:00 2019-05-02T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-05-02 12:00:00 2019-05-02 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> LaKeita Servance

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<![CDATA[Wells Profile]]>
<![CDATA[2019 BIO Vendor Showcase @ Georgia Tech]]> 27349

THE SHOWCASE IS NOW SOLD OUT

The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, with the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Student group (BBUGS), will host a BIO Vendor Showcase at Georgia Tech. 25+ plus companies will be on hand to display and demonstrate their equipment and research techniques thereby offering a great opportunity for faculty and staff to learn about new products as well. Donated items by vendors will be raffled for attendees throughout the showcase.
 

INFO

Reservations are available for exhibit tables for purchase by credit card. Vendor registration is for first floor tables only - $200 - one table per company. Registration and payment must be received before reservation can be confirmed.

If you are a vendor who prefers to pay by check, please contact Floyd Wood for instructions on this process.

Food will be served throughout the event to maximize exposure. All companies are asked to donate an item to be raffled off. Note: these raffles will take place throughout the event.

The following will be provided to vendor participants:

**All vendor registration fee proceeds are used to support the annual operations of the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS).


The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 19 research centers, more than 200 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems. 

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1547137529 2019-01-10 16:25:29 1555029476 2019-04-12 00:37:56 0 0 event 2019-04-16T11:00:00-04:00 2019-04-16T15:00:00-04:00 2019-04-16T15:00:00-04:00 2019-04-16 15:00:00 2019-04-16 19:00:00 2019-04-16 19:00:00 2019-04-16T11:00:00-04:00 2019-04-16T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-04-16 11:00:00 2019-04-16 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Floyd Wood - Event Coordinator

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27349 “Regulation of Mesenteric Lymphatics in Metabolic Syndrome”

Mariappan Muthuchamy, Ph.D.
Professor
Medical Physiology
Texas A&M College of Medicine

Lymphatic muscle is uniquely composed of both smooth and striated muscle components and studies elucidating their contractile behavior have unequivocally established that this is a new class of muscle that is distinct from smooth and cardiac/skeletal muscle types. Lymphatic muscle exhibits rapid, phasic contractile activity that drives the intrinsic lymphatic pumping in addition to the slower, tonic form of contractions. One of our goals is to elucidate the contractile regulatory mechanisms of lymphatic muscle in normal and in different inflammation animal models. Insulin resistance is a critical determinant of the onset and progression of several metabolic diseases, such as obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and type 2-diabetes. A state of chronic, sub-acute inflammation is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and understanding the insulin resistant mechanisms may provide new targets for treatment of MetSyn. Lymphatic function is impaired in a high-fructose diet-induced MetSyn rat model and that is associated with an increase macrophage investiture into, and along, the mesenteric lymphatic collecting vessels. Additionally, insulin resistant lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) exhibit selective impairment in PI3K/AKT pathway and enhancement in ERK/p38MAPK/JNK pathway to modulate cellular metabolic responses, and activating inflammatory signaling and perturb contractile status of LMCs. Insulin resistant LECs produced less NO due to a decrease in eNOS phosphorylation and showed a significant decrease in impedance across an LEC monolayer that was associated with disruption in the adherence junctional proteins. Additionally, insulin resistance in LECs impaired mitochondrial function by decreasing basal-, maximal-, and ATP-linked-oxygen consumption rates and activated NF-κB nuclear translocation coupled with increased pro-inflammatory signaling. Additionally, insulin resistant LMCs exhibited elevated intracellular calcium and decreased striated muscle-specific sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase 2a (SERCA2a)  expression and activity. SERCA2a expression was significantly decreased in MetSyn lymphatic vessels and a SERCA activator, CDN 1163 increased phasic contractile frequency in the vessels from MetSyn, thereby, partially restored lymph flow in MetSyn rats.
 

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1554216155 2019-04-02 14:42:35 1554216155 2019-04-02 14:42:35 0 0 event 2019-04-19T16:00:00-04:00 2019-04-19T17:00:00-04:00 2019-04-19T17:00:00-04:00 2019-04-19 20:00:00 2019-04-19 21:00:00 2019-04-19 21:00:00 2019-04-19T16:00:00-04:00 2019-04-19T17:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-04-19 04:00:00 2019-04-19 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Brandon Dixon - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Petit Institute]]> <![CDATA[Muthuchamy profile]]>
<![CDATA[Cell Manufacturing Seminar Series]]> 27349 “Precision Profiling of Microbiome-host Interactions via Single Molecule and Single Cell Sequencing”

Iwijn De Vlaminck, Ph.D.
Meinig School of Biomedical Engineering
Cornell University

Despite the centrality of microbes to human health, we know very little about how microbes interact with each other and their environment. This lack of understanding is due to fundamental limitations of existing tools to study microbiomes and microbiome-host interactions. In this talk, I will describe key limitations of existing tools, and I will provide solutions. First, I will discuss the utility of next generation sequencing assays of urinary cell-free DNA for the broad diagnosis of viral and bacterial infections of the urinary tract. Second, I will present a droplet-microfluidics single-cell RNA sequencing technology that enables to catalog the diversity of viral transcripts within infected cells, and at the same time record the cellular response to viral infection. Last, I will discuss a highly multiplexed in-situ hybridization assay that provides a means to map the locations and identities of hundreds of different microbial species in dense microbial communities. I will discuss both translational and basic science applications of these techniques. 

This presentation can be seen via videoconference using BlueJeans: https://bluejeans.com/941589573

This seminar is hosted by the Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies, the Marcus Center for Therapeutic Cell Characterization and Manufacturing and the Center for Immunoengineering at Georgia Tech

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1553013319 2019-03-19 16:35:19 1554215092 2019-04-02 14:24:52 0 0 event 2019-08-27T12:00:00-04:00 2019-08-27T13:00:00-04:00 2019-08-27T13:00:00-04:00 2019-08-27 16:00:00 2019-08-27 17:00:00 2019-08-27 17:00:00 2019-08-27T12:00:00-04:00 2019-08-27T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-08-27 12:00:00 2019-08-27 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Krish Roy - faculty host

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<![CDATA[CMaT]]> <![CDATA[De Vlaminck Lab]]>
<![CDATA[GT Neuro Seminar Series]]> 27349 “Integrating New Knowledge into a Neural Network without Catastrophic Interference: Computational and Theoretical Investigations in a Hierarchically Structured Environment”

James L. McClelland, Ph.D.
Lucie Stern Professor in the Social Sciences
Director, Center for Mind, Brain and Computation
Department of Psychology
Stanford University, Stanford, CA

According to complementary learning systems theory, integrating new memories into a multi-layer neural network without interfering with what is already known depends on interleaving presentation of the new memories with ongoing presentations of items previously learned. This putative dependence is both costly for machine learning and biologically implausible for real brains which are unlikely to have sufficient time for such massive interleaving, even during sleep. We use deep linear neural networks in hierarchically structured environments previously analyzed by Saxe, McClelland, and Ganguli () to gain new insights into how integration of new knowledge might be made more efficient. For this type of environment, its content can be described by the singular value decomposition (SVD) of the environment's input-output covariance matrix, in which each successive dimension corresponds to categorical split in the hierarchical environment. Prior work showed that deep linear networks are sufficient to learn the content of the environment, and they do so in a stage-line way, with each dimension strength rising from near-zero to its maximum strength after a delay inversely proportional to the strength of the dimension, as previously demonstrated by Saxe et al capturing patterns previously observed in deeper non-linear neural networks by Rogers and McClelland (2004). Several observations are then accessible when we consider learning a new item previously not encountered in the micro-environment. (1) The item can be examined in terms of its projection onto the existing structure, and the degree to which it adds a new categorical split. (2) To the extent the item projects onto existing structure, including it in the training corpus leads to the rapid adjustment of the representation of the categories involved, and effectively no adjustment occurs to categories onto which the new item does not project at all. (3) Learning a new split, however, is slow, and its learning dynamics show the same delayed rise to maximum that depends on the dimension's strength. These observations then motivate the development of ideas about how the new information might be acquired efficiently, combining interleaved learning with other strategies.

This presentation can be seen via BlueJeans: https://bluejeans.com/824485104/

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1553607330 2019-03-26 13:35:30 1553607330 2019-03-26 13:35:30 0 0 event 2019-04-15T12:15:00-04:00 2019-04-15T13:15:00-04:00 2019-04-15T13:15:00-04:00 2019-04-15 16:15:00 2019-04-15 17:15:00 2019-04-15 17:15:00 2019-04-15T12:15:00-04:00 2019-04-15T13:15:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-04-15 12:15:00 2019-04-15 01:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Chris Rozell, faculty host

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<![CDATA[GT Neuro]]> <![CDATA[McClelland profile]]>
<![CDATA[GT Immunoengineering Seminar]]> 27349 Omar F. Khan, Ph.D.
Founder & Chief Scientist
Tiba Biotech

“Embracing Engineering to Build a Startup and Exit Academia: A Perspective from Tiba Biotech”

Omar F. Khan is Founder and Chief Scientist of Tiba Biotech, a company based on the nucleic acid delivery technologies he invented during his postdoctoral research. Omar earned his B.A.Sc. and Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Toronto where his Ph.D. supervisor was Michael V. Sefton. As a Postdoctoral Associate and Research Scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he worked with Robert Langer and Daniel Anderson.

Omar is widely published on topics at the interface of engineering and life science. His areas of expertise include molecularly-defined nucleic acid delivery systems, vaccination nanotechnology, biomaterials, tissue engineering, reactor design, scale-up production and translational research models.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1551989539 2019-03-07 20:12:19 1551989539 2019-03-07 20:12:19 0 0 event 2019-04-12T14:00:00-04:00 2019-04-12T15:00:00-04:00 2019-04-12T15:00:00-04:00 2019-04-12 18:00:00 2019-04-12 19:00:00 2019-04-12 19:00:00 2019-04-12T14:00:00-04:00 2019-04-12T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-04-12 02:00:00 2019-04-12 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Julia Babensee ,facutly host

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<![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Center Seminar Series]]> 27349 “Machine Learning in Predicting Immunogenicity”

Eva Lee, Ph.D.
Virginia C. and Joseph C. Mello Chair and Professor
Milton Stewart School of Industrial and Systems Engineering
Director, Center for Operations Research in Medicine and HealthCare
Co-Director, NSF I/UCRC Center for Health Organization Transformation
Georgia Tech

 

The ability to predict how different individuals will respond to vaccination and to understand what best protects individuals from infection greatly facilitates developing next-generation vaccines. It facilitates both the rapid design and evaluation of new and emerging vaccines and identifies individuals unlikely to be protected by vaccine. We describe a general-purpose machine-learning framework, DAMIP, for discovering gene signatures that can predict vaccine immunity and efficacy. DAMIP is a multiple-group, concurrent classifier that offers unique features not present in other models: a nonlinear data transformation to manage the curse of dimensionality and noise; a reserved-judgment region that handles fuzzy entities; and constraints on the allowed percentage of misclassifications.

Using DAMIP, implemented results for yellow fever demonstrated that, for the first time, a vaccine’s ability to immunize a patient could be successfully predicted (with accuracy of greater than 90 percent) within one week after vaccination. A gene identified by DAMIP, EIF2AK4, decrypted a seven-decade-old mystery of vaccination. Results for flu vaccine demonstrated DAMIP’s applicability to both live-attenuated and inactivated vaccines. Results in a malaria study enabled targeted delivery to individual patients.

Our project’s methods and findings permit highlighting and probabilistically prioritizing hypothesis design to enhance biological discovery. Moreover, they guide the rapid development of better vaccines to fight emerging infections, and improve monitoring for poor responses in the elderly, infants, or others with weakened immune systems. In addition, the project’s work should help with universal flu-vaccine design.

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1551720733 2019-03-04 17:32:13 1551722325 2019-03-04 17:58:45 0 0 event 2019-03-05T16:00:00-05:00 2019-03-05T17:00:00-05:00 2019-03-05T17:00:00-05:00 2019-03-05 21:00:00 2019-03-05 22:00:00 2019-03-05 22:00:00 2019-03-05T16:00:00-05:00 2019-03-05T17:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-03-05 04:00:00 2019-03-05 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> John McDonald, faculty host

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<![CDATA[Integrated Cancer Research Institute]]> <![CDATA[Lee profile]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 "Towards the Design and Neurointegration of Dexterous Robotic Upper-extremity Prostheses"

Frank Hammond, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Georgia Tech


Frank Hammond’s research focuses on the design and control of adaptive robotic manipulation (ARM) systems. This class of devices exemplified by kinematic structures, actuation topologies, and sensing and control strategies that make them particularly well-suited to operating in unstructured, dynamically varying environments - specifically those involving cooperative interactions with humans. The ARM device design process uses an amalgamation of bioinspiration, computational modeling and optimization, and advanced rapid prototyping techniques to generate manipulation solutions which are functionally robust and versatile, but which may take completely non-biomorphic (xenomorphic) forms. This design process removes human intuition from the design loop and, instead, leverages computational methods to map salient characteristics of biological manipulation and perception onto a vast robotics design space. Areas of interest for ARM research include kinematically redundant industrial manipulation, wearable robotic devices for human augmentation, haptic-enabled teleoperative robotic microsurgery, and autonomous soft robotic platforms.

A key scientific challenge in ARM research is synthesizing robot designs which promote the functional versatility, efficiency, and mechanical robustness seen in biological manipulators, but which are built from non-biomorphic mechanisms, actuators, and energy sources. The first step in that process is empirical characterization of the biological manipulation systems that robotic systems will emulate. In the case of adaptive robotic grasping, the biomechanics and kinetics of human grasping are measured using soft wearable sensor suites (built in-lab) and various motion tracking systems. The experimental data is then analyzed using principal component analysis, partial least squares (regression), and other dimensionality reduction methods to elucidate form-function relationships and quantitative descriptions of human grasp mechanics. This information then forms the basis for the functional requirements of a robotic manipulator.

Mechanistic and statistical models generated from experimental data can be used to describe the characterized manipulation tasks mathematically. Computational models of candidate robotic manipulators – consisting of motion transmission mechanisms, actuators, and kinematic topologies, and control laws – are then used to simulate the tasks and assess manipulator design quality. The manipulator design space can include underactuated mechanisms, passively compliant structures, and distributed sensors for autonomous control or teleoperation. Various environmental conditions and task disturbances can be imposed on a manipulator in simulation, and computational design refinement can continue until certain performance criteria and design constraints are satisfied. To design kinematically-redundant industrial manipulators, for example, multiple task variants and environmental obstacles can be introduced in simulation to force design solutions which are both disturbance-tolerant and dexterous.

After optimization in-silica, ARM device designs are prototyped and experimentally validated in target environments. Rapid prototyping methods including, 3D printing, shape deposition manufacturing, and soft lithography, allow economical manufacturing of strain sensors, pneumatic actuators and other tunable, modular robotic components. Efficient, inexpensive prototyping capabilities are particularly for wearable devices which, along with mechanical performance requirements, must satisfy a variety human factors requirements. Experimental data gathered using these prototypes can be used to adjust simulation parameters and seed further optimizations.

