IEN Technical Seminar on Advanced Fabrication: Vanishing Devices – From Sensors to Drones Enabled by Transient Polymers

Event Details
Contact

hang.chen@ien.gatech.edu

Summaries

Summary Sentence: Transient materials are those designed for a specific end-of-life. The end-of-life can be triggered by a particular event (e.g. sunrise or the end of a mission) or the end-oflife can simply be planned obsolescence (don’t clutter a land-fill).

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Related Files

Abstract: Transient materials are those designed for a specific end-of-life. The end-of-life
can be triggered by a particular event (e.g. sunrise or the end of a mission) or the end-oflife can simply be planned obsolescence (don’t clutter a land-fill). Transient polymers are particularly valuable in these devices because they can be used in structural applications (component backbone) or part of the active device (e.g. sensors). Low ceiling temperature poly(aldehydes) are particularly valuable because the can be depolymerized into liquids or gases at a variety of temperatures when exposed to thermal, chemical, or photochemical stimuli. The nature of transient polymers will be described including advances in the synthesis of poly(aldehydes), component formulations & physical properties, triggering mechanisms, and component processing. The applications include disappearing sensors and airborne delivery vehicles.


Biography: Paul Kohl received a Ph.D. from The University of Texas, in Chemistry in 1978. After graduation, Dr. Kohl was employed at AT&T Bell Laboratories in Murray Hill, NJ from 1978 to 1989. During that time, he was involved in new chemical processes for silicon and compound semiconductor devices and their packaging. In 1989, he joined the faculty of the Georgia Institute of Technology in the School of Chemical and Biomolecular
Engineering, where he is currently a Regents’ Professor and holder of the Hercules Inc./
Thomas L. Gossage Chair. Dr. Kohl’s research interests include new materials and processes for advanced interconnects for integrated circuits, and electrochemical energy devices for energy conversion and storage. He has more than 270 journal publication, 64 US patents, and more than 400 conference presentations. Dr. Kohl is the past Editor of the Journal of the Electrochemical Society and Electrochemical and Solid-State Letters, past Director of the MARCO Interconnect Focus Center, and past President of the Electrochemical Society.

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
Yes
Groups

3D Systems Packaging Research Center, Georgia Electronic Design Center (GEDC), Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology, NanoTECH, The Center for MEMS and Microsystems Technologies

Invited Audience
Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students, Undergraduate students
Categories
Seminar/Lecture/Colloquium
Keywords
the Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology, the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Paul Kohl, transient materials, vanishing devices, sensors, Drones, transient polymers, Nanotechnology
Status
  • Created By: Christa Ernst
  • Workflow Status: Published
  • Created On: Nov 14, 2017 - 10:42am
  • Last Updated: Nov 14, 2017 - 10:42am