Gaming Graduate Virtue Ethics Education in Science and Engineering

Event Details
Contact

Director Clark Bonilla, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology

or Dr. J. Britt Holbrook, School of Public Policy, Georgia Institute of Technology

Summaries

Summary Sentence: How can games be developed to advance ethics education in science and engineering?

Full Summary: J. Britt Holbrook, Visiting Assistant Professor in the School of Public Policy, is co-PI on two recent NSF Awards to develop games for use in ethics education in science and engineering: EAGER: Prototyping a Virtue Ethics Game, and Graduate Virtue Ethics Education in Science and Engineering. The goal is to develop an alternative, gaming approach that seeks to recast the ethics education of scientists and engineers as less a matter of memorizing rules through content delivery systems and more a matter of practicing virtuous behavior in life-like gaming environments. This is an experimental approach, and it may fail. However, the hope is at least to learn something important about ethics education, in particular about assessment of ethics education. Holbrook will give a brief description of the project and then discuss possible synergies with Georgia Tech. There are three areas that come to mind immediately: 1) assessment; 2) testing the games at Georgia Tech; and 3) moving forward, transferring these games (which currently are physical card games and board games) to digital formats for wider dissemination.

J. Britt Holbrook, Visiting Assistant Professor in the School of Public Policy, is co-PI on two recent NSF Awards to develop games for use in ethics education in science and engineering: EAGER: Prototyping a Virtue Ethics Game, and Graduate Virtue Ethics Education in Science and Engineering. The goal is to develop an alternative, gaming approach that seeks to recast the ethics education of scientists and engineers as less a matter of memorizing rules through content delivery systems and more a matter of practicing virtuous behavior in life-like gaming environments. This is an experimental approach, and it may fail. However, the hope is at least to learn something important about ethics education, in particular about assessment of ethics education. Holbrook will give a brief description of the project and then discuss possible synergies with Georgia Tech. There are three areas that come to mind immediately: 1) assessment; 2) testing the games at Georgia Tech; and 3) moving forward, transferring these games (which currently are physical card games and board games) to digital formats for wider dissemination.

Additional Information

In Campus Calendar
No
Groups

School of Public Policy

Invited Audience
Undergraduate students, Faculty/Staff, Public, Graduate students
Categories
Seminar/Lecture/Colloquium
Keywords
Ethics, ethics education, ethics in engineering, ethics in science, gaming
Status
  • Created By: Clark Bonilla
  • Workflow Status: Draft
  • Created On: Nov 12, 2013 - 6:26am
  • Last Updated: Apr 13, 2017 - 5:23pm