Hammond is excited to collaborate with Georgia Tech faculty and students on a variety of ARM research projects, including new topics such as xenomorphic robotic systems, human-robot interaction and co-adaptation models, and transformable, autonomous robotic manipulation platforms.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1541421503 2018-11-05 12:38:23 1550687844 2019-02-20 18:37:24 0 0 event 2019-03-12T09:30:00-04:00 2019-03-12T10:30:00-04:00 2019-03-12T10:30:00-04:00 2019-03-12 13:30:00 2019-03-12 14:30:00 2019-03-12 14:30:00 2019-03-12T09:30:00-04:00 2019-03-12T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-03-12 09:30:00 2019-03-12 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

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595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[Hammon lab website]]>
<![CDATA[South Eastern Regional Yeast Meeting (SERYM)]]> 27195 The SERYM 26th annual Meeting brings together researchers in diverse fields who use any type of yeast as a model system. Topics stem from strategies for treatment of fungal disease to modeling human disease in yeast, showing very diverse and interdisciplinary approaches to tackle important biological questions. The meeting is attended by primarily students (Grad students and Undergrads) with strong representation from smaller colleges for the undergrads. Presentation opportunities are for trainees at all levels including oral presentations for undergrads, grad students and postdoctoral fellows.

AGENDA Outline

Friday, April 12, 2019
5 - 8:00 p.m .    Registration and Keynote Presentation, Reception

Saturday, April 13, 2019
8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.     Presentations
6 - 8:30 p.m.     Dinner

Sunday, April 14, 2019
8:30 a.m. - Noon     Presentations
Noon     Adjourn

SERYM 2019 WEBSITE
 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1547236137 2019-01-11 19:48:57 1550242661 2019-02-15 14:57:41 0 0 event 2019-04-12T18:00:00-04:00 2019-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 2019-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 2019-04-12 22:00:00 2019-04-14 17:00:00 2019-04-14 17:00:00 2019-04-12T18:00:00-04:00 2019-04-14T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-04-12 06:00:00 2019-04-14 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Francesca Storici, Ph.D. - Faculty organizer

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616300 616300 image <![CDATA[South Eastern Regional Yeast Meeting (SERYM)]]> image/png 1547469782 2019-01-14 12:43:02 1547470071 2019-01-14 12:47:51
<![CDATA[2019 Suddath Award Winner Presentation]]> 27195 The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience awards the Suddath Symposium graduate student awards to three students for their grand achievements in biological or biochemical research at the molecular or cellular level. The first place awardee presents their work to the Petit Institute community during the annual Suddath Symposium.

"Biosensor Development for Field-deployable Diagnostic Assays"

2019 Suddath Award Winner
Monica McNerney, Doctoral Candidate
Bioengineering
Georgia Institute of Technology

Mark Styczynski, Ph.D. - Advisor

Can't make the talk? Watch Livestream Here!

Almost all current tests for biomarkers require venous blood draws, extensive sample processing, and analysis with complex equipment. Inexpensive, easy-to-use tests are critical for expanding healthcare to under-developed regions, but the requirement for reliable quantification in complex sample types (like blood) has been a critical roadblock in developing such diagnostics. I will present the development of an inexpensive, “field-friendly” diagnostic platform that uses cell-free expression systems to generate colored readouts that are visible to the naked eye, yet quantitative and robust to the interference effects seen in complex samples. Using this platform, I created a nearly field-deployable test for zinc deficiency (which is estimated to kill over 100,000 children annually) that accurately measures clinically relevant zinc concentrations. The test requires just a finger-prick of blood, is robust to temperature variation, and can be freeze-dried for long term storage. We have also used this approach to measure other classes of biomarkers, demonstrating a generalizable platform for low-cost quantitative diagnostics.

The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 19 research centers, more than 220 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1545161292 2018-12-18 19:28:12 1549461742 2019-02-06 14:02:22 0 0 event 2019-02-07T11:30:00-05:00 2019-02-07T12:15:00-05:00 2019-02-07T12:15:00-05:00 2019-02-07 16:30:00 2019-02-07 17:15:00 2019-02-07 17:15:00 2019-02-07T11:30:00-05:00 2019-02-07T12:15:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-02-07 11:30:00 2019-02-07 12:15:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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<![CDATA[Styczynski lab website]]> <![CDATA[Suddath Memorial Award]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Design of Synthetic Alternatives to Biologics in Medicine"

Suzie Pun, Ph.D.
Robert F. Rushmer Professor of Bioengineering
Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering
University of Washington

ABSTRACT
Biologics, products produced from living organisms, have revolutionized treatment of disease. Examples of FDA-approved biologics include therapeutic proteins (e.g. blood clotting factors and antibodies), engineered viruses for gene therapy, and cell therapies. Biologics are addressing previous unmet medical needs, but are challenging to manufacture and therefore high in cost. In this talk, I will describe our efforts to develop synthetic alternatives to biologics used in medicine. In the first example, a multivalent polymer displaying a fibrin-binding peptide was developed as a synthetic alternative to recombinant proteins used in trauma medicine. The second example, a polymer that facilitates intracellular delivery of nucleic acids and peptides was synthesized based on design principles learned from adenoviral vectors. In a final example, an unique aptamer with high affinity for T cell marker CD8 was discovered and applied as an alternative to antibodies for T cell isolation in the manufacturing process for CAR T cells.


BIO
Suzie H. Pun is the Robert F Rushmer Professor of Bioengineering, an Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering, and a member of the Molecular Engineering and Sciences Institute at UW.  She is a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI) and the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) and has been recognized with the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2006 and as an AAAS-Lemelson Invention Ambassador in 2015. She serves as an Associate Editor for ACS Biomaterials Science and Engineering. Her research focus area is in biomaterials and drug delivery. 

Suzie Pun received her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University and her Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from the California Institute of Technology working under the supervision of Professor Mark E. Davis. She also worked as a senior scientist at Insert Therapeutics/Calando Pharmaceuticals developing polymeric drug delivery systems before joining the Department of Bioengineering at University of Washington.

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1527164802 2018-05-24 12:26:42 1548688048 2019-01-28 15:07:28 0 0 event 2019-03-28T12:00:00-04:00 2019-03-28T13:00:00-04:00 2019-03-28T13:00:00-04:00 2019-03-28 16:00:00 2019-03-28 17:00:00 2019-03-28 17:00:00 2019-03-28T12:00:00-04:00 2019-03-28T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-03-28 12:00:00 2019-03-28 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Johnna Temenoff, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Pun lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 "Decoding Memory in Health and Alzheimer’s Disease"

Annabelle Singer, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering
Georgia Tech and Emory University


ABSTRACT
In this talk I will discuss how neural activity goes awry in Alzheimer’s disease, driving specific frequencies of neural activity recruits the brain’s immune system, and new methods to drive rhythmic activity non-invasively. Spatial navigation deficits are one of the earliest symptoms of AD and the hippocampus is one of the areas first affected by the disease. First, I will describe how neural codes underlying memory-based spatial decisions fail in animal models Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Using a virtual reality behavior paradigm to record and manipulate neural activity in transgenic mice, the primary animal model of AD, we found deficits in hippocampal neural activity early in the progression of the disease. These deficits occurred in the same patterns of activity that we have found inform memory-guided decisions in a spatial navigation task. Next, I will discuss the effects of driving these patterns of activity in AD model mice. We found that driving gamma activity, the activity lacking in AD mice, mobilized the immune system to remove pathogenic proteins. Specifically, driving gamma recruited the primary immune cells of the brain, microglia, to alter their morphology and increase engulfment of beta-amyloid.  Finally, I will discuss new non-invasive methods we are developing to drive rhythmic neural activity non-invasively. Ultimately, these discoveries could lead to new therapies for Alzheimer’s disease by driving specific patterns of neural activity to impact the disease at the cognitive, cellular, and molecular levels.

BIO
Annabelle Singer is a neuroscientist with extensive experience in the biology of learning and memory from health to disease, from animal models to humans, and from computations within neurons to across populations of cells. She is currently an Assistant Professor in George Tech’s Department of Biomedical Engineering. She completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Ed Boyden’s Synthetic Neurobiology Group at MIT and she received her Ph.D. in Neuroscience from UCSF, performing research in the laboratory of Loren Frank. Singer’s long-term goal is to understand how neural activity produces memories and protects brain health. Using this knowledge, she is engineering neural activity to treat brain diseases. To achieve these aims, Singer integrates innovative engineering, biology, and computational approaches toexamine how coordinated electrical activity across many neurons represents memories of experiences and how this activity fails in  disease.  Singer’s discoveries have resulted in a series of first author peer-reviewed papers, dozens of talks and presentations, and both popular science articles and academic commentary. In the course of her research Singer has developed new methods to simultaneously record neural inputs and outputs during behavior in awake behaving animals, new approaches to analyze complex neural data, and new therapeutic approaches to treat cognitive disease.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1541421741 2018-11-05 12:42:21 1548681280 2019-01-28 13:14:40 0 0 event 2019-04-09T09:30:00-04:00 2019-04-09T10:30:00-04:00 2019-04-09T10:30:00-04:00 2019-04-09 13:30:00 2019-04-09 14:30:00 2019-04-09 14:30:00 2019-04-09T09:30:00-04:00 2019-04-09T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-04-09 09:30:00 2019-04-09 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

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595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[Singer lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 "Ex vivo Immune Organoids and On-Chip Technologies for Immunity, Epigenetics, and Malignancies"

Ankur Singh, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering
Cornell University

ABSTRACT
Antibodies are generated by the immune cells in the lymph nodes in response to infection, autoimmunity, and other maladies. Humoral immunity depends on the germinal center differentiation process in the B cell follicles of lymph nodes and spleen. In germinal centers, B cells rapidly proliferate and somatically mutated high-affinity antibody secreting cells, i.e. plasma cells, are generated from naïve B cells in response to T cell-dependent antigen. The stochasticity of the antibody formation process predisposes immune cells to turn into lymphomas. To date, the cross-talk between cellular, biochemical, and biomechanical factors in the lymph node microenvironment that regulate antibody formation and support lymphomas is poorly understood. In this talk, I will discuss my laboratory’s effort in developing tractable hydrogel-based ex vivo immune organoids for generating highly specific immune cells in a dish and to elucidate the role of epigenetic modifiers in humoral immunity against infection. I will subsequently describe designer bio-adhesive hydrogels and lymphatic-mimicking technologies for understanding the role of the lymphoid microenvironment in genetically diverse lymphomas and potential causes of drug resistance, including lymphoid tissue mechanics and lymphatic-like fluid flow. Finally, I will discuss the ongoing work on the development of engineered biomaterials for immunomodulation in metabolic syndrome conditions. 

BIOGRAPHY
Prof. Singh is an Assistant Professor with joint appointments in Mechanical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at Cornell University. He is the Associate Director on the NIH/NIBIB T32 training grant on Immune-Engineering at Cornell University. He is a standing member of the Englander Institute for Precision Medicine at Cornell Medicine (NYC) and has affiliations with Cornell’s Immunology and Infectious Disease Program. His “Immunotherapy and Cell Engineering” laboratory at Cornell is developing strategies to engineer adaptable, designer immune organoids and enabling technologies for the understanding of healthy and diseased immune cells and their immunomodulation. He has received funding from the National Institute of Health (NIAID, NCI), National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, and the Lymphoma and Leukemia Society, among others. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed journal articles, including those in Nature Methods, Nature Materials, Nature Communications, Cell Reports, PNAS, Blood, Nature Protocols, and Biomaterials. He is a recipient of several scientific awards including the NSF CAREER, Society for Biomaterials Young Investigator award, 3M Non-Tenured Faculty Award, and the Department of Defense Career award. In 2017, he received Cornell’s Teaching Excellence Award and in 2018, Cornell’s Research Excellence Award. His immune organoid research has been identified among Top 100 Discoveries of 2015 by the Discover Magazine. Prof. Singh is the founder and twice elected Chair of the Immune Engineering Special Interest Group (SIG) at the Society for Biomaterials. He is the current Chair of Immuno Delivery Focus Group at the Controlled Release Society. He currently serves on the editorial board of Science Translational Medicine and Nature's Scientific Reports. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1547761443 2019-01-17 21:44:03 1547761443 2019-01-17 21:44:03 0 0 event 2019-01-24T14:00:00-05:00 2019-01-24T15:00:00-05:00 2019-01-24T15:00:00-05:00 2019-01-24 19:00:00 2019-01-24 20:00:00 2019-01-24 20:00:00 2019-01-24T14:00:00-05:00 2019-01-24T15:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-01-24 02:00:00 2019-01-24 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Andrés García, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Singh lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Southeast Center or Mathematics and Biology Annual Symposium]]> 27195 The SCMB Annual Symposium is a forum to exchange ideas between the broader mathematics and biosystems communities. There will be plenary talks from mathematicians and biologists, organized in complementary pairs, as well as a a public lecture. These will be offered at a colloquium level of detail with an emphasis on engaging the full range of mathematical and biological researchers. A poster session will facilitate discussions among participants in a less formal setting. This will encourage interactions which may then nucleate new research collaborations at the math-bio interface. The overall goal of the SCMB Symposium is not just to highlight the many challenges and opportunities at the math-bio interface, but to create a vibrant community advancing the mathematics of complex biological systems.

SCMB has funding to partially support participants, and priority in allocation will be given to graduate students, postdocs, and junior researchers, including tenure-track faculty, and especially to those who are presenting posters. If funding allows, we may be able to fund additional participants.  For more information, see scmb.gatech.edu/symposium/additional-information.

REGISTER

Confirmed Speakers

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1547148808 2019-01-10 19:33:28 1547148808 2019-01-10 19:33:28 0 0 event 2019-01-28T12:00:00-05:00 2019-01-29T16:00:00-05:00 2019-01-29T16:00:00-05:00 2019-01-28 17:00:00 2019-01-29 21:00:00 2019-01-29 21:00:00 2019-01-28T12:00:00-05:00 2019-01-29T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-01-28 12:00:00 2019-01-29 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Chinneta Willis - SCMB Managing Director, Symposium coordinator
Christine Heitsch, Ph.D. - SCMB Director

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<![CDATA[SCMB website]]> <![CDATA[SCMB Symposium website]]>
<![CDATA[LymphaTech Launch Talk - "The Ph.D.-to-Startup Voyage"]]> 27195 Mike Weiler, Ph.D.
Nate Frank, M.B.A.
Co-Founders
LymphaTech, Inc.

While a Ph.D. candidate at Georgia Tech in the lab of Brandon Dixon (ME), Mike Weiler met Nate Frank, a Scheller M.B.A., who was part of his Tiger team. This partnership would go on to launch LymphaTech, a healthcare technology company focused on innovative 3D measurement solutions to enable optimal clinical care and well-being for patients and providers. Their digital measuring platform is fueled by proprietary algorithms that measure human geometry accurately and consistently in a quick and easy to use mobile platform. LymphaTech provides value throughout the healthcare continuum by serving doctors, physical therapists, medical compression garment manufacturers, and patients.

