The Invisible Underwater Messaging System in Blue Crab Urine

External News Details
Media
  • Julia Kubanek Julia Kubanek
    (image/jpeg)
  • Marc Weissburg Marc Weissburg
    (image/jpeg)

Mud crabs are a favorite snack for blue crabs. But when blue crabs pee in the water while searching for food, it sends their prey a warning: Better hide or urine trouble. (Sorry, we couldn't resist.) Researchers have known that chemicals in crab urine scare mud crabs, but couldn't identify the offending chemicals — until now, thanks to a new Georgia Tech study co-led by Julia Kubanek, a professor in both the School of Biological Sciences and the School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Marc Weissburg, a professor in the School of Biological Sciences. The findings could lead to better management of crab and oyster fisheries, and may even help target pollutants that upset marine life. Kubanek is also Associate Dean for Research for the College of Sciences.

Additional Information

Groups

College of Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

Categories
Life Sciences and Biology
Keywords
College of Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Julia Kubanek, Marc Weissburg, blue crabs, crab urine, signaling chemicals
Status
  • Created By: Renay San Miguel
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Jan 10, 2018 - 2:31pm
  • Last Updated: Jan 10, 2018 - 2:37pm