Come hear Weiler and Frank talk about what they would tell "Grad School Mike and Nate" what they wished they'd known when they were here, in the lab, and describe the startup ride, resources at Georgia Tech and beyond that helped them succeed.

Lunch provided.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1546957939 2019-01-08 14:32:19 1546962298 2019-01-08 15:44:58 0 0 event 2019-01-15T11:00:00-05:00 2019-01-15T12:00:00-05:00 2019-01-15T12:00:00-05:00 2019-01-15 16:00:00 2019-01-15 17:00:00 2019-01-15 17:00:00 2019-01-15T11:00:00-05:00 2019-01-15T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-01-15 11:00:00 2019-01-15 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Harold Solomon
Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D.
VentureLab

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<![CDATA[LymphaTech website]]>
<![CDATA[2019 Suddath Symposium, "Epigenetics: From Mechanisms to Tree of Life"]]> 27195 "Epigenetics: From Mechanisms to Tree of Life"

Epigenetics studies the interactions of genomic DNA with its environment that regulates gene expression. Tremendous progress has been made in current research of epigenetics in various cellular processes, diseases, as well as in behavior and sociality across the tree of life. 

The 2019 Suddath Symposium showcases the depth and diversity of epigenetics research.   Central and emerging topics of epigenetics, from mechanisms in normal and diseases states to evolution and behavior, will be covered. The symposium is intended to spark discussion of concepts that span diverse systems and to inspire future leaders in epigenetics.


The Suddath Symposium is held annually to celebrate the life and contribution of F.L. "Bud" Suddath by discussing the latest developments in the fields of bioengineering and bioscience. The speakers include leading researchers across the world. This successful symposium has been taking place for 27 years! Each year the symposium topic changes.

Symposium Chairs: Yuhong Fan, Ph.D., and Soojin Yi, Ph.D.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS
Victor Corces, Ph.D. - Emory University
Sharon Dent, Ph.D. - University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Yuhong Fan, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech
Brendan Hunt, Ph.D. - University of Georgia
William Kelly, Ph.D. - Emory University
Ali Shilatifard, Ph.D. - Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Paula Vertino, Ph.D. - Emory University / University of Rochester
Hengbin Wang, Ph.D. - University of Alabama at Birmingham
Jerry Workman, Ph.D. - Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Soojin Yi, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech
Yi Zhang, Ph.D. - Harvard Medical School / Harvard Stem Cell Institute

Registration 
Early registration $25 through Friday, January 11, 2019 - all attendees
Regular registration $35 beginning Saturday, January 12, 2019 - all attendees

For complete symposium info and registration, visit: Suddath Symposium website

The 2019 Suddath Symposium is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute of Bioengineering and Bioscience at Georgia Tech.


The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 19 research centers, more than 180 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1530124676 2018-06-27 18:37:56 1545161474 2018-12-18 19:31:14 0 0 event Topics include biomedicine and genomics, chemical ecology, biogeochemical cycling, environmental science, biophysics, and evolution of microbial interactions.

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2019-02-07T13:00:00-05:00 2019-02-08T16:00:00-05:00 2019-02-08T16:00:00-05:00 2019-02-07 18:00:00 2019-02-08 21:00:00 2019-02-08 21:00:00 2019-02-07T13:00:00-05:00 2019-02-08T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-02-07 01:00:00 2019-02-08 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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<![CDATA[Suddath Symposium Website]]>
<![CDATA[2018 Magnetic Resonance Workshop @ Georgia Tech]]> 27195 The aim of this workshop is to:

The central part of the workshop will be a “mini symposium” with a variety of short talks covering MR applications ranging from functional MRI over Biochemistry to Material Sciences.

This is the opportunity to learn about NMR and MRI and ask questions!

REGISTER HERE

AGENDA

10:00 a.m.    Welcome, Johannes Leisen - School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Tech

10:10 a.m.    Approaches to Decoding Mental States with MRI, Thackery Brown – School of Psychology, Georgia Tech

10:40 a.m.    Application of NMR in the Study of Probiotic Oligomerization of Glucose, Zhao Li – School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Tech

11:00 a.m.    Study of the β-sheet Structure in the N-terminal Region of Aβ1-42 150-kDa Oligomers using Solid State NMR, Yuan Gao – School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech

11:20 a.m.    Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Brain Networks using Functional MRI, Maysam Nezafati – Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

11:40 a.m.    Understanding the Structural Flexibility of Metal-Organic Frameworks Using NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Chu Han – School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech

12 noon       Lunch 

12:50 p.m.   Relaxometric Assessment of Matrix Integrity in Cartilage and Intervertebral Disc, David Reiter – Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Emory University

1:20 p.m.    Tracking f-element Imidophosphorane Complexes by 31P NMR, Natalie Rice – School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Tech

1:40 p.m.    Ion Dynamics in Solid Electrolytes, Ah-Young Song – School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Tech

2:00 p.m.    XD-GRASP (Extra Dimensional Golden-Angle Radial Sparse Parallel) MRI, Jackson Hair – Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

2:20 p.m.    Coffee break

2:40 p.m.    Chemokine Receptor 4 Targeted Protein MRI Contrast Agent for Early Detection of Liver Metastases, Shanshan Tan – Georgia State University

3:00 p.m.    Magnetic Property Measurement of Spinel Ferrite Nanoparticles, Yi Cao  – School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Tech

3:20 p.m.    An I for a G; The Consequences of an Amino Group, Zachary Ferris - Georgia State University

3:40 p.m.    Dynamic Nucleation in Metastable Peptide Particle Condensates, Anthony Sementelli – Emory University

4:00 p.m.    Wrap-up


Session Chairs:    Hannah Song, Anastasia Velalopoulou, Bhuwan Chhetri, Kong Wong

       

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1534270551 2018-08-14 18:15:51 1544027002 2018-12-05 16:23:22 0 0 event 2018-12-18T10:00:00-05:00 2018-12-18T16:00:00-05:00 2018-12-18T16:00:00-05:00 2018-12-18 15:00:00 2018-12-18 21:00:00 2018-12-18 21:00:00 2018-12-18T10:00:00-05:00 2018-12-18T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-12-18 10:00:00 2018-12-18 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Johannes Leisen
404-894-9241

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<![CDATA[2019 Suddath Symposium, "Epigenetics: From Mechanisms to Tree of Life"]]> 30678 "Epigenetics: From Mechanisms to Tree of Life"

Epigenetics studies the interactions of genomic DNA with its environment that regulates gene expression. Tremendous progress has been made in current research of epigenetics in various cellular processes, diseases, as well as in behavior and sociality across the tree of life. 

The 2019 Suddath Symposium showcases the depth and diversity of epigenetics research.   Central and emerging topics of epigenetics, from mechanisms in normal and diseases states to evolution and behavior, will be covered. The symposium is intended to spark discussion of concepts that span diverse systems and to inspire future leaders in epigenetics.


The Suddath Symposium is held annually to celebrate the life and contribution of F.L. "Bud" Suddath by discussing the latest developments in the fields of bioengineering and bioscience. The speakers include leading researchers across the world. This successful symposium has been taking place for 27 years! Each year the symposium topic changes.

Symposium Chairs: Yuhong Fan, Ph.D., and Soojin Yi, Ph.D.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS
Victor Corces, Ph.D. - Emory University
Sharon Dent, Ph.D. - University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Yuhong Fan, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech
Brendan Hunt, Ph.D. - University of Georgia
William Kelly, Ph.D. - Emory University
Ali Shilatifard, Ph.D. - Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine
Paula Vertino, Ph.D. - Emory University / University of Rochester
Hengbin Wang, Ph.D. - University of Alabama at Birmingham
Jerry Workman, Ph.D. - Stowers Institute for Medical Research
Soojin Yi, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech
Yi Zhang, Ph.D. - Harvard Medical School / Harvard Stem Cell Institute

Registration 
Early registration $25 through Friday, January 11, 2019 - all attendees
Regular registration $35 beginning Saturday, January 12, 2019 - all attendees

For complete symposium info and registration, visit: Suddath Symposium website

The 2019 Suddath Symposium is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute of Bioengineering and Bioscience at Georgia Tech.


The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 19 research centers, more than 180 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems.

]]> A. Maureen Rouhi 1 1543603986 2018-11-30 18:53:06 1543603986 2018-11-30 18:53:06 0 0 event Topics include biomedicine and genomics, chemical ecology, biogeochemical cycling, environmental science, biophysics, and evolution of microbial interactions.

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2019-02-07T13:00:00-05:00 2019-02-08T16:00:00-05:00 2019-02-08T16:00:00-05:00 2019-02-07 18:00:00 2019-02-08 21:00:00 2019-02-08 21:00:00 2019-02-07T13:00:00-05:00 2019-02-08T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-02-07 01:00:00 2019-02-08 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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<![CDATA[Suddath Symposium Website]]>
<![CDATA[Marcus Center for Therapeutic Cell Characterization and Manufacturing (MC3M) Symposium]]> 27195 Open to all in the bio-community. 

Complimentary RSVP required by Tuesday, December 4, 2018.

The agenda will include: breakfast, lightning talks on all the projects, keynote speaker, lunch, and poster session.

AGENDA
8:00 a.m.     Continental Breakfast & Poster Session
8:30 a.m.     Welcome and Overview of accomplishments
9:00 a.m.     Keynote address "The Incredible, Indelible MSC" - Edwin Horwitz, M.D., Ph.D. - Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Emory University School of Medicine
10:00 a.m.   Break
10:10 a.m.   Lightning Talks (10 minutes each, order below)
12:00 p.m.   Lunch & Poster Session
1:30 p.m.     Lightning Talks (10 minutes each, order below)
3:00 p.m.     Break
3:10 p.m.     Lightning Talks (10 minutes each, order below)
3:50 p.m.     Wrap-up and depart

LIGHTNING TALKS LINEUP

Omics
10:10 a.m.    presentation by Gilad Doron
“Modulation of MSC Secretome for Treatment of Inflammatory Diseases” - Bob Guldberg, GT and Johnna Temenoff, GT (with Arnie Caplan, CWRU)

10:23 a.m.     presentation by Andre Norfleet
“Multi-omic Constrained Optimization of Cardiomyocyte Selection Conditions” - Melissa Kemp, GT and Facundo Fernández, GT

Potency
10:36 a.m.    presentation by Molly Ogle
“High Through-Put Lipidomic Models and High-Content Imaging to Assess Mesenchymal Stem Cell Quality and Potency” Edward Botchwey, GT and Luke Mortensen, UGA

10:49 a.m.    presentation by Kendall Williams
“Tissue-on-a-Chip Platform for Mesenchymal Stem Cell Potency” Andrés J. García, GT and Wilbur Lam, GT/Emory

11:02 a.m.    presentation by JT Shoemaker
“Off-target Toxicity Testing of Cell Therapies using a Novel Brain-on-a-chip System” - Michelle LaPlaca, GT and Jelena Vukasinovic, Lena Biosciences/ATDC

11:15 a.m.    presentation by Michael Nelson and Delta Ghoshal
“Human Bone Marrow-on-a-Chip for Studying Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization and Engraftment” - Krish Roy, GT and Michael Nelson, GT

Sensors
11:28 a.m.    presentation by Mason Chilmonczyk
“Dynamic Mass Spectrometry Probe for Therapeutic Cell Bio-Reactor Quality Control Indicator Discovery” - Andrei Fedorov, GT and Robert Guldberg, GT

11:41 a.m.     presentation by Yun-Soung Kim
“Smart Bioreactor with Integrated Flexible Sensors and Wireless Electronics” - Woon-Hong Yeo, GT, Young Charles Jang, GT

1:30 p.m.    presentation by Decarle Jin
“Potentiometric Chemical and Biological Sensor Capsules for real-time Measurement of Cell Properties in Bioreactors” - Eric Vogel, GT, Billyde Brown, GT, Wilbur Lam, Emory/GT, and Reginald Tran, Emory

1:43 p.m.    presentation by Sam Jiang
“An All-printed Wireless, Distributed Sensor Array Platform for in-line, Continuous Monitoring of Cell Culture Conditions in Scale-up Bioreactors” - Chuck Zhang, GT, Suresh Sitaraman, GT, and Kan Wang, GT

Culture & Scale
1:56 p.m.    presentation by 
“RNA-powered Profiling of Lineage-specific Human iPSC-derived Cardiac Myocytes” - Philip Santangelo, GT and Hee Cheol Cho, Emory

2:09 p.m.    presentation by Emily Jackson-Holmes
“Developing a Microfluidics-based 3-D Organoid System for Modeling Human Brain Development” - Hang Lu, GT and Zhexing Wen, Emory

2:22 p.m.    presentation by Nate Dwarshuis
“Functionalized Microcarriers for Enhanced T cell Expansion” - Krish Roy, GT and  Nate Dwarshuis, GT

Supply Chain and Logistics
2:35 p.m.    presentation by Patrick Ledwig
“Cord Blood Mononuclear Cell Quantification using Oblique Back-illumination Microscopy” Francisco Robles, GT (with Krish Roy, GT and Joanne Kurtzberg, Duke)

2:48 p.m.    presentation by Kevin Wang
“Development of Novel Supply Chain and Process Modeling Algorithms, Methods, and Tools for Cell Therapy Manufacturing and Distribution” - Chip White, GT and Ben Wang, GT

Automation
3:10 p.m.    presentation by William Pilcher
 “A Novel Image-analytic Tool for Automated Characterization of Complex Cell Shapes and Patterns in 3D Tissue Models” - Denis Tsygankov, GT and Peng Qiu, GT

3:23 p.m.    presentation by 
“Towards Closed Loop Control of Cell Production” - Stephen Balakirsky (GTRI), Milad Navaei (GTRI), and James Hays (GT)

3:36 p.m.    presentation by Hongseo Bruce Lim
“Machine Learning for Image-based Early Predictions of Functional Properties in Cell Manufacturing” - Peng Qiu, GT and Krish Roy, GT

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1542210845 2018-11-14 15:54:05 1543587147 2018-11-30 14:12:27 0 0 event 2018-12-07T08:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07T16:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07T16:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07 13:00:00 2018-12-07 21:00:00 2018-12-07 21:00:00 2018-12-07T08:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07T16:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-12-07 08:00:00 2018-12-07 04:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Andrea Soyland
Administrative Director, NSF Center for Cell Manufacturing Technologies (CMaT)
Administrator, Marcus Center for Therapeutic Cell Characterization and Manufacturing (MC3M)

 

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<![CDATA[MC3M website]]>
<![CDATA[ImmunoEngineering Research Days]]> 27195 Presentations will be made by Georgia Tech and Emory faculty with the purpose of learning what we are working on with a view towards developing ideas and faculty teams for submission of multi-investigator research proposals. 

These research days are open to Georgia Tech and Emory faculty doing research in ImmunoEngineering.  

RSVP Required

Presenting Faculty:
Costas Arvanitis, Ph.D.
Steven Bosinger, Ph.D.
Madhav Dhodapkar, M.D.
Tobey MacDonald, M.D.
Jason Fangusare, M.D.
M.G. Finn, Ph.D.
Jyothi Rengarajan, Ph.D.
Shuichi Takayama, Ph.D.
Rabin Tirouranziam, Ph.D.

Lunch provided.

Sponsored by Georgia Tech's Center for ImmunoEngineering and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1543252418 2018-11-26 17:13:38 1543252445 2018-11-26 17:14:05 0 0 event 2018-12-07T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07T13:30:00-05:00 2018-12-07T13:30:00-05:00 2018-12-07 16:00:00 2018-12-07 18:30:00 2018-12-07 18:30:00 2018-12-07T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-07T13:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-12-07 11:00:00 2018-12-07 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Julia Babensee, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Center for ImmunoEngineering at Georgia Tech]]>
<![CDATA[ImmunoEngineering Research Days]]> 27195 Presentations will be made by Emory faculty with the purpose of learning what we are working on with a view towards developing ideas and faculty teams for submission of multi-investigator research proposals. 

These research days are open to Georgia Tech and Emory faculty doing research in ImmunoEngineering.  

RSVP Required

Presenting Faculty:
John Altman, Ph.D.
James Dahlman, Ph.D.
Greg Gibson, Ph.D.
Eliver Ghosn, Ph.D.
Kelly Goldsmith, M.D.
Curtis Henry, Ph.D.
Paul Johnson, M.D.
Gabe Kwong, Ph.D.
Chris Porter, M.D.
Mark Prausnitz, Ph.D.
Khalid Salaita, Ph.D.
Periasamy Selvaraj, Ph.D.
Trent Spencer, Ph.D.
Todd Sulchek, Ph.D.
Jens Wrammert, Ph.D.
Levi Wood, Ph.D.

Lunch provided.

Sponsored by Georgia Tech's Center for ImmunoEngineering and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1538484573 2018-10-02 12:49:33 1543252121 2018-11-26 17:08:41 0 0 event 2018-11-27T09:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27T13:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27T13:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27 14:00:00 2018-11-27 18:00:00 2018-11-27 18:00:00 2018-11-27T09:00:00-05:00 2018-11-27T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-27 09:00:00 2018-11-27 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Julia Babensee, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Health Innovation Commercialization Series]]> 27195 Bridging the gap from university innovation to commercialization.

"Intellectual Property 101: Fundamentals of Intellectual Property, Disclosing, and Patent Filing"

Join us for a panel discussion with Georgia Tech and Emory University Faculty sharing their journey through the commercialization process. Hear their firsthand experience bringing their ideas out of academia and into the marketplace.

This event is the fourth session in The Health Innovation Commercialization Series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. Series topics include how to take your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

REGISTER HERE

If you’re curious how to protect your invention and better understand available resources at both Georgia Tech and Emory, join us to learn the basics of intellectual property, disclosures and patent filing. Come with questions for your tech transfer teams!

Featured Speakers:
Cliff Michaels (Emory Tech Transfer)  
Terry Bray (GT Office of Industry Engagement)

This is the 4th session of the Health Innovation Commercialization Series created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. 

  • Topics designed for entrepreneurs in the life sciences 
  • Panel discussions with industry experts and investors
  • Tools to communicate the commercial potential of your research

For additional information, visit HERE 

Sponsored by the Coulter Translational Program and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance, and Georgia Tech's Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1542302436 2018-11-15 17:20:36 1542302524 2018-11-15 17:22:04 0 0 event 2018-12-11T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-11T12:30:00-05:00 2018-12-11T12:30:00-05:00 2018-12-11 16:00:00 2018-12-11 17:30:00 2018-12-11 17:30:00 2018-12-11T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-11T12:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-12-11 11:00:00 2018-12-11 12:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Petit Institute Holiday Party]]> 27195 The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience will hold its annual Holiday Party to celebrate another great year of interdisciplinary and collaborative research!

Above & Beyond Faculty, Student and Staff Awards to be given, so take a break from your offices and labs to come and celebrate the holiday season with the Petit Institute community!

This event is open to all faculty, staff, research staff, postdocs, and graduate students of the Petit Institute.

RSVP required by December 6 (space limited)

AND....please be sure to bring your donations for the Atlanta Community Food Bank and drop it off in one of the collection cans in the Petit Biotech Building atrium by Friday, Dec. 14!

MOST NEEDED:

Whole Grain Foods
Shelf-stable Milk
Dried or Canned Fruit
Low-sodium Canned Vegetables
Low-sodium Pasta Sauce (plastic containers only)
Peanut Butter
Dried Peas
Dried Beans
Canned Tuna, Salmon, or Chicken
Cooking Oil
100% Fruit or Vegetable Juice
**no glass containers

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1542207455 2018-11-14 14:57:35 1542207473 2018-11-14 14:57:53 0 0 event 2018-12-13T16:00:00-05:00 2018-12-13T18:00:00-05:00 2018-12-13T18:00:00-05:00 2018-12-13 21:00:00 2018-12-13 23:00:00 2018-12-13 23:00:00 2018-12-13T16:00:00-05:00 2018-12-13T18:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-12-13 04:00:00 2018-12-13 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

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69773 69773 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449177264 2015-12-03 21:14:24 1475894611 2016-10-08 02:43:31 <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[ Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 34435 "From Pipettes to Policy: At the Intersection of International Security and Technology"

Margaret Kosal, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
The Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
Georgia Tech

 

Margaret E. Kosal’s research explores the relationships among technology, strategy, and governance. Her research focuses on two, often intersecting, areas:  reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and understanding the role of emerging technologies for security.

Her work aims to understand and explain the role of technology and technological diffusion for national security at strategic and operational levels. In the changing post-Cold War environment, the most advanced military power no longer guarantees national or international security in a globalized world in which an increasing number of nation-states and non-state actors have access to new and potentially devastating dual-use capabilities. The long-term goals of her work are to understand the underlying drivers of technological innovation and how technology affects national security and modern warfare. She is interested in both the scholarly, theoretical level discourse and in the development of new strategic approaches and executable policy options to enable US dominance and to limit the proliferation of unconventional weapons.

On the question of understanding the impact of emerging technology on national and international security her research considers what role will nanotechnology, cognitive science, biotechnology, and converging sciences have on states, non-state actors, balance of power, deterrence postures, security doctrines, nonproliferation regimes, and programmatic choices. Through examination of these real applications on the science (benign and defensive) and potential (notional) offensive uses of nanotechnology, she seeks to develop a model to probe the security implications of this emerging technology. The goal of the research is not to predict new specific technologies but to develop a robust analytical framework for assessing the impact of new technology on national and international security and identifying policy measures to prevent or slow proliferation of new technology - the next generation “WMD” - for malfeasant intentions.

Kosal is the author of Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense (Springer Academic Publishers, 2009), which explores scenarios and strategies regarding the benefits and potential proliferation threats of nanotechnology and other emerging sciences for international security. She is also Director of the Sam Nunn Security Fellows Program and Co-Director of the Program on Emerging Technology within the Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP).

Kosal was recently appointed Adjunct Scholar to the Modern War Institute at the US Military Academy/West Point. From 2012-2013, she as a senior advisor to the Chief of Staff of the US Army as part of his inaugural Strategic Studies Group (SSG). Before joining the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, she was Science and Technology Advisor within the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD). Kosal also served as the first liaison to the Biological and Chemical Defense Directorate at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). She has been recognized for her leadership across the U.S. federal government, specifically for efforts to coordinate across the DoD as part of the interagency Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technology Working Group, reporting to the National Security Council (NSC), and as member of the interagency federal group charged with leading the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). Kosal was nominated to and led the U.S. involvement in the NATO Nanotechnology for Defense Working Group.

Her awards include the 2015 CETL/BP Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award, 2014 Georgia Tech Junior Faculty Outstanding Undergraduate Research Mentor Award, 2012 Ivan Allen Jr Legacy Award, 2010 INTAGO Faculty Award, CETL Class of 1969 Teaching Scholar, the OSD Award for Excellence, 2007 UIUC Alumni Association Recent Alumni Award, the President’s Volunteer Service Award, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Defense Policy Fellow, and the Society of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines Dissertation Research Award. Currently, she serves on the editorial board of the scholarly journals Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, the Journal of Strategic Security, the Journal of Defense Management, and Global Security: Health Science and Policy.

]]> jpalacios9 1 1541624492 2018-11-07 21:01:32 1542043064 2018-11-12 17:17:44 0 0 event 2018-11-13T08:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13T09:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13T09:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13 13:30:00 2018-11-13 14:30:00 2018-11-13 14:30:00 2018-11-13T08:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-13 08:30:00 2018-11-13 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

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595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[Kosal profile]]>
<![CDATA[Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology & Technology]]> 27195 A Festival of Research Ideas in Cancer Biology and Technology is open to all interested in exploring novel ideas about cancer and its detection and treatment.

On display will be posters showing cancer research by scientists and engineers at Georgia Tech and other local institutions as well as summaries of recent publications that have been chosen for display and discussion from Cancer Biology and Technology students.

If you would like to present a poster on your research related to cancer, or for a list of the poster titles and other info about the Festival, please contact Al Merrill. 

This event is supported by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1541699212 2018-11-08 17:46:52 1541699221 2018-11-08 17:47:01 0 0 event 2018-11-15T15:00:00-05:00 2018-11-15T17:00:00-05:00 2018-11-15T17:00:00-05:00 2018-11-15 20:00:00 2018-11-15 22:00:00 2018-11-15 22:00:00 2018-11-15T15:00:00-05:00 2018-11-15T17:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-15 03:00:00 2018-11-15 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute]]> Al Merrill, Ph.D. - faculty organizer

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<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 "RNA Profiling: Extracting Structural Signals from Noisy Distributions"

Christine Heitsch, Ph.D.
Professor, School of Mathematics
Georgia Tech


Accurate RNA structural prediction remains challenging, despite its increasing biomedical importance.  Sampling secondary structures from the Gibbs distribution yields a strong signal of high probability base pairs.  However, identifying higher order substructures requires further analysis.  Profiling (Rogers & Heitsch, NAR, 2014) is a novel method which identifies the most probable combinations of base pairs across the Boltzmann ensemble.  This combinatorial approach is straightforward, stable, and clearly separates structural signal from thermodynamic noise.  Moreover, it can be extended to predict consensus stems for an RNA family with high accuracy via unsupervised clustering of unaligned homologous sequences.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1541421113 2018-11-05 12:31:53 1541421113 2018-11-05 12:31:53 0 0 event 2019-02-12T08:30:00-05:00 2019-02-12T09:30:00-05:00 2019-02-12T09:30:00-05:00 2019-02-12 13:30:00 2019-02-12 14:30:00 2019-02-12 14:30:00 2019-02-12T08:30:00-05:00 2019-02-12T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-02-12 08:30:00 2019-02-12 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

]]>
595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[Heitsch profile]]>
<![CDATA[2018 Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) Distinguished Lecture]]> 27195 “Emergence”

Nigel Goldenfeld, Ph.D.
Swanlund Chair and Professor
Department of Physics
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Professor Goldenfeld will discuss the collective behavior of complex systems and the new laws of physics which describe these emergent states of matter. He will provide a number of examples from recent research in biology and fluid dynamics.

Goldenfeld holds a Center for Advanced Study Professorship and a Swanlund Endowed Chair at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, with appointments in the Department of Physics and the Institute for Genomic Biology.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1541096833 2018-11-01 18:27:13 1541096858 2018-11-01 18:27:38 0 0 event 2018-11-26T16:00:00-05:00 2018-11-26T17:00:00-05:00 2018-11-26T17:00:00-05:00 2018-11-26 21:00:00 2018-11-26 22:00:00 2018-11-26 22:00:00 2018-11-26T16:00:00-05:00 2018-11-26T17:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-26 04:00:00 2018-11-26 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> LaKeita Servance

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<![CDATA[Goldenfeldlab website]]> <![CDATA[EBICS website]]>
<![CDATA[Mentored Training Programs Info. Session: Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance]]> 27195 Are you interested in making a clinical impact with your research? The Georgia Clinical & Translation Science Alliance (Georgia CTSA) offers highly competitive (funded) programs of formal coursework coupled with mentored clinical research experiences for trainees at Georgia CTSA partners (Emory, Georgia Tech, Morehouse School of Medicine, and University of Georgia). These programs are designed for PhD students, postdocs, and junior faculty. The information session will outline these programs and describe the application process.

The overarching goal of these programs is to train the next generation of scientists and clinician-scientists who can lead the design and oversight of future clinical investigations. These investigations will be critical to the overall mission of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS).

Opportunities & deadlines

KL2 Mentored Clinical & Translational Research, two-year Junior Faculty Scholar grant  – Due Mar. 1, 2019

TL1 (T32-like) one-year grants: PhD student training – Due Feb. 15, 2019, Post-doctoral scholar training – Due Mar. 15, 2019

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1541093245 2018-11-01 17:27:25 1541093245 2018-11-01 17:27:25 0 0 event 2018-11-13T11:00:00-05:00 2018-11-13T13:00:00-05:00 2018-11-13T13:00:00-05:00 2018-11-13 16:00:00 2018-11-13 18:00:00 2018-11-13 18:00:00 2018-11-13T11:00:00-05:00 2018-11-13T13:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-13 11:00:00 2018-11-13 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Pamela Bhatti, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 "Microfabrication of Elastomeric Polymers for Organ-on-a-chip Engineering and Injectable Tissues"

Milica Radisic, Ph.D.
Professor and Canada Research Chair Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
University of Toronto

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) biology enable derivation of essentially any cell type in the human body, and development of three-dimensional (3D) tissue models for drug discovery, safety testing, disease modelling and regenerative medicine applications. However, limitations related to cell maturation, vascularization, cellular fidelity and inter-organ communication still remain. Relying on an engineering approach, microfluidics and microfabrication techniques our laboratory has developed new technologies aimed at overcoming them.

Since native heart tissue is unable to regenerate after injury, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) represent a promising source for human cardiomyocytes. Here, biological wire (Biowire) technology will be described, developed to specifically enhance maturation levels of hPSC based cardiac tissues, by controlling tissue geometry and electrical field stimulation regime (Nunes et al Nature Methods 2013). We will describe new applications of the Biowire technology in engineering a specifically atrial and specifically ventricular cardiac tissues, safety testing of small molecule kinase inhibitors, potential new cancer drugs, and modelling of left ventricular hypertrophy using patient derived cells. 

For probing of more complex physiological questions, dependent on the flow of culture media or blood, incorporation of vasculature is required, most commonly performed in organ-on-a-chip devices. Current organ-on-a-chip devices are limited by the presence of non-physiological materials such as glass and drug-absorbing PDMS as well as the necessity for specialized equipment such as vacuum lines and fluid pumps that inherently limit their throughput. An overview of two new technologies, AngioChip (Zhang et al Nature Materials 2016) and inVADE (Lai et al Advanced Functional Materials 2017) will be presented, that overcome the noted limitations and enable engineering of vascularized liver, vascularized heart tissues and studies of cancer metastasis. These platforms enable facile operation and imaging in a set-up resembling a 96-well plate. Using polymer engineering, we were able to marry two seemingly opposing criteria in these platforms, permeability and mechanical stability, to engineer vasculature suitable for biological discovery and direct surgical anastomosis to the host vasculature. 

Finally, to enable minimally invasive delivery of engineered tissues into the body, a new shape-memory scaffold was developed that enables delivery of fully functional tissues on the heart, liver and aorta through a keyhole surgery (Montgomery et al Nature Materials 2017).

BIOGRAPHY
Milica Radisic, Ph.D., is a Professor at the University of Toronto, Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Functional Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and a Senior Scientist at the Toronto General Research Institute. She is also the Associate Chair-Research for the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry at the University of Toronto and Director of the NSERC CREATE Training Program in Organ-on-a-Chip Engineering and Entrepreneurship. She obtained B.Eng. from McMaster University, and Ph.D. form the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada-Academy of Science, Canadian Academy of Engineering and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. She received numerous awards and fellowships, including MIT Technology Review Top 35 Innovators under 35.  She was a recipient of the Professional Engineers Ontario-Young Engineer Medal in 2011, Engineers Canada Young Engineer Achievement Award in 2012, Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal in 2013 and NSERC E.W.R Steacie Fellowship in 2014. The long term objective of Radisic’s research is to enable cardiovascular regeneration through tissue engineering and development of new biomaterials. Her research interests also include microfluidic cell separation and development of in vitro models for drug testing. Currently, she holds research funding from CIHR, NSERC, CFI, ORF, NIH, and the Heart and Stroke Foundation. She is an Associate Editor for ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, a member of the Editorial Board of Tissue Engineering, Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews and Regenerative Biomaterials. She serves on review panels for Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the National Institutes of Health. She is actively involved with BMES (Cardiovascular Track Chair in 2013 and 2104) and TERMIS-AM (Council member, Chair of the Membership Committee). She was a co-organizer of a 2017 Keystone Symposium, “Engineered Cells and Tissues as Platforms for Discovery and Therapy”. Her research findings were presented in over 160 research papers, reviews and book chapters with h-index of 54 and over 10,000 citations.  She is a co-founder of a New York-based company TARA Biosystems, that uses human engineered heart tissues in drug development and safety testing for major pharmaceutical companies. She serves on the Board of Directors for Ontario Society of Professional Engineers and TARA Biosystems. 

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1539184306 2018-10-10 15:11:46 1540831842 2018-10-29 16:50:42 0 0 event 2018-11-29T11:00:00-05:00 2018-11-29T12:00:00-05:00 2018-11-29T12:00:00-05:00 2018-11-29 16:00:00 2018-11-29 17:00:00 2018-11-29 17:00:00 2018-11-29T11:00:00-05:00 2018-11-29T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-29 11:00:00 2018-11-29 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Petit Events

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612530 312351 612530 image <![CDATA[Milica Radisic, Ph.D. - University of Toronto]]> image/jpeg 1539184867 2018-10-10 15:21:07 1539184867 2018-10-10 15:21:07 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Radisic lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 Georgios A. Sotiriou, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology
Karolinska Institutet - Sweden

ABSTRACT
When it comes to nanomedicine in general, engineers are quite innovative to find ways of how nanoscale materials can assist the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The small size of these materials allows them to carry drugs and travel selectively to tumors, or to transform external stimuli such as light or magnetism into heat to kill cancer cells, or even to be used as sensitive gas-sensors to detect from the breath volatile organic species associated to diseases (e.g. acetone for diabetes), just to name a few examples. Such nanoparticles are usually made by gas- or liquid-phase bottom-up or top-down processes, while nanoparticle films or coatings on surfaces are made by stochastic self-assembly of particles on substrates. Studies using such nanomaterials have given us a good understanding on how physicochemical properties influence their biointeractions.

However, very few of these exciting discoveries are translated to commercial medical products today. The main reasons for this are two inherent limitations of most nanomanufacture processes: scalability and reproducibility. There is too little knowledge on how well the unique properties associated with nanoparticles are maintained during their large-scale production while often poor reproducibility hinders their successful use. In this talk, I will discuss how we can utilize a nanomanufacture process famous for its scalability and reproducibility, flame aerosol reactors that produce at tons/hr commodity powders, and advance the knowledge for synthesis of complex nanoparticles and their direct integration in medical devices. Specifically, we will focus on how flame nanomaterial engineering facilitates the fabrication of multifunctional nanoparticles and devices for both diagnostic and therapeutic applications including, but not limited to, bacterial infections and antimicrobial resistance.

BIOGRAPHY
Georgios A. Sotiriou, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology at Karolinska Institutet (KI) focusing on nanobiotechnology and biomaterial technology. He has world-leading expertise in the synthesis of functional nanoscale materials and devices for biomedicine using flame aerosol technology. His lab’s mission at KI is to develop biomaterials, devices, tools and methods for medicine using core material and process engineering. The main target of his research program is to address societal and clinical needs by developing the next generation of nano-enabled molecular diagnostic and therapeutic (theranostic) systems towards their employment in personalized nanomedicine. The focus lies on nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates for their integration in functional systems exploiting both the responsive properties of nanomaterials in the presence of target analytes but also external stimuli, acting as transducer elements towards the diagnosis and on-demand therapeutic interventions. The systematic approach for the investigation of the theranostic capabilities of smart nanostructured materials provides knowledge and insight into the fundamental physicochemical and molecular processes assisting in rapid translation into clinics.

Sotiriou received a Diploma in Applied Physics (2006) from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece and he continued his postgraduate studies at ETH Zurich, Switzerland where he received a MSc in Micro- and Nanosystems (2008) and later on his PhD from the Particle Technology Laboratory (2011). He carried out postdoctoral research stays in Harvard University (2013-2015, Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology) and ETH Zurich (2015-2016, Drug Formulation and Delivery Lab) before joining KI. His research has been recognized internationally by several awards including the 2011 AIChE Bionanotechnology Graduate Student award, the 2012 Best PhD Thesis Award from the Swiss Chemical Society, the 2012 ETH Medal for outstanding Dissertation and the 2013 Hilti Award for Innovative Research. In 2017 he was awarded the 2017 ERC Starting Grant.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1540564146 2018-10-26 14:29:06 1540817981 2018-10-29 12:59:41 0 0 event 2018-12-05T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-05T12:00:00-05:00 2018-12-05T12:00:00-05:00 2018-12-05 16:00:00 2018-12-05 17:00:00 2018-12-05 17:00:00 2018-12-05T11:00:00-05:00 2018-12-05T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-12-05 11:00:00 2018-12-05 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute]]> Costas Arvanitis, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Sotiriou lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Health Innovation Commercialization Series]]> 27195 Bridging the gap from university innovation to commercialization.

"Tales from the Trenches - Tips for Success in Commercialization"

Join us for a panel discussion with Emory University and Georgia Tech Faculty sharing their journey through the commercialization process. Hear their firsthand experience bringing their ideas out of academia and into the marketplace.

This event is the third session in The Health Innovation Commercialization Series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. Series topics include how to take your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

REGISTER HERE

FAQs

Where can I find information about the entire Health Innovation Commercialization Series?
For details and registration links for all events in the series, visit HERE

How do I register for the Georgia CTSA Entrepreneurship Certificate?
Contact Gayathri Srinivasan for additional information or to register.

Will the session be recorded?
Registered attendees will receive a link to view the recording after the session.

Who Should Attend?
Events are open to entrepreneurs in the life sciences, Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance, Georgia Tech and Emory University faculty, staff, graduate students, post-doc, residents and fellows. Registered attendees will receive a link to view the recording after the session.

Parking: Visitor parking is available at the Michael Street Parking Deck at 550 Houston Mill Road, Atlanta, GA 30329. Once on Houston Mill Road, take the first left onto Rollins Way and continue towards the blue banner for Visitor Parking. After parking, take the Pedestrian Bridge over the railroad tracks and The James B Williams School of Medicine Building will be the 2nd building on your left.

Sponsored by the Coulter Translational Program and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance, and Georgia Tech's Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1540226709 2018-10-22 16:45:09 1540226793 2018-10-22 16:46:33 0 0 event 2018-11-07T08:00:00-05:00 2018-11-07T09:30:00-05:00 2018-11-07T09:30:00-05:00 2018-11-07 13:00:00 2018-11-07 14:30:00 2018-11-07 14:30:00 2018-11-07T08:00:00-05:00 2018-11-07T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-07 08:00:00 2018-11-07 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[ImmunoEngineering Research Days]]> 27195 Presentations will be made by Georgia Tech faculty with the purpose of learning what we are working on with a view towards developing ideas and faculty teams for submission of multi-investigator research proposals. 

RSVP Required

AGENDA

12:45 – 1:10 p.m.    Pick up lunch before talks start

1:10 - 1:15 p.m.    Introductory comments, Julia Babensee, Susan Thomas, Rafi Ahmed 

1:15 – 1:30 p.m.    Ravi Kane, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech

1:30 – 1:45 p.m.    Julie Champion, School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Tech

1:45 – 2:00 p.m.    Krish Roy, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

2:00– 2:15 p.m.    Phil Santangelo, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

2:15 – 2:30 p.m.    Mehul Suthar, Emory Vaccine Center

2:30 – 2:45 p.m.    Break

2:45 – 3:00 p.m.     Susan Thomas, School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:00 – 3:15 p.m.    Erik Dreaden, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:15 – 3:30 p.m.    Peng Qui, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:30 – 3:45 p.m.    Julie Babensee, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

3:45 – 4:00 p.m.    Cheng Zhu, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Tech

These research days are open to Emory and Georgia Tech faculty doing research in ImmunoEngineering.  

Lunch provided.

Sponsored by the Emory Vaccine Center, Georgia Tech's Center for ImmunoEngineering and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1538485068 2018-10-02 12:57:48 1539108548 2018-10-09 18:09:08 0 0 event 2018-10-10T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10 18:00:00 2018-10-10 21:00:00 2018-10-10 21:00:00 2018-10-10T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-10T17:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-10 02:00:00 2018-10-10 05:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Julia Babensee, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Petit Institute Distinguished Lecture]]> 27195 "From Academia to Government to Industry: Lessons Learned"

Elias Zerhouni, M.D.
Former Director, National Institutes of Health
President, Global Research & Development
Sanofi


Elias Zerhouni, M.D., is the President, Global Research & Development, and a member of the Executive Committee for Sanofi.

Dr. Zerhouni’s academic career was spent at the renowned Johns Hopkins University and Hospital where he was professor of Radiology and Biomedical engineering and senior adviser for Johns Hopkins Medicine. He served as Chair of the Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Vice Dean for Research and Executive Vice Dean of the School of Medicine from 1996 to 2002 before his appointment as Director of the National Institutes of Health from 2002 to 2008. In that position he oversaw the NIH’s 27 Institutes and Centers with more than 18,000 employees and a budget of $29.5 billion (2008).

In November 2009, President Obama appointed Dr. Zerhouni as one of the first presidential U.S. science envoys.

Dr. Zerhouni has founded or co-founded five start-up companies, authored more than 200 publications and holds eight patents and a number of prominent positions on several Boards, including most recently, the board of the Lasker Foundation. He is also a member of the U.S. National Academy of Medicine and U.S. National Academy of Engineering, received the prestigious Legion of Honor medal from the French National Order in 2008, and was elected in 2010 as a member of the French Academy of Medicine and appointed as Chair of Innovation at the College de France in 2011.

A community lunch will be served immediately following the presentation.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1506087094 2017-09-22 13:31:34 1539099291 2018-10-09 15:34:51 0 0 event 2018-10-31T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-31T13:00:00-04:00 2018-10-31T13:00:00-04:00 2018-10-31 16:00:00 2018-10-31 17:00:00 2018-10-31 17:00:00 2018-10-31T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-31T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-31 12:00:00 2018-10-31 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

]]>
596352 596352 image <![CDATA[Elias Zerhouni, M.D. - President, Global R&D, Sanofi]]> image/jpeg 1506087151 2017-09-22 13:32:31 1506087151 2017-09-22 13:32:31 <![CDATA[Zerhouni profile]]>
<![CDATA[Need Funding for Your Technology? Lunch & Learn Seminar]]> 27195 “NSF’s Medical Diagnostics Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program”

Henry Ahn
SBIR/STTR Program Director
National Science Foundation

Henry Ahn joined the National Science Foundation in July 2016 as an SBIR/STTR Program Director. Prior to joining NSF, Ahn managed seed/early stage investment programs for TEDCO for 12 years including Technology Commercialization Fund, TEDCO’s flagship seed funding program for technology-based companies in Maryland. During his time at TEDCO, he was actively involved with various entrepreneurs and entrepreneur support groups as a guest speaker, an advisory board member, a judge, a mentor, among others. Additionally, Ahn was part of the licensing/supplier relations team at a biotechnology company called Upstate, where he successfully negotiated, licensed and commercialized approximately 190 biomedical research reagents from around the world. He has also done approximately 5 years of research, mostly in the field of immunology (including graduate work). Ahn has an M.B.A. from Rice University, an M.S. in biotechnology from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville and a B.S. in biomedical engineering from Boston University.

Lunch provided.

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1538669817 2018-10-04 16:16:57 1538684110 2018-10-04 20:15:10 0 0 event 2018-10-19T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-19T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-19T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-19 16:00:00 2018-10-19 18:00:00 2018-10-19 18:00:00 2018-10-19T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-19T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-19 12:00:00 2018-10-19 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Harold Solomon and Cynthia Sundell, GT VentureLab

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<![CDATA[VentureLab website]]>
<![CDATA[Health Innovation Commercialization Series]]> 27195 Bridging the gap from university innovation to commercialization.

"Early Translational Funding - When and How to Request Funding and Resources Available in Georgia"

Join us for a panel discussion focusing on different sources of early-stage funding as well as strategies to consider when funding a company.

This event is the second session in The Health Innovation Commercialization Series which was created to provide commercialization guidance to the university research community. Series topics include how to take your technology from the lab to commercial success and explore market opportunities surrounding entrepreneurial and innovative ideas.

  • Topics designed for entrepreneurs in the life sciences 
  • Panel discussions with industry experts and investors
  • Tools to communicate the commercial potential of your research

Lunch provided.

Who Should Attend?
Events are open to entrepreneurs in the life sciences, Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance, Georgia Tech and Emory University faculty, staff, graduate students, post-doc, residents and fellows.

Registered attendees will receive a link to view the recording after the session.

Parking: Visitor parking can be found in the Area 5 Visitor Parking deck at the corner of State Street and 10th Street ($2/hour, $15 max), or the Area 4 Visitor Parking lot at the corner of State Street and Ferst Drive ($2/hour, no max). Visitor lot map.

Sponsored by the Coulter Translational Program and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University, Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance, and Georgia Tech's Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1538488892 2018-10-02 14:01:32 1538489186 2018-10-02 14:06:26 0 0 event 2018-10-15T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-15T13:30:00-04:00 2018-10-15T13:30:00-04:00 2018-10-15 16:00:00 2018-10-15 17:30:00 2018-10-15 17:30:00 2018-10-15T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-15T13:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-15 12:00:00 2018-10-15 01:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Cynthia Sundell, Ph.D.

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<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Linking Retinal Regeneration with Retinogenesis using Microfluidics"

Maribel Vazquez, Sc.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Grove School of Engineering
The City College of New York
(Rutgers University starting January 2019)

ABSTRACT
Progressive and irreversible vision loss affects millions of Americans each year and is a profound health challenge worldwide. Contemporary restorative treatments for retinal dysfunction have introduced stem-like cells (STLCs) into damaged tissue as replacements to re-establish synaptic connectivity needed for vision. In an idealized model, groups of STLCs recapitulate developmental behavior and migrate collectively toward precise injury sites along concentration profiles of biological factors. In truth, poor migration and positioning of transplanted STLCs have greatly limited the synaptic STLC integration needed to advance vision-restorative therapies.

The coordinated migratory processes of donor STLCs into host retinal laminae are only partially-understood. Our laboratory examines the migration of STLCs within microscale environments that mimic, both, developing retina and degenerated retina in order to quantitatively evaluate the cell signaling that leads to directional motility. Our experimental models use combinatory physiochemical signals and electric fields to recapitulate the STLC migratory responses and connectivity employed during retinogenesis in vitro and stimulate these desired behaviors in future cell replacement therapy. 

BIOGRAPHY
Maribel Vazquez is a Founding Member of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at CCNY, established in 2002 by a team of 4 faculty who worked tirelessly to develop the new undergraduate curriculum and program. She established a micro-nanofabrication laboratory using initial funding from Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to acquire key pieces of microfabrication equipment in collaboration with Chemical Engineering. 

Her Research Laboratory integrates the design and manufacture of microfluidic systems and nanoparticles to examine the migration of neural progenitor cells and their implications in the health and development of the Nervous System. Research projects have utilized bio-microtechnologies to examine the development and dissemination of glial tumors, develop integrated cellular systems of glia and neurons for regenerative medicine, and to investigate progenitor migration during retinogenesis and retinal transplantation. 

Vazquez has served as Principal Investigator (PI) in research funding from the NIH (National Cancer Institute, National Institute of General Medical Sciences and National Eye Institute) and the NSF (CBET: Biomedical Engineering).  She has also as Co-PI on several educational initiatives from the National Science Foundation (NSF: Nanotechnology Education for Undergraduates, Emergent Behaviors of Intracellular Systems) and AFOSR (Microtechnology and Fabrication for Mechanical Engineers). 

Vazquez regularly Teaches Undergraduate and Graduate Laboratory-based Courses in Microfluidics and Microfabrication, BME Experimental Methods and Capstone/ Biodesign for BME Seniors and students in the Master's in Translational Medicine (MTM) program. 


The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1527164055 2018-05-24 12:14:15 1538154899 2018-09-28 17:14:59 0 0 event 2018-11-08T11:00:00-05:00 2018-11-08T12:00:00-05:00 2018-11-08T12:00:00-05:00 2018-11-08 16:00:00 2018-11-08 17:00:00 2018-11-08 17:00:00 2018-11-08T11:00:00-05:00 2018-11-08T12:00:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-08 11:00:00 2018-11-08 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Melissa Kemp, Ph.D. - faculty host

]]>
312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Vazquez profile]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Microfluidic Homeostasis – Tapping in the Circulatory System One Cell at a Time"

Abraham Lee, Ph.D.
William J. Link Professor and Chair
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Professor, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
University of California, Irvine

ABSTRACT
Through the advancement of microfluidics technologies, we have enabled the automation of biological fluids delivery through physiological vasculature networks that mimic the physiological circulation of the human body.  The critical bottleneck is to engineer the microenvironment for the formation of 3D tissues and organs and to also pump and perfuse the tissue vascular network for on-chip microcirculation.  On the other hand, microfluidics play an important role in the recent advances in liquid biopsy, an emerging technique that analyzes biological samples such as blood for the detection of biomolecules or cells that are indicative of disease or physiological state.  Specifically, liquid biopsy has become a promising technology to isolate and target rare cells such as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in body fluids thanks to many of these microfluidic cell sorting techniques.  This advent of microfluidic liquid biopsy provides an in vitro snap shot into the patient’s physiological status via the in vivo circulation that enables one to monitor disease state and progression for diagnosis and prognosis. A key bottleneck is to identify the critical subpopulation of cells, often at single cell resolution among billions of cells in circulation. Along with the aforementioned in vitro on-chip perfused vascularized tissue platforms, these two technologies go hand-in-hand to connect in vitro screening to in vivo screening with great potential in the development of personalized medicine.  Ultimately this is the microfluidic maintenance of physiological equilibrium, or ‘microfluidic homeostasis’.

BIO
Abraham (Abe) P. Lee is the William J. Link Professor and Chair of the Biomedical Engineering (BME) Department with a courtesy appointment in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) at the University of California, Irvine. He is the Director of the NSF I/UCRC “Center for Advanced Design & Manufacturing of Integrated Microfluidics” (CADMIM). Prior to UCI, he was at the National Cancer Institute and a program manager in the Microsystems Technology Office at DARPA (1999-2001). Lee’s lab focuses on developing active integrated microfluidics and droplet microfluidic platforms. These platforms are applied to point-of-care and molecular diagnostics, “smart” nanomedicine for early detection and treatment, single cell processing and analysis, and tissue engineering and cell-based therapeutics.  His research has contributed to the founding of several start-up companies. Lee serves as an associate editor for the Lab on a Chip journal and he is also an advisor to companies and government agencies. He owns 42 issued US patents and is author of over 100 journals articles. Lee was awarded the 2009 Pioneers of Miniaturization Prize and is an elected fellow of the American Institute of and Medical and Biological Engineering and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.



The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1527101135 2018-05-23 18:45:35 1538135795 2018-09-28 11:56:35 0 0 event 2018-10-16T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 2018-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 2018-10-16 16:00:00 2018-10-16 17:00:00 2018-10-16 17:00:00 2018-10-16T12:00:00-04:00 2018-10-16T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-16 12:00:00 2018-10-16 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Hang Lu, Ph.D. - faculty host

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Lee lab website]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 "Emergence of Genetic Complexity in Clonal Populations Evolving in the Lab: Implications for Cancer and Chronic Infectious Disease"

Frank Rosenzweig Ph.D.
Professor
School of Biological Sciences
Georgia Tech


A bacterial population that initially consists of a single clone can evolve into a population teeming with many, whether or not the surrounding environment is structured, and whether or not resource levels are constant or fluctuating. Emergence of genetic complexity, measured as functional information, has been variously attributed to balancing selection, clonal interference and/or clonal reinforcement arising from either antagonistic or synergistic interactions among evolving lineages. Using a combination of theory and experiment, we seek to define the boundary conditions under which one causal mechanism prevails over another. These investigations illuminate the process of adaptive evolution in other populations that originate as a single clone: those that give rise to cancer and those that bring about chronic infectious disease.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1525891804 2018-05-09 18:50:04 1537190378 2018-09-17 13:19:38 0 0 event 2018-10-09T09:30:00-04:00 2018-10-09T10:30:00-04:00 2018-10-09T10:30:00-04:00 2018-10-09 13:30:00 2018-10-09 14:30:00 2018-10-09 14:30:00 2018-10-09T09:30:00-04:00 2018-10-09T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-09 09:30:00 2018-10-09 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

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595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[NASA Astrobiology Institute]]>
<![CDATA[2018 BBUGS Techniques & Core Facilities Expo]]> 27195 The Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS) and the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience are excited to announce an all-new format for its annual techniques training event!

Calling all Petit trainees, research engineers and faculty!

Come to the all new, half-day expo of the more than 16 state-of-the-art core facilities available to the Petit research community. Come for rapid fire core presentations, learn about GT Library resources, and a special faculty techniques presentation. Things will wrap up with a Pizza & Posters event, presented by each of the Institute's core managers who will be on hand to answer your questions about their labs and training opportunities on specific pieces of equipment.

Registration is FREE, and lunch is provided, so reserve your spot today! (space is limited) 

REGISTER HERE

AGENDA
Suddath Seminar Room 1128
9:00 a.m.               GT Library - presentation
9:30 a.m.               Core Facilities Rapid Fire Presentations (5 min each)
10:30 a.m.             Coffee Break
10:40 a.m.             Core Facilities Rapid Fire Presentations (5 min each)
11:30 a.m.             James Dahlman, Ph.D. - technique presentation
12:00 p.m.             BD rapid fire presentation on "what's next"
12:05 - 1:00 p.m.   Pizza & Posters - Core Labs - Petit Atrium

Organized by the Research Committee of the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS) and the Petit Institute, this workshop is open to any interested Georgia Tech, Emory, Georgia State or Morehouse students.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1525173564 2018-05-01 11:19:24 1536693812 2018-09-11 19:23:32 0 0 event 2018-10-04T10:00:00-04:00 2018-10-04T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-04T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-04 14:00:00 2018-10-04 18:00:00 2018-10-04 18:00:00 2018-10-04T10:00:00-04:00 2018-10-04T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-04 10:00:00 2018-10-04 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Seleipiri Charles and Jason Wan - Event organizer

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68922 68922 image <![CDATA[Bioengineering & Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS)]]> image/png 1449177214 2015-12-03 21:13:34 1475894599 2016-10-08 02:43:19 <![CDATA[BBUGS Techniques Symposium]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute]]>
<![CDATA[NASA Astrobiology Institute Executive Council Meeting and 20th Anniversary Celebration]]> 27195 Georgia Tech hosts three-day NASA Astrobiology Institute extravaganza!
 
Wednesday, September 12, 2018
NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) Executive Council Meeting  (Closed meeting)
 
Thursday, September 13, 2018
The Georgia Tech “Reliving the Past” team, led by PI Frank Rosenzweig, Ph.D., will present a series of exciting talks on their research achievements.  The talks are open to the public, however lunch is reserved for the NAI team only.
 
Friday, September 14, 2018
TIME TO CELEBRATE!
The NAI is marking its 20th anniversary this year and Georgia Tech is throwing a party! This celebration will feature talks and a poster session by faculty members, NPP Fellows, grad students, and postdocs in GT’s vibrant astrobiology community (by invitation only).

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1536256994 2018-09-06 18:03:14 1536266228 2018-09-06 20:37:08 0 0 event 2018-09-12T01:00:00-04:00 2018-09-14T01:00:00-04:00 2018-09-14T01:00:00-04:00 2018-09-12 05:00:00 2018-09-14 05:00:00 2018-09-14 05:00:00 2018-09-12T01:00:00-04:00 2018-09-14T01:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-09-12 01:00:00 2018-09-14 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Frank Rosenzweig, Ph.D. - faculty contact
Teresa Jonsson - event contact

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<![CDATA[NASA Astrobiology Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 "Microengineered Physiological Systems for Disease Modeling and Nanomedicine Testing"

YongTae (Tony) Kim, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Georgia Tech


Biography:
YongTae Kim joined the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering as an Assistant Professor in July 2013. Prior to his current appointment, he was a Postdoctoral Associate in the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT, where he developed biomimetic microsystems for probing nanoparticle behaviors in the inflamed endothelium and for synthesizing therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials. His doctorate research at CMU focused on closed-loop microfluidic control systems for lab-on-a-chip applications to biochemistry and developmental biology. Prior to his Ph.D., he was a researcher in areas of dynamics, controls, and robotics at R&D Divisions of Hyundai-Kia Motors and Samsung Electronics for 6 years.

Research:
Kim’s research focuses on developing biomimetic microsystems that reconstitute organ-level functions on chip and integrative control systems that allow large-scale production of therapeutic and diagnostic bio/nanomaterials. His lab develops experimental control systems and micro/millifluidic platforms, and employs computer-aided engineering to understand: (1) how cells coordinate responses to signaling cues in multicellular environments; (2) how bio/nanomaterials assemble and break in dynamically controlled fluid flows; and (3) how biological systems interact with nanomaterials with varied physicochemical properties.

Organs-on-chips that mimic the characteristics of human organs are enabling scientists to predict more accurately how effective therapeutic drug candidates would be in clinical studies without serious adverse effects and to address how multiple cells coordinate organizational decisions in response to complicated signaling cascades. Dr. Kim’s lab builds valid artificial organ-on-a-chip systems by manipulating 3D extracellular environments in time and space, utilizing the expertise in microfabrication, miniaturization, robotics, and control systems engineering, and understanding the human body’s fundamental physiological responses to mechanochemical cues. This research will help examine the behavior and interaction of multifunctional nanomaterials with biologically relevant microenvironments for rapid clinical translation of nanomedicine, thereby bringing drugs to market more quickly and perhaps even eliminate the need for animal testing.

Advanced treatment of diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis needs controlled delivery of multifunctional nanocarriers that contain multiple drugs that can target tumors with anti-angiogenic and cytostatic agents and a diversity of imaging agents that monitor the transport in the body. Optimized integration of manufacturing nanomaterials will contribute to advanced health technology not only because of rapid clinical translation of drugs but also due to reduction of any release of harmful byproducts. Dr. Kim’s lab designs and fabricates diverse microfluidic modules for diverse syntheses of multifunctional nanomaterials and integrates the modules to establish large-scale implementation of manufacturing processes scaled to economically and industrially relevant production level. The integrative system will facilitate good manufacturing practice (GMP) production and clinical translation in pharmaceutical and biomedical industry and enable reproducible and controlled synthesis of nanoparticles at scales suitable for rapid clinical development and commercialization.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1525891608 2018-05-09 18:46:48 1534436208 2018-08-16 16:16:48 0 0 event 2018-09-11T09:30:00-04:00 2018-09-11T10:30:00-04:00 2018-09-11T10:30:00-04:00 2018-09-11 13:30:00 2018-09-11 14:30:00 2018-09-11 14:30:00 2018-09-11T09:30:00-04:00 2018-09-11T10:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-09-11 09:30:00 2018-09-11 10:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

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595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[Kim lab website]]>
<![CDATA[21st Annual Southeast Ultrafast Laser Conference]]> 27195 The Petit Institute’s Optical Microscopy Core is hosting the 21st annual Southeast Ultrafast Conference, two-day conference, August 14-15, for faculty, research scientists, grad students and postdocs. The meeting will feature speakers from a variety of ultrafast laser applications including:

  • Microscopy and Optics
  • Chemistry
  • Spectroscopy
  • Nanotechnology and Material science
  • Optoelectronics

Join fellow industry leaders and prominent academic researchers and enjoy: 

  • Networking with peers and mentors
  • Sharing ideas and insights
  • Talking one-on-one with product specialists

 This event fills up quickly, so be sure to register and lock in your seat!

REGISTER HERE

AGENDA

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1532607934 2018-07-26 12:25:34 1533739371 2018-08-08 14:42:51 0 0 event 2018-08-14T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-15T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-15T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-14 05:00:00 2018-08-15 05:00:00 2018-08-15 05:00:00 2018-08-14T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-15T01:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-08-14 01:00:00 2018-08-15 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Aaron W. Lifland, Ph.D.
Director of Microscopy
Georgia Institute of Technology

]]>
<![CDATA[Conference website]]>
<![CDATA[21st Annual Southeast Conference on Ultrafast Laser Applications ]]> 30678 Registration is Open!

Registration is now open for the 21st Annual Southeast Conference on Ultrafast Laser Applications. Presented with a focus toward grad students, postdoctoral scholars, faculty members, and research scientists, this year's conference will be held on Aug.14-15 in the Roger A. & Helen B. Krone Engineered Biosystems Building at Georgia Tech.

The list of speakers is now available and the agenda will be announced soon, so be sure to check back often for more details.

Also, let us know now if you're interested in presenting one of the Poster Sessions. Space is limited, so be sure to reserve your spot!

For more information, email evan.raba@coherent.com or call 423-276-8502.

CONFIRMED SPEAKERS

 

]]> A. Maureen Rouhi 1 1532637266 2018-07-26 20:34:26 1532638367 2018-07-26 20:52:47 0 0 event 2018-08-14T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-15T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-15T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-14 05:00:00 2018-08-15 05:00:00 2018-08-15 05:00:00 2018-08-14T01:00:00-04:00 2018-08-15T01:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-08-14 01:00:00 2018-08-15 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Aaron W. Lifland, Ph.D.
Director of Microscopy
Georgia Institute of Technology

]]>
<![CDATA[Conference website]]>
<![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series]]> 27195 "Vascular Mechanics and Mechanobiology in Health and Disease"

Jay D. Humphrey, Ph.D.
John C. Malone Professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chair
Yale University

Abstract:
Vascular cells – the endothelial cells of the intima, smooth muscle cells of the media, and fibroblasts of the adventitia – are exquisitely sensitive to changes in their local mechanical environment. As examples, arteries dilate in response to sustained increases in blood flow and they thicken in response to sustained increases in blood pressure, both of which tend to restore hemodynamically imposed stresses towards homeostatic values. Presented here is a general theoretical framework for modeling mechanobiologically-driven adaptations to altered hemodynamics that can also be used to capture diverse cases of vascular maladaptations and disease progression. Basic computational simulations show that a constrained mixture framework can yield emergent evolving responses of vessels that are consistent with experimental findings and clinical observations in diverse cases of vascular adaptation or disease progression. The primary challenge as we move forward is to collect appropriate mechanobiological and immunobiological data that will allow us to refine the constitutive assumptions as we consider increasingly more detailed situations, particularly in cases of genetic mutations that give rise to vascular conditions and innovations for improving disease treatment.

Bio:
J.D. Humphrey's primary interests and expertise are in experimental and computational biomechanics related to vascular adaptations and disease. He received the Ph.D. degree in Engineering Science and Mechanics from The Georgia Institute of Technology and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in Medicine - Cardiovascular at the Johns Hopkins University. He is currently John C. Malone Professor and Chair of Biomedical Engineering at Yale. He has authored a graduate textbook (Cardiovascular Solid Mechanics), co-authored an undergraduate textbook (An Introduction to Biomechanics), co-authored a handbook (Style and Ethics of Communication in Science and Engineering), co-edited a research text (Cardiovascular Soft Tissue Mechanics), published chapters in 20+ other books or encyclopedias, and published 230+ archival journal papers. He served for 10 years as founding co-editor-in-chief for the international journal Biomechanics and Modeling in Mechanobiology and currently serves as Chair of the US National Committee on Biomechanics. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering and a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1527165182 2018-05-24 12:33:02 1532519183 2018-07-25 11:46:23 0 0 event 2019-04-11T12:00:00-04:00 2019-04-11T13:00:00-04:00 2019-04-11T13:00:00-04:00 2019-04-11 16:00:00 2019-04-11 17:00:00 2019-04-11 17:00:00 2019-04-11T12:00:00-04:00 2019-04-11T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-04-11 12:00:00 2019-04-11 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Ross Ethier, Ph.D. - faculty host

]]>
312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22 <![CDATA[Humphrey profile]]> <![CDATA[Bioengineering Seminar Series Schedule]]>
<![CDATA[Buzz on Biotechnology High School Open House]]> 27195 The popular annual event, hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience and the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS), is held for high school students to come and engage their interest in science and biotechnology. Students will be able to participate in interesting - and fun! - hands-on demonstrations, take tours of state-of-the-art Georgia Tech laboratories and attend short scientific seminars on a variety of biotechnology topics.

For complete event information and for FREE registration, visit the Buzz on Biotechnology website.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1529588639 2018-06-21 13:43:59 1529588746 2018-06-21 13:45:46 0 0 event 2018-10-27T11:00:00-04:00 2018-10-27T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-27T14:00:00-04:00 2018-10-27 15:00:00 2018-10-27 18:00:00 2018-10-27 18:00:00 2018-10-27T11:00:00-04:00 2018-10-27T14:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-10-27 11:00:00 2018-10-27 02:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell
Events Manager

]]>
245221 245221 image <![CDATA[Buzz on Biotechnology]]> image/jpeg 1449243722 2015-12-04 15:42:02 1475894921 2016-10-08 02:48:41 <![CDATA[Buzz on Biotechnology website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Seminar]]> 27195 "Zika Virus Microneedle Vaccination Confers Long-term Protection to Immune Privileged Compartments"

Ioanna Skountzou, M.D., Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Microbiology and Immunology
Emory University School of Medicine

Jacob Beaver
Doctoral Candidate
Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
Emory University

ABSTRACT
Zika virus (ZIKV) has garnered global attention since outbreaks in French Polynesia and Brazil suggested infection with ZIKV was linked to development of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and additionally linked to congenital microcephaly in newborns from infected pregnant women. Since 2013, ZIKV has spread rapidly across the globe, infecting thousands of pregnant women and hundreds of thousands of the general population in several countries. Given ZIKV is transmitted both by sexual contact and via the arthropod vectors Aedes spp., skin vaccinations effort may prove particularly advantageous as the skin serves as the first natural host barrier ZIKV would encounter. The need for a vaccine against ZIKV remains a critical international health issue, yet few studies seek to characterize ZIKV infections and dermal immune barriers, and even less investigate ZIKV cutaneous vaccination routes. Our group has demonstrated that cutaneous vaccination using whole Zika virus inactivated particles (ZVIP) delivered by microneedle patches (MN) display greater efficacy than traditional intramuscular (IM) vaccinations. Using an immune competent BALB/c mouse model, we observed Zika virus pathogenesis can be monitored by clinical scoring methods specifically aimed toward ocular and motor/neural symptoms, as ocular conjunctivitis and arthralgia are two of the more common symptoms of ZIKV infections. Our results demonstrate MN vaccinations with ZVIP generate a greater quality of antibody response, and confer greater protection against ocular and motor/neural symptoms, infection, and tissue damage compared to IM vaccinations. This appears true for MN vaccinations in both a prime only, and a prime/boost vaccine course. Given that ZIKV has shown a proclivity for immune privileged compartments, such as the eyes, brain, and spinal cord; the development of a safe and protective vaccine against ZIKV should demonstrate protection for these three compartments, while minimizing the risk of auto-reactive antibodies that lead to nervous system damage and GBS.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1529069360 2018-06-15 13:29:20 1529069360 2018-06-15 13:29:20 0 0 event 2018-06-19T12:00:00-04:00 2018-06-19T13:00:00-04:00 2018-06-19T13:00:00-04:00 2018-06-19 16:00:00 2018-06-19 17:00:00 2018-06-19 17:00:00 2018-06-19T12:00:00-04:00 2018-06-19T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-06-19 12:00:00 2018-06-19 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Mark Prausnitz, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Skountzou profile]]> <![CDATA[Beaver profile]]> <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Biotech Building Lab Clean-Up and Swap-O-Rama]]> 27195 PETIT BIOTECH BUILDING LAB CLEANUP

During the week of June 18-22, 2018, the Petit Institute Biotech Building will host its annual summer clean-up for labs in the bio-complex. We will provide garbage bins so your lab can throw out any supplies that cannot be traded or recycled, or that don't need special attention (see instructions for chemical disposal and supply swapping below).

SWAP-O-RAMA

During our clean-up week, we will have tables set up in the building atrium. Leave items that can be swapped on the tables, let your colleagues know they're there, and smile, knowing that your trash is someone else's treasure. :)

Only items from the Petit Biotechnology Building labs may be donated, but anyone may help themselves to the goodies!

Items that can be swapped include:

  • Intact glassware
  • Unopened plastic ware
  • Non-contaminated materials
  • Old non-inventoried equipment*

*If you have inventoried equipment that you would like to get rid of, please contact Allen Echols with the tag number.

Chemicals, broken glassware and contaminated materials should not be included in this event, but must be disposed of properly. Any items remaining on the tables in the atrium on Friday, June 22 @ 12 noon will be disposed of by Petit Institute/GT facilities.

Chemical Inventory

  • Identify chemicals that must be disposed through Environmental Health & Safety (EH&S).
  • Chemicals that have not been used in the past two years should be identified for disposal.
  • To dispose of chemicals, create a waste card in the "Waste" module of Chematix. Once a waste card has been submitted, EH&S will schedule a pick-up time. Essential information on the waste card must include point-of-contact, location of waste and phone number.
  • If chemicals may be used by other personnel, they can be designated as "Surplus," which allows others to request the chemical and transfer it/them to the requesting lab.
  • Surplus chemicals may be stored in your lab with that designation for two weeks maximum. If no one has claimed the chemicals within this time period, a waste card must be created and submitted to EH&S for disposal.

 

 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1526323064 2018-05-14 18:37:44 1528813427 2018-06-12 14:23:47 0 0 event 2018-06-18T09:00:00-04:00 2018-06-22T18:00:00-04:00 2018-06-22T18:00:00-04:00 2018-06-18 13:00:00 2018-06-22 22:00:00 2018-06-22 22:00:00 2018-06-18T09:00:00-04:00 2018-06-22T18:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-06-18 09:00:00 2018-06-22 06:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Allen Echols - Petit Facilities Manager
Colly Mitchell - Petit Events Manager

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22
<![CDATA[23rd Annual Regenerative Medicine Workshop at Charleston]]> 27195 The 23rd annual Regenerative Medicine Workshop at Charleston will be held March 20-23, 2019 at the Wild Dunes Resort in Charleston, South Carolina. The 2019 meeting has a powerhouse line-up of speakers in a breadth of topics in the regenerative medicine field.

This year’s workshop will focus on “Synergizing Science, Engineering, and Clinical Translation” and abstracts are due by December 1, 2018. Georgia Tech and Emory's Regenerative Engineering and Medicine Center will partner with both the University of Wisconsin Madison, the University of Pittsburgh, Mayo Clinic and the Medical University of South Carolina as organizing institutions.

The workshop has many exciting sponsorship and exhibit opportunities.

This annual workshop sells out each year at approximately 200 participants. The intimate environment allows for ample discussion time with attending faculty, trainees, industry participants and exhibitors. The program, which spans four days, has presentations in a wide range of topics.

NEREM LECTURER
Deepak Srivastava, M.D. - Gladstone Institutes

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
Steven Bauer, Ph.D. - U.S. Food and Drug Administration
Kapil Bharti, Ph.D. - National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health
Melissa Carpenter, Ph.D. - Carpenter Group, Canada Centre for Regenerative Medicine
Felicia Pagliuca, Ph.D. - Semma Therapeutics
April Pyle, Ph.D. - University of California, Los Angeles
Arshed Quyyumi, M.D. - Emory University School of Medicine
Tatiana Segura, Ph.D. - Duke University
Joseph Wu, M.D., Ph.D. - Stanford University School of Medicine

Registration:
$595 Early Bird Registration - Non-trainees
$695 Regular Registration - Non-trainees
$360 Early Bird Registration - Trainees
$410 Regular Registration - Trainees

For more information, please visit: Regenerative Medicine Workshop

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1527166522 2018-05-24 12:55:22 1528460976 2018-06-08 12:29:36 0 0 event 2019-03-20T01:00:00-04:00 2019-03-23T01:00:00-04:00 2019-03-23T01:00:00-04:00 2019-03-20 05:00:00 2019-03-23 05:00:00 2019-03-23 05:00:00 2019-03-20T01:00:00-04:00 2019-03-23T01:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2019-03-20 01:00:00 2019-03-23 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Wild Dunes Resort]]> Colly Mitchell - Event Manager

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599199 599199 image <![CDATA[Regenerative Medicine Workshop at Charleston]]> image/jpeg 1511882295 2017-11-28 15:18:15 1511882295 2017-11-28 15:18:15 <![CDATA[Regenerative Medicine Workshop website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Ice Cream Social]]> 27195 The Petit Institute invites the bio-community to come and celebrate summer with its annual Ice Cream Social. So plan to get out of those labs to come and hang out with your fellow Petit community members!

All Petit faculty, staff and trainees are welcome!

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1526323454 2018-05-14 18:44:14 1526323464 2018-05-14 18:44:24 0 0 event 2018-07-11T14:00:00-04:00 2018-07-11T15:30:00-04:00 2018-07-11T15:30:00-04:00 2018-07-11 18:00:00 2018-07-11 19:30:00 2018-07-11 19:30:00 2018-07-11T14:00:00-04:00 2018-07-11T15:30:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-07-11 02:00:00 2018-07-11 03:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Petit Events Manager

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]> image/jpeg 1449244929 2015-12-04 16:02:09 1475895022 2016-10-08 02:50:22
<![CDATA[Breakfast Club Seminar]]> 27195 "From Pipettes to Policy: At the Intersection of International Security and Technology"

Margaret Kosal, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
The Sam Nunn School of International Affairs
Georgia Tech

 

Margaret E. Kosal’s research explores the relationships among technology, strategy, and governance. Her research focuses on two, often intersecting, areas:  reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction (WMD) and understanding the role of emerging technologies for security.

Her work aims to understand and explain the role of technology and technological diffusion for national security at strategic and operational levels. In the changing post-Cold War environment, the most advanced military power no longer guarantees national or international security in a globalized world in which an increasing number of nation-states and non-state actors have access to new and potentially devastating dual-use capabilities. The long-term goals of her work are to understand the underlying drivers of technological innovation and how technology affects national security and modern warfare. She is interested in both the scholarly, theoretical level discourse and in the development of new strategic approaches and executable policy options to enable US dominance and to limit the proliferation of unconventional weapons.

On the question of understanding the impact of emerging technology on national and international security her research considers what role will nanotechnology, cognitive science, biotechnology, and converging sciences have on states, non-state actors, balance of power, deterrence postures, security doctrines, nonproliferation regimes, and programmatic choices. Through examination of these real applications on the science (benign and defensive) and potential (notional) offensive uses of nanotechnology, she seeks to develop a model to probe the security implications of this emerging technology. The goal of the research is not to predict new specific technologies but to develop a robust analytical framework for assessing the impact of new technology on national and international security and identifying policy measures to prevent or slow proliferation of new technology - the next generation “WMD” - for malfeasant intentions.

Kosal is the author of Nanotechnology for Chemical and Biological Defense (Springer Academic Publishers, 2009), which explores scenarios and strategies regarding the benefits and potential proliferation threats of nanotechnology and other emerging sciences for international security. She is also Director of the Sam Nunn Security Fellows Program and Co-Director of the Program on Emerging Technology within the Center for International Strategy, Technology, and Policy (CISTP).

Kosal was recently appointed Adjunct Scholar to the Modern War Institute at the US Military Academy/West Point. From 2012-2013, she as a senior advisor to the Chief of Staff of the US Army as part of his inaugural Strategic Studies Group (SSG). Before joining the Sam Nunn School of International Affairs, she was Science and Technology Advisor within the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD). Kosal also served as the first liaison to the Biological and Chemical Defense Directorate at the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). She has been recognized for her leadership across the U.S. federal government, specifically for efforts to coordinate across the DoD as part of the interagency Nonproliferation and Arms Control Technology Working Group, reporting to the National Security Council (NSC), and as member of the interagency federal group charged with leading the National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI). Kosal was nominated to and led the U.S. involvement in the NATO Nanotechnology for Defense Working Group.

Her awards include the 2015 CETL/BP Junior Faculty Teaching Excellence Award, 2014 Georgia Tech Junior Faculty Outstanding Undergraduate Research Mentor Award, 2012 Ivan Allen Jr Legacy Award, 2010 INTAGO Faculty Award, CETL Class of 1969 Teaching Scholar, the OSD Award for Excellence, 2007 UIUC Alumni Association Recent Alumni Award, the President’s Volunteer Service Award, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Defense Policy Fellow, and the Society of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines Dissertation Research Award. Currently, she serves on the editorial board of the scholarly journals Studies in Conflict and Terrorism, the Journal of Strategic Security, the Journal of Defense Management, and Global Security: Health Science and Policy.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1526299195 2018-05-14 11:59:55 1526299237 2018-05-14 12:00:37 0 0 event 2018-11-13T08:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13T09:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13T09:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13 13:30:00 2018-11-13 14:30:00 2018-11-13 14:30:00 2018-11-13T08:30:00-05:00 2018-11-13T09:30:00-05:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-11-13 08:30:00 2018-11-13 09:30:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Colly Mitchell - Events Manager

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595880 595880 image <![CDATA[Petit Institute Breakfast Club Seminar Series]]> image/png 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 1505321122 2017-09-13 16:45:22 <![CDATA[Kosal profile]]>
<![CDATA[Immunoengineering Seminar ]]> 27349 "Supramolecular Immunotherapies"

Joel Collier, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Biomedical Engineering
Duke University

Successful immunotherapies must raise both the correct strength and phenotype of an immune response. To treat a particular disease via the immune system, it can be challenging to discover what the optimally protective immune response may be and then reliably achieve it. In part the challenge arises from the fact that the overall phenotype of an immune response includes contributions from many different cell subsets, including T cells, B cells, and antigen presenting cells, all of which interact complexly to generate an integrated response. We have been developing supramolecular materials, primarily comprised of peptides and proteins, which serve as modular platforms for discovering and eliciting clinically important immune responses by engaging and modulating this cellular diversity. In this seminar, several different self-assembling components will be described, including synthetic fibrillizing peptides, expressed proteins that can be induced to self-assemble after purification, and coiled coil nanofibers displaying immune epitopes. This class of materials has surprising self-adjuvanting properties, which we have recently exploited towards several clinical goals. In one example, we are developing novel treatments for chronic inflammation by creating biomaterials that can raise therapeutic levels of TNF-neutralizing antibodies. In this system, the strength and phenotype of the immune response can be modulated and optimized by systematically varying the epitope composition, a task that is greatly facilitated by the materials’ non-covalent construction.

This presentation can be seen via videoconference using BlueJeans: https://bluejeans.com/979003372

]]> Floyd Wood 1 1500652522 2017-07-21 15:55:22 1525187922 2018-05-01 15:18:42 0 0 event 2018-05-15T11:00:00-04:00 2018-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15 15:00:00 2018-05-16 04:00:00 2018-05-16 04:00:00 2018-05-15T11:00:00-04:00 2018-05-16T00:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-05-15 11:00:00 2018-05-16 12:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Andrés García, Ph.D. - faculty host

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<![CDATA[Immunoengineering Center]]> <![CDATA[Collier profile]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Executive Director Candidate Town Hall]]> 27195 Charles Brenner Ph.D.
Professor of Biochemistry
Professor of Internal Medicine
Carver College of Medicine
University of Iowa

 

Education:
B.A., Biology, Wesleyan University
Ph.D., Cancer Biology, Stanford University

Postdoctoral Fellow, Chemistry and Biochemistry (X-Ray Crystallography), Brandeis University

Education/Training Program Affiliations:
Department of Biochemistry PhD, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Genetics, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Molecular Medicine, Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Translational Biomedicine, Medical Scientist Training Program

Center, Program and Institute Affiliations:
Center for Biocatalysis and Bioprocessing, Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa Neuroscience Institute, UI Obesity Research and Education Initiative

Research Summary:
Cellular function and differentiation depend on an ability to read environmental cues and to execute a gene expression program that is appropriate to time, place and context. Nutrient availability is among the most important signals to which cells respond. Importantly, nutrients are not only transmitted from outside an organism, i.e., by feeding, but are also transmitted from cell to cell and from tissue to tissue. Metabolic control of gene expression is critical to the maintenance of cellular longevity. Dysregulation of the nutritional control of gene expression underlies a series of conditions including nondetection of satiety, which can lead to obesity and diabetes, and diseases such as cancer. Our laboratory is engaged in several projects that dissect specific problems in the metabolic control of gene expression. In particular, we are interested in how changing environmental conditions lead to reversible transfer of two carbon, i.e. acetyl, and one carbon, i.e. methyl, groups to proteins and DNA, respectively. These processes are fundamentally important because two carbon transfers link carbohydrate and fat metabolism to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) biosynthesis and because one carbon transfers link the folate cycle and methionine biosynthesis to S-adenosyl methionine metabolism. Trainees in our group are engaged in interdisciplinary projects, performing protein purification, enzymology, structural biology, yeast and somatic cell genetics, genomics, and chemical biology.
 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1525105490 2018-04-30 16:24:50 1525109179 2018-04-30 17:26:19 0 0 event 2018-05-08T12:00:00-04:00 2018-05-08T13:00:00-04:00 2018-05-08T13:00:00-04:00 2018-05-08 16:00:00 2018-05-08 17:00:00 2018-05-08 17:00:00 2018-05-08T12:00:00-04:00 2018-05-08T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-05-08 12:00:00 2018-05-08 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Lisa Tuttle
Office of Stephen Cross
Executive Vice President for Research
Georgia Tech

]]>
605685 605685 image <![CDATA[Charles Brenner, Ph.D. - University of Iowa]]> image/jpeg 1525103819 2018-04-30 15:56:59 1525103819 2018-04-30 15:56:59 <![CDATA[Brenner lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Executive Director Candidate Town Hall]]> 27195 M.G. Finn, Ph.D.
Professor and Chair
James A. Carlos Family Chair for Pediatric Technology
School of Chemistry and Biochemistry
Georgia Tech


Research:

In the Finn lab, we develop chemical and biological tools for research in a wide range of fields. Some of them are briefly described below; please see our group web page for more details.

Chemistry, biology, immunology, and evolution with viruses. The sizes and properties of virus particles put them at the interface between the worlds of chemistry and biology. We use techniques from both fields to tailor these particles for applications to cell targeting, diagnostics, vaccine development, catalysis, and materials self-assembly. This work involves combinations of small-molecule and polymer synthesis, bioconjugation, molecular biology, protein design, protein evolution, bioanalytical chemistry, enzymology, physiology, and immunology. It is an exciting training ground for modern molecular scientists and engineers.

Development of reactions for organic synthesis, chemical biology, and materials science.  Molecular function is what matters most to our scientific lives, and good chemical reactions provide the means to achieve such function. We continue our efforts to develop and optimize reactions that meet the click chemistry standard for power and generality. Our current focus is on highly reliable reversible reactions, which open up new possibilities for polymer synthesis and modification, as well as for the controlled delivery of therapeutic and diagnostic agents to biological targets.

Traditional and combinatorial synthesis of biologically active compounds.  We have a longstanding interest in the development of biologically active small molecules. We work closely with industrial and academic collaborators on such targets as antiviral agents, compounds to combat tobacco addiction, and treatments for inflammatory disease.

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1525105197 2018-04-30 16:19:57 1525108275 2018-04-30 17:11:15 0 0 event 2018-05-15T12:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15T13:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15T13:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15 16:00:00 2018-05-15 17:00:00 2018-05-15 17:00:00 2018-05-15T12:00:00-04:00 2018-05-15T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-05-15 12:00:00 2018-05-15 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Lisa Tuttle
Office of Stephen Cross
Executive Vice President for Research
Georgia Tech

]]>
605694 605694 image <![CDATA[M.G. Finn, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech]]> image/jpeg 1525108255 2018-04-30 17:10:55 1525108255 2018-04-30 17:10:55 <![CDATA[Finn lab website]]>
<![CDATA[Petit Institute Executive Director Candidate Town Hall]]> 27195 Andrés García, Ph.D.
Rae S. and Frank H. Neely Chair and Regents' Professor of Mechanical Engineering
George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Interdisciplinary Bioengineering Graduate Program
Georgia Tech


Background:
Andrés García, Ph.D. began at Georgia Tech in 1998 as an Assistant Professor. Prior, he was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Microbiology at the School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania.

Research:
García's research centers on cellular and tissue engineering, areas which integrate engineering and biological principles to control cell function in order to restore and/or enhance function in injured or diseased organs. Specifically, his research focuses on fundamental structure-function relationships governing cell-biomaterials interactions for bone and muscle applications. Current projects involve the analysis and manipulation of cell adhesion receptors and their extracellular matrix ligands. For example, a mechanochemical system has been developed to analyze the contributions of receptor binding, clustering, and interactions with other cellular structural proteins to cell adhesion strength.

In another research thrust, bio-inspired surfaces, including micropatterned substrates, are engineered to control cell adhesion in order to direct signaling and cell function. For instance, biomolecular surfaces have been engineered to target specific adhesion receptors to modulate cell signaling and differentiation. These biomolecular strategies are applicable to the development of 3D hybrid scaffolds for enhanced tissue reconstruction,"smart" biomaterials, and cell growth supports. Finally, genetic engineering approaches have been applied to engineer cells that form bone tissue for use in the development of mineralized templates for enhanced bone repair.
 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1525104608 2018-04-30 16:10:08 1525108052 2018-04-30 17:07:32 0 0 event 2018-05-21T12:00:00-04:00 2018-05-21T13:00:00-04:00 2018-05-21T13:00:00-04:00 2018-05-21 16:00:00 2018-05-21 17:00:00 2018-05-21 17:00:00 2018-05-21T12:00:00-04:00 2018-05-21T13:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-05-21 12:00:00 2018-05-21 01:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[]]> Lisa Tuttle
Office of Stephen Cross
Executive Vice President for Research
Georgia Tech

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605687 605687 image <![CDATA[Andrés García, Ph.D. - Georgia Tech]]> image/jpeg 1525103896 2018-04-30 15:58:16 1525103896 2018-04-30 15:58:16 <![CDATA[García lab website]]>
<![CDATA[BIO Vendor Showcase @ Georgia Tech]]> 27195 The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, with the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Student group (BBUGS), will host a BIO Vendor Showcase at Georgia Tech. 25+ plus companies will be on hand to display and demonstrate their equipment and research techniques thereby offering a great opportunity for faculty and staff to learn about new products as well. Donated items by vendors will be raffled for attendees throughout the showcase.

VENDOR REGISTRATION IS NOW CLOSED

AGENDA:
Showcase 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
with Special Educational Seminar Presentation @ 11 a.m.

"How to Combine Cell Culture, Cell Based Assay and Live Cell Imaging"

Nancy Elliott
Technical Sales
ibidi
11:00 a.m.
Petit Institute Seminar Room 1128

Participating Companies:
Beckman Coulter - Life Sciences division
BioTek Instruments    
BMG LABTECH Inc.    
BrandTech Scientific    
Caron Products    
Corning - Life Science division
Denville Scientific    
DWK Life Sciences    
Eppendorf    
Eurofins Genomics    
Fisher Scientific - Safety division
Fisher Scientific - Research division
Global Center for Medical Innovation    
Greiner Bio-One North America Inc. - Bioscience division
ibidi    
IKA Works Inc. - Laboratory Equipment division
INTEGRA Biosciences    
Leica Microsystems    
Mettler Toledo - Balances division
Molecular Devices    
Petit Institute 3D Medical Fabrication Core Facility    
Sage Science    
Sartorius - Laboratory Products division
Thermo Fisher - Anatomical Pathology division
Thermo Fisher Scientific - Laboratory Equipment division
Thermo Fisher Scientific - Laboratory Plastic Essentials division
Thermo Fisher - Biosciences division
VWR International    


INFO

Reservations are available for exhibit tables for purchase by credit card. Vendor registration is for first floor tables only - $200 - one table per company. Registration and payment must be received before reservation can be confirmed.

If you are a vendor who prefers to pay by check, please contact Floyd Wood for instructions on this process.

Food will be served throughout the event to maximize exposure. All companies are asked to donate an item to be raffled off. Note: these raffles will take place throughout the event.

The following will be provided to vendor participants:

  • advertising and marketing for the event
  • 6 ft. table - arranged alphabetically by company name
  • free parking in Parking Area 5 Visitor's Deck
  • complimentary lunch

**All vendor registration fee proceeds are used to support the annual operations of the Bioengineering and Bioscience Unified Graduate Students (BBUGS).


The Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, an internationally recognized hub of multidisciplinary research at the Georgia Institute of Technology, brings engineers, scientists, and clinicians together to solve some of the world’s most complex health challenges. With 19 research centers, more than 200 faculty members, and $24 million in state-of-the-art facilities, the Petit Institute is translating scientific discoveries into game-changing solutions to solve real-world problems. 

]]> Colly Mitchell 1 1516242314 2018-01-18 02:25:14 1524059160 2018-04-18 13:46:00 0 0 event 2018-04-24T11:00:00-04:00 2018-04-24T15:00:00-04:00 2018-04-24T15:00:00-04:00 2018-04-24 15:00:00 2018-04-24 19:00:00 2018-04-24 19:00:00 2018-04-24T11:00:00-04:00 2018-04-24T15:00:00-04:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime 2018-04-24 11:00:00 2018-04-24 03:00:00 America/New_York America/New_York datetime <![CDATA[Petit Institute website]]> Floyd Wood - Event Coordinator

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312351 312351 image <![CDATA[Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering & Bioscience]]>